Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

ARM - Field Campaign - The ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsThe ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment (PROBE) Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : The...

2

The Optical Properties of Equatorial Cirrus from Observations in the ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical properties of equatorial cirrus were studied during a three-week period of the ARM Pilot Radiation and Observation Experiment at Kavieng, Papua New Guinea, in January and February 1993. The experiment consisted of vertical lidar (532 ...

C. M. R. Platt; S. A. Young; P. J. Manson; G. R. Patterson; S. C. Marsden; R. T. Austin; J. H. Churnside

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Overview of observations from the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger. Part 2: Radiative fluxes and divergences  

SciTech Connect

Broadband shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes observed both at the surface and from space during the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger in 2006 are presented. The surface fluxes were measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mobile Facility (AMF) at Niamey airport, while the fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on the Meteosat-8 satellite. The data are analyzed as daily averages, in order to minimise sampling differences between the surface and top of atmosphere instruments, while retaining the synoptic and seasonal changes that are the main focus of this study. A cloud mask is used to identify days with cloud from those with predominantly clear skies. The influence of temperature, water vapor, aerosols and clouds is investigated. Aerosols are ubiquitous throughout the year and have a significant impact on both the shortwave and longwave fluxes. The large and systematic seasonal changes in temperature and column integrated water vapor (CWV) through the dry and wet seasons are found to exert strong influences on the longwave fluxes. These influences are often in opposition to each other, because the highest temperatures occur at the end of the dry season when the CWV is lowest, while in the wet season the lowest temperatures are associated with the highest values of CWV. Apart from aerosols, the shortwave fluxes are also affected by clouds and by the seasonal changes in CWV. The fluxes are combined to provide estimates of the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere throughout 2006. The longwave divergence is remarkably constant through the year, because of a compensation between the seasonal variations in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and surface net longwave radiation. A simple model of the greenhouse effect is used to interpret this result in terms of the dependence of the normalized greenhouse effect at the TOA and of the effective emissivity of the atmosphere at the surface on the CWV. It is shown that, as the CWV increases, the atmosphere loses longwave energy to the surface with about the same increasing efficiency with which it traps the OLR, thus keeping the atmospheric longwave divergence roughly constant. The shortwave divergence is mainly determined by the CWV and aerosol loadings and the effect of clouds is much smaller than on the component fluxes.

Slingo, A.; White, H. E.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

Design of experiments to observe radiation stabilized Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at an embedded decelerating interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a hohlraum produced thermal x-ray drive at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to create pressure by material ablation, a shock exceeding 200 Mbar can be driven through a planar, solid-density target and into a lower-density foam material. The shock driven through the foam is strongly radiative, and this radiation significantly alters the dynamics of the system, including those of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) fluid instability at the interface between the two materials. We discuss here the design of experiments that can produce such radiative conditions. One will be able to compare the observed growth rates with an extensive body of hydrodynamic experiments performed previously. In this paper, we describe a set of 1D simulations performed to understand the mechanisms of stabilization in a strongly radiative Rayleigh-Taylor unstable system. Simulation results are used to calculate modified analytic RT growth rates which have been proposed in the literature. Calculations predict reduced RT spike growth as a result of increases in density gradient scale length and mass ablation from the unstable interface. This work has direct applicability to the observable features in upcoming NIF experiments.

Huntington, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P. [AOSS, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Miles, A. R.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Park, H.-S.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Defense Report Finding Aids Department of Defense Report on Search for Human Radiation Experiments Records 1944-1994 Exit Human Radiation Experiments Site This...

6

Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments This database contains information on records collections related to human radiation...

7

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

8

Observing System Simulation Experiments and Objective Analysis Tests in Support of the Goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time continuous data assimilation or four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) is a collection of techniques where observations are ingested into a numerical model during the simulation in order to produce a physically balanced estimate of the ...

David B. Parsons; Jimy Dudhia

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing as Determined from Nimbus-7 Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collocated and coincident cloud and outgoing longwave radiation observations taken by experiments on board the Nimbus-7 satellite have been used to infer the daytime longwave cloud-radiative forcing. Through the specification of a time-series of ...

Philip E. Ardanuy; Larry L. Stowe; Arnold Gruber; Mitchell Weiss; Craig S. Long

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Diurnal Cycle of Outgoing Longwave Radiation from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal cycle of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the earth is analyzed by decomposing satellite observations into a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). The observations are from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) ...

G. Louis Smith; David A. Rutan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Radiation Energy Budget Studies Using Collocated AVHRR and ERBE Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the energy balance at the top of the atmosphere are specified as a function of atmospheric and surface properties using observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVURR) and the Earth Radiation budget Experiment (...

Steven A. Ackerman; Toshiro Inoue

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

GNSS radio occultation constellation observing system experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observing system experiments within the operational ECMWF data assimilation framework have been performed for summer 2008 when the largest recorded number of GNSS radio occultation observations from both operational and experimental satellites ...

Peter Bauer; Gbor Radnti; Sean Healy; Carla Cardinali

13

The THORPEX Observation Impact Intercomparison Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment is being conducted to directly compare the impact of all assimilated observations on short-range forecast errors in different forecast systems using an adjoint-based technique. The technique allows detailed comparison of observation ...

Ronald Gelaro; Rolf H. Langland; Simon Pellerin; Ricardo Todling

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is the first multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. It will fly on a low-inclination NASA satellite and two Sun-synchronous NOAA satellites during the mid-1980s. Each ...

Bruce R. Barkstrom

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Preliminary Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies on the Variational Assimilation Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations M. Janisková, J.-F. Mahfouf, and J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Shinfield Park, Reading Berskshire, United Kingdom Abstract A linearized cloud scheme and a radiation scheme including cloud effects have been developed at European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to assimilate cloud properties in the framework of the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) assimilation system. To investigate the potential of those schemes to modify the model temperature, humidity and cloud profiles and produce a better match to the observed radiation fluxes, one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) assimilation experiments have been carried out using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

16

DOE Openess: Human Radiation Experiments - Roadmap to the Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project DOE Shield DOE Openness: Human Radiation Experiment Roadmap to the Project Roadmap to the Project Home Roadmap What's New Search HREX...

17

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - CERN: Experiments Observe...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERN: Experiments Observe Particle Consistent with Long-sought Higgs Boson July 5, 2012 from CERN At a seminar held at CERN as a curtain raiser to the year's major particle physics...

18

Human Radiation Experiments: Related Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Experiment Related Sites Related Links Home Roadmap What's New Search HREX Multimedia Related Sites Federal DOE DOE Sites & National Laboratories Federal Other The following are organizations which provide related information and links to databases, electronic documents, and servers. FEDERAL - DOE U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) homepage (http://www.doe.gov/)contains information on DOE's Departmental Resources, Programs, Offices, National Labs and other DOE related topics. DOE's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Technical Information Services (TIS) homepage (http://nattie.eh.doe.gov/) is a collection of information services designed to provide safety and health professionals with reliable, accurate and current information to assist them in performing their jobs.

19

Diurnal Variability of the Hydrologic Cycle and Radiative Fluxes: Comparisons between Observations and a GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulated diurnal cycle is in many ways an ideal test bed for new physical parameterizations. The purpose of this paper is to compare observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission, the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment, the ...

Xin Lin; David A. Randall; Laura D. Fowler

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Correction of Marine Air Temperature Observations for Solar Radiation Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of incoming solar radiation on merchant ships' observations of air temperature was assessed as part of the Voluntary Observing Ships' Special Observing Project for the North Atlantic (VSOP-NA), The ships' reports were compared with ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Raoul J. Tiddy; Peter K. Taylor

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solar radiation observation stations updated to 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The type of sensing and recording equipment for 420 stations in the US are listed alphabetically by states. The stations are divided according to whether or not they are in the basic National Weather Service, NOAA, network. Reports of summarized solar radiation data are listed in an appendix. (MHR)

Carter, E.A.; Cristina, J.R.; Williams, B.B.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Observed Aerosol Radiative Forcings: Comparison for Natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are from 1997, when the El Nio suppressed the rainfall in that region and biomass burning was widespread in the area. These observations are compared to those observed during...

23

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

24

First Data From the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first data obtained from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are presented. These data include emitted infrared radiation, albedo, and estimated scene types for 15 November 1984, as well as measurements of the solar constant. ...

ERRE Science Team

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Reexamination of the Observed Decadal Variability of the Earth Radiation Budget Using Altitude-Corrected ERBE/ERBS Nonscanner WFOV Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper gives an update on the observed decadal variability of the earth radiation budget (ERB) using the latest altitude-corrected Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)/Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) Nonscanner Wide Field of View (...

Takmeng Wong; Bruce A. Wielicki; Robert B. Lee III; G. Louis Smith; Kathryn A. Bush; Joshua K. Willis

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

ARM - Field Campaign - Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) Campaign Links RACORO Website Related Campaigns Surface Radiation Comparison Transfer Measurements for RACORO 2009.01.20, Long, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) 2009.01.22 - 2009.06.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/racoro/ Lead Scientist : Andrew Vogelmann For data sets, see below. Description The ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) supported the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, led by principal investigator Andrew Vogelmann. During this long-term campaign, the AAF conducted routine flights at the ACRF Southern

27

Determination of Effective Emittance and a Radiatively Equivalent Microphysical Model of Cirrus from Ground-Based and Satellite Observations during the International Cirrus Experiment: The 18 October 1989 Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based observations and satellite data have been compared for the 18 October 1989 case study of the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE) field campaign. They correspond to thin cirrus clouds with infrared emittances in the range 00.3. ...

G. Brogniez; J. C. Buriez; V. Giraud; F. Parol; C. Vanbauce

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Surface Solar Radiation Flux and Cloud Radiative Forcing for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP): A Satellite, Surface Observations, and Radiative Transfer Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents surface solar radiation flux and cloud radiative forcing results obtained by using a combination of satellite and surface observations interpreted by means of a simple plane-parallel radiative transfer model called 2001. This ...

Catherine Gautier; Martin Landsfeld

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Temperature Measurements in Radiative Shock Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??At signifcantly large pressures, shock waves can be driven that are so energetic that radiation starts to play an important role in the dynamics of (more)

Visco, Anthony John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results May 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - New Mexico State University"s Low Background Radiation Experiment (LBRE), which takes place 2,150 feet below the earth"s surface at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, recently released some results about the project"s first two years of experimentation. The March 2011 edition of Health Physics printed an article titled "Exploring Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation from the Other Side of Background," summarizing some initial data taken from LBRE and from a sister experiment conducted at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute

31

Radiation Fog: A Comparison of Model Simulation with Detailed Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional model designed to study the formation, growth, and dissipation of radiation fog is described. The model is compared with detailed observations made at the 200-m tower at Cabauw in the Netherlands. This study we use observations ...

Peter G. Duynkerke

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Observing-Systems Simulation Experiments: Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the history of observing-systems simulation experiments (OSSEs) is presented together with a description of current methodology, its capabilities and limitations, and considerations for the design of future experiments. These ...

Charles P. Arnold Jr.; Clifford H. Dey

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Office of Human Radiation Experiments - Archived Website  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

documents cold war metabolism of lethal dose studies with rates dose experiments medical research program Iodine-131 Iron-59 For further information regarding information...

34

Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Archival and April 1985 Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data products being made available to the community. The Science Team used ten validation criteria to judge the acceptability of the data for archival. We list these criteria and ...

B. Barkstrom; E. Harrison; G. Smith; R. Green; J. Kibler; R. Cess; the ERBE Science Team

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Year-Round Observation of Longwave Radiative Flux Divergence in Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Longwave radiative flux divergence within the lowest 50 m of the atmospheric boundary layer was observed during the Eidgenssische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Greenland Summit experiment. The dataset collected at 7235?N, 3830?W, 3203 m MSL is ...

S. W. Hoch; P. Calanca; R. Philipona; A. Ohmura

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Validation of General Circulation Model Radiative Fluxes Using Surface Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface radiative fluxes of the ECHAM3 General Circulation Model (GCM) with T2 1, T42, and T 106 resolutions have been validated using observations from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA, World Climate Program-Water Project A7). GEBA ...

Martin Wild; Atsumu Ohmura; Hans Gilgen; Erich Roeckner

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Radiative Corrections to the PREX and QWEAK Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The high precision parity violating electron scattering experiments PREX and QWEAK are sensitive to radiative corrections. In this paper we introduce the PREX experiment that measures the neutron radius of {sup 208}Pb and discuss coulomb distortion corrections. We then discuss dispersion corrections for QWEAK that aims to measure the weak charge of the proton.

C. J. Horowitz

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia: Film Clips  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Film Clips Multimedia Film Clips Multimedia Home Roadmap What's New Multimedia Related Sites Feedback Sound Bytes Film Clips Historical Photographs Films require: Get Real Player 5.0 to view the films on this page. The Atom and You Second in the series The Atom and You, Paramount News, March 25, 1953, shows tests conducted at Hanford, Washington, on effects of exposure of sheep and salmon to radiation; testing of radioactive dust at UCLA laboratory; the use of radioisotopes and tracer materials for detecting cancer in patients at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the use of rays from the cobalt source at N.Y. city’s Moncure Hospital, to treat cancer of the brain. (Time: 5 min 9 secs) Real Media Download Versions 28.8 kbps version (782k) 56.0 kbps version (1.3mb) T1 version (7.5mb) Iodine 131

39

Radiation shielding for underground low-background experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design task of creating an efficient radiation shield for the new COBRA double-beta decay experiment led to a comprehensive study of commercially available shielding materials. The aim was to find the most efficient combination of materials under the constraints of an extreme low-background experiment operating in a typical underground laboratory. All existing shield configurations for this type of experiment have been found to perform sub-optimally in comparison to the class of multilayered configurations proposed in this study. The method used here to create a specific shield configuration should yield a close to optimal result when applied to any experiment utilising a radiation shield. In particular, the survey of single material response to a given radiation source turns out to give a guideline for the construction of efficient multilayer shields.

D. Y Stewart; P. F. Harrison; B. Morgan; Y. A. Ramachers

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Assessment of the Impact of Observations on Analyses Derived from Observing System Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observing system experiments (OSEs) are commonly used to quantify the impact of different observation types on forecasts produced by a specific numerical weather prediction system. Recently, methods based on degree of freedom for signal (DFS) have ...

Cristina Lupu; Pierre Gauthier; Stphane Laroche

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government`s role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future.

Not Available

1994-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

42

Capturing the content of physics: systems, observables, and experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a content markup language for physics realized by extending the OMDoc format by an infrastructure for the principal concepts of physics: observables, physical systems, and experiments. The formalization of the description ...

Eberhard R. Hilf; Michael Kohlhase; Heinrich Stamerjohanns

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Publication Information The Creation of the Advisory Committee The President's Charge The Committee's Approach The Historical Context Key Findings Key Recommendations What's Next: The Advisory Committee's Legacy PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Final Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (stock number 061-000-00-848-9), the supplemental volumes to the Final Report (stock numbers 061-000-00850-1, 061-000-00851-9, and 061-000-00852-7), and additional copies of this Executive Summary (stock number 061-000-00849-7) may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: Superintendent of Documents

44

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment govCampaignsARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment 2015.10.01 - 2016.03.31 Lead Scientist : Dan Lubin Description West Antarctica is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, and this warming is closely connected with global sea level rise. The discovery of rapid climate change on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) has challenged previous explanations of Antarctic climate change that focused on strengthening of circumpolar westerlies in response to the positive polarity trend in the Southern Annular Mode. West Antarctic warming does not yet have a comprehensive explanation: dynamical mechanisms may vary

45

First Estimates of the Diurnal Variation of Longwave Radiation from the Multiple-Satellite Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First results for diurnal cycles derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are presented for the combined Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and NOAA-9 spacecraft for April 1985. Regional scale longwave (LW) radiation data ...

Edwin F. Harrison; David R. Brooks; Patrick Minnis; Bruce A. Wielicki; W. Frank Staylor; Gary G. Gibson; David F. Young; Frederick M. Denn

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CHEMICAL OR RADIATION SPILL Observe the following procedures in the event of a chemical or radiation spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL OR RADIATION SPILL Observe the following procedures in the event of a chemical or radiation spill: · Report immediately any spillage of a hazardous chemical or radioactive material to campus

Meyers, Steven D.

47

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part IV: Overview Part IV: Overview In part IV we present the overall findings of the Advisory Committee's inquiry and deliberations and the recommendations that follow from these findings. In chapter 17, findings are presented in two parts, first for the period 1944 through 1974 and then for the contemporary period. These parts, in turn, are divided into findings regarding biomedical experiments and those regarding population exposures. We begin our presentation of findings for the period 1944 through 1974 with a summation of what we have learned about human radiation experiments: their number and purpose, the likelihood that they produced harm, and how human radiation experimentation contributed to advances in medicine. We then summarize what we have found concerning the nature of federal rules and policies governing research involving human subjects during this period, and the implementation of these rules in the conduct of human radiation experiments. Findings about the nature and implementation of federal rules cover issues of consent, risk, the selection of subjects, and the role of national security considerations.

48

Observational and Theoretical Studies of Solar Radiation in Arctic Stratus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of clouds-radiation experiments was carried out in June 1980 in Arctic stratus clouds occurring over the Beaufort Sea using the NCAR Electra aircraft. This paper is an analysis of the hemispheric radiation fields obtained with Eppley ...

G. F. Herman; J. A. Curry

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report  

SciTech Connect

When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Evaluation of Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Sa...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Type Occurrences Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Satellite and Cloud Radar Y. Luo and S. K. Krueger University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Because of both the various effects clouds exert on the earth-atmospheric system and the cloud feedback, correct representations of clouds in numerical models are critical for accurate climate modeling and weather forecast. Unfortunately, determination of clouds and their radiative feedback processes is still the weakest component of current general circulation models (e.g., Senior and Mitchell 1993, Cess et al. 1996). Using radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) available from satellite observations made by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE; Barkstrom 1984), one could assess cloud radiative effects

51

International RADAGAST Experiment in Niamey, Niger: Changes and Drivers of Atmospheric Radiation Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sahara desert is notorious as a source of massive dust storms. This dust dramatically influences the Earth-atmosphere energy budget through reflecting and absorbing the incoming sunlight. However, this budget is poorly understood, and in particular, we lack quantitative understanding of how the diurnal and seasonal variation of meteorological variables and aerosol properties influence the propagation of solar irradiance through the desert atmosphere. To improve our understanding of these influences, coincident and collocated observations of fluxes, measured from both space and the surface, are highly desirable. Recently, the unique capabilities of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Experiment, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument, and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) were combined effectively as part of a large international project: the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB data and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST), which took place in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. The RADAGAST objectives, instrumentation, and scientific background are presented in [1]. Initial results from RADAGAST documented the strong radiative impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earths radiation budget [2]. A special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research will include a collection of papers with the more complete results from RADAGAST (e.g., [1,3], and references therein). In particular, a year-long time series from RADAGAST are used to investigate (i) the factors that control the radiative fluxes and the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere [3-5], (ii) seasonal changes in the surface energy balance and associated variations in atmospheric constituents (water vapor, clouds, aerosols) [6], and (iii) sensitivity of microphysical, chemical and optical properties of aerosols to their sources and the atmospheric conditions [7]. Here we show retrievals of the aerosol properties from spectrally resolved solar measurements, the simulated and observed radiative fluxes at the surface, and outline factors that control the magnitude and variability of aerosol and radiative properties [8].

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Turner, David D.; Miller, Mark; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Miller, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Effect of Cloud Sides on Reflected Solar Radiation as Deduced from Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the observation of a feature that is characteristic of the reflection of solar radiation from absorbing, finite clouds. When absorption takes place, more radiation can be reflected by broken cloud fields than by extensive unbroken cloud ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Roger Davies

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Technique for Estimating Outgoing Longwave Radiation from HIRS Radiance Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for estimating outgoing longwave radiation from observations on the NOAA operational satellites has been developed from a regression analysis of radiation model calculations. The technique consists of a weighted sum of radiance in ...

Robert G. Ellingson; David J. Yanuk; Hai-Tien Lee; Arnold Gruber

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Calculating Monthly Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates fromMonthly Cloud Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative transfer model from NCARs general circulation model CCM3 is modified to calculate monthly radiative fluxes and heating rates from monthly observations of cloud properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project ...

John W. Bergman; Harry H. Hendon

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The 2728 October 1986 FIRF IFO Cirrus Case Study: Comparison of Radiative Transfer Theory with Observations by Satellite and Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of cirrus and altocumulus clouds during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment (FIRE) are compared to theoretical models of cloud radiative properties. Three tests are performed. First, ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; J.T. Suttles; Andrew J. Heymsfield; Ronald M. Welch; James D. Spinhirne; Man-Li C. Wu; David O'C. Starr; Lindsay Parker; Robert F. Arduini

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

What Controls Stratocumulus Radiative Properties? Lagrangian Observations of Cloud Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine stratocumulus clouds have a large impact on the earths radiation budget. Their optical properties vary on two distinct timescales, one associated with the diurnal cycle of solar insolation and another with the downstream transition to ...

Robert Pincus; Marcia B. Baker; Christopher S. Bretherton

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Shortwave Shape Factor Inversion of Earth Radiation Budget Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shape factor technique is routinely used to invert wide-angle radiometric measurements at satellite altitude to flux at the top of the atmosphere. The derivation of a shortwave shape factor requires assumptions on both the viewed radiation ...

Richard N. Green; G. Louis Smith

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Estimation of Daytime Net Radiation from Shortwave Radiation Measurements and Meteorological Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in surface net radiation Rn control the earths climate, the hydrological cycle, and plant photosynthesis. However, Rn is not readily available. This study develops a method to estimate surface daytime Rn from solar shortwave radiation ...

Kaicun Wang; Shunlin Liang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The CERES/ARM/GEWEX Experiment (CAGEX) for the Retrieval of Radiative Fluxes with Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a temporally intensive, limited area, radiative transfer model experiment are on-line for investigating the vertical profile of shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The CERES/...

Thomas P. Charlock; Timothy L. Alberta

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Aircraft Observations of the Vertical Structure of Stratiform Precipitation Relevant to Microwave Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retrieval of rainfall intensity over the oceans from passive microwave observations is based on a radiative transfer model. Direct rainfall observations of oceanic rainfall are virtually nonexistent making validation of the retrievals ...

A. T. C. Chang; A. Barnes; M. Glass; R. Kakar; T. T. Wilheit

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Overview of observations from the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger: Meteorology and thermodynamic variables  

SciTech Connect

An overview is presented of the meteorological and thermodynamic data obtained during the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. RADAGAST (Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile Facility, GERB data and AMMA STations), combined data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mobile Facility (AMF) at Niamey airport with broadband satellite data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on Meteosat-8. The experiment was conducted in collaboration with the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) project. The focus in this paper is on the variations through the year of key surface and atmospheric variables. The seasonal advance and retreat of the InterTropical Front (ITF) and the seasonal changes in near-surface variables and precipitation in 2006 are discussed and contrasted with the behavior in 2005 and with long-term averages. Observations from the AMF at Niamey airport are used to document the evolution of near-surface variables and of the atmosphere above the site. There are large seasonal changes in these variables, from the arid and dusty conditions typical of the dry season to the much moister and more cloudy wet season accompanying the arrival and intensification of the West African monsoon. Back trajectories show the origin of the air sampled at Niamey and profiles for selected case studies from rawinsondes and from a MicroPulse Lidar at the AMF site reveal details of typical atmospheric structures. Radiative fluxes and divergences are discussed in the second part of this overview and the subsequent papers in this special section explore other aspects of the measurements and of the associated modeling.

Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Settle, Jeff; Allan, R. P.; White, H. E.; Lamb, Peter J.; Lele, M.; Turner, David D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Miller, Mark

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Observed Perturbations of the Earth's Radiation Budget: A Response to the El Chichn Stratospheric Aerosol Layer?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Earth Radiation Budget experiment, launched aboard the Nimbus-7 polar-orbiting spacecraft in late 1978, has now taken over seven years of measurements. The dataset, which is global in coverage, consists of the individual components of the ...

Philip E. Ardanuy; H. Lee Kyle

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Observations and Modeling of the Surface Aerosol Radiative Forcing during UAE2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol radiative forcing in the Persian Gulf region is derived from data collected during the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2). This campaign took place in August and September of 2004. The landsea-breeze circulation ...

K. M. Markowicz; P. J. Flatau; J. Remiszewska; M. Witek; E. A. Reid; J. S. Reid; A. Bucholtz; B. Holben

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Experiments with Cloud Properties: Impact on Surface Radiative Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation reaching the earths surface provides the primary forcing of the climate system, and thus, information on this parameter is needed at a global scale. Several satellite-based estimates of surface radiative fluxes are available, but ...

H. Wang; R. T. Pinker; P. Minnis; M. M. Khaiyer

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Nimbus Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) Experiment: 1975 to 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three spectrally broadband measurement sets are presently being used for earth radiation budget (ERB) studies. These are the Nimbus-6 ERB (July 1975 to June 1978), the Nimbus-7 ERB (November 1978 to the present), and the Earth Radiation Budget ...

H. L. Kyle; A. Arking; J. R. Hickey; P. E. Ardanuy; H. Jacobowitz; L. L. Stowe; G. G. Campbell; T. Vonder Haar; F. B. House; R. Maschhoff; G. L. Smith

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Assimilation of Satellite Infrared Radiances and Doppler Radar Observations during a Cool Season Observing System Simulation Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An observing system simulation experiment is used to examine the impact of assimilating water vaporsensitive satellite infrared brightness temperatures and Doppler radar reflectivity and radial velocity observations on the analysis accuracy of a ...

Thomas A. Jones; Jason A. Otkin; David J. Stensrud; Kent Knopfmeier

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Electroweak Radiative Corrections to the Parity-violating Asymmetry for SLAC Experiment E158  

SciTech Connect

Electroweak radiative corrections to observable quantities of Moeller scattering of polarized particles are calculated. We emphasize the contribution induced by infrared divergent parts of cross section. The covariant method is used to remove infrared divergences, so that our results do not involve any unphysical parameters. When applied to the kinematics of SLAC E158 experiment, these corrections reduce the parity violating asymmetry by about -6.5% at E = 48 GeV and y = 0.5, and kinematically weighted 'hard' bremsstrahlung effect for SLAC E158 is {approx} 1%.

