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1

Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments  

SciTech Connect

We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic ?, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ?7 10{sup 14} W cm{sup ?2} to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code.

Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics, 2455 Hayward Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics, 2455 Hayward Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Bingham, D.; Goh, J. [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada)] [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is the first multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. It will fly on a low-inclination NASA satellite and two Sun-synchronous NOAA satellites during the mid-1980s. Each ...

Bruce R. Barkstrom

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

4

Human Radiation Experiments: Related Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Experiment Related Sites Related Links Home Roadmap What's New Search HREX Multimedia Related Sites Federal DOE DOE Sites & National Laboratories Federal Other The following are organizations which provide related information and links to databases, electronic documents, and servers. FEDERAL - DOE U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) homepage (http://www.doe.gov/)contains information on DOE's Departmental Resources, Programs, Offices, National Labs and other DOE related topics. DOE's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Technical Information Services (TIS) homepage (http://nattie.eh.doe.gov/) is a collection of information services designed to provide safety and health professionals with reliable, accurate and current information to assist them in performing their jobs.

5

Preliminary Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies on the Variational Assimilation Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations M. Janisková, J.-F. Mahfouf, and J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Shinfield Park, Reading Berskshire, United Kingdom Abstract A linearized cloud scheme and a radiation scheme including cloud effects have been developed at European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to assimilate cloud properties in the framework of the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) assimilation system. To investigate the potential of those schemes to modify the model temperature, humidity and cloud profiles and produce a better match to the observed radiation fluxes, one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) assimilation experiments have been carried out using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

6

Initial state radiation experiment at MAMI  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to contribute further insight into the discrepancy between the Lamb shift and elastic scattering determinations of the proton charge radius, a new experiment at MAMI is underway, aimed at measuring proton form-factors at very low momentum transfers by using a new technique based on initial state radiation. This paper reports on first findings of the pilot measurement performed in 2010, whose main goal was to check the feasibility of the proposed experiment and to recognize and overcome potential obstacles before running the full experiment in 2013.

Mihovilovi?, M.; Merkel, H. [Institut fr Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitt Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Synchrotron-radiation experiments with recoil ions  

SciTech Connect

Studies of atoms, ions and molecules with synchrotron radiation have generally focused on measurements of properties of the electrons ejected during, or after, the photoionization process. Much can also be learned, however, about the atomic or molecular relaxation process by studies of the residual ions or molecular fragments following inner-shell photoionization. Measurements are reported of mean kinetic energies of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon recoil ions produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell photoionization using white and monochromatic synchrotron x radiation. Energies are much lower than for the same charge-state ions produced by charged-particle impact. The results may be applicable to design of future angle-resolved ion-atom collision experiments. Photoion charge distributions are presented and compared with other measurements and calculations. Related experiments with synchrotron-radiation produced recoil ion, including photoionization of stored ions and measurement of shakeoff in near-threshold excitation, are briefly discussed. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Levin, J.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

9

Experiment generates THz radiation 20,000 times brighter than...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gwyn Williams Gwyn Williams, JLab's FEL Basic Research Program manager, led a multi-lab experiment that generated nearly 20 watts of terahertz radiation - a world record....

10

Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft F. Nemec,1,2 O. Santoli´k,3 January 2006; published 22 April 2006. [1] Results of a systematic survey of Power Line Harmonic Radiation from the electric power systems which are magnetically conjugated with the place of observation

Santolik, Ondrej

11

ARM - Field Campaign - Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) Campaign Links RACORO Website Related Campaigns Surface Radiation Comparison Transfer Measurements for RACORO 2009.01.20, Long, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) 2009.01.22 - 2009.06.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/racoro/ Lead Scientist : Andrew Vogelmann For data sets, see below. Description The ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) supported the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, led by principal investigator Andrew Vogelmann. During this long-term campaign, the AAF conducted routine flights at the ACRF Southern