Zykunov, Vladimir A.; /Gomel State Tech. U.

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated in situ Indian Ocean observing system (IndOOS) is simulated using a high-resolution ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with daily mean forcing, including an estimate of subdaily oceanic variability derived from observations. The ...

Gabriel A. Vecchi; Matthew J. Harrison

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Field Experiment for Measurement of the Radiative Characteristics of a Hazy Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two-and three-dimensional solutions to the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. A field experiment was conducted to test this theory. in the experiment the upward radiance was measured above ...

Y. J. Kaufman; T. W. Brakke; E. Eloranta

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Preliminary Experiments Using GALE Observations at the National Meteorological Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses and forecasts for the first 2 weeks of the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE) are described. These fields were produced using the National Meteorological Center (NMC) Regional Analysis and Forecast System (RAFS). Two sets of ...

Eric Rogers; Geoffrey J. DiMego; Joseph P. Gerrity; Ralph A. Petersen; Brian D. Schmidt; Deirdre M. Kann

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Sea-Land Transition Observed during the COAST Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sea wind situation was analyzed during the COAST (Cooperative Operations with Acoustic Sounding Techniques) experiment. The thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) which develops inland from the coast was investigated by an instrumented aircraft ...

Pierre Durand; Aime Druilhet; Serge Briere

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Bow Echo and MCV Experiment: Observations and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex Experiment (BAMEX) is a research investigation using highly mobile platforms to examine the life cycles of mesoscale convective systems. It represents a combination of two related investigations to ...

Christopher Davis; Nolan Atkins; Diana Bartels; Lance Bosart; Michael Coniglio; George Bryan; William Cotton; David Dowell; Brian Jewett; Robert Johns; David Jorgensen; Jason Knievel; Kevin Knupp; Wen-Chau Lee; Gregory Mcfarquhar; James Moore; Ron Przybylinski; Robert Rauber; Bradley Smull; Robert Trapp; Stanley Trier; Roger Wakimoto; Morris Weisman; Conrad Ziegler

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

"Radiative Closure Studies for Clear Skies During the ARM 2003 Aerosol Intensive Observation Period"  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large intensive observation period (IOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile with sensors aboard two aircraft. One of the principal motivations for this experiment was to resolve the disagreement between models and measurements of diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance at the surface, especially for modest aerosol loading. This paper focuses on using the redundant aerosol and radiation measurements during this IOP to compare direct beam and diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance measurements and models at the surface for a wide range of aerosol cases that occurred during 30 clear-sky periods on 13 days of May 2003. Models and measurements are compared over a large range of solar-zenith angles. Six different models are used to assess the relative agreement among them and the measurements. Better agreement than previously achieved appears to be the result of better specification of input parameters and better measurements of irradiances than in prior studies. Biases between modeled and measured direct irradiances are less than 1%, and biases between modeled and measured diffuse irradiances are less than 2%.

J. J. Michalsky, G. P. Anderson, J. Barnard, J. Delamere, C. Gueymard, S. Kato, P. Kiedron, A. McComiskey, and P. Ricchiazzi

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil ...

Scott W. Powell; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Anil Kumar; Sally A. McFarlane

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Comparison of Radiation Variables Calculated in the UCLA General Circulation Model to Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between the spatial patterns of solar and thermal fluxes of radiation calculated by the UCLA general circulation model and observations. The latter include estimates at the Pacific Ocean surface of the climatological averages ...

Bryan C. Weare

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

An Aerosol Climatology at Kyoto: Observed Local Radiative Forcing and Columnar Optical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the radiative effect of the atmospheric aerosol at Kyoto, Japan, surface solar irradiance and columnar aerosol optical properties were observed in the period between September 1998 and December 2001. The aerosol optical ...

Takahiro Yabe; Robert Hller; Susumu Tohno; Mikio Kasahara

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Estimation of TAMDAR Observational Error and Assimilation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) observations are becoming a major data source for numerical weather prediction (NWP) because of the advantages of their high spatiotemporal resolution and humidity measurements. In this ...

Feng Gao; Xiaoyan Zhang; Neil A. Jacobs; Xiang-Yu Huang; Xin Zhang; Peter P. Childs

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance  

SciTech Connect

Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties: Application to Climate Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties: Application to Climate Studies G. M. McFarquhar and T. Nousiainen Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois M. S. Timlin, S. F. Iacobellis, and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Cloud radiative feedback is the most important effect determining climate response to human activity. Ice clouds reflect solar radiation and absorb thermal emission from the ground and the lower atmosphere and emit infrared radiation to space. The representation of these processes in models affects future climate predictions and there is much uncertainty in the representation of these processes. The size and

80

Human radiation experiments associated with the US Department of Energy and its predecessors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains a listing, description, and selected references for documented human radiation experiments sponsored, supported, or performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessors, including the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the Off ice of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). The list represents work completed by DOE`s Off ice of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) through June 1995. The experiment list is available on the Internet via a Home Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.ohre.doe.gov). The Home Page also includes the full text of Human Radiation Experiments. The Department of Energy Roadmap to the Story and the Records (DOE/EH-0445), published in February 1995, to which this publication is a supplement. This list includes experiments released at Secretary O`Leary`s June 1994 press conference, as well as additional studies identified during the 12 months that followed. Cross-references are provided for experiments originally released at the press conference; for experiments released as part of The DOE Roadmap; and for experiments published in the 1986 congressional report entitled American Nuclear Guinea Pigs: Three Decades of Radiation Experiments on US Citizens. An appendix of radiation terms is also provided.

None

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Accuracy of Trajectory Models as Revealed by the Observing System Simulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourteen observing system simulation experiments (OSSE) wore conducted using the results from a mesoscale model on the Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains(OSCAR) experiment to test the accuracy of trajectory models. Our ...

Ying-Hwa Kuo; Marina Skumanich; Philip L. Haagenson; Julius S. Chang

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Cirrus-Cloud Experiment: Intensive Field Observations Planned for Fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plans for an intensive cirrus-cloud field experiment are described. The Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (Citrus IFO) is a major component of the First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment (FIRE). The ...

David O'C. Starr

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Blackbody radiation-pumped CO/sub 2/ laser experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO/sub 2/ mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping.

Christiansen, W.H.; Insuik, R.J.; Deyoung, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

El Nio and Outgoing Longwave Radiation: Observations from Nimbus-7 ERB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five years of broad-band earth radiation budget measurements taken by the Nimbus-7 ERB experiment have been archived. This period encompasses the 1982/83 El Nio/Southern Oscillation event, which reached a peak near the beginning of the fifth ...

Philip E. Ardanuy; H. Lee Kyle

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Management of Spent and Disused Radiation Sources - The Zambian Experience  

SciTech Connect

Zambia like all other countries in the world is faced with environmental problems brought about by a variety of human activities. In Zambia the major environmental issues as identified by Nation Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) of 1994 are water pollution, poor sanitation, land degradation, air pollution, poor waste management, misuse of chemicals, wildlife depletion and deforestation. Zambian has been using a lot of radioactive materials in its various industries. The country has taken several projects with help of external partners. These partners however left these projects in the hands of the Zambians without developing their capacities to manage these radioactive sources. The Government recognized the need to manage these sources and passed legislation governing the management of radioactive materials. The first act of Parliament on Radiation Protection work was passed in 1975 to legislate the use of ionizing radiation. However, because of financial constraints the Country is facing, these regulations have remained unimplemented. Fortunately the international Community has been working in partnership with the Zambian Government in the Management of Radioactive Material. Therefore this paper will present the following aspects of radioactive waste management in Zambia: review Existing Legislation in Zambia regarding management of spent/radioactive sources; capacity building in the field of management of radioactive waste; management of spent and disused radiation sources; existing disposal systems in Zambia regarding spent/orphaned sources; existing stocks of radioactive sources in the Zambian industries.

Chabala, F.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

Environmental Phenomena of the Beaufort Sea Observed during the Leads Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes unique environmental phenomena observed during LEADEX (Leads Experiment), a multidisciplinary investigation staged from an ice camp in the Beaufort Sea during March and April 1992. The paper focuses on phenomena observed by ...

Robert W. Fett; Stephen D. Burk; William T. Thompson; Thomas L. Kozo

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Assimilation of Infrared Radiances in the Context of Observing System Simulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) capability developed at Environment Canada allows simulation of all observation types currently used operationally as well as future data types. Its infrastructure, based on the operational global ...

Sylvain Heilliette; Yves J. Rochon; Louis Garand; Jacek W. Kaminski

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Two-Dimensional Simulations of Mountain Waves Observed during the PYREX Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-dimensional numerical simulations of mountain waves observed during the Pyrenees Experiment have been performed. Two intensive observing periods (IOP) have been simulated, IOP 3, which lasted less than one day, and IOP 9, which lasted two and ...

Ahmed Elkhalfi; Marc Georgelin; Evelyne Richard

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

CLARREO shortwave observing system simulation experiments of the twenty-first century: Simulator design and implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projected changes in the Earth system will likely be manifested in changes in reflected solar radiation. This paper introduces an operational Observational System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to calculate the signals of future climate forcings and feedbacks in top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectra. The OSSE combines simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report for the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to calculate reflectance spectra for simulations of current and future climatic conditions over the 21st century. The OSSE produces narrowband reflectances and broadband fluxes, the latter of which have been extensively validated against archived CCSM results. The shortwave reflectance spectra contain atmospheric features including signals from water vapor, liquid and ice clouds, and aerosols. The spectra are also strongly influenced by the surface bidirectional reflectance properties of predicted snow and sea ice and the climatological seasonal cycles of vegetation. By comparing and contrasting simulated reflectance spectra based on emissions scenarios with increasing projected and fixed present-day greenhouse gas and aerosol concentrations, we find that prescribed forcings from increases in anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are detectable and are spatially confined to lower latitudes. Also, changes in the intertropical convergence zone and poleward shifts in the subsidence zones and the storm tracks are all detectable along with large changes in snow cover and sea ice fraction. These findings suggest that the proposed NASA Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission to measure shortwave reflectance spectra may help elucidate climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks.

Feldman, D.R.; Algieri, C.A.; Ong, J.R.; Collins, W.D.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Synchrotron Radiation as X-Ray Source for EXAFS Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Synchrotron radiation sources...Tokyo, Japan 0.40 250 1.1 0.13 Dedicated SURF II Washington, DC 0.25 25 0.84 0.041 Dedicated Tantalus I Wisconsin 0.24 200 0.64 0.048 Dedicated PTB Braunschweig, Germany 0.14 150 0.46 0.013 Dedicated N-100 Karkhov, Soviet Union 0.10 25 0.50 0.004 ? Photon factory Tsukuba, Japan 2.5 500 8.33 4.16 Dedicated ?...

91

Importance of Accurate Liquid Water Path for Estimation of Solar Radiation in Warm Boundary Layer Clouds: An Observational Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1-yr observational study of overcast boundary layer stratus at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains site illustrates that surface radiation has a higher sensitivity to cloud liquid water ...

Manajit Sengupta; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Thomas P. Ackerman; Seiji Kato; Qilong Min

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New: Press Briefing by Secretary of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE WHITE HOUSE THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release March 28, 1997 PRESS BRIEFING BY SECRETARY OF ENERGY FEDRICO PENA, ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF ENERGY TARA O'TOOLE, AND ACTING ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY GENERAL JOHN DWYER The Briefing Room 11:10 A.M. EST MS. GLYNN: Good morning, everybody. Today we have a human radiation report here. To brief is Secretary Federico Pena; Tara O'Toole, who is the Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environment, Safety and Health; and John Dwyer, the Acting Associate Attorney General. SECRETARY PENA: Thank you very much. Good morning, everybody. Dr. O'Toole, please come up, and John, join me here to my left and right. Let me begin by reading a statement from the President and then I have an opening comment. I'll introduce Dr. O'Toole and John to make some comments.

93

REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING STREAM-DISK IMPACT IN INTERACTING BINARIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first results from high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics experiments that explore the hydrodynamic and radiative properties of a reverse shock relevant to a cataclysmic variable system. A reverse shock is a shock wave that develops when a freely flowing, supersonic plasma is impeded. In our experiments, performed on the Omega Laser Facility, a laser pulse is used to accelerate plasma ejecta into a vacuum. This flow is directed into an Al plate in front of which a shock forms in the rebounding plasma. The plasma flow is moving fast enough that it is shocked to high enough temperatures that radiative cooling affects the shock structure. These are the first experiments to produce a radiative reverse shock wave.

Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Huntington, C. M.; Kaczala, D. N.; Klein, S.; Sweeney, R.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Villette, B. [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Plewa, T., E-mail: krauland@umich.edu, E-mail: rpdrake@umich.edu [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Some Characteristic Differences in the Earth's Radiation Budget over Land and Ocean Derived from the Nimbus-7 ERB Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad spectral band Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiment data are analyzed for top-of-the-atmosphere regional variations in near-ultraviolet visible and near-infrared reflected solar radiation. Regional differences in the noon vs ...

H. Lee Kyle; K. L. Vasanth

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Physical Oceanography of Two Rings Observed by the Cyclonic Ring Experiment. Part I: Physical Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight cruises over a 10-month period in the North Atlantic have provided the Cyclonic Ring Experiment with observations of two rings. Life histories, structure and structural changes have been studied with emphasis on the effects of Stream ...

Andrew C. Vastano; Joyce E. Schmitz; Denise E. Hagan

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Coastal Orographic Rainfall Processes Observed by Radar during the California Land-Falling Jets Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar and rain gauge observations collected in coastal mountains during the California Land-Falling Jets Experiment (CALJET) are used to diagnose the bulk physical properties of rainfall during a wet winter season (JanuaryMarch 1998). Three ...

Allen B. White; Paul J. Neiman; F. Martin Ralph; David E. Kingsmill; P. Ola G. Persson

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Numerical Experiments on Consistent Horizontal and Vertical Resolution for Atmospheric Models and Observing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple numerical experiments are performed in order to determine the effects of inconsistent combinations of horizontal and vertical resolution in both atmospheric models and observing systems. In both cases, we find that inconsistent spatial ...

Michael S. Fox-Rabinovitz; Richard S. Lindzen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for an Optimal Moored Instrument Array in the Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are used to study the design of a proposed array of instrumented moorings in the Indian Ocean (IO) outlined by the IO panel of the Climate Variability and Predictability (...

Joaquim Ballabrera-Poy; Eric Hackert; Raghu Murtugudde; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSES) was conducted to assess the potential impact of the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) instrument on a 5-day forecast using the Florida State University (FSU) primitive equation ...

G. D. Rohaly; T. N. Krishnamurti

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental Volume 2a, Sources and documentation appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This large document provides a catalog of the location of large numbers of reports pertaining to the charge of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Research and is arranged as a series of appendices. Titles of the appendices are Appendix A- Records at the Washington National Records Center Reviewed in Whole or Part by DoD Personnel or Advisory Committee Staff; Appendix B- Brief Descriptions of Records Accessions in the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Research Document Collection; Appendix C- Bibliography of Secondary Sources Used by ACHRE; Appendix D- Brief Descriptions of Human Radiation Experiments Identified by ACHRE, and Indexes; Appendix E- Documents Cited in the ACHRE Final Report and other Separately Described Materials from the ACHRE Document Collection; Appendix F- Schedule of Advisory Committee Meetings and Meeting Documentation; and Appendix G- Technology Note.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Radiative Parameters during EUCREX94. Case Study of 17 April 1994. Part I: Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the intensive European Cloud and Radiation Experiment 1994 (EUCREX94) conducted off the coast of Brittany (France) over the Atlantic Ocean during April 1994, natural cirrus have been analyzed from in situ and remote sensing measurements. ...

Laurent Sauvage; Pierre H. Flamant; Hlne Chepfer; Grard Brogniez; Vincent Trouillet; Jacques Pelon; Franck Albers

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Observation of Synchrotron Radiation from Electrons Accelerated in a Petawatt-Laser-Generated Plasma Cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of plasma electrons in the focus of a petawatt laser beam are studied via measurements of their x-ray synchrotron radiation. With increasing laser intensity, a forward directed beam of x rays extending to 50 keV is observed. The measured x rays are well described in the synchrotron asymptotic limit of electrons oscillating in a plasma channel. The critical energy of the measured synchrotron spectrum is found to scale as the Maxwellian temperature of the simultaneously measured electron spectra. At low laser intensity transverse oscillations are negligible as the electrons are predominantly accelerated axially by the laser generated wakefield. At high laser intensity, electrons are directly accelerated by the laser and enter a highly radiative regime with up to 5% of their energy converted into x rays.

Kneip, S.; Nagel, S. R.; Bellei, C.; Dangor, A. E.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Nilson, P. M.; Willingale, L.; Najmudin, Z. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bourgeois, N.; Marques, J. R. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Gopal, A. [Department of Electronics, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Romanou, 3-GR73133 Chania (Greece); Heathcote, R. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Maksimchuk, A.; Reed, S. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science (CUOS) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Phuoc, K. Ta; Rousse, A. [Laboratoire d'Optique Applique, ENSTA, Ecole Polytechnique, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Tzoufras, M.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Krushelnick, K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Center for Ultrafast Optical Science (CUOS) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

104

The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC1333  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations of NGC1333 from SCUBA-2 on JCMT, observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 microns. Temperature maps are derived from 450 micron and 850 micron ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index beta=1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other young stars in the IR/optically visible cluster, and embedded protostars. Other luminous protostars are also identified by temperature rises at the 17" resolution of the ratio maps (0.02 pc assuming a distance of 250 pc for Perseus). The extensive heating raises the possibility that the radiative feedback may lead to increased masses for the next generation of stars.

Hatchell, J; Drabek, E; Curtis, E; Richer, J; Nutter, D; Di Francesco, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoski, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [NOAA, BOULDER; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Recent Chemical Decontamination Experience: 2012 Radiation Management and Source Term Technical Strategy Group Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical decontamination remains a viable option for nuclear power plants to reduce radiation levels during maintenance and operating activities. This report presents the results of recent system chemical decontamination experiences from EPRI-member utilities in the United States and Europe, collected through an industry survey and as part of participation in the EPRI BWR Chemistry Monitoring and Assessment Program.BackgroundSome plants have performed ...

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

Global Calibration of the GEOS-5 L-Band Microwave Radiative Transfer Model over Nonfrozen Land Using SMOS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A zero-order (tau-omega) microwave radiative transfer model (RTM) is coupled to the Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) catchment land surface model in preparation for the future assimilation of global brightness temperatures (Tb) ...

Gabrille J. M. De Lannoy; Rolf H. Reichle; Valentijn R. N. Pauwels

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Evaluation of Cirrus Parameterizations for Radiative Flux Computations in Climate Models Using TOVSScaRaB Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined simultaneous satellite observations are used to evaluate the performance of parameterizations of the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds used for radiative flux computations in climate models. Atmospheric and cirrus ...

C. J. Stubenrauch; F. Eddounia; J. M. Edwards; A. Macke

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Observational Characterization of the Downward Atmospheric Longwave Radiation at the Surface in the City of So Paulo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the seasonal and diurnal variations of downward longwave atmospheric irradiance (LW) at the surface in So Paulo, Brazil, using 5-min-averaged values of LW, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation observed ...

Eduardo Barbaro; Amauri P. Oliveira; Jacyra Soares; Georgia Codato; Maurcio J. Ferreira; Primo Mlakar; Marija Z. Bonar; Joo F. Escobedo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Executive summary and guide to final report: Advisory committee on human radiation experiments  

SciTech Connect

On January 15, 1994, President Clinton appointed the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments to investigate reports of possibly unethical experiments funded by the government decades ago. The Committee was directed to uncover the history of human radiation experiments during the period 1944 through 1974 and to examine cases in which the government had intentionally released radiation into the environment for research purposes. The Committee was further charged with identifying the ethical and scientific standards for evaluating these events, and with making recommendations to ensure that whatever wrongdoing may have ocurred in the past cannot be repeated. The Committee undertook three projects: A review of how each agency of the federal government that currently conducts or funds research involving human subjects regulates this activity or oversees it; An examination of the documents and consent forms of research projects that are today sponsored by the federal government in order to develop insight into the current status of protections for the rights and interests of human subjects; and, Interviews of nearly 1,900 patients receiving out-patient medical care in private hospitals and federal facilities throughout the country. This booklet provides an overview of the Final Report, summarizing each chapter.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records  

SciTech Connect

The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department`s ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE`s historical records to independent research and analysis.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Observable Signatures of a Black Hole Ejected by Gravitational Radiation Recoil in a Galaxy Merger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to recent general-relativistic simulations, the coalescence of two spinning black holes (BHs) could lead to recoil speeds of the BH remnant of up to thousands of km/s as a result of the emission of gravitational radiation. Such speeds would enable the merger product to escape its host galaxy. Here we examine the circumstances resulting from a gas-rich galaxy merger under which the ejected BH would carry an accretion disk with it and be observable. As the initial BH binary emits gravitational radiation and its orbit tightens, a hole is opened around it in the disk which delays the consumption of gas prior to the eventual BH ejection. The punctured disk remains bound to the ejected BH within the region where the gas orbital velocity is larger than the ejection speed. For a ~10^7 solar mass BH the ejected disk has a characteristic size of tens of thousands of Schwarzschild radii and an accretion lifetime of ~10^7 years. During that time, the ejected BH could traverse a considerable distance and appear as an off-center quasar with a feedback trail along the path it left behind. A small fraction of all quasars could be associated with an escaping BH.

Abraham Loeb

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

113

Efficient spin resolved spectroscopy observation machine at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center  

SciTech Connect

Highly efficient spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer named ESPRESSO (Efficient SPin REsolved SpectroScopy Observation) machine has been developed at the beamline BL-9B in Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. Combination of high-resolution hemispherical electron analyzer and the high-efficient spin detector based on very low energy electron diffraction by the ferromagnetic target makes the high-energy resolution and angular resolution compatible with spin- and angle-resolved photoemission (SARPES) measurement. 7.5 meV in energy and {+-}0.18 deg. in angular resolution have been achieved with spin resolution. The ESPRESSO machine, combination of quick energy-band dispersion measurement and Fermi surface mapping by two-dimensional electron detector for the spin integrated ARPES and the high-efficient spin analysis by the efficient spin detector realizes the comprehensive investigation of spin electronic structure of materials.

Okuda, Taichi; Miyamaoto, Koji; Namatame, Hirofumi [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HSRC), Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Miyahara, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Kenta; Kimura, Akio [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Taniguchi, Masaki [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HSRC), Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) for the Mid-Columbia Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In this phase of the project the focus is on the Mid-Columbia Basin region, which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area (Figure 1) that includes the Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate the Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) observational system deployment approach in order to move closer to the overall goal: (1) Perform an Observing System Experiment (OSE) using a data denial approach. The results of this task are presented in a separate report. (2) Conduct a set of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for the Mid-Colombia basin region. This report presents the results of the OSSE task. The specific objective is to test strategies for future deployment of observing systems in order to suggest the best and most efficient ways to improve wind forecasting at BPA wind farm locations. OSSEs have been used for many years in meteorology to evaluate the potential impact of proposed observing systems, determine tradeoffs in instrument design, and study the most effective data assimilation methodologies to incorporate the new observations into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (Atlas 1997; Lord 1997). For this project, a series of OSSEs will allow consideration of the impact of new observing systems of various types and in various locations.

Zack, J; Natenberg, E J; Knowe, G V; Waight, K; Manobianco, J; Hanley, D; Kamath, C

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

115

Bayesian inference of inaccuracies in radiation transport physics from inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First principles microphysics models are essential to the design and analysis of high energy density physics experiments. Using experimental data to investigate the underlying physics is also essential, particularly when simulations and experiments are not consistent with each other. This is a difficult task, due to the large number of physical models that play a role, and due to the complex (and as a result, noisy) nature of the experiments. This results in a large number of parameters that make any inference a daunting task; it is also very important to consistently treat both experimental and prior understanding of the problem. In this paper we present a Bayesian method that includes both these effects, and allows the inference of a set of modifiers which have been constructed to give information about microphysics models from experimental data. We pay particular attention to radiation transport models. The inference takes into account a large set of experimental parameters and an estimate of the prior kno...

Gaffney, Jim A; Sonnad, Vijay; Libby, Stephen B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM's). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM's under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM's to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

Howard Barker; Jason Cole

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

Empirical Orthogonal Function Analysis of Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation During Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the characteristic features of the Asiatic summer monsoon were investigated using outgoing longwave radiation data obtained from NOAA polar orbiting satellites during the summer mouths in 197477. Monthly mean outgoing longwave radiation ...

Takio Murakami

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Observations and Modeling of Downward Radiative Fluxes (Solar and Infrared) in Urban/Rural Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutants (gaseous and aerosol) contained in urban atmospheres alter radiative fluxes at the surface.Numerous radiative models have been developed, and while few experimental data are available, results areoften contradictory. We have taken ...

Claude Estournel; Raoul Vehil; Daniel Guedalia; Jacques Fontan; Aim Druilhet

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Ground-Based Observations and Modeling of the Visibility and Radar Reflectivity in a Radiation Fog Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a radiation fog layer at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (51.97N, 4.93E) on 23 March 2011 was observed with ground-based in situ and remote sensing observations to investigate the relationship between ...

R. Boers; H. Klein Baltink; H. J. Hemink; F. C. Bosveld; M. Moerman

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Neutron Fluences and Radiation Damage Parameters for the HFIR-MFE-RB-17J Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HFIR-MFE-RB-17J experiment was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of HFIR with a Eu2O2 shield. The irradiation was conducted from April 27, 2004, to May 18, 2005. The total exposure was for 353.6 FPD (full power days). Reactor dosimetry capsules were analyzed and the activation data were used to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluences and radiation damage parameters as a function of height relative to midplane of the reactor.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Glasgow, David C.; Baldwin, Charles A.

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Neutron Fluences and Radiation Damage Parameters for the HFIR-MFE-RB-14J Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HFIR-MFE-RB-14J experiment was conducted in the unshielded removable beryllium (RB) position of HFIR. The irradiation of the assembly occurred for two separated time periods. The first irradiation was from June 3, 1999 to August 27, 1999. The second irradiation period was from January 27, 2000 until June 6, 2000. The total exposure was for 14293 FPD (full power days). Reactor dosimetry capsules were analyzed and the activation data were used to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluences and radiation damage parameters as a function of height relative to midplane of the reactor.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Glasgow, David C.; Baldwin, Charles A.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Neutron Fluences and Radiation Damage Parameters for the HFIR-MFE-RB-17J Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HFIR-MFE-RB-17J experiment was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of HFIR with a Eu2O2 shield. The irradiation was conducted from April 27, 2004, to May 18, 2005. The total exposure was for 353.6 FPD (full power days). Reactor dosimetry capsules were analyzed and the activation data were used to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluences and radiation damage parameters as a function of height relative to midplane of the reactor.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Glasgow, David C.; Baldwin, Charles A.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Neutron Fluences and Radiation Damage Parameters for the HFIR-MFE-RB-14J Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HFIR-MFE-RB-14J experiment was conducted in the unshielded removable beryllium (RB) position of HFIR. The irradiation of the assembly occurred for two separated time periods. The first irradiation was from June 3, 1999 to August 27, 1999. The second irradiation was from January 27, 2000 until June 6, 2000. The total exposure was for 14293 FPD (full power days). Reactor dosimetry capsules were analyzed and the activation data were used to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluences and radiation damage parameters as a function of height relative to midplane of the reactor.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Glasgow, David C.; Baldwin, Charles A.

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Global ice cloud observations: radiative properties and statistics from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice clouds occur quite frequently, yet so much about these clouds is unknown. In recent years, numerous investigations and field campaigns have been focused on the study of ice clouds, all with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding of microphysical and optical properties, as well as determining the radiative impact. Perhaps one of the most recognized instruments used for such research is the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), carried aboard the NASA EOS satellites Terra and Aqua. The present research aims to support ongoing efforts in the field of ice cloud research by use of observations obtained from Terra and Aqua MODIS. First, a technique is developed to infer ice cloud optical depth from the MODIS cirrus reflectance parameter. This technique is based on a previous method developed by Meyer et al. (2004). The applicability of the algorithm is demonstrated with retrievals from level-2 and -3 MODIS data. The technique is also evaluated with the operational MODIS cloud retrieval product and a method based on airborne ice cloud observations. From this technique, an archive of daily optical depth retrievals is constructed. Using simple statistics, the global spatial and temporal distributions of ice clouds are determined. Research has found that Aqua MODIS observes more frequent ice clouds and larger optical depths and ice water paths than does Terra MODIS. Finally, an analysis of the time series of daily optical depth values revealed that ice clouds at high latitudes, which are most likely associated with synoptic scale weather sytems, persist long enough to move with the upper level winds. Tropical ice clouds, however, dissipate more rapidly, and are in all likelihood associated with deep convective cells.

Meyer, Kerry Glynne

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Thermal correction to the Casimir force, radiative heat transfer, and an experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low-temperature asymptotic expressions for the Casimir interaction between two real metals described by Leontovich surface impedance are obtained in the framework of thermal quantum field theory. It is shown that the Casimir entropy computed using the impedance of infrared optics vanishes in the limit of zero temperature. By contrast, the Casimir entropy computed using the impedance of the Drude model attains at zero temperature a positive value which depends on the parameters of a system, i.e., the Nernst heat theorem is violated. Thus, the impedance of infrared optics withstands the thermodynamic test, whereas the impedance of the Drude model does not. We also perform a phenomenological analysis of the thermal Casimir force and of the radiative heat transfer through a vacuum gap between real metal plates. The characterization of a metal by means of the Leontovich impedance of the Drude model is shown to be inconsistent with experiment at separations of a few hundred nanometers. A modification of the impedance of infrared optics is suggested taking into account relaxation processes. The power of radiative heat transfer predicted from this impedance is several times less than previous predictions due to different contributions from the transverse electric evanescent waves. The physical meaning of low frequencies in the Lifshitz formula is discussed. It is concluded that new measurements of radiative heat transfer are required to find out the adequate description of a metal in the theory of electromagnetic fluctuations.

V. B. Bezerra; G. Bimonte; G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko; C. Romero

2007-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

127

Assimilation of Surface-Based Boundary Layer Profiler Observations during a Cool-Season Weather Event Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment. Part I: Analysis Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, an Observing System Simulation Experiment was used to examine how the assimilation of temperature, water vapor, and wind profiles from a potential array of ground-based remote sensing boundary layer profiling instruments impacts the ...

Jason A. Otkin; Daniel C. Hartung; David D. Turner; Ralph A. Petersen; Wayne F. Feltz; Erik Janzon

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Ground-Based and Near-Surface Meteorological Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A short-term meteorological database has been developed for the Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). This database includes meteorological observations from stations designed and deployed exclusively for CLPX as well as observations available ...

Kelly Elder; Angus Goodbody; Don Cline; Paul Houser; Glen E. Liston; Larry Mahrt; Nick Rutter

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES): An Earth Observing System Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is an investigation to examine the role of cloud/radiation feedback in the Earth's climate system. The CERES broadband scanning radiometers are an improved version of the Earth Radiation Budget ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Bruce R. Barkstrom; Edwin F. Harrison; Robert B. Lee III; G. Louis Smith; John E. Cooper

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Low-energy quantum gravity: new challenges for an experiment and observation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some new challenges for an experiment and observation, which are consequences of the model of low-energy quantum gravity by the author, are considered here. In particular, the property of asymptotic freedom of this model leads to the unexpected consequence: if a black hole arises due to a collapse of a matter with some characteristic mass of particles, its full mass should be restricted from the bottom. For usual baryonic matter, this limit of mass is of the order $10^{7}M_{\\odot}$.

Michael A. Ivanov

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

Observation of electron antineutrino disappearance by the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation describes a measurement of the neutrino mixing parameter, sin^2(2theta_13), from the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. Disappearance of electron antineutrinos at a distance of ~2 km from a set of six reactors, where the reactor flux is constrained by near detectors, has been clearly observed. The result, based on the ratio of observed to expected rate of antineutrinos, using 139 days of data taken between December 24, 2011 and May 11, 2012, is sin^2(2theta_13) = 0.089 +/- 0.010(stat.) +/- 0.005(syst.). Improvements in sensitivity from inclusion of additional data, spectral analysis, and improved calibration are expected in the future.

Elizabeth Worcester for the Daya Bay Collaboration

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Can quantum fractal fluctuations be observed in an atom-optics kicked rotor experiment?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the parametric fluctuations in the quantum survival probability of an open version of the delta-kicked rotor model in the deep quantum regime. Spectral arguments [Guarneri I and Terraneo M 2001 Phys. Rev. E vol. 65 015203(R)] predict the existence of parametric fractal fluctuations owing to the strong dynamical localisation of the eigenstates of the kicked rotor. We discuss the possibility of observing such dynamically-induced fractality in the quantum survival probability as a function of the kicking period for the atom-optics realisation of the kicked rotor. The influence of the atoms' initial momentum distribution is studied as well as the dependence of the expected fractal dimension on finite-size effects of the experiment, such as finite detection windows and short measurement times. Our results show that clear signatures of fractality could be observed in experiments with cold atoms subjected to periodically flashed optical lattices, which offer an excellent control on interaction times and the initial atomic ensemble.

Andrea Tomadin; Riccardo Mannella; Sandro Wimberger

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Programs 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programs first water vapor intensive observation period (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This ...

D. D. Turner; J. E. M. Goldsmith

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Assessing and Improving the Quality of Unattended Radiation Observations in Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of atmospheric radiation measurements made at automatic weather stations (AWSs) in Antarctica is assessed. The AWSs are placed on the coastal ice shelf in the katabatic wind zone and on the high Antarctic plateau, and they measure ...

Michiel van den Broeke; Dirk van As; Carleen Reijmer; Roderik van de Wal

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Some Perspectives on Recent In Situ Air Temperature Observations: Modeling the Microclimate inside the Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature measurement has inherent biases associated with the particular radiation shield and sensor deployed. The replacement of the Cotton Region Shelter (CRS) with the MaximumMinimum Temperature System (MMTS) and the introduction of ...

X. Lin; K. G. Hubbard; E. A. Walter-Shea; J. R. Brandle; G. E. Meyer

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

An Effective, Economic, Aspirated Radiation Shield for Air Temperature Observations and Its Spatial Gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and evaluates the performance of a double-walled electrically aspirated radiation shield for thermometers measuring air temperature and its gradients in the atmospheric surface layer. Tests were performed to quantify ...

Christoph K. Thomas; Alexander R. Smoot

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A 10-Year Climatology of Tropical Radiative Heating and Its Vertical Structure from TRMM Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines recent advances in estimating atmospheric radiative heating rate profiles from the sensors aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The approach employs a deterministic framework in which four distinct retrievals ...

Tristan S. LEcuyer; Greg McGarragh

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Application of 3-dimensional radiation transport codes to the analysis of the CRBR prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the calculational results from analyses of a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment Comparisons of calculated and measured results are presented, major emphasis being placed on results at bends in the chaseway. Calculations were performed with three three-dimensional radiation transport codes: the discrete ordinates code TORT and the Monte Carlo code MORSE, both developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the discrete ordinates code ENSEMBLE, developed by Japan. The calculated results from the three codes are compared (1) with previously-calculated DOT3.5 two-dimensional results, (2) among themselves, and (3) with measured results. Calculations with TORT used both the weighted-difference and nodal methods. Only the weighted-difference method was used in ENSEMBLE. When the calculated results were compared to measured results, it was found that calculation-to-experiment (C/E) ratios were good in the regions of the chaseway where two-dimensional modeling might be difficult and where there were no significant discrete ordinates ray effects. Excellent agreement was observed for responses dominated by thermal neutron contributions. MORSE-calculated results and comparisons are described also, and detailed results are presented in an appendix.

Chatani, K. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Development Corp., Experimental Reactor Div., Ibaraki (Japan))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

New Revelation of Lightning Ball Observation and Proposal for a Nuclear Reactor Fusion Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, the author brings further details regarding his Lightning Ball observation that were not mentioned in the first one (Ref.1-2). Additionally, he goes more into detail as the three forces that are necessary to allow the residual crescent form the hydrodynamic vortex ring to shrink into a sphere.Further topics are the similarities and analogies between the Lightning Ball formation's theory and the presently undertaken Tokamak-Stellarator-Spheromak fusion reactor experiments. A new theory and its experimental realisation are proposed as to make the shrinking of the hot plasma of reactors into a ball possible by means of the so called long range electromagnetic forces. In this way,the fusion ignition temperature could possibly atteined.

Tar, Domokos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

New Revelation of Lightning Ball Observation and Proposal for a Nuclear Reactor Fusion Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, the author brings further details regarding his Lightning Ball observation that were not mentioned in the first one (Ref.1-2). Additionally, he goes more into detail as the three forces that are necessary to allow the residual crescent form the hydrodynamic vortex ring to shrink into a sphere.Further topics are the similarities and analogies between the Lightning Ball formation's theory and the presently undertaken Tokamak-Stellarator-Spheromak fusion reactor experiments. A new theory and its experimental realisation are proposed as to make the shrinking of the hot plasma of reactors into a ball possible by means of the so called long range electromagnetic forces. In this way,the fusion ignition temperature could possibly atteined.

Domokos Tar

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Final report, September 15, 1990--October 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

DOE has launched a major initiative -- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCMs under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. In 1990, the authors proposed to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems connected with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem -- longwave radiation. In particular, their long-term research goals are to: develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations, assess the impact of the longwave radiative forcing in a GCM, determine the sensitivity of a GCM to the radiative model used in it, and determine how the longwave radiative forcing contributes relatively when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and expansion.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B-1 B-1 Appendix B APPENDIX B ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ACCESS TO RECORDS AND INFORMATION RELATING TO HUMAN RADIATION EXPERIMENTS Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Collection at the National Archives, College Park Overview: 665 cubic feet of records from the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments have been deposited at the National Archives and made part of Record Group 220, Presidential Commit- tees, Commissions, and Boards. The collection can be accessed through the Archive's Textual Reference Branch located at Archives II, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, Maryland. The phone number

143

Energy spectrum and mass composition of primary cosmic radiation in the region above the knee from the GAMMA experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of the primary cosmic radiation in the energy range 1 - 100 PeV and the extensive air shower (EAS) characteristics obtained on the basis of the expanded data bank of the GAMMA experiment (Mt. Aragats, Armenia) are presented. With increased statistics we confirm our previous results on the energy spectrum. The spectral index above the knee is about -3.1, but at energies beyond 20 PeV a flattening of the spectrum is observed. The existence of the 'bump' at about 70 PeV is confirmed with a significance of more than 4{\\sigma}. In the energy range of 10 - 100 PeV the shower age becomes energy independent and we observe a direct proportionality of the EAS size to the primary energy. This suggests an approximately constant depth of the EAS maximum in this energy range. This is evidence in favour of an increasing average mass of primary particles at energies above 20 PeV. The additional source scenario, which is a possible explanation of the 'bump' in the spectrum, also leads to the conclusion of ...

Martirosov, R M; Vardanyan, H S; Erlykin, A D; Nikolskaya, N M; Gallant, Y A; Jones, L W; Babayan, H A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Observations of Saharan Aerosols: Results of ECLATS Field Experiment. Part I: Optical Thicknesses and Aerosol Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of ground-based and airborne observations of desert aerosols, the ECLATS experiment was carried out in December 1980 in the vicinity of Niamey (Niger). This paper deals with aerosol optical thicknesses and size distributions derived from ...

Y. Fouquart; B. Bonnel; M. Chaoui Roquai; R. Santer; A. Cerf

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Accuracy of Diagnostic Heat and Moisture Budgets Using SESAME-79 Field Data as Revealed by Observing System Simulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of diagnostic heat and moisture budgets using the AVE-SESAME 1979 data is investigated through a series of observing system simulation experiments. The four-dimensional (including time) data set provided by a mesoscale model is used ...

Ying-Hwa Kuo; Richard A. Anthes

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cloud and Radiative Characteristics of Tropical Deep Convective Systems in Extended Cloud Objects from CERES Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical and radiative properties of tropical deep convective systems for the period from January to August 1998 are examined with the use of Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System Single-Scanner Footprint (SSF) data from the Tropical ...

Zachary A. Eitzen; Kuan-Man Xu; Takmeng Wong

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The observed relationship between the occurrence of acute radiation effects and leukemia mortality among A-bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

In an analysis of a follow-up study of a fixed population of 73,330 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the slope of an estimated dose response between ionizing radiation and leukemia mortality was found to be steeper (P less than 0.002), by a factor of 2.4, among those who reported epilation within 60 days of the bombings, compared to those who did not experience this sign of acute radiation exposure. The strength of this empirical finding as evidence of biological association in individual radiosensitivity for these two end points is studied here. The major factor complicating the interpretation of this finding as evidence of such an association is the degree of imprecision of the radiation dosimetry system used in assignment of radiation doses to the A-bomb survivors. Using models recently suggested for dealing with dosimetry errors in epidemiological analysis of the A-bomb survivor data, the sensitivity of the apparent association between leukemia mortality and severe epilation to the assumed level of dosimetry error is investigated.

Neriishi, K.; Stram, D.O.; Vaeth, M.; Mizuno, S.; Akiba, S. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Baseline Surface Radiation Network Pyrgeometer Round-Robin Calibration Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the aim of improving the consistency of terrestrial and atmospheric longwave radiation measurements within the Baseline Surface Radiation Network, five Eppley Precision Infrared Radiometer (PIR) pyrgeometers and one modified Meteorological ...

Rolf Philipona; Claus Frhlich; Klaus Dehne; John DeLuisi; John Augustine; Ellsworth Dutton; Don Nelson; Bruce Forgan; Peter Novotny; John Hickey; Steven P. Love; Steven Bender; Bruce McArthur; Atsumu Ohmura; John H. Seymour; John S. Foot; Masataka Shiobara; Francisco P. J. Valero; Anthony W. Strawa

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Investigation of Thin Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties on the Basis of Satellite Observations and Fast Radiative Transfer Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the global investigation of optically thin cirrus cloud optical thickness (tau) and microphysical properties, such as, effective particle size (D_(eff)) and ice crystal habits (shapes), based on the global satellite observations and fast radiative transfer models (RTMs). In the first part, we develop two computationally efficient RTMs simulating satellite observations under cloudy-sky conditions in the visible/shortwave infrared (VIS/SWIR) and thermal inferred (IR) spectral regions, respectively. To mitigate the computational burden associated with absorption, thermal emission and multiple scattering, we generate pre-computed lookup tables (LUTs) using two rigorous models, i.e., the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) and the discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT). The second part introduces two methods (i.e., VIS/SWIR- and IR-based methods) to retrieve tau and D_(eff) from satellite observations in corresponding spectral regions of the two RTMs. We discuss the advantages and weakness of the two methods by estimating the impacts from different error sources on the retrievals through sensitivity studies. Finally, we develop a new method to infer the scattering phase functions of optically thin cirrus clouds in a water vapor absorption channel (1.38-m). We estimate the ice crystal habits and surface structures by comparing the inferred scattering phase functions and numerically simulated phase functions calculated using idealized habits.

Wang, Chenxi

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Summary Executive Summary Executive Summary ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ "Our greatness is measured not only in how we . . . do right but also [in] how we act when we know we've done the wrong thing; how we confront our mistakes, make our apologies, and take action." -President Clinton October 3, 1995 In January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) to examine reports that the government had funded and conducted unethical human radiation experiments and releases of radiation during the

151

Building public trust: Actions to respond to the report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Democratic government requires trust: people need to know and believe that the government is telling the truth. Without information about what the government is doing and why, citizens cannot exercise democratic control over government institutions. During his first year in office, President Clinton became concerned about reports that the government had conducted unethical secret human radiation experiments during the Cold War. To address this issue, in January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), chaired by bioethicist Dr. Ruth Faden of Johns Hopkins University. The President also directed all Federal agencies to search for records related to human subjects radiation research and provide them to the Advisory Committee. This report presents the Administration`s actions to respond to the ACHRE`s findings and recommendations.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Observation of Interference between Cerenkov and Synchrotron Radiation K.D. Bonin, K.T. McDonald, and D.P. Russell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observation of Interference between Cerenkov and Synchrotron Radiation K.D. Bonin, K.T. Mc photons per electron passing through a helium-filled Cerenkov counter is observed to oscillate with an analysis which treats Cerenkov and synchrotron radiation as limiting mani- festations of a unified process

McDonald, Kirk

153

Experimental observation of nonspherically-decaying radiation from a rotating superluminal source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, United Kingdom J. Singleton National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, TA-35, MS-E536, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 H. Ardavan Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, United Kingdom... of (retarded) source time. Consequently, the intensity of the radiation in the direction of these cusps declines more slowly with in- creasing distance from the source than would the emis- sion from a conventional antenna. Note, however, that energy...

Ardavan, A; Hayes, W; Singleton, J; Ardavan, H; Fopma, J; Halliday, D

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Final report, Supplemental Volume 2. Sources and documentation  

SciTech Connect

This volume and its appendixes supplement the Advisory Committee`s final report by reporting how we went about looking for information concerning human radiation experiments and intentional releases, a description of what we found and where we found it, and a finding aid for the information that we collected. This volume begins with an overview of federal records, including general descriptions of the types of records that have been useful and how the federal government handles these records. This is followed by an agency-by-agency account of the discovery process and descriptions of the records reviewed, together with instructions on how to obtain further information from those agencies. There is also a description of other sources of information that have been important, including institutional records, print resources, and nonprint media and interviews. The third part contains brief accounts of ACHRE`s two major contemporary survey projects (these are described in greater detail in the final report and another supplemental volume) and other research activities. The final section describes how the ACHRE information-nation collections were managed and the records that ACHRE created in the course of its work; this constitutes a general finding aid for the materials deposited with the National Archives. The appendices provide brief references to federal records reviewed, descriptions of the accessions that comprise the ACHRE Research Document Collection, and descriptions of the documents selected for individual treatment. Also included are an account of the documentation available for ACHRE meetings, brief abstracts of the almost 4,000 experiments individually described by ACHRE staff, a full bibliography of secondary sources used, and other information.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH:USING ARM OBSERVATIONS & ADVANCED STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES TO EVALUATE CAM3 CLOUDS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF STOCHASTIC CLOUD-RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

The long-range goal of several past and current projects in our DOE-supported research has been the development of new and improved parameterizations of cloud-radiation effects and related processes, using ARM data, and the implementation and testing of these parameterizations in global models. The main objective of the present project being reported on here has been to develop and apply advanced statistical techniques, including Bayesian posterior estimates, to diagnose and evaluate features of both observed and simulated clouds. The research carried out under this project has been novel in two important ways. The first is that it is a key step in the development of practical stochastic cloud-radiation parameterizations, a new category of parameterizations that offers great promise for overcoming many shortcomings of conventional schemes. The second is that this work has brought powerful new tools to bear on the problem, because it has been a collaboration between a meteorologist with long experience in ARM research (Somerville) and a mathematician who is an expert on a class of advanced statistical techniques that are well-suited for diagnosing model cloud simulations using ARM observations (Shen).

Somerville, Richard

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The standard model of elementary particle physics (SM) predicts, besides the top-quark pair production via the strong interaction, also the electroweak production of single top-quarks [19]. Up to now, the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton-collider is the only place to produce and study top quarks emerging from hadron-hadron-collisions. Top quarks were directly observed in 1995 during the Tevatron Run I at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.8 TeV simultaneously by the CDF and D0 Collaborations via the strong production of top-quark pairs. Run II of the Tevatron data taking period started 2001 at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV after a five year upgrade of the Tevatron accelerator complex and of both experiments. One main component of its physics program is the determination of the properties of the top quark including its electroweak production. Even though Run II is still ongoing, the study of the top quark is already a successful endeavor, confirmed by dozens of publications from both Tevatron experiments. A comprehensive review of top-quark physics can be found in reference. The reasons for searching for single top-quark production are compelling. As the electroweak top-quark production proceeds via a Wtb vertex, it provides the unique opportunity of the direct measurement of the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|, which is expected to be |V{sub tb}| {approx} 1 in the SM. Significant deviations from unity could be an indication of a fourth quark generation, a production mode via flavor-changing neutral currents, and other new phenomena, respectively. There are two dominating electroweak top-quark production modes at the Fermilab Tevatron: the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson striking a b quark and the s-channel production of a timelike W boson via the fusion of two quarks. In proton-antiproton-collisions the third electroweak production mode, the associated Wt production of an on-shell W boson in conjunction with a top quark has a comparatively negligible small predicted cross section. Therefore, the vast majority of the CDF and D0 single top-quark analyses search for the combined s- and t-channel signal, with the production ratio to be given by the SM. In Tevatron Run I, several limits on the single top-quark production cross section were set by CDF and D0, whereas in Run II, even stronger limits followed by both collaborations. Furthermore, limits on the non-SM production of single top-quarks via flavor-changing neutral currents could be obtained. The electroweak production of single top-quarks has not yet been observed up to the time of this thesis, although the D0 and shortly thereafter the CDF Collaborations found first evidence. The experimental challenge of the search for single top-quark production is the tiny expected signal beneath a large and imprecisely known amount of background processes. The relative fraction of background events is at the order of about ten times higher compared to the top-quark pair production. Consequently, the expected signal amounts to about 5% of the full candidate event sample whose background contribution is only known to a level at the order of 20%. Furthermore, the signal events themselves are expected to be not as distinct from the background as the top-quark pair production since there is only one heavy object present in the event. Thus, experimental methods like simple counting experiments are not sufficiently sensitive and the development of more sophisticated analysis techniques is required to distinguish such small signals from alike and inaccurately known background processes. Neural networks comply with those requirements. They can be used to distinguish between signal and background processes by combining the information contained in several variables into a powerful discriminant, while each variable has a rather low separation capability. The application of those neural network discriminants to collision data provide a method for the extraction of the signal fraction and its significance. This thesis presents a neural network search for combined as well as separate

Lueck, Jan; /KARLSRUHE U., EKP

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard model of elementary particle physics (SM) predicts, besides the top-quark pair production via the strong interaction, also the electroweak production of single top-quarks [19]. Up to now, the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton-collider is the only place to produce and study top quarks emerging from hadron-hadron-collisions. Top quarks were directly observed in 1995 during the Tevatron Run I at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.8 TeV simultaneously by the CDF and D0 Collaborations via the strong production of top-quark pairs. Run II of the Tevatron data taking period started 2001 at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV after a five year upgrade of the Tevatron accelerator complex and of both experiments. One main component of its physics program is the determination of the properties of the top quark including its electroweak production. Even though Run II is still ongoing, the study of the top quark is already a successful endeavor, confirmed by dozens of publications from both Tevatron experiments. A comprehensive review of top-quark physics can be found in reference. The reasons for searching for single top-quark production are compelling. As the electroweak top-quark production proceeds via a Wtb vertex, it provides the unique opportunity of the direct measurement of the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|, which is expected to be |V{sub tb}| {approx} 1 in the SM. Significant deviations from unity could be an indication of a fourth quark generation, a production mode via flavor-changing neutral currents, and other new phenomena, respectively. There are two dominating electroweak top-quark production modes at the Fermilab Tevatron: the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson striking a b quark and the s-channel production of a timelike W boson via the fusion of two quarks. In proton-antiproton-collisions the third electroweak production mode, the associated Wt production of an on-shell W boson in conjunction with a top quark has a comparatively negligible small predicted cross section. Therefore, the vast majority of the CDF and D0 single top-quark analyses search for the combined s- and t-channel signal, with the production ratio to be given by the SM. In Tevatron Run I, several limits on the single top-quark production cross section were set by CDF and D0, whereas in Run II, even stronger limits followed by both collaborations. Furthermore, limits on the non-SM production of single top-quarks via flavor-changing neutral currents could be obtained. The electroweak production of single top-quarks has not yet been observed up to the time of this thesis, although the D0 and shortly thereafter the CDF Collaborations found first evidence. The experimental challenge of the search for single top-quark production is the tiny expected signal beneath a large and imprecisely known amount of background processes. The relative fraction of background events is at the order of about ten times higher compared to the top-quark pair production. Consequently, the expected signal amounts to about 5% of the full candidate event sample whose background contribution is only known to a level at the order of 20%. Furthermore, the signal events themselves are expected to be not as distinct from the background as the top-quark pair production since there is only one heavy object present in the event. Thus, experimental methods like simple counting experiments are not sufficiently sensitive and the development of more sophisticated analysis techniques is required to distinguish such small signals from alike and inaccurately known background processes. Neural networks comply with those requirements. They can be used to distinguish between signal and background processes by combining the information contained in several variables into a powerful discriminant, while each variable has a rather low separation capability. The application of those neural network discriminants to collision data provide a method for the extraction of the signal fraction and its significance. This thesis presents a neural network search for combined as well as separate

Lueck, Jan; /KARLSRUHE U., EKP

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Change Experiment: Observations and Modeling of Hurricanes Katrina, Ophelia, and Rita  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) used three P3 aircraft aided by high-resolution numerical modeling and satellite communications to investigate the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina, Ophelia, and Rita. The aim was to increase ...