12

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results May 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - New Mexico State University"s Low Background Radiation Experiment (LBRE), which takes place 2,150 feet below the earth"s surface at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, recently released some results about the project"s first two years of experimentation. The March 2011 edition of Health Physics printed an article titled "Exploring Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation from the Other Side of Background," summarizing some initial data taken from LBRE and from a sister experiment conducted at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute

13

On interrelating laboratory experiments and geoplasma observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The history, benefits, suitability and limitations of laboratory simulation of space plasma processes are reviewed. Aspects of waves, instabilities, nonlinearities, particle transport, reconnection and hydrodynamics are addressed in terms of interrelated experiments performed in space and in the laboratory. Over time, the degree to which the interrelated experiments can be compared has increased, thanks to improved diagnostic techniques in space and closer attention to matching dimensionless space parameters in the laboratory.

M E Koepke

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Archival and April 1985 Results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data products being made available to the community. The Science Team used ten validation criteria to judge the acceptability of the data for archival. We list these criteria and ...

B. Barkstrom; E. Harrison; G. Smith; R. Green; J. Kibler; R. Cess; the ERBE Science Team

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

ARM - Field Campaign - Macquarie Island Cloud and Radiation Experiment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud and Radiation Experiment (MICRE) 2016.03.01 - 2018.03.31 Lead Scientist : Roger Marchand Abstract Clouds over the Southern Ocean are poorly represented in present day...

16

Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides an overview summary of radiation doses from occupational exposures at the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration for the year 2013.

17

Chronic radiation enteritis: A community hospital experience  

SciTech Connect

A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the operative management of patients with chronic radiation enteropathy. Thirty-eight affected patients from 1974 to 1986 were reviewed. Patients with recurrent cancer responsible for symptoms were excluded. Seventy-one percent of patients presented with bowel obstruction. Twenty-one patients were treated with bowel resection, while 17 were treated with a bypass procedure or diverting ostomy alone. Overall morbidity was 45%, and postoperative mortality was 16%. Patients in the bypass group were significantly older than those in the resection group (70.3 vs. 55.5 years, P = .024), suggesting that age may have been a determinant of the procedure performed. In our study there was no difference in outcome based on preexisting vascular disease, tumor site, type of procedure performed, or radiation dose. We conclude that resection is the procedure of choice in cases of chronic radiation enteritis requiring surgery except in cases with dense adhesions when enteroenterostomal bypass is a viable alternative.

Fenner, M.N.; Sheehan, P.; Nanavati, P.J.; Ross, D.S. (Southern Illinois Univ. School of Medicine, Springfield (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Disc-cylinder Argonne-Maryland gravitational radiation experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new kind of antenna has been developed for gravitational radiation. It consists of a disc operating in the radial mode of circular symmetry, and search has been carried out for a scalar component. The observ...

J. Weber

1971-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia: Film Clips  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Film Clips Multimedia Film Clips Multimedia Home Roadmap What's New Multimedia Related Sites Feedback Sound Bytes Film Clips Historical Photographs Films require: Get Real Player 5.0 to view the films on this page. The Atom and You Second in the series The Atom and You, Paramount News, March 25, 1953, shows tests conducted at Hanford, Washington, on effects of exposure of sheep and salmon to radiation; testing of radioactive dust at UCLA laboratory; the use of radioisotopes and tracer materials for detecting cancer in patients at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the use of rays from the cobalt source at N.Y. city’s Moncure Hospital, to treat cancer of the brain. (Time: 5 min 9 secs) Real Media Download Versions 28.8 kbps version (782k) 56.0 kbps version (1.3mb) T1 version (7.5mb) Iodine 131

20

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments - Executive Summary Publication Information The Creation of the Advisory Committee The President's Charge The Committee's Approach The Historical Context Key Findings Key Recommendations What's Next: The Advisory Committee's Legacy PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Final Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (stock number 061-000-00-848-9), the supplemental volumes to the Final Report (stock numbers 061-000-00850-1, 061-000-00851-9, and 061-000-00852-7), and additional copies of this Executive Summary (stock number 061-000-00849-7) may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: Superintendent of Documents