Robert A. Houze Jr.; Jasmine Cetrone; S. Rita Brodzik; Shuyi S. Chen; Wei Zhao; Wen-Chau Lee; James A. Moore; Gregory J. Stossmeister; Michael M. Bell; Robert F. Rogers

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Objective comparison of design of experiments strategies in design and observations in practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of Experiments (DoE) strategies in robust engineering determine which prototypes and how many of each are created and tested. A better strategy is one that delivers a closer-to-optimal performance at a lower ...

Freeman, Ion Chalmers, 1968-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Observations of Typhoon Melissa during the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) provided the first high-resolution (15 m) vertical profiling of clouds and aerosols from space. The LITE instrument flew aboard the space shuttle as its prime payload during Space Transportation ...

Thomas A. Kovacs; M. Patrick McCormick

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Quality of Mobile Air Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure Observations from the 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment (DTE10) took place from 28 January to 29 March 2010 in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area for the purposes of collecting and evaluating mobile data from vehicles. To examine the quality of ...

Amanda R. S. Anderson; Michael Chapman; Sheldon D. Drobot; Alemu Tadesse; Brice Lambi; Gerry Wiener; Paul Pisano

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Polarimetric Radar Observations of Convection in Northwestern Mexico during the North American Monsoon Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial and temporal variability of convection during the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) was examined via analysis of three-dimensional polarimetric radar data. Terrain bands were defined as the Gulf of California (over water) and ...

Timothy J. Lang; Steven A. Rutledge; Robert Cifelli

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

Limits to the Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effect Derived from Observations of Ship Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations of the effects of ships on low-level clouds off the west coast of the United States are used to derive limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Christopher D. Walsh

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ultrafast shift and injection currents observed in wurtzite semiconductors via emitted terahertz radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and injection currents have been generated in bulk GaAs and strained GaAs quantum wells QWs , respectivelyUltrafast shift and injection currents observed in wurtzite semiconductors via emitted terahertz; published online 18 November 2005 Shift and injection currents are generated in the wurtzite semiconductors

Van Driel, Henry M.

167

Surface Net Solar Radiation Estimated from Satellite Measurements: Comparisons with Tower Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization that relates the reflected solar flux at the top of the atmosphere to the net solar flux at the surface in terms of only the column water vapor amount and the solar zenith angle was tested against surface observations. Net ...

Zhanqing Li; H. O. Leighton; Robert D. Cess

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

First Beam Observation and Near Future Plans at SPring-8 LEPS2 Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first photon beam was successfully produced by laser Compton backscattering at the LEPS2 beamline, which was newly constructed at SPring-8 for the purpose to increase the beam intensity one order of magnitude more than that of the LEPS experiments and to achieve the large acceptance coverage with high resolution detectors. The BGOegg electromagnetic calorimeter with associated detectors are being set up at the LEPS2 experimental building for the physics programs, including the searches for $\\eta$'-bound nuclei and highly excited baryon resonances. In parallel to the BGOegg experiments, the LEPS2 charged particle spectrometer will be prepared inside the 1 Tesla solenoidal magnet, transported from the BNL-E949 experiment.

Norihito Muramatsu

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols over Global Oceans from Merged CERES and MODIS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA) is defined as the difference between radiative fluxes in the absence and presence of aerosols. In this study, the direct radiative effect of aerosols is estimated for 46 months (March 2000December ...

Norman G. Loeb; Natividad Manalo-Smith

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Structure and Origin of a Small Cyclonic Eddy Observed during the POLYMODE Local Dynamics Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the POLYMODE Local Dynamics Experiment (31N; 69.5W) a small cyclonic eddy was discovered and mapped. The eddy was characterized by an upward doming of isotherms in the upper part of the main thermocline. The dynamical signal extended from ...

Eric J. Lindstrom; Curtis C. Ebbesmeyer; W. Brechner Owens

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Transport, Radiative, and Dynamical Effects of the Antarctic Ozone Hole: A GFDL SKYHI Model Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GFDL SKYHI general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic ozone hole phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. Both the polar ozone destruction and photochemical ...

J. D. Mahlman; L. J. Umscheid; J. P. Pinto

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Multichannel Microwave Radiometric Observations at Saipan during the 1990 Tropical Cyclone Motion Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To estimate mesoscale variations in integrated water vapor, cloud liquid water, and temperature in a tropical region, multiwavelength microwave radiometric observations were carried out over a seven-week period on the island of Saipan during the ...

Yong Han; Dennis W. Thomson

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Multiresolution Ensemble Forecasts of an Observed Tornadic Thunderstorm System. Part II: Storm-Scale Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, the authors used a full physics, nonhydrostatic numerical model with horizontal grid spacing of 24 km and nested grids of 6- and 3-km spacing to generate the ensemble forecasts of an observed tornadic thunderstorm complex. The ...

Fanyou Kong; Kelvin K. Droegemeier; Nicki L. Hickmon

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

An Ocean Observing and Prediction Experiment in Prince William Sound, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observing and forecasting conditions of coastal oceans in Alaska is technically challenging because of the mountainous terrain, the notoriously stormy seas, and a complex hydrological system of freshwater from rivers and glaciers. The Alaska Ocean ...

G. Carl Schoch; Yi Chao; Francois Colas; John Farrara; Molly McCammon; Peter Olsson; Gaurav Singhal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Observations and Simulations of Upper-Ocean Response to Wind Events during the Ocean Storms Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ocean Storms dataset is used to compile observations of the oceanic response to midlatitude storms. Of particular interest are episodic mixed layer temperature cooling events whose characteristics are reviewed. The data include subsurface ...

W. G. Large; G. B. Crawford

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Forecast evaluation of an Observing System Simulation Experiment assimilating both radar and satellite data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In part 1 of this study, Jones et al. (2013a) compared the relative skill of assimilating simulated radar reflectivity and radial velocity observations and satellite 6.95 ?m brightness temperatures (TB) and found that both improved analyses of ...

Thomas A. Jones; Jason A. Otkin; David J. Stensrud; Kent Knopfmeier

177

Experiences from First Top-Off Injection at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) is moving toward Top-Off injection mode, SLAC's Radiation Protection Department is working with SSRL on minimizing the radiological hazards of this mode. One such hazard is radiation that is created inside the accelerator concrete enclosure by injected beam. Since during Top-Off injection the stoppers that would otherwise isolate the storage ring from the experimental area stay open, the stoppers no longer prevent such radiation from reaching the experimental area. The level of this stray radiation was measured in April 2008 during the first Top-Off injection tests. They revealed radiation dose rates of up to 18 microSv/h (1.8 millirem/h) outside the experimental hutches, significantly higher than our goal of 1 microSv/h (0.1 millirem/h). Non-optimal injection increased the measured dose rates by a factor two. Further tests in 2008 indicated that subsequent improvements by SSRL to the injection system have reduced the dose rates to acceptable levels. This presentation describes the studies performed before the Top-Off tests, the tests themselves and their major results (both under initial conditions and after improvements were implemented), and presents the controls being implemented for full and routine Top-Off injection.

Bauer, J.M.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, S.H.; /SLAC

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Intersatellite Radiance Biases for the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounders (HIRS) on board NOAA-15, -16, and -17 from Simultaneous Nadir Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intersatellite radiance comparisons for the 19 infrared channels of the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounders (HIRS) on board NOAA-15, -16, and -17 are performed with simultaneous nadir observations at the orbital intersections of the ...

Changyong Cao; Hui Xu; Jerry Sullivan; Larry McMillin; Pubu Ciren; Yu-Tai Hou

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Observation of diffraction with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A clear evidence of inclusive diffraction observed by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in minimum bias events at $\\sqrt{s}=$0.9 TeV, 2.36 TeV is presented. The observed diffractive signal is dominated by inclusive single-diffractive dissociation and can be identified by the presence of a Large Rapidity Gap that extends over the forward region of the CMS detector. A comparison of the data with Monte Carlo predictions provided by PYTHIA6 and PHOJET generators is given. In addition, first observation of the single-diffractive production of di-jets at $\\sqrt{s}=$7 TeV is presented.

Dmytro Volyanskyy

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Improved radiative corrections to (e,e{sup '}p) experiments: Explicit treatment of kinematical corrections in multiphoton bremsstrahlung  

SciTech Connect

Radiative processes lead to important corrections to (e,e{sup '}p) experiments. While radiative corrections can be calculated exactly in QED and to a good accuracy also including hadronic corrections, these corrections cannot be included into data analyses to arbitrary orders exactly. Nevertheless consideration of multiphoton bremsstrahlung above the low-energy cutoff is important for many (e,e{sup '}p) experiments. To date, higher-order bremsstrahlung effects concerning electron scattering experiments have been implemented approximately by employing the soft-photon approximation (SPA). In this paper we propose a novel approach to multiphoton emission which partially removes the SPA from (e,e{sup '}p) experiments. In this combined approach one hard photon is treated exactly; and additional (softer) bremsstrahlung photons are taken into account resorting to the soft-photon approximation. This partial removal of the soft-photon approximation is shown to be relevant for the missing-energy distribution for several kinematic settings at MAMI and TJNAF energies.

Weissbach, Florian [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Departement fuer Physik, Universitaet Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Hencken, Kai [Departement fuer Physik, Universitaet Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); ABB Schweiz AG, Corporate Research, CH-5405 Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland); Kiselev, Daniela [Departement fuer Physik, Universitaet Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Trautmann, Dirk [Departement fuer Physik, Universitaet Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Sensitivity of the Tropical-Mean Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key disagreement exists between global climate model (GCM) simulations and satellite observations of the decadal variability in the tropical-mean radiation budget. Measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) over the period ...

Amy C. Clement; Brian Soden

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Comments to "Comparison of two experiments on radiative neutron decay" by R.U.Khafizov et al., published in Physics of Atomic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some critical comments and remarks on the article "Comparison of two experiments on radiative neutron decay" by R.U.Khafizov et al., published in Physics of Atomic Nuclei.

Kuznetsov, I A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Comments to "Comparison of two experiments on radiative neutron decay" by R.U.Khafizov et al., published in Physics of Atomic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some critical comments and remarks on the article "Comparison of two experiments on radiative neutron decay" by R.U.Khafizov et al., published in Physics of Atomic Nuclei.

I. A. Kuznetsov

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

185

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 16 March 1991--15 March 1992  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM`s). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM`s under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM`s to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Radiation Budget of the West African Sahel and Its Controls: A Perspective from Observations and Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous measurements of the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net cross-atmosphere radiation flux divergence over the West African Sahel were made during the year 2006 using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and ...

Mark A. Miller; Virendra P. Ghate; Robert K. Zahn

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Observations of the Pulsar PSR B1951+32 with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis and results of 12.5 hours of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the EGRET-detected pulsar PSR B1951+32 using the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). STACEE is an atmospheric Cherenkov detector, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that detects cosmic gamma rays using the shower-front-sampling technique. STACEE's sensitivity to astrophysical sources at energies around 100 GeV allows it to investigate emission from gamma-ray pulsars with expected pulsed emission cutoffs below 100 GeV. We discuss the observations and analysis of STACEE's PSR 1951+32 data, accumulated during the 2005 and 2006 observing seasons.

Kildea, J; Ball, J; Carson, J E; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Jarvis, A; Lindner, T; Mller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

THE COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRUM OBSERVED WITH THE SURFACE DETECTOR OF THE TELESCOPE ARRAY EXPERIMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Telescope Array (TA) collaboration has measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with primary energies above 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV. This measurement is based upon four years of observation by the surface detector component of TA. The spectrum shows a dip at an energy of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV and a steepening at 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV which is consistent with the expectation from the GZK cutoff. We present the results of a technique, new to the analysis of UHECR surface detector data, that involves generating a complete simulation of UHECRs striking the TA surface detector. The procedure starts with shower simulations using the CORSIKA Monte Carlo program where we have solved the problems caused by use of the ''thinning'' approximation. This simulation method allows us to make an accurate calculation of the acceptance of the detector for the energies concerned.

Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Hanlon, W. [High Energy Astrophysics Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Aida, R. [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Azuma, R.; Fukuda, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Cheon, B. G.; Cho, E. J. [Department of Physics and Research Institute of Natural Science, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J. [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Cho, W. R. [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujii, T. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); and others

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Earth's radiation budget and its relation to atmospheric hydrology 3. Comparison of observations over the oceans with a GCM  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a study that seeks to examine a very limited set of interactions between the hydrological cycle and the radiative processes that take place on Earth and attempt to test how well these interactions are simulated by a general circulation model. Two broad types of tests of the model are introduced in this paper. The first focuses on comparing various sensitivity relationships established by the model with those observed on Earth. The specific relationships examined in this paper include the sensitivities of column-integrated water vapor, the clear sky greenhouse effect, cloud albedo, and cloud radiative forcing to sea surface temperature. The second type of test focuses on comparison of simulated and observed seasonal cycles of the greenhouse effect and cloud radiative forcing. The main results of this study suggest that the model studied, which the authors take to be representative of the current generation of global climate models, is able to simulate some aspects of the observed sensitivities fairly well. Qualitative successes of the simulations include realistic variations of column vapor with sea surface temperature, the clear sky greenhouse parameter and its variation with both column vapor and sea surface temperature, and cloud longwave radiative forcing with sea surface temperature, as well as the seasonal changes of the greenhouse effect and the cloud radiative forcing. However, there exist many serious quantitative differences between the model and the observations. These include problems in the simulations of the column vapor in the tropics and an excessively strong clear-sky greenhouse effect in the mid-latitudes. Significant differences between the simulated and the observed radiative properties of clouds include the overprediction of the longwave cloud radiative forcing over warm tropical oceans and a significant underestimate of the cloud reflection in mid-latitudes during the summer season. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Stephens, G.L.; Randall, D.A.; Wittmeyer, I.L.; Dazlich, D.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States)); Tjemkes, S. (State University, Utrecht (Netherlands))

1993-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

The impact of covariance localization for radar data on enKF analyses of a developing MCS: Observing system simulation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) were performed to assess the impact of covariance localization of radar data on ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) analyses of a developing convective system. Simulated WSR-88D radar observations ...

Ryan A. Sobash; David J. Stensrud

191

Precipitation and soil impacts on partitioning of subsurface moisture in Avena barbata: Observations from a greenhouse experiment  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of two grassland soils and precipitation regimes on soil-moisture dynamics. We set up an experiment in a greenhouse, and monitored soil moisture dynamics in mesocosms planted with Avena barbata, an annual species found in California grasslands. By repeating the precipitation input at regular intervals, we were able to observe plant manipulation of soil moisture during well-defined periods during the growing season. We found that the amount of water partitioned to evapotranspiration, seepage, and soil storage varied among different growth stages. Further, both soil type and precipitation regimes had a significant impact on redistributing soil moisture. Whereas in the low-precipitation treatments most water was released to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration, major losses from the high-precipitation treatment occurred as gravity drainage. Observations from this study emphasize the importance of understanding intra-seasonal relationships between vegetation, soil, and water.

Salve, R.; Torn, M.S.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cirrus Cloud Radiative and Microphysical Properties from Ground Observations and In Situ Measurements during FIRE 1991 and Their Application to Exhibit Problems in Cirrus Solar Radiative Transfer Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements from the FIRE 1991 cirrus cloud field experiment in the central United States are presented and analyzed.

S. Kinne; T. P. Ackerman; M. Shiobara; A. Uchiyama; A. J. Heymsfield; L. Miloshevich; J. Wendell; E. Eloranta; C. Purgold; R. W. Bergstrom

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatron oscillations, and beam steering in a plasma wakefield experiment at 30 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gearhart,Construction of a Cerenkov light source, Rev.Plasma density from Cerenkov radiation, betatroncal considerations in the use of Cerenkov radiation as an

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part 2: Protecting Future Human Subjects Part 2: Protecting Future Human Subjects Part 2: Protecting Future Human Subjects ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Overview The success of the effort to open the historical record will be measured, in part, by whether we avoid repeating the mistakes of the past. ACHRE's review of human radiation experiments raised questions of whether the current system of protection is adequate for all types of human subjects research. The measures described below will strengthen the protection of human subjects and address ACHRE's findings. Federal responsibilities for maintaining ethics in human subjects research are dispersed in several agencies and committees in the

196

A Radiation-Hydrodynamics Code Comparison for Laser-Produced Plasmas: FLASH versus HYDRA and the Results of Validation Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential for laser-produced plasmas to yield fundamental insights into high energy density physics (HEDP) and deliver other useful applications can sometimes be frustrated by uncertainties in modeling the properties and expansion of these plasmas using radiation-hydrodynamics codes. In an effort to overcome this and to corroborate the accuracy of the HEDP capabilities recently added to the publicly available FLASH radiation-hydrodynamics code, we present detailed comparisons of FLASH results to new and previously published results from the HYDRA code used extensively at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We focus on two very different problems of interest: (1) an Aluminum slab irradiated by 15.3 and 76.7 mJ of "pre-pulse" laser energy and (2) a mm-long triangular groove cut in an Aluminum target irradiated by a rectangular laser beam. Because this latter problem bears a resemblance to astrophysical jets, Grava et al., Phys. Rev. E, 78, (2008) performed this experiment and compared detailed x-ray int...

Orban, Chris; Chawla, Sugreev; Wilks, Scott C; Lamb, Donald Q

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluation of the Spatial and Temporal Uncertainties Distribution of Daily-Integrated Shortwave Downward Radiation Estimated from Polar-Orbiting Satellite Observation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polar-orbiting satellite sensor, which can observe the entire Earths surface with good spatial and spectral resolution, is a potential tool for estimation of global downward shortwave radiation (DSR). However, it can only provide a couple of ...

Yang Liu; Ronggao Liu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train  

SciTech Connect

We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band ({delta}f/f{approx_equal}20% at f{approx_equal}0.5THz) transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. The bunch train is generated via a transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange technique. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

Piot, P.; Maxwell, T. J. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Accelerator Physics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Sun, Y.-E [Accelerator Physics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Thurman-Keup, R. [Accelerator Division, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Rihaoui, M. M. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States)

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Sensitivity of Latent Heat Flux to Changes in the Radiative Forcing: A Framework for Comparing Models and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climate model must include an accurate surface physics scheme in order to examine the interactions between the land and atmosphere. Given an increase in the surface radiative forcing, the sensitivity of latent heat flux to available energy ...

Jonathan M. Winter; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Short-Term Climate Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections from Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation. Part I: Simultaneous Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-inferred short-term climate variability and atmospheric teleconnections are studied using seven years (197481) of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) data from NOAA polar orbiters. This study utilizes composite, partition-of-variance and ...

Ka-Ming Lau; Paul H. Chan

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Short-Term Climate Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections from Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation. Part II: Lagged Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a sequel to Part I of this study, lagged relationships in atmospheric teleconnections associated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are investigated using Lagged Cross Correlations (LCC). The feasibility of extratropical seasonal-to-...

Ka-Ming Lau; Paul H. Chan

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Sensitivity of Latent Heat Flux to Changes in the Radiative Forcing: A Framework for Comparing Models and Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A climate model must include an accurate surface physics scheme in order to examine the interactions between the land and atmosphere. Given an increase in the surface radiative forcing, the sensitivity of latent heat flux ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

203

Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences with 100Gbps Network Applications Mehmet Balman, Eric Pouyoul, Yushu Yao, E. Wes Bethel Burlen Loring, Prabhat, John Shalf, Alex Sim, and Brian L. Tierney Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA {mbalman,epouyoul,yyao,ewbethel,bloring,prabhat,jshalf,asim,btierney}@lbl.gov ABSTRACT 100Gbps networking has finally arrived, and many research and educational institutions have begun to deploy 100Gbps routers and services. ESnet and Internet2 worked together to make 100Gbps networks available to researchers at the Supercomputing 2011 con- ference in Seattle Washington. In this paper, we describe two of the first applications to take advantage of this network. We demon- strate a visualization application that enables remotely located sci- entists to gain insights from large datasets. We also demonstrate climate

204

The Impact of NaH+ Exchange on Long-Term Borosilicate Glass Corrosion: Experiments and Field Observations  

SciTech Connect

New insights from laboratory experiments coupled with field observations indicate that pore water solutions that eventually breach containment materials in disposal systems will interact with sodium-excess borosilicate waste glass in an unexpected way. Because many glass waste forms are relatively sodium-rich, they are especially vulnerable to Na+H+ exchange (ion exchange or simply, IEX). Although the kinetics of this process has been previously investigated for early-stage glass reactions, the implications of IEX for long-term dissolution resistance have not yet been realized. Non-radioactive glass with major- and minor-element chemical compositions similar to Hanford high-Na waste glass were subjected to dissolution experiments to quantify the rates of matrix dissolution and IEX rates. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests quantified the IEX rate at 40C pH = 8 and silica saturation and showed a dependence upon the fraction of excess sodium in the glass. The equation for the rate (in moles of sodium released per meter squared per second) dependence on excess sodium is: log10rate[mol/(m2?s)] = 0.63R + (-11.0); r2 = 0.86 where R = molar Na+/?(M3+). Further, rates of Na release are slower by ?30% in D2O-based solutions compared to those in H2O. These results are the hallmark of IEX reactions. Our results are compared against those from a lysimeter field experiment consisting of glasses buried in Hanford sand and to dissolution experiments conducted with a Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) apparatus. These longer-term tests indicate an initial decrease in dissolution rate by a factor of 10, and then a constant steady-state rate thereafter. Thus, these data show that IEX reactions are important at near-saturation conditions and effectively prevent dissolution rates from falling below a minimum value. In sum, IEX modifies the long-term behavior of glass dissolution and models cannot assume that dissolution of Na-rich borosilicate glass will decrease by a factor of 100 to 1000, as argued for minerals and less sodic glasses.

Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Offshore Radiation Observations for Climate Research at the CERES Ocean Validation Experiment: A New Laboratory for Retrieval Algorithm Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When radiometers on satellites point toward Earth with the goal of sensing an important variable quantitatively, rather than just creating a pleasing image, the task at hand is often not simple. The electromagnetic energy detected by the ...

Charles K. Rutledge; Gregory L. Schuster; Thomas P. Charlock; Frederick M. Denn; William L. Smith Jr.; Bryan E. Fabbri; James J. Madigan Jr.; Robert J. Knapp

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Observed physical processes in mechanical tests of PBX9501 and recomendations for experiments to explore a possible plasticity/damage threshold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo discusses observations that have been made in regards to a series of monotonic and cyclic uniaxial experiments performed on PBX9501 by Darla Thompson under Enhanced Surveilance Campaign support. These observations discussed in Section Cyclic compression observations strongly suggest the presence of viscoelastic, plastic, and damage phenomena in the mechanical response of the material. In Secton Uniaxial data analysis and observations methods are discussed for separating out the viscoelastic effects. A crude application of those methods suggests the possibility of a critical stress below which plasticity and damage may be negligible. The threshold should be explored because if it exists it will be an important feature of any constitutive model. Additionally, if the threshold exists then modifications of experimental methods may be feasible which could potentially simplify future experiments or provide higher quality data from those experiments. A set of experiments to explore the threshold stress are proposed in Section Exploratory tests program for identifying threshold stress.

Buechler, Miles A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Impact of Covariance Localization for Radar Data on EnKF Analyses of a Developing MCS: Observing System Simulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) were performed to assess the impact of covariance localization of radar data on ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) analyses of a developing convective system. Simulated Weather Surveillance Radar-...

Ryan A. Sobash; David J. Stensrud

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

CRaTER: The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation Experiment on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) characterizes the radiation environment to be experienced by humans during future lunar missions. CRaTER measures the ...

Spence, H. E.

209

OBSERVATION OF TeV GAMMA RAYS FROM THE CYGNUS REGION WITH THE ARGO-YBJ EXPERIMENT  

SciTech Connect

We report the observation of TeV {gamma}-rays from the Cygnus region using the ARGO-YBJ data collected from 2007 November to 2011 August. Several TeV sources are located in this region including the two bright extended MGRO J2019+37 and MGRO J2031+41. According to the Milagro data set, at 20 TeV MGRO J2019+37 is the most significant source apart from the Crab Nebula. No signal from MGRO J2019+37 is detected by the ARGO-YBJ experiment, and the derived flux upper limits at the 90% confidence level for all the events above 600 GeV with medium energy of 3 TeV are lower than the Milagro flux, implying that the source might be variable and hard to be identified as a pulsar wind nebula. The only statistically significant (6.4 standard deviations) {gamma}-ray signal is found from MGRO J2031+41, with a flux consistent with the measurement by Milagro.

Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant'Angelo, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Bernardini, P.; Bleve, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita del Salento, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, Y. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, 100049 Beijing (China); Bolognino, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica dell'Universita di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Branchini, P.; Budano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Calabrese Melcarne, A. K. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-CNAF, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Camarri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Cardarelli, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Cattaneo, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Chen, T. L. [Tibet University, 850000 Lhasa, Xizang (China); Creti, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Cui, S. W. [Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016, Hebei (China); Dai, B. Z. [Yunnan University, 2 North Cuihu Road, 650091 Kunming, Yunnan (China); D'Ali Staiti, G., E-mail: chensz@ihep.ac.cn [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Discovery potential of xenon-based neutrinoless double beta decay experiments in light of small angular scale CMB observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has probed an expanded angular range of the CMB temperature power spectrum. Their recent analysis of the latest cosmological data prefers nonzero neutrino masses, mnu = 0.32+-0.11 eV. This result, if confirmed by the upcoming Planck data, has deep implications on the discovery of the nature of neutrinos. In particular, the values of the effective neutrino mass involved in neutrinoless double beta decay (bb0nu) are severely constrained for both the direct and inverse hierarchy, making a discovery much more likely. In this paper, we focus in xenon-based bb0nu experiments, on the double grounds of their good performance and the suitability of the technology to large-mass scaling. We show that the current generation, with effective masses in the range of 100 kg and conceivable exposures in the range of 500 kg year, could already have a sizable opportunity to observe bb0nu events, and their combined discovery potential is quite large. The next generation, with an exposure in the range of 10 ton year, would have a much more enhanced sensitivity, in particular due to the very low specific background that all the xenon technologies (liquid xenon, high-pressure xenon and xenon dissolved in liquid scintillator) can achieve. In addition, a high-pressure xenon gas TPC also features superb energy resolution. We show that such detector can fully explore the range of allowed effective Majorana masses, thus making a discovery very likely.

J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; J. Martin-Albo; J. Muoz Vidal; C. Pea-Garay

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

211

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

212

Effects of the Choice of Meteorological Data on a Radiation Model Simulation of the NOAA Technique for Estimating Outgoing Longwave Radiation from Satellite Radiance Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technique used by NOAA to estimate the outgoing longwave flux from 10 ?m window radiance observations has been reexamined because the data that result from the application of the empirically determined regression equation are systematically ...

Robert G. Ellingson; David J. Yanuk; Arnold Gruber

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Hubble diagrams of soft and hard radiation sources in the graviton background: to an apparent contradiction between supernova 1a and gamma-ray burst observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the sea of super-strong interacting gravitons, non-forehead collisions with gravitons deflect photons, and this deflection may differ for soft and hard radiations. As a result, the Hubble diagram would not be a universal function and it will have a different view for such sources as supernovae in visible light and gamma-ray bursts. Observations of these two kinds are compared here with the limit cases of the Hubble diagram.

Michael A. Ivanov

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

214

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part 1: Openness in Government Part 1: Openness in Government Part 1: Openness in Government ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Overview Throughout our nation's history, the government has needed to operate with some secrecy to protect our nation's security. At the same time, Americans have recognized that the government's power to act in secret conflicts with core democratic principles. Misuse of secrecy feeds a sense of mistrust in government that can undermine our cohesion as a nation. During the Cold War, the government funded human radiation experiments, some of which were secret. It is imperative that the public have access to the record of the government's activities. The

215

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 15 September 1990--25 April 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of our group to meet our stated objectives. The report is divided into sections entitled: Radiation Model Testing Activities, General Circulation Model Testing Activities, Science Team Activities, and Publications, Presentations and Meetings. The section on Science Team Activities summarizes our participation with the science team to further advance the observation and modeling programs. Appendix A lists graduate students supported, and post-doctoral appointments during the project. Reports on the activities during each of the first two years are included as Appendix B. Significant progress has been made in: determining the ability of line-by-line radiation models to calculate the downward longwave flux at the surface; determining the uncertainties in calculated the downwelling radiance and flux at the surface associated with the use of different proposed profiling techniques; intercomparing clear-sky radiance and flux observations with calculations from radiation codes from different climate models; determining the uncertainties associated with estimating N* from surface longwave flux observations; and determining the sensitivity of model calculations to different formulations of the effects of finite sized clouds.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

THE PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION MODEL FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: INTERPRETING FOUR OBSERVED CORRELATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the empirical E{sub p}-L, {Gamma}-L, E{sub p}-{Gamma}, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}}-E{sub p} correlations (where L is the time-averaged luminosity of the prompt emission, E{sub p} is the spectral peak energy, {Gamma} is the bulk Lorentz factor, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}} is the emission efficiency of gamma-ray bursts, GRBs) are well consistent with the relations between the analogous parameters predicted in the photospheric radiation model of the prompt emission of GRBs. The time-resolved thermal radiation of GRB 090902B does follow the E{sub p}-L and {Gamma}-L correlations. A reliable interpretation of the four correlations in alternative models is still lacking. These may point toward a photospheric origin of prompt emission of some GRBs.

Fan Yizhong; Wei Daming; Zhang Fuwen [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Binbin, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: bbzhang@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION-MEDIATED SHOCKS IN THE PROMPT PHASE OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

A shock that forms below the photosphere of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow is mediated by Compton scattering of radiation advected into the shock by the upstream fluid. The characteristic scale of such a shock, a few Thomson depths, is larger than any kinetic scale involved by several orders of magnitude. Hence, unlike collisionless shocks, radiation-mediated shocks cannot accelerate particles to nonthermal energies. The spectrum emitted by a shock that emerges from the photosphere of a GRB jet reflects the temperature profile downstream of the shock, with a possible contribution at the highest energies from the shock transition layer itself. We study the properties of radiation-mediated shocks that form during the prompt phase of GRBs and compute the time-integrated spectrum emitted by the shocked fluid following shock breakout. We show that the time-integrated emission from a single shock exhibits a prominent thermal peak, with the location of the peak depending on the shock velocity profile. We also point out that multiple shock emission can produce a spectrum that mimics a Band spectrum.

Levinson, Amir, E-mail: Levinson@wise.tau.ac.il [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Dosimetry experiments at the MEDUSA Facility (Little Mountain).  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments on the MEDUSA linear accelerator radiation test facility were performed to evaluate the difference in dose measured using different methods. Significant differences in dosimeter-measured radiation dose were observed for the different dosimeter types for the same radiation environments, and the results are compared and discussed in this report.

Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Shaneyfelt, Marty Ray; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Schwank, James Ralph

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Parameter Sweep Experiments on Spontaneous Gravity Wave Radiation from Unsteady Rotational Flow in an f-Plane Shallow Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inertial gravity wave radiation from an unsteady rotational flow (spontaneous radiation) is investigated numerically in an f-plane shallow water system for a wide range of Rossby numbers, 1 ? Ro ? 1000, and Froude numbers, 0.1 ? Fr ? 0.8. A ...

Norihiko Sugimoto; Keiichi Ishioka; Katsuya Ishii

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evaluation and Intercomparison of Cloud Fraction and Radiative Fluxes in Recent Reanalyses over the Arctic Using BSRN Surface Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With continual advancements in data assimilation systems, new observing systems, and improvements in model parameterizations, several new atmospheric reanalysis datasets have recently become available. Before using these new reanalyses it is ...

Behnjamin J. Zib; Xiquan Dong; Baike Xi; Aaron Kennedy

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Climatology of Surface Meteorology, Surface Fluxes, Cloud Fraction, and Radiative Forcing over the Southeast Pacific from Buoy Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 5-yr climatology of the meteorology, including boundary layer cloudiness, for the southeast Pacific region is presented using observations from a buoy located at 20S, 85W. The sea surface temperature and surface air temperature exhibit a ...

Virendra P. Ghate; Bruce A. Albrecht; Christopher W. Fairall; Robert A. Weller

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

An Algorithm for the Constraining of Radiative Transfer Calculations to CERES-Observed Broadband Top-of-Atmosphere Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASAs Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) project is responsible for operation and data processing of observations from scanning radiometers on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Terra, Aqua, and Suomi National ...

Fred G. Rose; David A. Rutan; Thomas Charlock; G. Louis Smith; Seiji Kato

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Comparison of Radiation Budget at the TOA and Surface in the Antarctic from ERBE and Ground Surface Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the surface were compared at two Antarctic stations, Syowa and the South Pole, using Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data and surface observations. Fluxes at both sites were plotted ...

Takashi Yamanouchi; Thomas P. Charlock

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Retrieval of Aerosol Scattering and Absorption Properties from Photopolarimetric Observations over the Ocean during the CLAMS Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extensive set of measurements performed during the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) experiment provides a unique opportunity to evaluate aerosol retrievals over the ocean from multiangle, multispectral ...

Jacek Chowdhary; Brian Cairns; Michael I. Mishchenko; Peter V. Hobbs; Glenn F. Cota; Jens Redemann; Ken Rutledge; Brent N. Holben; Ed Russell

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Precipitation Features Observed by Doppler Radar at Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories, Canada, during the Beaufort and Arctic Storms Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the fall of 1994, the Beaufort and Arctic Storms Experiment (BASE) was held to collect information on the structure and evolution of mesoscale weather systems over the southern Beaufort Sea and the Mackenzie River delta of the western Canadian ...

Yoshio Asuma; Soshi Iwata; Katsuhiro Kikuchi; G. W. Kent Moore; Ryuji Kimura; Kazuhisa Tsuboki

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Relationship between Ice Water Path and Downward Longwave Radiation for Clouds Optically Thin in the Infrared: Observations and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertically pointing 3.2-cm radar is used to observe altostratus and cirrus clouds as they pass overhead. Radar reflectivities are used in combination with an empirical Zi-IWC (ice water content) relationship developed by Sassen (1987) to ...

Taneil Uttal; Sergey Y. Matrosov; Jack B. Snider; Robert A. Kropfli

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Study of Horizontally Oriented Ice Crystals with CALIPSO Observations and Comparison with Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Horizontally Oriented Ice Crystals with CALIPSO Observations and Comparison with Monte oriented ice crystals (HOIC) occur frequently in both ice and mixed-phase clouds. When compared with the case for clouds consisting of randomly oriented ice crystals (ROIC), lidar measurements from clouds

Baum, Bryan A.

228

Numerical Forecasting of Radiation Fog. Part II: A Comparison of Model Simulation with Several Observed Fog Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1D model adapted for forecasting the formation and development of fog, and forced with mesoscale parameters derived from a 3D limited-area model, was used to simulate three fog event observations made during the Lille 88 campaign. The model ...

Daniel Guedalia; Thierry Bergot

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Cloud Cover over the South Pole from Visual Observations, Satellite Retrievals, and Surface-Based Infrared Radiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of cloud cover over the South Pole are presented from five different data sources: routine visual observations (19572004; Cvis), surface-based spectral infrared (IR) data (2001; CPAERI), surface-based broadband IR data (19942003; Cpyr)...

Michael S. Town; Von P. Walden; Stephen G. Warren

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A Tropical Squall Line Observed during the COPT 81 Experiment in West Africa. Part 1: Kinematic Structure Inferred from Dual-Doppler Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the analysis of a tropical squall line, observed on 22 June 1981 during the COPT 81 (Convection Profonde Tropicale) experiment. The present Part I is restricted to the study of the kinematic structure of the system, which ...

Michel Chong; Paul Amayenc; Georges Scialom; Jacques Testud

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves hematologic toxicity in particular. Although the long-term efficacy of current treatment options remains disappointing, the improved therapeutic index of IMRT may aid in generalizing its use and allowing the addition of novel approaches such as intraperitoneal immunotherapy.

Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

AirSea Exchange in Hurricanes: Synthesis of Observations from the Coupled Boundary Layer AirSea Transfer Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coupled Boundary Layer AirSea Transfer (CBLAST) field program, conducted from 2002 to 2004, has provided a wealth of new airsea interaction observations in hurricanes. The wind speed range for which turbulent momentum and moisture exchange ...

Peter G. Black; Eric A. D'Asaro; Thomas B. Sanford; William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Jeffrey R. French; Pearn P. Niiler; Eric J. Terrill; Edward J. Walsh

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Estimating the Wind Field from Chemical Constituent Observations: Experiments with a One-Dimensional Extended Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern data assimilation algorithms such as the four-dimensional variational algorithm or the extended Kalman filter (EKF) can, in theory, estimate the wind field from chemical constituent observations. This seems to be possible because of the ...

Roger Daley

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Numerical Study of Stratospheric Gravity Waves Triggered by Squall Lines Observed during the TOGA COARE and COPT-81 Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3D mesoscale model is used to study the structure and intensity of stratospheric gravity waves generated by tropical convection. Two prototypical cases are examined: a squall line observed during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled ...

C. Piani; D. R. Durran

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Assimilation of Circumpolar Wind Vectors Derived from Highly Elliptical Orbit Imagery: Impact Assessment Based on Observing System Simulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a well-recognized spatiotemporal meteorological observation gap at latitudes higher than 55, especially in the region 5570. A possible solution to address this issue is a constellation of four satellites in a highly elliptical orbit (...

L. Garand; J. Feng; S. Heilliette; Y. Rochon; A. P. Trishchenko

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Assimilation of circumpolar wind vectors derived from highly elliptical orbit imagery: impact assessment based on observing system simulation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a well recognized spatio-temporal meteorological observation gap at latitudes higher than 55, especially in the region 55-70. A possible solution to address this issue is a constellation of four satellites in a highly elliptical orbit (...

L. Garand; J. Feng; S. Heilliette; Y. Rochon; A. P. Trishchenko

237

IN-PILE RADIATION CORROSION EXPERIMENTS WITH ZIRCONIUM, TITANIUM, AND STEEL ALLOYS IN 0.17 m UO$sub 2$SO$sub 4$ SOLUTIONS AT 280 C  

SciTech Connect

In-pile loop experiments L-2-15 and L-4-16 were designed to test the radiation corrosion of Zircaloy-2 and other possible reactor construction materials in UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions. The solutions employed were 0.17 m UO/ sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.015 m CuSO/sub 4/, and 0.03 m H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/O for experiment L-2-15, and 0.17 m UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.015 m CuSO/sub 4/, and 0.025 m H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/O for experiment L-4-16. The mainstream temperature in the experiments ranged from 278 to 280 deg C. Construction material for the loops was type 347 stainless steel. Specimens of types 347 and 309SCb stainless steels titanium-55A and -110AT, platinum, Zircaloy-2, crystalbar zirconium, and a variety of other zirconium alloys were tested. The power density at core specimens ranged from 19.8 to 4.6 w/ml in L-2-15 and from 5.7 to 1.3 w/ml in L-4-16. For loop L-2-15, the total time of hightemperature operation with UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ was 792 hr, during in-pile exposure, and the reactor energy was 1632 Mwh; for loop L-4-16, 1032 hr and 2325 Mwh. During both experiments most of the reactor energy was accumulated at 3-Mw power level. In general, stainless steel corrosion results from these experiments were comparable to those observed in other in-pile loop experiments. Corrosion was confined primarily to the core areas and was power-density dependent. Some variations in attack, both positive and negative, with velocity of solution flow past specimens have been observed in other experiments, but there was no apparent effect of varying velocities in the range 10 to 40 fps on either the core-channel or in- line channel specimens in the present experiments. The coreannulus steel specimens in L-2-15 corroded at rates very much greater than those in the channel. This difference may have resulted, in part, from the differences in velocities, however, it may have also been a result of galvanic actton between the steel annulus specimens and adjacent platinum specimens. In previous 250 deg C experiments the occurrence of a change in the stainless steel corrosion rate was correlated with a decrease in acidity and/or increase in the nickel concentration. The results for the oxygen consumption rates on steel during radiation exposure in the present experiments varied with radiation time in a manner qualitatively similar to that observed at the lower temperature. However, the concentration of excess acid in the present experiments probably remained fairly constant throughout the radiation exposures, and correlations similar to those obtained at the lower temperature could not be established. The acid concentration in the 280 deg C experiments was greater than the concentrations prevailing when corrosion rate changes occurred in the 250 deg C experiments. The difference in acid tolerance is probably a result of the increased temperature, since a similar beneficial effect of temperature occurs out-ofpile No overall correlation has been established for the various factors found to have influenced steel corrosion in previous experiments. Results of the present experiments provide additional evidence in support of previous findings but do not further their interpretation. Zircaloy-2 corrosion results from both loops have been discussed and correlated elsewhere in terms of the 280 deg C relationship between the corrosion rate R (mils per year, mpy), power density P (w/ml), and uranium sorption factor alpha : 1/R = 2.23/P alpha + 1/40. The data from these experiments obey this relationship. (This is only a portion of the Author abstract.)

Jenks, G.H.; Baker, J.E.

1963-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEYS AND LABORATORY ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS. IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK EVALUATION AND DECISION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Bomb survivors 1950-1974. Mortality Experience of L i f e Span Study Reportatomic bomb survivor studies). Furthermore, the 1980 BEIR-III Report [

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ISEE-1 observations in the magnetosphere of VLF emissions triggered by nonducted coherent VLF waves during VLF wave-injection experiments  

SciTech Connect

It is noted that recent data from the ISEE-1 spacecraft indicate that VLF emissions triggered by nonducted coherent VLF waves often possess spectral characteristics markedly different from those of emissions triggered by ducted waves. Emission triggering by nonducted waves is found to involve a strong path selectiveness. It is also established that emission triggering by nonducted waves can take place over a wide L-range and may involve inner radiation belt particles of energy up to 200 keV. It is concluded that the VLF emission generation process can occur under much more general conditions than previously believed on the basis of the results of ground-to-ground wave-injection experiments.

Bell, T.F.; Inan, U.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part 3: Righting Past Wrongs Part 3: Righting Past Wrongs Part 3: Righting Past Wrongs ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Overview The ACHRE report reviewed in detail several case studies of government-supported human radiation research including: the injections of plutonium into 18 hospital patients during and after World War II, research with prisoners, and research on patients who were exposed to total body irradiation in clinical settings. The Advisory Committee also considered issues related to certain radiation exposures associated with government activities that the Advisory Committee concluded should not be considered "human

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Galactic Synchrotron Radiation at 33 GHz NOIiWNPQaa s x s sthe Cosmic Background Radiation Philip Michael Lubin Spacethe Cosmic Background Radiation. The ground-based experiment

Lubin, Philip Lubin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Full-Time, Eye-Safe Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Observation at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Sites: Instruments and Data Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric radiative forcing, surface radiation budget, and top-of-the-atmosphere radiance interpretation involve knowledge of the vertical height structure of overlying cloud and aerosol layers. During the last decade, the U.S. Department of ...

James R. Campbell; Dennis L. Hlavka; Ellsworth J. Welton; Connor J. Flynn; David D. Turner; James D. Spinhirne; V. Stanley Scott III; I. H. Hwang

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

NEW Fe IX LINE IDENTIFICATIONS USING SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY/SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET MEASUREMENT OF EMITTED RADIATION AND HINODE/EIS JOINT OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we study joint observations of Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation of Fe IX lines emitted by the same level of the high energy configuration 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 5}4p. The intensity ratios of these lines are dependent on atomic physics parameters only and not on the physical parameters of the emitting plasma, so that they are excellent tools to verify the relative intensity calibration of high-resolution spectrometers that work in the 170-200 A and 700-850 A wavelength ranges. We carry out extensive atomic physics calculations to improve the accuracy of the predicted intensity ratio, and compare the results with simultaneous EIS-SUMER observations of an off-disk quiet Sun region. We were able to identify two ultraviolet lines in the SUMER spectrum that are emitted by the same level that emits one bright line in the EIS wavelength range. Comparison between predicted and measured intensity ratios, wavelengths and energy separation of Fe IX levels confirms the identifications we make. Blending and calibration uncertainties are discussed. The results of this work are important for cross-calibrating EIS and SUMER, as well as future instrumentation.

Landi, E.; Young, P. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Personal Experience Reducing Radiation Exposures: Protecting Family in Kiev during the First Two Weeks after Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect

The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident occurred in 1986. The plume from the explosions and fires was highly radioactive and resulted in very high exposure levels in the surrounding regions. This paper describes how the people in Kiev, Ukraine, a city 90 miles (120 km) south of Chernobyl, and in particular one individual in that city, Professor Vitaly Eremenko, became aware of the threat before the official announcement and the steps he took to mitigate potential impacts to his immediate family. The combination of being informed and using available resources led to greatly reduced consequences for his family and, in particular, his newborn granddaughter. He notes how quickly word of some aspects of the hazard spread in the city and how other aspects appear to not have been understood. Although these events are being recalled as the 20th anniversary of the terrible event approaches, the lessons are still pertinent today. Threats of possible terrorist use of radiation dispersal devices makes knowledge of effective individual actions for self-protection from radiation exposures a topic of current interest.

Eremenko, Vitaly A.; Droppo, James G.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

EXPERIENCE MONITORING FOR LOW LEVEL NEUTRON RADIATION AT THE H-CANYON AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy contractors are required to monitor external occupational radiation exposure of an individual likely to receive an effective dose equivalent to the whole body of 0.1 rem (0.001sievert) or more in a year. For a working year of 2000 hours, this translates to a dose rate of 0.05 mrem/hr (0.5 {micro}Sv/hr). This can be a challenging requirement for neutron exposure because traditional surveys with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters are difficult to conduct, particularly at low dose rates. A modified survey method was used at the Savannah River Site to find low dose rates in excess of 0.05 mrem/hr. An unshielded He{sup 3} detector was used to find elevated gross slow neutron counts. Areas with high count rates on the unshielded He{sup 3} detector were further investigated with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters and thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters were placed in the area of interest. An office area was investigated with this method. The data initially suggested that whole body neutron dose rates to office workers could be occurring at levels significantly higher than 0.1 rem (0.001sievert). The final evaluation, however, showed that the office workers were exposed to less than 0.1 rem/yr (0.001sievert/yr) of neutron radiation.

HOGUE, MARK

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

EOS Terra Aerosol and Radiative Flux Validation: An Overview of the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA developed an Earth Observing System (EOS) to study global change and reduce uncertainties associated with aerosols and other key parameters controlling climate. The first EOS satellite, Terra, was launched in December 1999. The Chesapeake ...

W. L. Smith Jr.; T. P. Charlock; R. Kahn; J. V. Martins; L. A. Remer; P. V. Hobbs; J. Redemann; C. K. Rutledge

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

ANITA collaboration; P. W. Gorham; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; D. Z. Besson; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

248

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

SciTech Connect

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

Gorham, P.W.

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

249

On the Observed Near Cancellation between Longwave and Shortwave Cloud Forcing in Tropical Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations based on Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) satellite data indicate that there is a near cancellation between tropical longwave and shortwave cloud forcing in regions of deep convective activity. Cloud forcing depends on both ...

J. T. Kiehl

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Observed dependence of the water vapor and clear-sky greenhouse effect on sea surface temperature: Comparison with climate warming experiments  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a comparison of the water vapor and clear-sky greenhouse effect dependence on sea surface temperature for climate variations of different types. Firstly, coincident satellite observations and meteorological analyses are used to examine seasonal and interannual variations and to evaluate the performance of a general circulation model. Then, this model is used to compare the results inferred from the analysis of observed climate variability with those derived from global climate warming experiments. One part of the coupling between the surface temperature, the water vapor and the clear-sky greenhouse effect is explained by the dependence of the saturation water vapor pressure on the atmospheric temperature. However, the analysis of observed and simulated fields shows that the coupling is very different according to the type of region under consideration and the type of climate forcing that is applied to the Earth-atmosphere system. This difference, due to the variability of the vertical structure of the atmosphere, is analyzed in detail by considering the temperature lapse rate and the vertical profile of relative humidity. Our results suggest that extrapolating the feedbacks inferred from seasonal and short-term interannual climate variability to longer-term climate changes requires great caution. It is argued that our confidence in climate models` predictions would be increased significantly if the basic physical processes that govern the variability of the vertical structure of the atmosphere, and its relation to the large-scale circulation, were better understood and simulated. For this purpose, combined observational and numerical studies focusing on physical processes are needed. 44 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Bony, S.; Le Treut, H. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France); Duvel, J.P. [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Obtaining Best Estimates for the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Tropical Ice Clouds from TWP-ICE In Situ Microphysical Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Best estimates of the bulk microphysical and radiative properties (ice water content, visible extinction, effective radius, and total concentration) are derived for three case studies of tropical ice clouds sampled during the Tropical Warm Pool ...

A. Protat; G. M. McFarquhar; J. Um; J. Delano

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Observations of the Infrared Radiative Properties of the OceanImplications for the Measurement of Sea Surface Temperature via Satellite Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) was used to measure the infrared radiative properties and the temperature of the Gulf of Mexico during a 5-day oceanographic cruise in January 1995. The ocean skin temperature was measured ...

William L. Smith; R. O. Knuteson; H. E. Revercomb; W. Feltz; N. R. Nalli; H. B. Howell; W. P. Menzel; Otis Brown; James Brown; Peter Minnett; Walter McKeown

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Temporal Variations of Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation over the Winter Monsoon Region. Part II: Short-Period (46 Day) Oscillations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Empirical orthogonal function analysis was applied to outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data over three limited regions during the three winters of 197475, 197576 and 197677. Regional composite maps were constructed by truncating the ...

Takio Murakami

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Turbulence and Radiation in Stratocumulus Topped Marine Boundary Layers: A Case Study from VOCALS-REx  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations made during a 24 hour period as part of the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) are analyzed to study the radiation and turbulence associated with stratocumulus topped marine boundary layer (BL). ...

Virendra P. Ghate; Bruce A. Albrecht; Mark A. Miller; Alan Brewer; Christopher W. Fairall

258

Effect of Increasing Experience on Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes in the Management of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the impact of increasing experience with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Methods and Materials: The records of all patients who received IMRT following EPP at Duke University Medical Center between 2005 and 2010 were reviewed. Target volumes included the preoperative extent of the pleural space, chest wall incisions, involved nodal stations, and a boost to close/positive surgical margins if applicable. Patients were typically treated with 9-11 beams with gantry angles, collimator rotations, and beam apertures manually fixed to avoid the contalateral lung and to optimize target coverage. Toxicity was graded retrospectively using National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria version 4.0. Target coverage and contralateral lung irradiation were evaluated over time by using linear regression. Local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Thirty patients received IMRT following EPP; 21 patients also received systemic chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 15 months. The median dose prescribed to the entire ipsilateral hemithorax was 45 Gy (range, 40-50.4 Gy) with a boost of 8-25 Gy in 9 patients. Median survival was 23.2 months. Two-year local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were 47%, 34%, and 50%, respectively. Increasing experience planning MPM cases was associated with improved coverage of planning target volumes (P=.04). Similarly, mean lung dose (P<.01) and lung V5 (volume receiving 5 Gy or more; P<.01) values decreased with increasing experience. Lung toxicity developed after IMRT in 4 (13%) patients at a median of 2.2 months after RT (three grade 3-4 and one grade 5). Lung toxicity developed in 4 of the initial 15 patients vs none of the last 15 patients treated. Conclusions: With increasing experience, target volume coverage improved and dose to the contralateral lung decreased. Rates of pulmonary toxicity were relatively low. However, both local and distant control rates remained suboptimal.

Patel, Pretesh R., E-mail: patel073@mc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Center Biostatistics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Miles, Edward F. [Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth, Virginia (United States); D'Amico, Thomas A.; Harpole, David [Department of Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radiation Response of Nano-scale Gold Foams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our recent experiments and computer simulations focus on the radiation and mechanical response of nanoporous gold (NPG). Radiation tolerance was...

260

An investigation of the Goshen County, Wyoming, tornadic supercell of 5 June 2009 using EnKF assimilation of mobile mesonet and radar observations collected during VORTEX2. Part I: Experiment design and verification of the EnKF analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution Doppler radar velocities and in situ surface observations collected in a tornadic supercell on 5 June 2009 during the second Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX2) are assimilated into a simulated ...

James Marquis; Yvette Richardson; Paul Markowski; David Dowell; Joshua Wurman; Karen Kosiba; Paul Robinson; Glen Romine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Relation of Near-Inertial Motions Observed in the Mixed layer During the JASIN (1978) Experiment to the Local Wind Stress and to the Quasi-Geostrophic Flow Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oscillations with near-inertial frequencies were an energetic component of the upper ocean velocity field observed at each of two moorings separated by 44 km during the Joint Air Sea INteraction (JASIN) experiment during the late summer of 1978. ...

Robert A. Weller

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Airborne Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the airborne data collected during the 2002 and 2003 Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). These data include gamma radiation observations, multi- and hyperspectral optical imaging, optical altimetry, and passive and active ...

Don Cline; Simon Yueh; Bruce Chapman; Boba Stankov; Al Gasiewski; Dallas Masters; Kelly Elder; Richard Kelly; Thomas H. Painter; Steve Miller; Steve Katzberg; Larry Mahrt

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

USE OF COHERENT TRANSITION RADIATION TO SET UP THE APS RF THERMIONIC GUN TO PRODUCE HIGH-BRIGHTNESS BEAMS FOR SASE FEL EXPERIMENTS ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe use of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) rf thermionic gun [1], alpha-magnet beamline, and linac [2] to produce a stable high-brightness beam in excess of 100 amperes peak current with normalized emittance of 10 ? mm-mrad. To obtain peak currents greater than 100 amperes, the rf gun system must be tuned to produce a FWHM bunch length on the order of 350 fs. Bunch lengths this short are measured using coherent transition radiation (CTR) produced when the rf gun beam, accelerated to 40 MeV, strikes a metal foil. The CTR is detected using a Golay detector attached to one arm of a Michelson interferometer. The alpha-magnet current and gun rf phase are adjusted so as to maximize the CTR signal at the Golay detector, which corresponds to the minimum bunch length. The interferometer is used to measure the autocorrelation of the CTR. The minimum phase approximation [3] is used to derive the bunch profile from the autocorrelation. The high-brightness beam is accelerated to 217 MeV and used to produce self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in five APS undulators installed in the Low- Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) experiment hall [4]. Initial optical measurements showed a gain length of 1.3 m at 530 nm. 1

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Retrieval of Ice Cloud Properties from AIRS and MODIS Observations Based on a Fast High-Spectral-Resolution Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally efficient high-spectral-resolution cloudy-sky radiative transfer model (HRTM) in the thermal infrared region (7001300 cm?1, 0.1 cm?1 spectral resolution) is advanced for simulating the upwelling radiance at the top of atmosphere ...

Chenxi Wang; Ping Yang; Steven Platnick; Andrew K. Heidinger; Bryan A. Baum; Thomas Greenwald; Zhibo Zhang; Robert E. Holz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

266

Radiation Inspection System Lab (RISL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Inspection System Lab May 30, 2013 This team has the background and experience to test and optimize radiation detection systems from handheld background survey meters to...

267

GFDL ARM Project Technical Report: Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Cloud and Convection Parameterizations & Cloud-Convection-Radiation Interactions in the GFDL Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly summarizes the progress made by ARM postdoctoral fellow, Yanluan Lin, at GFDL during the period from October 2008 to present. Several ARM datasets have been used for GFDL model evaluation, understanding, and improvement. This includes a new ice fall speed parameterization with riming impact and its test in GFDL AM3, evaluation of model cloud and radiation diurnal and seasonal variation using ARM CMBE data, model ice water content evaluation using ARM cirrus data, and coordination of the TWPICE global model intercomparison. The work illustrates the potential and importance of ARM data for GCM evaluation, understanding, and ultimately, improvement of GCM cloud and radiation parameterizations. Future work includes evaluation and improvement of the new dynamicsPDF cloud scheme and aerosol activation in the GFDL model.

V. Ramaswamy; L. J. Donner; J-C. Golaz; S. A. Klein

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

Lidar Network Observations of Cirrus Morphological and Scattering Properties during the International Cirrus Experiment 1989: The 18 October 1989 Case Study and Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four lidars located roughly 75 km from each other in the inner German Bight of the North Sea, were used to measure geometrical and optical properties of cirrus clouds during the International Cirrus Experiment 1989 (ICE '89). A complete cirrus ...

Albert Ansmann; Jens Bsenberg; Grard Brogniez; Salem Elouragini; Pierre H. Flamant; Karlheinz Klapheck; Holger Linn; Louis Menenger; Walfried Michaelis; Maren Riebesell; Christoph Senff; Pierre-Yves Thro; Ulla Wandinger; Claus Weitkamp

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Intercomparison of Variational Data Assimilation and the Ensemble Kalman Filter for Global Deterministic NWP. Part I: Description and Single-Observation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intercomparison of the Environment Canada variational and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation systems is presented in the context of global deterministic NWP. In an EnKF experiment having the same spatial resolution as the inner ...

Mark Buehner; P. L. Houtekamer; Cecilien Charette; Herschel L. Mitchell; Bin He

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Radiation Budgets in the Western Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usefulness of the radiances measured by operational satellites in deriving radiation budgets is demonstrated by comparing the model calculations with the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) fluxes. The radiation budgets in the atmosphere ...

Mino-Dah Chou

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Spatial Variability of Outgoing Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment scanning radiometer aboard the NOAA-9 operational meteorological satellite are used to investigate the spatial variability of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). Daily and monthly radiation maps at ...

G. Louis Smith; David Rutan

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.; Schuch, R.L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Estimating Clear-Sky Regional Surface Fluxes in the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site with Ground Measurements and Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compared methods for estimating surface fluxes under clear-sky conditions over a large heterogeneous area from a limited number of ground measurements and from satellite observations using data obtained from the southern Great Plains ...

W. Gao; R. L. Coulter; B. M. Lesht; J. Qiu; M. L. Wesely

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hydrologic data assimilation with a hillslope-scale-resolving model and L band radar observations: Synthetic experiments with the ensemble Kalman filter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Soil moisture information is critical for applications like landslide susceptibility analysis and military trafficability assessment. Existing technologies cannot observe soil moisture at spatial scales of hillslopes ...

Flores, Alejandro N.

275

Does an accelerated electron radiate Unruh radiation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerated particle sees the Minkowski vacuum as thermally excited, and the particle moves stochastically due to an interaction with the thermal bath. This interaction fluctuates the particle's transverse momenta like the Brownian motion in a heat bath. Because of this fluctuating motion, it has been discussed that the accelerated charged particle emits extra radiation (the Unruh radiation) in addition to the classical Larmor radiation, and experiments are under planning to detect such radiation by using ultrahigh intensity lasers constructed in near future. There are, however, counterarguments that the radiation is canceled by an interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the fluctuating motion. In fact, in the case of an internal detector where the Heisenberg equation of motion can be solved exactly, there is no additional radiation after the thermalization is completed. In this paper, we revisit the issue in the case of an accelerated charged particle in the scalar QED. We first prove the e...

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Global 4DVAR Assimilation and Forecast Experiments Using AMSU Observations over Land. Part I: Impacts of Various Land Surface Emissivity Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the assimilation of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A and -B (AMSU-A and -B) observations over land, three methods, based either on an estimation of the land emissivity or the land skin temperature directly from satellite observations,...

Fatima Karbou; Elisabeth Grard; Florence Rabier

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Determination of the Optical Thickness and Effective Particle Radius of Clouds from Reflected Solar Radiation Measurements. Part II: Marine Stratocumulus Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multispectral scanning radiometer has been used to obtain measurements of the reflection function of marine stratocumulus clouds at 0.75, 1.65 and 2.16 ?m. These observations were obtained from the NASA ER-2 aircraft as part of the First ISCCP [...

Teruyuki Nakajima; Michael D. King; James D. Spinhirne; Lawrence F. Radke

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Effect of Topographic Variability on Initial Condition Sensitivity of Low-Level Wind Forecasts. Part II: Experiments Using Real Terrain and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study by Bieringer et al., which is Part I of this two-part study, demonstrated analytically using the shallow-water equations and numerically in controlled experiments that the presence of terrain can result in an enhancement of sensitivities ...

Paul E. Bieringer; Peter S. Ray; Andrew J. Annunzio

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Comparison between Dual-Doppler and EnKF Storm-Scale Wind Analyses: Observing System Simulation Experiments with a Supercell Thunderstorm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinematical analyses of mobile radar observations are critical to advancing the understanding of supercell thunderstorms. Maximizing the accuracy of these and subsequent dynamical analyses, and appropriately characterizing the uncertainty in ...

Corey K. Potvin; Louis J. Wicker

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Meridional and Seasonal Structures of the Mixed-Layer Depth and its Diurnal Amplitude Observed during the Hawaii-to-Tahiti Shuttle Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the meridional and seasonal structures of daily mean mixed-layer depth and its diurnal amplitude and their relation to atmospheric fluxes by compositing mixed-layer depth estimates derived from density observations. The diurnal mean ...

Niklas Schneider; Peter Mller

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

282

Stress control of seismicity patterns observed during hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill hot dry rock geothermal energy site, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seismicity accompanying hydraulic injections into granitic rock is often diffuse rather than falling along a single plane. This diffuse zone of seismicity cannot be attributed to systematic errors in locations of the events. It has often been asserted that seismicity occurs along preexisting joints in the rock that are favorably aligned with the stress field so that slip can occur along them when effective stress is reduced by increasing pore fluid pressure. A new scheme for determining orientations and locations of planes along which the microearthquakes occurred was recently developed. The basic assumption of the method, called the three point method, is that many of the events fall along well defined planes; these planes are often difficult to identify visually in the data because planes of many orientations are present. The method has been applied to four hydraulic fracturing experiments conducted at Fenton Hill as part of a hot dry rock geothermal energy project. While multiple planes are found for each experiment; one plane is common to all experiments. The ratio of shear to normal stress along planes of all orientations is calculated using a best estimate of the current stress state at Fenton Hill. The plane common to all experiments has the highest ratio of shear to normal stress acting along it, so it is the plane most likely to slip. The other planes found by the three point method all have orientations with respect to current principal stresses that are favorable for slip to occur along preexisting planes of weakness. These results are consistent with the assertion that the rock contains pre-existing joints which slip when the effective stress is reduced by the increased pore fluid pressure accompanying the hydraulic injection. Microearthquakes occur along those planes that are favorably aligned with respect to the current stress field.

Fehler, M.C.

1987-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

283

Estimation and Model Validation of Surface Solar Radiation and Cloud Radiative Forcing Using TOGA COARE Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled OceanAtmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) radiation measurements in the western Pacific warm pool are used to estimate surface solar radiation budgets and to validate radiation model ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Wenzhong Zhao

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

An Indirect Effect of Ice Nuclei on Atmospheric Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with observed large-scale forcing is used to study how ice nuclei (IN) affect the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In all the numerical experiments carried out, the cloud ice ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Minghua Zhang; Arthur Y. Hou; Shaocheng Xie; Stephen Lang; Xiaowen Li; David OC. Starr; Xiaofan Li; Joanne Simpson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Global 4DVAR Assimilation and Forecast Experiments Using AMSU Observations over Land. Part II: Impacts of Assimilating Surface-Sensitive Channels on the African Monsoon during AMMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A and -B (AMSU-A and -B) have been more intensively used over sea than over land because of large uncertainties about the land surface emissivity and the skin temperature. Several methods based ...

Fatima Karbou; Florence Rabier; Jean-Philippe Lafore; Jean-Luc Redelsperger; Olivier Bock

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Wavelength Dependence of the Absorption of Black Carbon Particles: Predictions and Results from the TARFOX Experiment and Implications for the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements are presented of the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption coefficient taken during the Tropical Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) over the northern Atlantic. The data show an approximate ??1 ...

Robert W. Bergstrom; Philip B. Russell; Phillip Hignett

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

288

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

289

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered 'excellent', 33% 'good', and =}16 Gy, breast size >900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a 'fair/poor' cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with 'fair/poor' physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported 'excellent', 'good', and 'fair/poor' cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with 'fair/poor' outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose {>=}16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy. Conclusions: Whole-breast IMRT is associated with very low rates of local recurrence at 5 years, 83%-98% 'good/excellent' cosmetic outcomes, and minimal chronic toxicity, including late fibrosis.

Keller, Lanea M.M., E-mail: Lanea.Keller@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sopka, Dennis M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Klayton, Tracy; Li Jinsheng; Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Use of Coherent Transition Radiation to Set Up the APS RF Thermionic Gun to Produce High-Brightness Beams for SASE FEL Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe use of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) rf thermionic gun, alpha magnet beamline, and linac to produce a stable high-brightness beam in excess of 100 amperes peak current with normalized emittance of 10 pi mm-mrad. To obtain peak currents greater than 100 amperes, the rf gun system must be tuned to produce a FWHM bunch length on the order of 350 fs. Bunch lengths this short are measured using coherent transition radiation (CTR) produced when the rf gun beam, accelerated to 40 MeV, strikes a metal foil. The CTR is detected using a Golay detector attached to one arm of a Michelson interferometer. The alpha magnet current and gun rf phase are adjusted so as to maximize the CTR signal at the Golay detector, which corresponds to the minimum bunch length. The interferometer is used to measure the autocorrelation of the CTR radiation. The minimum phase approximation is used to derive the bunch profile from the autocorrelation. The high-brightness beam is accelerated to 217 MeV and used to produce SASE in...

Sereno, N S; Lumpkin, Alex H; Sereno, Nicholas; Borland, Michael; Lumpkin, Alex

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

295

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Observation of the submillimeter cosmic background spectrum  

SciTech Connect

An experimental measurement of the spectrum of the submillimeter cosmic background radiation is described. The experiment consists of measuring the night sky emission at an altitude of 39 km, correcting for the atmospheric molecular line emission, and placing limits on the contamination from sources of continuum radiation such as the apparatus itself and the earth. The observations were made on 24 July 1974 using a fully calibrated liquid-helium-cooled balloon- borne spectrophotometer. Important features of the apparatus include a cooled antenna, a polarizing interferometer, and a germanium bolometric detector. The characterization of the spectrophotometer includes the large angle response and emission of the antenna. The calibration of the instrument and corrections to the observed sky spectrum are based on measurements made during the flight. A simple model of the molecular line emission is used to determine the atmospheric contribution. The resulting spectrum covers the frequency range from 4 to 17 cm$sup -1$ and establishes that the cosmic background radiation follows the high frequency quantum cutoff for a 3K blackbody. A blackbody temperature of 2.99/sub -.$sub 14$/$sup +$.$sup 07$/K is deduced from our data. The present status of the cosmic background observations, which span more than three decades in frequency, is analyzed and it is concluded that they are all consistent with a blackbody temperature of 2.90 +- .04K (+- 1 SIGMA). This firmly supports the Big Bang cosmological model of the universe. (auth)

Woody, D.P.

1975-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

297

Solar radiation model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mathematical models have been developed within the past few years which estimate the solar radiation from other weather variables. Some of these models have been used to generate data bases which are extensively used in the design and analysis of solar system. Three of these solar radiation models have been used in developing the Augmented SOLMET Solar Data Tapes for the 26 SOLMET sites and the 222 ERSATZ Solar Data Tapes. One of the models, a theoretical one, predicts the solar noon radiation for clear sky conditions from the optical air mass, precipitable water vapor and turbidity variables. A second model, an empirical one, predicts the hourly total horizontal radiation from meteorological variables. And, a third model, also an empirical one, predicts the hourly direct normal radiation from the hourly total horizontal radiation. A study of the accuracy of these three solar radiation models is reported here. To assess the accuracy of these models, data were obtained from several US National Weather Service Stations and other sources, used the models to estimate the solar-radiation, and then compared the modeled radiation values with observed radiation values. The results of these comparisons and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the models are presented.

Hall, I.J.; Prairie, R.R.; Anderson, H.E.; Boes, E.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

299

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Probing Axions with Radiation from Magnetic Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experiments suggest that polarized photons may couple significantly to pseudoscalar particles such as axions. We study the possible observational signatures of axion-photon coupling for radiation from magnetic stars, with particular focus on neutron stars. We present general methods for calculating the axion-photon conversion probability during propagation through a varying magnetized vacuum as well as across an inhomogeneous atmosphere. Partial axion-photon conversion may take place in the vacuum region outside the neutron star. Strong axion-photon mixing occurs due to a resonance in the atmosphere, and depending on the axion coupling strength and other parameters, significant axion-photon conversion can take place at the resonance. Such conversions may produce observable effects on the radiation spectra and polarization signals from the star. We also apply our results to axion-photon propagation in the Sun and in magnetic white dwarfs. We find that there is no appreciable conversion of solar axions to photons during the propagation.

Dong Lai; Jeremy Heyl

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a new satellite sensor, the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) experiment. GERB is designed to make the first measurements of the Earth's radiation budget from geostationary orbit. Measurements at high absolute ...

J. E. Harries; J. E. Russell; J. A. Hanafin; H. Brindley; J. Futyan; J. Rufus; S. Kellock; G. Matthews; R. Wrigley; A. Last; J. Mueller; R. Mossavati; J. Ashmall; E. Sawyer; D. Parker; M. Caldwell; P. M. Allan; A. Smith; M. J. Bates; B. Coan; B. C. Stewart; D. R. Lepine; L. A. Cornwall; D. R. Corney; M. J. Ricketts; D. Drummond; D. Smart; R. Cutler; S. Dewitte; N. Clerbaux; L. Gonzalez; A. Ipe; C. Bertrand; A. Joukoff; D. Crommelynck; N. Nelms; D. T. Llewellyn-Jones; G. Butcher; G. L. Smith; Z. P. Szewczyk; P. E. Mlynczak; A. Slingo; R. P. Allan; M. A. Ringer

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Smith Purcell radiation from femtosecond electron bunches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present theoretical and experimental results from a Smith-Purcell radiation experiment using the electron beam from a 17 GHz high gradient accelerator. Smith- Purcell radiation occurs when a charged particle travels ...

Korbly, Stephen E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

Nelson, Carl [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Bai, Harrison [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Neboori, Hanmanth [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Takita, Cristiane [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Motwani, Sabin [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Jones, Tiffanie [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Goyal, Sharad [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

306

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

308

OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE-MINUTE SOLAR OSCILLATIONS IN THE CORONA USING THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROPHOTOMETER (ESP) ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT (SDO/EVE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the detection of oscillations in the corona in the frequency range corresponding to five-minute acoustic modes of the Sun. The oscillations have been observed using soft X-ray measurements from the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (ESP) of the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The ESP zeroth-order channel observes the Sun as a star without spatial resolution in the wavelength range of 0.1-7.0 nm (the energy range is 0.18-12.4 keV). The amplitude spectrum of the oscillations calculated from six-day time series shows a significant increase in the frequency range of 2-4 mHz. We interpret this increase as a response of the corona to solar acoustic (p) modes and attempt to identify p-mode frequencies among the strongest peaks. Due to strong variability of the amplitudes and frequencies of the five-minute oscillations in the corona, we study how the spectrum from two adjacent six-day time series combined together affects the number of peaks associated with the p-mode frequencies and their amplitudes. This study shows that five-minute oscillations of the Sun can be observed in the corona in variations of the soft X-ray emission. Further investigations of these oscillations may improve our understanding of the interaction of the oscillation modes with the solar atmosphere, and the interior-corona coupling, in general.

Didkovsky, L.; Judge, D.; Wieman, S. [Space Sciences Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Kosovichev, A. G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Woods, T., E-mail: leonid@usc.edu [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Theory of Light Emission in Sonoluminescence as Thermal Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the model proposed by Hilgenfeldt {\\it at al.} [Nature {\\bf 398}, 401 (1999)], we present here a comprehensive theory of thermal radiation in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). We first invoke the generalized Kirchhoff's law to obtain the thermal emissivity from the absorption cross-section of a multilayered sphere (MLS). A sonoluminescing bubble, whose internal structure is determined from hydrodynamic simulations, is then modelled as a MLS and in turn the thermal radiation is evaluated. Numerical results obtained from simulations for argon bubbles show that our theory successfully captures the major features observed in SBSL experiments.

Wang-Kong Tse; P. T. Leung

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

311

Earth Radiation Budget: Results of Outgoing Longwave Radiation from Nimbus-7, NOAA-9, and ERBS Satellites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eighteen months of wide field-of-view (WFOV) outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft have been deconvolved to produce resolution-enhanced flux maps at the top ...

T. Dale Bess; G. Louis Smith

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Roadmap to the Project: Experiments List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into the environment. These releases were designed to characterize the dispersion of radiation. The purpose of the experiment was to enable scientists to determine the fraction...

313

Climatological Aspects of Radiation Fog Occurrence at Albany, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a detailed investigation of the local radiation fog climatology, carried out in support of our ongoing field program to study radiation fog mechanisms at Albany, New York. At Albany, a distinct radiation fog season is observed during ...

Michael B. Meyer; G. Garland Lala

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Make Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and public perceptions and preferences, help improve our understanding of risk, vulnerability, resilience, and adaptive capacity. How does USGCRP make observations? USGCRP...

315

Observations - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 10, 1999 ... A broad range of observations were made, culled from the various sources mentioned. Those bearing directly on the participatory process are...

316

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

317

Conduction Effect of Thermal Radiation in a Metal Shield Pipe in a Cryostat for a Cryogenic Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large heat load caused by thermal radiation through a metal shield pipe was observed in a cooling test of a cryostat for a prototype of a cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector. The heat load was approximately 1000 times larger than the value calculated by the Stefan-Boltzmann law. We studied this phenomenon by simulation and experiment and found that it was caused by the conduction of thermal radiation in a metal shield pipe.

Takayuki Tomaru; Masao Tokunari; Kazuaki Kuroda; Takashi Uchiyama; Akira Okutomi; Masatake Ohashi; Hiroyuki Kirihara; Nobuhiro Kimura; Yoshio Saito; Nobuaki Sato; Takakazu Shintomi; Toshikazu Suzuki; Tomiyoshi Haruyama; Shinji Miyoki; Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Akira Yamamoto

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

319

Experiment #8: Radiation Makes House Calls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials in front of the Geiger counter. Record the reading in Table 8.1. Applying usage of the "Chart of Nuclides," recorded data in Table 8.1 and 8.2, fill in the question...

320

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Image Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Gallery Image Gallery These are images, photographs, and charts presented or developed for Low Dose Radiation Research Investigators’ Meetings. They may be used for presentations or reports. To save, right click on the picture, then choose "Save picture as." U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 1980. various sources 1980 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 2006. various sources 2006 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources in the United States for 2006. man-made 2006 Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience (Rem) Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Experiment Hall & Beamline | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Hall & Beamlines The ratchet-shaped radiation-shielding wall between the APS storage ring and the experiment hall serves as a line of demarcation. Thirty-five "sectors"...

322

Radiation-Hard Quartz Cerenkov Calorimeters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New generation hadron colliders are going to reach unprecedented energies and radiation levels. Quartz has been identified as a radiation-hard material that can be used for Cerenkov calorimeters of the future experiments. We report from the radiation hardness tests performed on quartz fibers, as well as the characteristics of the quartz fiber and plate Cerenkov calorimeters that have been built, designed, and proposed for the CMS experiment.

Akgun, U.; Onel, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, 203 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, IA, 52242 (United States)

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

323

Investigation Of A Transient Energetic Charge Exchange Fux Enhancement (?spike-on-tail?) Observed In Neutral-beam-heated H-mode Discharges In The National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect

In the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), a large increase in the charge exchange neutral flux localized at the Neutral Beam (NB) injection full energy is measured by the E||B (superimposed parallel electric and magnetic fields) Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA). Termed the High-Energy Feature (HEF), it appears on the NB-injected energetic ion spectrum only in discharges where tearing or kink-type modes (f < 50 kHz) are absent, Toroidal Alfvn Eigenmode (TAE) activity (f ~ 50 - 150 kHz) is weak and Global Alfvn Eigenmode (GAE) activity (f ~ 400 1000 kHz) is robust. Compressional Alfvn eigenmode (CAE) activity (f > 1000 kHz) is usually sporadic or absent during the HEF event. The HEF exhibits growth times of ?t ~ 20 - 80 ms, durations of ~ 100 600 ms and peak-to-base flux ratios up to H = Fmax /Fmin ~ 10. In infrequent cases, a slowing down distribution below the HEF energy can develop that continues to evolve over periods > 100 ms, a time scale long compared with the typical fast ion equilibration times. HEFs are Transient energetic charge exchange flux enhancement (?spike-on-tail?) 2 observed only in H-mode (not L-mode) discharges with injected power Pb ? 4 MW and in the pitch range ? = vll /v ~ 0.7 0.9; i.e. only for passing particles. Increases of ~ 10 - 30 % in the measured neutron yield and total stored energy that are observed to coincide with the feature appear to be driven by concomitant broadening of measured Te(r), Ti(r) and ne(r) profiles and not the HEF itself. While the HEF has minimal impact on plasma performance, it nevertheless poses a challenging wave-particle interaction phenomenon to understand. Candidate mechanisms for HEF formation are developed based on quasilinear theory of wave-particle interaction. The only mechanism found to lead to the large NPA flux ratios, H = Fmax /Fmin , observed in NSTX is the quasilinear evolution of the energetic ion distribution, Fb(E,?,r), in phase space and the concomitant loss of some particles, which occurs due to the cyclotron interaction of the particles with destabilized modes having sufficiently high frequencies, F ~ 700 - 1000 kHz, in the plasma frame that are tentatively identified as Global Alfvn Eigenmodes.

S.S. Medley et. al.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos S. L. Soares

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

326

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

327

Radiation Incident on Tilted Collectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For solar energy system design purposes, observations of solar radiation on a horizontal surface must be converted to values on a tilted energy collector. An empirical conversion relationship, introduced by Liu and Jordan (1960) and based on ...

P. J. Robinson

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

DE 1 VLF observations during Activny wave injection  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on coordinated high-altitude satellite observations in support of one of the first space-based VLF wave injection experiments, namely the USSR Aktivny mission. The Activny satellite (A) was designed to carry a VLF transmitter (nominal frequency {approximately}10 kHz, transmitter power {approximately}10 kW) coupled to a 20-m-diameter loop antenna in a nearly polar orbit (83 inclination, apogee {approximately}2500 km, perigee {approximately}500 km). The authors focus their attention on conjunction experiments between the Activny and DE 1 satellites. Because of problems in the deployment of the loop antenna, the radiated power capability of the antenna was significantly reduced. Although this substantially reduced the expectation of receiving detectable signal levels on the satellite, the DE 1/Activny conjunction experiments were nevertheless carried out as a means of possibly placing an upper limit on the radiated power. During the period November 1989 through April 1990, a total of 10 DE 1/Activny wave injection sessions were conducted. During each session the Activny transmitter operated at 10.537 kHz with 1 s On-1 s Off format, for a period of 6 min centered around the conjunction time. Though no Activny signals were detected by the LWR on the DE 1 satellite, the experimental constraints allow the authors to place an upper limit on the total power radiated by the Activny transmitter in the whistler-mode. Using experimental parameters, and the minimum detectable signal level of 0.05 {mu}V/m for LWR, they find the upper limit on the total power radiated by the Activny satellite in the whistler-mode to be {approximately}10 mW. Several recommendations for future space-based wave injection experiments are presented. 25 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Sonwalkar, V.S.; Inan, U.S.; Bell, T.F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation Period Workshop at Annual Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Science Team Meeting D. A. Randall Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado R. T. Cederwall Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California * Study previous observation simulation system experiments (OSSEs) (i.e., Bill Frank, Pennsylvania State University [PSU]) and conduct OSSEs as necessary to evaluate data network. * Implement additional "boundary" facilities and investigate possible interim capabilities for upcoming SCM IOPs. * Improve resolution of wind profiles observed in lowest 1 km, using data sources such as towers of opportunity, doppler sodar, and doppler radar.

337

Tracer Transport by the Diabatic Circulation Deduced from Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean meridional circulations for the months of November through May 1979 are deduced from the net radiative heating rates obtained from detailed calculations based on satellite observations of temperature and radiatively important trace species. ...

S. Solomon; J. T. Kiehl; R. R. Garcia; W. Grose

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Entrainment into a Stratocumulus Layer with Distributed Radiative Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the radiative cooling of a cloud layer strongly influences the turbulent flux profiles and the entrainment rate, and that the radiative cooling should be modeled as acting inside the turbulent layer. Numerical experiments ...

David A. Randall

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Uncertainties in the Radiative Forcing Due to Sulfate Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer calculations based on a new sulfate distribution from a chemistry-transport model simulation have been performed. A wide range of sensitivity experiments have been performed to illustrate the large uncertainty in the radiative ...

Gunnar Myhre; Frode Stordal; Tore F. Berglen; Jostein K. Sundet; Ivar S. A. Isaksen

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Investigation of Aerosol Sources, Lifetime and Radiative Forcing through Multi-Instrument Data Assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as clouds reflect solar radiation and trap outgoing CHAPTEReffectively scatter solar radiation, such as sulfate, reduceF o = 1361W/m 2 (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiement (

Rubin, Juli Irene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling Tropical Pacific Sea Surface Temperature with Satellite-Derived Solar Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two independent datasets for the solar radiation at the surface derived from satellites are compared. The data derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is for the net solar radiation at the surface whereas the International ...

Richard Seager; M. Benno Blumenthal

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information presented here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Determining foreground contamination in cosmic microwavebackground observations: Diffuse Galactic emission in the MAXIMA-Ifield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be contaminated by diffuse foreground emission from sources such as Galactic dust and synchrotron radiation. In these cases, the morphology of the contaminating source is known from observations at different frequencies, but not its amplitude at the frequency of interest for the CMB. We develop a technique for accounting for the effects of such emission in this case, and for simultaneously estimating the foreground amplitude in the CMB observations. We apply the technique to CMB data from the MAXIMA-1 experiment, using maps of Galactic dust emission from combinations of IRAS and DIRBE observations, as well as compilations of Galactic synchrotron emission observations. The spectrum of the dust emission over the 150-450 GHz observed by MAXIMA is consistent with preferred models, but the effect on CMB power spectrum observations is negligible.

Jaffe, A.H.; Balbi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Ferreira, P.G.; Finkbeiner, D.; Hanany, S.; Lee, A.T.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot,G.F.; Stompor, R.; Winant, C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

2003-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

345

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

346

Radiation receiver  

SciTech Connect

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments AE01 - Micro-undulator FEL Experiment. Spokesperson: I. Ben-Zvi, BNL. (1992 - 1997) AE02. - Inverse FEL Accelerator. Spokesperson: A. van Steenbergen, BNL. [Yale, Columbia]. (1992-1997) AE03 - Laser Grating Accelerator Experiment. Spokesperson: R. Fernow, BNL. [Princeton, LANL]. (1992- 1996) AE05 - Nonlinear-Compton Scattering. Spokesperson: K. McDonald, Princeton (1992-) AE06 - Inverse Cherenkov Acceleration. Spokesperson: W. Kimura, STI Optronics. [UCSB,BNL]. (1992-1997) AE08 - Far Infrared Radiation Source. Spokesperson J. Walsh, Dartmouth. [Oxford, BNL]. (1992 - 1994) AE09. - Photocathode R&D. Spokesperson: T. Rao, BNL. (1992 - ) AE10. - High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL. Spokesperson: L.H. Yu, BNL. [ANL] (1992 - 2001)

349

The German Front Experiment 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The German Front Experiment, 1987 (GFE87) is a field experiment using aircraft, radar, surface, and upper-air observations to determine the influence of the European Alps on cold fronts. Measurements are concentrated in the Rhine Valley and in ...

Klaus P. Hoinka; Hans Volkert

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

351

Radiation Tolerant Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategies that can alleviate radiation damage may assist the design of radiation tolerant materials. We will summarize our recent studies on radiation damage in...

352

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

An Examination of the Clear-Sky Solar Absorption over the Central Equatorial Pacific: Observations versus Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of downward surface solar radiation (global radiation) and albedo taken during the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) are used to obtain baseline estimates for two quantities concerning the radiation budget of the tropical ...

William C. Conant; V. Ramanathan; Francisco P. J. Valero; Jens Meywerk

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for the DOI laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report on a series of experiments concerned with transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for a Cr,Nd:GSGG laser. Both the Sandia National Laboratories SPR III pulsed reactor and the Hermes III pulsed X-ray machine are used as radiation sources. The time dependence and the magnitude of the induced absorption in filter glasses and in doped and undoped LiNbO{sub 3} Q-switch materials have been measured. Gain has been observed in Cr,Nd:GSGG, the laser medium, when it is irradiated by X-rays.

Brannon, P.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Probing Radiative Solar Neutrinos Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by a pilot experiment conducted by F.Vannucci et al. during a solar eclipse, we work out the geometry governing the radiative decays of solar neutrinos. Surprisingly, although a smaller proportion of the photons can be detected, the case of strongly non-degenerate neutrinos brings better limits in terms of the fundamental couplings. We advocate satellite-based experiments to improve the sensitivity.

Frre, J M

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Radiation properties of cavity Cerenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect

Cerenkov radiation from cavities has been analyzed by quantum electrodynamic theory. Analytical expressions of basic radiation properties such as the Einstein's A and B coefficients are derived and shown to be directly modified by the cavities. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the coherent radiation from the Cerenkov radiation devices is due to super radiance of spontaneous emission instead of stimulated emission. Coherent and incoherent radiations are analyzed in the THz radiation range.

Gao Ju; Shen Fang [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earths radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

Jefferson, A

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

359

Decomposition of radiational effects of model feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

Three separate doubled CO/sub 2/ experiments with the statistical dynamic model are used to illustrate efforts to study the climate dynamics, feedbacks, and interrelationships of meteorological parameters by decomposing and isolating their individual effects on radiation transport.

Ellsaesser, H.W.; MacCracken, M.C.; Potter, G.L.; Mitchell, C.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Minimizing Errors Associated with Multiplate Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiplate radiation shield errors are examined using the following techniques: 1) ray tracing analysis, 2) wind tunnel experiments, 3) numerical flow simulations, and 4) field testing. The authors objectives are to develop guidelines for ...

Scott J. Richardson; Fred V. Brock; Steven R. Semmer; Cathy Jirak

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Annual Cycle of Surface Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual cycles of upward and downward longwave fluxes at the earths surface are investigated by use of the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Surface Radiation Budget Dataset. Principal component analysis is used to quantify ...

Pamela E. Mlynczak; G. Louis Smith; Anne C. Wilber; Paul W. Stackhouse

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

THERMAL RADIATION FROM AN ACCRETION DISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effect of stimulated radiation processes on thermal radiation from an accretion disk is considered. The radial density waves triggering flare emission and producing quasiperiodic oscillations in radiation from an accretion disk are discussed. It is argued that the observational data suggest the existence of the weak laser sources in a twotemperature plasma of an accretion disk. It was shown earlier that thermal radio emission has a stimulated character and that this statement is probably valid for thermal blackbody radiation in others spectral ranges (Prigara 2003). According to this conception thermal radiation from non-uniform gas is produced by an ensemble of individual emitters.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

ICRCCM Phase 2: Verification and calibration of radiation codes in climate models  

SciTech Connect

Following the finding by the InterComparison of Radiation Codes used in Climate Models (ICRCCM) of large differences among fluxes predicted by sophisticated radiation models that could not be sorted out because of the lack of a set of accurate atmospheric spectral radiation data measured simultaneously with the important radiative properties of the atmosphere, our team of scientists proposed to remedy the situation by carrying out a comprehensive program of measurement and analysis called SPECTRE (Spectral Radiance Experiment). SPECTRE will establish an absolute standard against which to compare models, and will aim to remove the hidden variables'' (unknown humidities, aerosols, etc.) which radiation modelers have invoked to excuse disagreements with observation. The data to be collected during SPECTRE will form the test bed for the second phase of ICRCCM, namely verification and calibration of radiation codes used in climate models. This should lead to more accurate radiation models for use in parameterizing climate models, which in turn play a key role in the prediction of trace-gas greenhouse effects.

Ellingson, R.G.; Wiscombe, W.J.; Murcray, D.; Smith, W.; Strauch, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

365

Radiation Effects In Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RADIATION MATERIALS SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II: Radiation Effects in Ceramics. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials...

366

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. ... OH. US Air Force Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Wright-Patterson - Base, OH [100548- 0] PA. ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

Search for possible solar neutrino radiative decays during total solar eclipses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total solar eclipses (TSEs) offer a good opportunity to look for photons produced in possible radiative decays of solar neutrinos. In this paper we briefly review the physics bases of such searches as well as the existing limits on the neutrino proper lifetimes obtained by such experiments. We the report on the observations performed in occasion of the 29 March 2006 TSE, from Waw an Namos, Libya.

S. Cecchini; D. Centomo; G. Giacomelli; R. Giacomelli; V. Popa

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

Trip Report for the 2005 Sino-American SF6 Tracer Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Chinese Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP) conducted an SF6 atmospheric tracer experiment in July 2005 in the vicinity of the Qinshan Nuclear Power Company complex on the coast of the East China Sea. The experiment was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, under the NA-23 International Emergency Management and Cooperation Program. NA-23 sent a delegation of five scientists to observe the experiment; four of the observers were from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and one was from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). CIRP's cooperation with the US-Japanese delegation was excellent, and the project was very successful from the international cooperation perspective. Although the experiment was modest in scope, it may provide one or more data sets that can be used for international dispersion model validation and intercomparison projects. Several areas for procedural improvements were noted by the US and Japanese observers, and a more concise measure of the experiment's scientific value will be available after CIRP completes and delivers the database of the experiment results by the end of the fiscal year. The consensus recommendation of the observers is that CIRP and DOE/NNSA NA-23 build on the experience and personal contacts gained during the experiment to plan and conduct an even more effective experiment in the future, perhaps as early as next year (2006). If the decision is made to conduct a follow-on experiment, we strongly recommend that the LLNL and JAERI representatives work cooperatively with CIRP throughout the entire planning phase of the experiment. As discussed in Section V, a 2006 China tracer experiment could serve as a springboard to a 2007 long-range international tracer experiment involving South Korea.

Bradley, M M; Sullivan, T J; Keating II, G A; Leach, M J

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - SSRL Experiments to Focus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SSRL Experiments to Focus on Solar Tech By Glenn Roberts Jr. November 7, 2012 SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource will play a central role in three research projects...

371

Betatron Radiation from a Beam Driven Plasma Source  

SciTech Connect

Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 x 10{sup 10} electrons, 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} spot, 20-100 {micro}m length, 20 GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of {approx} 1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 x 35 cm{sup 2} phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

Litos, M.; Corde, S.; /SLAC

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cerenkov radiation and scalar stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the possibility that a charged particle moving in the gravitational field generated by a scalar star could radiate energy via a recently proposed gravitational \\v{C}erenkov mechanism. We numerically prove that this is not possible for stable boson stars. We also show that soliton stars could have \\v{C}erenkov radiation for particular values of the boson mass, although diluteness of the star grows and actual observational possibility decreases for the more usually discussed boson masses. These conclusions diminish, although do not completely rule out, the observational possibility of actually detecting scalar stars using this mechanism, and lead us to consider other forms, like gravitational lensing.

S. Capozziello; G. Lambiase; Diego F. Torres

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

Gamma Ray Pulsars: Multiwavelength Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The seven or more pulsars seen by instruments on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. For all the known gamma-ray pulsars, multiwavelength observations and theoretical models based on such observations offer the prospect of gaining a broad understanding of these rotating neutron stars. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2007, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

David J. Thompson

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

374

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Synchrotron Radiation. What is Synchrotron Radiation? Synchrotron radiation ... known. Properties of Synchrotron Radiation. Schwinger ...

375

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) was conducted from 27 September through 22 October 2004 over the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) on the North Slope of Alaska. The ...

J. Verlinde; J. Y. Harrington; V. T. Yannuzzi; A. Avramov; S. Greenberg; S. J. Richardson; C. P. Bahrmann; G. M. McFarquhar; G. Zhang; N. Johnson; M. R. Poellot; J. H. Mather; D. D. Turner; E. W. Eloranta; D. C. Tobin; R. Holz; B. D. Zak; M. D. Ivey; A. J. Prenni; P. J. DeMott; J. S. Daniel; G. L. Kok; K. Sassen; D. Spangenberg; P. Minnis; T. P. Tooman; M. Shupe; A. J. Heymsfield; R. Schofield

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1...

377

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

378

Enhancement of ARM Surface Meteorological Observations during the Fall 1996 Water Vapor Intensive Observation Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes in situ moisture sensor comparisons that were performed in conjunction with the first Water Vapor Intensive Observation Period (IOP) conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) ...

Scott J. Richardson; Michael E. Splitt; Barry M. Lesht

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Observations of a Mesoscale Ducted Gravity Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports coordinated observations of a mesoscale gravity wave made during the FRONTS 84 field experiment conducted in southwestern France in the summer of 1984. The observations were unique in the sense that all relevant wave ...

F. M. Ralph; V. Venkateswaran; M. Crochet

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

TRIO experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Measurement Methods Affect the Observed Global Dimming and Brightening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface incident solar radiation G determines our climate and environment, and has been widely observed with a single pyranometer since the late 1950s. Such observations have suggested a widespread decrease between the 1950s and 1980s (global ...

Kaicun Wang; Robert E. Dickinson; Qian Ma; John A. Augustine; Martin Wild

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

383

RADIATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

Goldsworthy, W.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

RADIATION DOSIMETER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Title Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors de Boer, Gijs, William D. Collins, Surabi Menon, and Charles N. Long Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 11 Start Page 11937 Pagination 11937-11949 Abstract Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

386

Aerosol Radiative Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions.in Winter ZCAREX-2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions in Winter ZCAREX-2001 G. S. Golitsyn, I. A. Gorchakova, and I. I. Mokhov Institute of Atmospheric Physic Moscow, Russia Introduction Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) is estimated for winter clear-sky conditions from measurements during ZCAREX-2001-Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment in February-March, 2001 at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS) of the A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS. ARF in the shortwave range is determined by the difference between the net fluxes of the solar radiation, calculated with and without the aerosol component of the atmosphere. The estimates of ARF are made for conditions with high surface albedo. Data Used The following data of atmospheric characteristics observed during winter are used for the

387

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

388

Approved Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cycle 31OCT97 Exp Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 666 Clark Magnetic Rotation in 104Sn 5 667 Janssens Unsafe COULEX of the 240Pu Nucleus 3 670 Smith Exotic Structures in very...

389

DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) W. J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , Newand R. J. Berry, "Manual on Radiation Dosimetry" (New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (New

Perez-Mendez, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Modeling Topographic Solar Radiation Using GOES Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors present an algorithm that combines solar radiation fields derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations with digital elevation data to produce topographically varying insolation ...

R. Dubayah; S. Loechel

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Curvature radiation in pulsar magnetospheric plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the curvature radiation of the point-like charge moving relativistically along curved magnetic field lines through a pulsar magnetospheric electron-positron plasma. We demonstrate that the radiation power is largely suppressed as compared with the vacuum case, but still at a considerable level, high enough to explain the observed pulsar luminosities. The emitted radiation is polarized perpendicularly to the plane of the curved magnetic filed lines coincides with $ which can freely escape from the magnetospheric plasma. Our results strongly support the coherent curvature radiation by the spark-associated solitons as a plausible mechanism of pulsar radio emission.

Janusz Gil; Yuri Lyubarsky; George I. Melikidze

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

394

Radiation Physics Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Events. Radiation Physics Events. (showing 1 - 3 of 3). CIRMS 2012 Start Date: 10/22/2012 ...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Measurements and General Instrumentation

Kenneth D. Jarman; Erin A. Miller; Richard S. Wittman; Christopher J. Gesh

396

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

397

Experiment I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

February 16, 2010. Room: 614. Location: Washington State Convention Center .... This paper gives an overview on nucleation phenomena observed on added...

398

World Wide Web Access to Radiation Datasets for Environmental and Climate Change Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five years of scanner data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), eight years of surface radiation budget (SRB) data, and one year of scanner radiation budget data from the FrenchRussianGerman experiment, ScaRaB, will be available ...

T. Dale Bess; Ann B. Carlson; Calvin Mackey; Fredrick M. Denn; Anne Wilber; Nancy Ritchey

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Background. Extensive research on the health effects of radiation using standard epidemiological and toxicological approaches has been done for decades to characterize responses of populations and individuals to high radiation doses, and to set exposure standards to protect both the public and the workforce. These standards were set using models that extrapolated from the cancers observed following exposure to high doses of radiation to predicted, but not measurable, changes in cancer frequency at low radiation doses. The use of models was necessary because of our inability to detect changes in cancer incidence following low doses of radiation. Historically, the predominant approach has been the Linear-no-Threshold model (see Wikipedia entry) and collective dose concept that assumes each unit of radiation, no

400

RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. <' ," . . * . RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED . 370 Lexl.ngton Avenue New York 17# New York jq.5' L- Contract No. A T (30-l)-2093 with the United States Atom ic Energy Commission F O A M SEPARATION Progress Report for March, 1959 Abstract Appreciable cesium enrichment in the foam has been obtained using the system sodium tetraphenyl boron-Geigy reagent. Enrichment ratios varied from 1.5 to 3.5 depending upon operating conditions. The en- richment appears to depend on the ratio of the sodium tetraphenyl boron to Geigy reagent rather than on the absolute values of the indi- vidual concentrations. Further experiments are being conducted to verify and extend the range of results. Continuous countercurrent column operation has been continued.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

402

Surface Radiative Fluxes in Sub-Sahel Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports results of observations of radiative fluxes measured in sub-Sahel Africa during a 2-yr period (199294). Shortwave radiation in the solar spectrum (0.24.0 ?m), photosynthetically active radiation (0.40.7 ?m), and longwave ...

F. Miskolczi; T. O. Aro; M. Iziomon; R. T. Pinker

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Mission to planet Earth: Role of clouds and radiation in climate  

SciTech Connect

The role of clouds in modifying the earth`s radiation balance is well recognized as a key uncertainty in predicting any potential future climate change. This statement is true whether the climate change of interest is caused by changing emissions of greenhouse gases and sulfates, deforestation, ozone depletion, volcanic eruptions, or changes in the solar constant. This paper presents and overview of the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Earth Observing System (EOR) satellite data in understanding the role of clouds in the global climate system. The paper gives a brief summary of the cloud/radiation problem, and discusses the critical observations needed to support further investigation. The planned EOS data products are summarized, including the critical advances over current satellite cloud and radiation budget data. Key advances include simultaneous observation on cloud particle size and phase, improved detection of thin clouds and multilayer cloud systems, greatly reduced ambiguity in partially cloud-filled satellite fields of view, improved calibration and stability of satellite-observed radiances, and improved estimates of radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and at levels within the atmosphere. outstanding sampling and remote sensing issues that effect data quality are also discussed. Finally, the EOS data are placed in the context of other satellite observations as well as the critical surface, field experiment and laboratory data needed to address the role in clouds on the climate system. I is concluded that the EOS data are a necessary but insufficient condition for solution of the scientific cloud/radiation issues. A balanced approach of satellite, field, and laboratory data will be required. These combined data can span the necessary spatial scales of global, regional, cloud cell and cloud particle physics. 137 refs., 12 fig., 4 tab.

Wielicki, B.A.; Harrison, E.F. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

NIST MIRF - Accelerator Radiation Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerator Radiation Physics. Medium-energy accelerators are under investigation for production of channeling radiation ...

405

NIST Synchrotron radiation in SSD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation in the Sensor Science Division. ... Synchrotron Radiation-Based Calibrations for Space Weather Prediction. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

406

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

407

Global Distribution of Photosynthetically Active Radiation as Observed from Satellites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern about possible effects of a steady increase in CO2 on the earth's climate, and the fact that current estimates of sources and sinks of CO2 do not balance, generated interest to improve knowledge of rates at which carbon is cycled between ...

R. T. Pinker; I. Laszlo

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee Charter 1. Purpose The committee reviews functional changes to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) and Personnel Protection System (PSS) used to provide personnel protection and area exclusion related to APS accelerators, storage ring and other radiation handling areas. The RSPP Committee advises APS management on radiation safety matters. At the request of APS Management the committee reviews projects, recommends radiation safety policy, and evaluates accident investigation conclusions. 2. Membership Members are appointed by the APS Division Directors and APS Director for their knowledge and background in Interlock Systems, Radiation Safety, Accelerator Operations and Work on the Experiment Floor.

409

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

410

Analysis of an MCG/fuse/PFS experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos PROCYON high-explosive pulsed power (HEPP) implosion system is intended to produce 1 MJ of soft X-radiation for fusion and material studies. The system uses the MK-IX magnetic flux compression generator to drive a ``slow`` opening switch which, upon operation, connects the output of the MK-IX generator to a plasma flow switch, which, in turn, delivers current to a rapidly imploding load. The closing switch isolates the plasma flow switch (PFS) and load from any precursor current which might arise due to the finite impedance of the opening switch during its closed phase. In that experiment, our first test, the MK-IX generated approximately 16 MA and 8.2 MJ, and approximately 9.8 MA and 1.15 MJ were delivered to a fixed inductive load in 8--10 microseconds. Computations performed after the experiment, taking into account experimental variables which could not be accurately predicted prior to the experiment, were in satisfactory agreement with all experimental observations, including a double-peaked dI/dt signal which indicated a particular trajectory of the copper fuse material through density-temperature space. Prompted by our success with a fixed load, a second experiment was performed using the MK-IX/fuse/STS combination to drive a plasma flow switch. The objectives of the experiment were to observe the ability of the fuse/STS combination to drive a plasma flow switch and to evaluate our ability to predict system performance. The details of the experiment, the measurements taken, and the data reduction process have previously been reported. The MK-IX produced approximately 22 MA, and approximately 10 MA was delivered to the PFS, which moved down the coaxial barrel of the assembly in an intact manner in about 8 microseconds. In this paper, we present the results of our computational analysis of the experiment.

Lindemuth, I.R.; Rickel, D.G.; Reinovsky, R.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Analysis of an MCG/fuse/PFS experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos PROCYON high-explosive pulsed power (HEPP) implosion system is intended to produce 1 MJ of soft X-radiation for fusion and material studies. The system uses the MK-IX magnetic flux compression generator to drive a slow'' opening switch which, upon operation, connects the output of the MK-IX generator to a plasma flow switch, which, in turn, delivers current to a rapidly imploding load. The closing switch isolates the plasma flow switch (PFS) and load from any precursor current which might arise due to the finite impedance of the opening switch during its closed phase. In that experiment, our first test, the MK-IX generated approximately 16 MA and 8.2 MJ, and approximately 9.8 MA and 1.15 MJ were delivered to a fixed inductive load in 8--10 microseconds. Computations performed after the experiment, taking into account experimental variables which could not be accurately predicted prior to the experiment, were in satisfactory agreement with all experimental observations, including a double-peaked dI/dt signal which indicated a particular trajectory of the copper fuse material through density-temperature space. Prompted by our success with a fixed load, a second experiment was performed using the MK-IX/fuse/STS combination to drive a plasma flow switch. The objectives of the experiment were to observe the ability of the fuse/STS combination to drive a plasma flow switch and to evaluate our ability to predict system performance. The details of the experiment, the measurements taken, and the data reduction process have previously been reported. The MK-IX produced approximately 22 MA, and approximately 10 MA was delivered to the PFS, which moved down the coaxial barrel of the assembly in an intact manner in about 8 microseconds. In this paper, we present the results of our computational analysis of the experiment.

Lindemuth, I.R.; Rickel, D.G.; Reinovsky, R.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

413

Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

414

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dynamic Effects on the Tropical Cloud Radiative Forcing and Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical velocity is used to isolate the effect of large-scale dynamics on the observed radiation budget and cloud properties in the tropics, using the methodology suggested by Bony et al. Cloud and radiation budget quantities in the tropics show ...

Jian Yuan; Dennis L. Hartmann; Robert Wood

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Interannual Variability of the Tropical Radiation Balance and the Role of Extended Cloud Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tropical radiation balance is investigated on an interannual time scale using a five-year(197983) dataset obtained from the Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiment. The study emphasizes the separate contributions to interannual ...

Eric A. Smith; Matthew R. Smith

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Effect of Clouds on the Earth's Solar and Infrared Radiation Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of global cloudiness on the solar and infrared components of the earth's radiation balance is studied in general circulation model experiments. A wintertime simulation is conducted in which the cloud radiative transfer calculations use ...

Gerald F. Herman; Man-Li C. Wu; Winthrop T. Johnson

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Radiative Effects of Airborne Dust on Regional Energy Budgets at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of dust on the radiative energy budget at the top of the atmosphere were investigated using model calculations and measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Estimates of the dust optical depth were made from ...

Steven A. Ackerman; Hyosang Chung

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Improved Simulation of Clear-Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer in the CCC-GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of mean July clear-sky solar radiation in the Canadian Climate Centre second-generation general circulation model (CCC-GCMII) was analyzed by comparing top of the atmosphere (TOA) net fluxes with earth radiation budget experiment (...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Field Comparisons of Direct and Component Measurements of Net Radiation under Clear Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate measurements of net radiation are basic to all studies of the surface energy budget. In preparation for an energy budget experiment significant differences were found between direct and component measurement of net radiation, which ...

Claude E. Duchon; Gregory E. Wilk

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SANE experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of parallel and near-perpendicular double spin asymmetries in an inclusive electron scattering. The main goal of the experiment was to measure A{sub {parallel}} and A{sub 80} and extract the spin asymmetries of the proton A{sub 1}{sup p}, A{sub 2}{sup p} and spin structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup p}. Using the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia ({sup 14}NH{sub 3}) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q{sup 2} region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV{sup 2} and between Bjorken x of 0.3 to 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector. This talk will address the progress of the analysis designed to extract the proton spin asymmetries and structure functions. Preliminary results will be presented.

H. Baghdasaryan, SANE Collaboration

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

San Antonio Mountain Experiment (SAMEX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The San Antonio Mountain Experiment (SAMEX) involves a 3325 m. conically shaped, isolated mountain in north-central New Mexico where hourly observations of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, and precipitation are being ...

Morris H. McCutchan; Douglas G. Fox; R. William Furman

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Deconvolution of Wide Field-of-View Radiometer Measurements of Earth-Emitted Radiation Part II: Analysis of First Year of Nimbus 6 ERB Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One year of longwave radiation data from July 1975 through June 1976 from the Nimbus 6 satellite Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiment is analyzed by representing the longwave radiation field by a spherical harmonic expansion. The data are from ...

T. Dale Bess; Richard N. Green; G. Louis Smith

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Radiation tolerance of prototype BTeV pixel detector readout chips  

SciTech Connect

High energy and nuclear physics experiments need tracking devices with increasing spatial precision and readout speed in the face of ever-higher track densities and increased radiation environments. The new generation of hybrid pixel detectors (arrays of silicon diodes bump bonded to arrays of front-end electronic cells) is the state of the art technology able to meet these challenges. We report on irradiation studies performed on BTeV pixel readout chip prototypes exposed to a 200 MeV proton beam at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Prototype pixel readout chip preFPIX2 has been developed at Fermilab for collider experiments and implemented in standard 0.25 micron CMOS technology following radiation tolerant design rules. The tests confirmed the radiation tolerance of the chip design to proton total dose up to 87 MRad. In addition, non destructive radiation-induced single event upsets have been observed in on-chip static registers and the single bit upset cross section has been extensively measured.

Gabriele Chiodini et al.

2002-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reactor Internals Segmentation Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990's. Based on current information, the next group of plants will not begin this process for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on projects involving the segmentation of the Reactor Vessel Internal Subassemblies conducted at a number of plants undergoing decommissioning. Utilities have found this task very challenging from both a technological and radiation exposure perspective. This report documents the experience...

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

Window Functions for CMB Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the applicability and derivation of window functions for cosmic microwave background experiments on large and intermediate angular scales. These window functions describe the response of the experiment to power in a particular mode of the fluctuation spectrum. We give general formulae, illustrated with specific examples, for the most common observing strategies.

Martin White; Mark Srednicki

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

429

Broken-Cloud Enhancement of Solar Radiation Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations cited by Ramanathan et al. and Cess et al. indicate systematic errors in the solar radiation parameterizations of the current atmospheric general circulation models. Cloudy scenes have an observational excess (or calculational ...

R. N. Byrne; R. C. J. Somerville; B. Suba?ilar

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Modeling Surface Solar Radiation: Model Formulation and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for computing global solar radiation at the surface was formulated for use with satellite observations. A compromise in the approach was necessary, whereby the model accuracy and the inherent limitations of satellite observations were ...

R. T. Pinker; J. A. Ewing

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Vertical distribution and radiative effects of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol over West Africa during DABEX  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction coefficient over West Africa, during the Dust and Biomass burning aerosol Experiment (DABEX) / African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis dry season Special Observing period zero (AMMA-SOP0). In situ aircraft measurements from the UK FAAM aircraft are compared with two ground based lidars (POLIS and ARM MPL) and an airborne lidar on an ultra-light aircraft. In general mineral dust was observed at low altitudes (up to 2km) and a mixture of biomass burning aerosol and dust was observed at altitudes of 2-5km. The study exposes difficulties associated with spatial and temporal variability when inter-comparing aircraft and ground measurements. Averaging over many profiles provided a better means of assessing consistent errors and biases associated with in situ sampling instruments and retrievals of lidar ratios. Shortwave radiative transfer calculations and a 3-year simulation with the HadGEM2-A climate model show that the radiative effect of biomass burning aerosol is somewhat sensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosol. Results show a 15% increase in absorption of solar radiation by elevated biomass burning aerosol when the observed low-level dust layer is included as part of the background atmospheric state in the model. This illustrates that the radiative forcing of anthropogenic absorbing aerosol is sensitive to the treatment of other aerosol species and that care is needed in simulating natural aerosols assumed to exist in the pre-industrial, or natural state of the atmosphere.

Johnson, Ben; Heese, B.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Chazette, P.; Jones, A.; Bellouin, N.

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

CE in Engineering Education: An Observation from the Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concurrent Engineering is one of the key issues of manufacturing to be competitive in the global market place. Even though the major goal of CE would be to reduce the production lead time and to increase of quality of products, its basic idea includes ... Keywords: Collaboration Tool, Concurrent Engineering, Distant Learning And Teaching, Engineering Education, Network Communication

Teruaki Ito

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Cross-Document Event Coreference: Annotations, Experiments, and Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

back and forth to answer key questions is something I first experienced at Van- derbilt. We were free latest project focused on water quality and the effects of thermal pollution from thermal electric plants requires a new way of thinking,"says Sztipanovits, who is pro- fessor of electrical engineering, professor

434

Improvement of Microphysical Parameterization through Observational Verification Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite continual increases in numerical model resolution and significant improvements in the forecasting of many meteorological parameters, progress in quantitative precipitation forecasting (QPF) has been slow. This is attributable in part to ...

Mark T. Stoelinga; Peter V. Hobbs; Clifford F. Mass; John D. Locatelli; Brian A. Colle; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Arthur L. Rangno; Nicholas A. Bond; Bradley F. Smull; Roy M. Rasmussen; Gregory Thompson; Bradley R. Colman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Vaporizing Flow in Hot Fractures: Observations from Laboratory Experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Understanding water seepage in hot fractured rock is important in a number of fields including geothermal energy recovery and nuclear waste disposal. Heat-generating high-level nuclear waste packages which will be emplaced in the partially saturated fractured tuffs at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, if it becomes a high-level nuclear waste repository, will cause significant impacts on moisture distribution and migration. Liquid water, which occupies anywhere from 30 to 100% of the porespace, will be vaporized as the temperature reaches the boiling temperature. Flowing primarily in fractures, the vapor will condense where it encounters cooler rock, generating mobile water. This water will flow under gravitational and capillary forces and may flow back to the vicinity of the emplaced waste where it may partially escape vaporization. Water flowing down (sub-) vertical fractures may migrate considerable distances through fractured rock that is at above-boiling temperatures; thus, flowing condensate may contact waste packages, and provide a pathway for the transport of water-soluble radionuclides downward to the saturated zone. Thermally-driven flow processes induced by repository heat may be as important or even more important for repository performance than natural infiltration. For a nominal thermal loading of 57 kW/acre, vaporization may generate an average equivalent percolation flux from condensate of 23.1 mm/yr over 1,000 years, and 5.2 mm/yr over 10,000 years. These numbers are comparable to or larger than current estimates of net infiltration at Yucca Mountain. This condensate, which is generated in the immediate vicinity (meters) of the waste packages, will likely have a larger impact on waste package and repository performance than a similar amount of water introduced at the land surface.

Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

An Observing System Experiment with the West Coast Picket Fence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses and forecasts from a modern data assimilation and modeling system are used to evaluate the impact of a special rawinsonde dataset of 3-h soundings at seven sites interspersed with the seven regular sites along the West Coast (to form a ...

Paul A. Hirschberg; Perry C. Shafran; Russell L. Elsberry; Elizabeth A. Ritchie

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Image Formation by Incoherent and Coherent Transition Radiation from Flat and Rough Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we derive equations for the image formation of transverse profile of a relativistic beam obtained by means of optical transition radiation (OTR) from flat and rough metal surfaces. The motivation behind this study lies in the desire to suppress coherent transition radiation (COTR) observed in experiments at modern free electron lasers. The physical mechanism behind the problem of COTR is that the OTR is predominantly radiated at small angles of order of 1/{gamma} where {gamma} is the relativistic factor of the beam. This means that the transverse formation size of the image is of order of {bar {lambda}}{gamma} where {bar {lambda}} = {lambda}/2{pi} with {lambda} the radiation wavelength. For relativistic beams this can be comparable or even exceed the transverse size of the beam, which would mean that the image of the beam has very little to do with its transverse profile. It is fortuitous, however, that the incoherent image is formed by adding radiation energy of electrons and results in the transverse formation size being of order of {bar {lambda}}/{theta}{sub a}, with {theta}{sub a} is the aperture angle of the optical system. The COTR image, in contrast, is formed by adding electromagnetic field of electrons, and leads to the formation size {bar {lambda}}{gamma}. In situations when the COTR intensity exceeds that of OTR the COTR imaging makes the diagnostic incapable of measuring the beam profile.

Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Theory of cooling neutron stars versus observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review current state of neutron star cooling theory and discuss the prospects to constrain the equation of state, neutrino emission and superfluid properties of neutron star cores by comparing the cooling theory with observations of thermal radiation from isolated neutron stars.

Yakovlev, D G; Kaminker, A D; Potekhin, A Yu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - General Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Radiation Information Answers to Questions about Radiation Dose Ranges Charts - tables showing radiation dose ranges from radio diagnostics to cancer radiotherapy....

440

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Websites about Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Websites About Radiation The ABC's of Nuclear Science A Teacher's Guide To The Nuclear Science Wall Chart Answers to Questions about Radiation and You Background Radiation:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

442

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisor Paul Hoover Special Assistant and Issues Management Coordinator Elinor Gwynn Radiation Protection Radiation Protection The Radiation Protection Division supports the...

444

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. RADIATION EXPOSURE CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2.2. Internal ExposureRADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Rubloff, Gary W.

445

The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin Australia)  

SciTech Connect

The diurnal variation of convection and associated cloud and radiative properties remains a significant issue in global NWP and climate models. This study analyzes observed diurnal variability of convection in a coastal monsoonal environment examining the interaction of convective rain clouds, their associated cloud properties, and the impact on the surface radiation and corresponding boundary layer structure during periods where convection is suppressed or active on the large scale. The analysis uses data from the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) as well as routine measurements from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Both active monsoonal and large-scale suppressed (buildup and break) conditions are examined and demonstrate that the diurnal variation of rainfall is much larger during the break periods and the spatial distribution of rainfall is very different between the monsoon and break regimes. During the active monsoon the total net radiative input to the surface is decreased by more than 3 times the amount than during the break regime - this total radiative cloud forcing is found to be dominated by the shortwave (SW) cloud effects because of the much larger optical thicknesses and persistence of long-lasting anvils and cirrus cloud decks associated with the monsoon regime. These differences in monsoon versus break surface radiative energy contribute to low-level air temperature differences in the boundary layer over the land surfaces.

May, Peter T.; Long, Charles N.; Protat, Alain

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Observations and Calculations of Aerosol Heating over the Arabian Sea during MONEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation flux observations were obtained during a flight of the NCAR Electra over the Arabian Sea during MONEX when aerosols were present, and these observations have been compared with theoretical calculations based upon simultaneously observed ...

Robert O. Ellingson; George N. Serafino

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

448

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

449

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV Name: Flora R Pitchford Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are the effects of nonionizing radiation on DNA , RNA or any other cell...

450

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Rapid shutdown experiments with one and two gas jets on Alcator C-Mod  

SciTech Connect

Massive gas injection rapid shutdown experiments have been conducted on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak using two toroidally separated gas injectors, in order to investigate the effect of multiple gas injection locations on the toroidal asymmetry in the radiated power. Toroidal radiation asymmetry is diagnosed by an array of six single-channel photodiodes mounted on the vessel wall. The presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity is diagnosed using an array of magnetic pickup (Mirnov) coils, mounted on stalks on the vessel wall. Scans were conducted of the relative timing between the two jets, of the 95th percentile safety factor, and of the plasma elongation. It is observed that firing the two gas jets so that the injected impurities arrive at the plasma at nearly the same time produced an increase in the toroidal radiation asymmetry. In addition, the radiation asymmetry in the thermal quench phase correlates with the growth rate of low toroidal mode number MHD modes, indicating that these mode(s) are playing a role in setting the radiation asymmetry.

OlynykPlasma Scien, G. [Plasma Sciences and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Plasma Sciences and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Granetz, R. S. [Plasma Sciences and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Plasma Sciences and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Reinke, M. L. [Plasma Sciences and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Plasma Sciences and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Whyte, D. G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Golfinopoulos, T. [Plasma Sciences and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Plasma Sciences and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Hughes, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Walk, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Izzo, V. A. [University of California, San Diego & La Jolla] [University of California, San Diego & La Jolla; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL] [ORNL; Milora, Stanley L [ORNL] [ORNL; Brookman, M. W. [University of Texas Fusion Research Center, Austin, TX] [University of Texas Fusion Research Center, Austin, TX

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Radiation protection at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Radiation Dosimetry Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Dosimetry Data. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions. MJ Berger The databases ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

454

Radiation Shields Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Radiation...

455

Surface Temperature Observations from AVHRR in FIFE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the surface radiometric temperature by the AVHRR sensor on board the NOAA-9 satellite during the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment conducted in central Kansas during 1987 are ...

T. J. Schmugge; G. M. Schmidt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Dark radiation emerging after big bang nucleosynthesis?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how recent data from observations of the cosmic microwave background may suggest the presence of additional radiation density which appeared after big bang nucleosynthesis. We propose a general scheme by which this radiation could be produced from the decay of nonrelativistic matter, we place constraints on the properties of such matter, and we give specific examples of scenarios in which this general scheme may be realized.

Fischler, Willy; Meyers, Joel [Theory Group, Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States) and Texas Cosmology Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

In situ measurement of lattice strain using synchrotron radiation and a conical slit system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An experiment utilizing synchrotron radiation to measure lattice strain components from an aluminum-lithium sample during tensile loading is presented in detail. The conical slit system (more)

Obstalecki, Mark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Relating Cirrus Cloud Properties to Observed Fluxes: A Critical Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy needed in cirrus cloud scattering and microphysical properties is quantified such that the radiative effect on climate can he determined. Our ability to compute and observe these properties to within needed accuracies is assessed, ...

A. M. Vogelmann; T. P. Ackerman

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Observed VegetationClimate Feedbacks in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed vegetation feedbacks on temperature and precipitation are assessed across the United States using satellite-based fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) and monthly climate data for the period of 19822000. This study ...

M. Notaro; Z. Liu; J. W. Williams

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The Arm Program's Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of water vapor intensive observation periods (WVIOPs) were conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma between 1996 and 2000. The goals of these WVIOPs are to characterize the accuracy of the operational ...

H. E. Revercomb; D. D. Turner; D. C. Tobin; R. O. Knuteson; W. F. Feltz; J. Barnard; J. Bsenberg; S. Clough; D. Cook; R. Ferrare; J. Goldsmith; S. Gutman; R. Halthore; B. Lesht; J. Liljegren; H. Linn; J. Michalsky; V. Morris; W. Porch; S. Richardson; B. Schmid; M. Splitt; T. Van Hove; E. Westwater; D. Whiteman

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ATLAS APPROVED EXPERIMENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8MAY98 8MAY98 Exp # Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 433-9 Miller Ion Irradiations of Anisotropic High-Tc Superconductors: Probing Dynamics of Magnetic Vortices 2 651-2 Paul Accelerator-Mass-Spectrometry Measurements of Natural 236U Concentrations with the ECR-ATLAS System 4 667-2 Janssens Unsafe Coulex of the 238,239Pu Nuclei 4 669-2 Carpenter Excited States Associated with Different Shapes in 178Hg and Neighboring Odd-A Nuclei 4 673-2 Lister A Study of Radiative Decay from High Lying States in 24Mg 5 689-2 Freeman Spectroscopy of Odd Tin Isotopes Approaching 100Sn 5 693-2 Reiter Structure and Formation Mechanism of Heavy Elements - Request for additional beam time for Experiment 693 - 6 706 Kwok Heavy-Ion Lithography on High Temperature Superconductors 2 708 Yu In-Beam Spectroscopy Study of the Proton Emitter 109I with Recoil-Decay Tagging Technique

462

Surface Energy and Radiation Balance Systems: General Description and Improvements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface evaluation of sensible and latent heat flux densities and the components of the radiation balance were desired for various vegetative surfaces during the ASCOT84 experiment to compare with modeled results and to relate these values to ...

Leo J. Fritschen; James R. Simpson

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

A Simulated Climatology of Spectrally Decomposed Atmospheric Infrared Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation experiment is conducted to inquire into the mean climate state and likely trends in atmospheric infrared radiation spectra. Upwelling and downwelling spectra at five vertical levels from the surface to the top of the atmosphere (TOA) ...

Yi Huang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

An Analytic Longwave Radiation Formula for Liquid Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Study (GCSS) intercomparisons of boundary layer clouds have used a convenient but idealized longwave radiation formula for clouds in their large-eddy simulations (LESs). Under ...

Vincent E. Larson; Kurt E. Kotenberg; Norman B. Wood

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A Surface Solar Radiation Model for Cloudy Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical solar radiation model based on standard meteorological data was revised for clouds using data from the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE). Climatic-mean transmittance functions were revised for low and convective clouds ...

Marshall A. Atwater; John T. Ball

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanistic Modeling of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Why This Project? Cells that are directly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation may experience DNA damage. Cells which happen to be in the vicinity of the exposed...

467

Rainfall and Radiative Heating Rates from TOGA COARE Atmospheric Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heat and moisture budgets are used to determine rainfall and radiative heating rates over the western Pacific warm pool during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled OceanAtmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Results are ...

Richard H. Johnson; Paul E. Ciesielski

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Radiative Heating and Cooling Rates in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the limitations to the accurate calculation of radiative heating and cooling rates in the stratosphere and mesosphere has been the lack of accurate data on the atmospheric temperature and composition. Data from the LIMS experiment on ...

John C. Gille; Lawrence V. Lyjak

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Radiation Effects in Ceramic Oxide and Novel LWR Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... TMS/ASM: Nuclear Materials Committee ... of radiation response of nuclear fuel through experiment, theory and computational multi-scale modeling. ... test reactors and commercial nuclear power reactors are all of interest.

470

Polarized photons in radiative muon capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the measurement of polarized photons arising from radiative muon capture. The spectrum of left circularly polarized photons or equivalently the circular polarization of the photons emitted in radiative muon capture on hydrogen is quite sensitive to the strength of the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant $g_P$. A measurement of either of these quantities, although very difficult, might be sufficient to resolve the present puzzle resulting from the disagreement between the theoretical prediction for $g_P$ and the results of a recent experiment. This sensitivity results from the absence of left-handed radiation from the muon line and from the fact that the leading parts of the radiation from the hadronic lines, as determined from the chiral power counting rules of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, all contain pion poles.

Shung-ichi Ando; Harold W. Fearing; Dong-Pil Min

2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

471

Radiative Forcing of Simulated Tropical Cloud Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of field experiments and subsequent studies in the 1970s and 1980s have led to the belief that radiative processes play a more significant role in the evolution of tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSS) than was once thought. In ...

Rosemary Auld Miller; William M. Frank

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Comparison of Spectrally Resolved Outgoing Longwave Radiation over the Tropical Pacific between 1970 and 2003 Using IRIS, IMG, and AIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observation of changes in the earths spectrally resolved outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) provides a direct method of determining changes in the radiative forcing of the climate system. An earlier study showed that satellite-observed ...

J. A. Griggs; J. E. Harries

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Atomic Collapse Observed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collapse State Observed Aided by Simulations, Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 |...

474

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

475

Radiation detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Davies, Terence J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Morton, III, John R. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

477

CMB Observational Techniques and Recent Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) consists of photons that were last created about 2 months after the Big Bang, and last scattered about 380,000 years after the Big Bang. The spectrum of the CMB is very close to a blackbody at 2.725 K and upper limits on any deviations of the CMB from a blackbody place strong constraints on energy transfer between the CMB and matter at all redshifts less than 2,000,000. The CMB is very nearly isotropic, but a dipole anisotropy of +/-3.346(17) mK shows that the Solar System barycenter is moving at 368+/-2 km/sec relative to the observable Universe. The dipole corresponds to a spherical harmonic index l=1. The higher indices l geq 2 indicate intrinsic inhomogeneities in the Universe that existed at the time of last scattering. While the photons have traveled freely only since the time of last scattering, the inhomogeneities traced by the CMB photons have been in place since the inflationary epoch only 10^{-35} sec after the Big Bang. These intrinsic anisotropies are much smaller in amplitude than the dipole anisotropy, with Delta T leq 100 microK. Electron scattering of the anisotropic radiation field produces an anisotropic linear polarization in the CMB with amplitudes less than 5 microK. Detailed studies of the angular power spectrum of the temperature and linear polarization anisotropies have yielded precise values for many cosmological parameters. This paper will discuss the techniques necessary to measure signals that are 100 million times smaller than the emission from the instrument and briefly describe results from experiments up to WMAP.

E. L. Wright

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

Vertical Profiles of Aerosol and Radiation and the Influence of a Temperature Inversion: Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an airborne experiment performed near Mnchengladbach (Germany) in November 1993 are reported. Besides meteorological data, vertical profiles of aerosol properties (number concentration, size distribution) and radiation (...

M. Wendisch; S. Mertes; A. Ruggaber; T. Nakajima

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Continuous Emission of A Radiation Quantum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is in accordance with such experiments as single photon self-interference that a photon, conveying one radiation energy quantum "$ h \\times$ frequency", is spatially extensive and stretches an electromagnetic wave train. A wave train, hence an energy quantum, can only be emitted by its source gradually. In both the two processes the wave and "particle" attributes of the radiation field are simultaneously prominent, where an overall satisfactory theory has been lacking. This paper presents a first principles treatment, in a unified framework of the classical and quantum mechanics, of the latter process, the emission of a single radiation quantum based on the dynamics of the radiation-emitting source, a charged oscillator which is itself extensive across its confining potential well. During the emission of one single radiation quantum, the extensive charged oscillator undergoes a continuous radiation damping and is non-stationary. This process is in this work treated using a quasi stationary approach, whereby the classical equation of motion, which directly facilitates the correspondence principle for a particle oscillator, and the quantum wave equation are established for each sufficiently brief time interval. As an inevitable consequence of the division of the total time for emitting one single quantum, a fractional Planck constant $h$ is introduced. The solutions to the two simultaneous equations yield for the charged oscillator a continuously exponentially decaying Hamiltonian that is at the same time quantised with respect to the fractional-$h$ at any instant of time; and the radiation wave field emitted over time stretches a wave train of finite length. The total system of the source and radiation field maintains at any time (integer $n$ times) one whole energy quantum, $h \\times$ frequency, in complete accordance with the notion of quantum mechanics and experiment.

J. X. Zheng-Johansson

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

480

NIST Optical Radiation Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Staff Directory. Staff. Name, Position, Office Phone. ... Contact. Optical Radiation Group Eric Shirley, Group Leader. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NVLAP Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP. ... This site has been established for applicants to the accreditation program for ionizing radiation dosimetry. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

482

Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Welcome. The Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division is a division ... disseminate the national standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

483

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course. ... 2012 NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course October 15-19, 2012 NIST Gaithersburg, Maryland. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ionizing Radiation Division of the Physics Laboratory supports the ... meaningful, and compatible measurements of ionizing radiations (x rays ...

485

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) will raise and lower a heavily instrumented tethered balloon system at regular intervals in the lower 2 kilometers of the atmosphere at Oliktok Point. Data obtained during the ALTOS campaign will provide a statistically significant set of observed in situ cloud properties for validating retrieval algorithms and help scientists reduce the uncertainty in the radiative forcing and heating rates on hourly time scales. The data will also help researchers gain a better understanding of the driving processes that control climate changes and determine the state of the Arctic climate system. Collaborators Science Team: The Pennsylvania State University, Stratton