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment govCampaignsARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment 2015.10.01 - 2016.03.31 Lead Scientist : Dan Lubin Description West Antarctica is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, and this warming is closely connected with global sea level rise. The discovery of rapid climate change on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) has challenged previous explanations of Antarctic climate change that focused on strengthening of circumpolar westerlies in response to the positive polarity trend in the Southern Annular Mode. West Antarctic warming does not yet have a comprehensive explanation: dynamical mechanisms may vary

22

Estimation of net radiation and surface heat fluxes using NOAA-7 satellite infrared data during fair-weather cloudy situations of Mesogers-84 experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimation of radiation during fair weather cloudy situations of the MESOGERS-84 experiment has been examined using micrometeorological observations and satellite data. Diurnal variation of cloudiness is empirica...

M. Zhong; A. Weill; O. Taconet

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) measured the daily  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation for astronauts orbiting Mars. The biggest uncertainty is in the SPE dose estimate. We had important than GCRs as a source of radiation? Explain why or why not in terms of estimation uncertainties5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE

24

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part IV: Overview Part IV: Overview In part IV we present the overall findings of the Advisory Committee's inquiry and deliberations and the recommendations that follow from these findings. In chapter 17, findings are presented in two parts, first for the period 1944 through 1974 and then for the contemporary period. These parts, in turn, are divided into findings regarding biomedical experiments and those regarding population exposures. We begin our presentation of findings for the period 1944 through 1974 with a summation of what we have learned about human radiation experiments: their number and purpose, the likelihood that they produced harm, and how human radiation experimentation contributed to advances in medicine. We then summarize what we have found concerning the nature of federal rules and policies governing research involving human subjects during this period, and the implementation of these rules in the conduct of human radiation experiments. Findings about the nature and implementation of federal rules cover issues of consent, risk, the selection of subjects, and the role of national security considerations.

25

Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report  

SciTech Connect

When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Blast wave radiation source measurement experiments on the Z Z-pinch facility  

SciTech Connect

The Dynamic Hohlraum (DH) radiation on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories [R. B. Spielman, W. A. Stygar, J. F. Seamen et al., Proceeding of the 11th International Pulsed Power Conference, Baltimore, 1997, edited by G. Cooperstein and I. Vitkovitsky (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1997), Vol. 1, p. 709] is a bright source of radiant energy that has proven useful for high energy density physics experiments. But the radiation output from a DH on Z needs to be well known. In this paper, a new method is presented for measuring the radiation fluence deposited in an experiment, specifically, an experiment driven by a Z DH. This technique uses a blast wave produced in a SiO{sub 2} foam, which starts as supersonic but transitions to subsonic, producing a shock at the transition point that is observable via radiography. The position of this shock is a sensitive measure of the radiation drive energy from the Z DH. Computer simulations have been used to design and analyze a Z foam blast wave experiment.

Peterson, R.R.; Peterson, D.L.; Watt, R.G.; Idzorek, G.; Tierney, T.; Lopez, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Radiation shielding and dosimetry experiments updates in the SINBAD database  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......characterisation of the radiation source, it describes...National Laboratory, Radiation Safety Information Computational...Internet Nuclear Physics Radiation Protection instrumentation Radiometry Research Software Validation...

I. Kodeli; H. Hunter; E. Sartori

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

28

Evaluation of Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Sa...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Type Occurrences Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Satellite and Cloud Radar Y. Luo and S. K. Krueger University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Because of both the various effects clouds exert on the earth-atmospheric system and the cloud feedback, correct representations of clouds in numerical models are critical for accurate climate modeling and weather forecast. Unfortunately, determination of clouds and their radiative feedback processes is still the weakest component of current general circulation models (e.g., Senior and Mitchell 1993, Cess et al. 1996). Using radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) available from satellite observations made by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE; Barkstrom 1984), one could assess cloud radiative effects

29

Report on Physics of Channelization: Theory, Experiment, and Observation  

SciTech Connect

The project involved a study of physical processes that create eroded channel and drainage networks. A particular focus was on how the shape of the channels and the network depended on the nature of the fluid flow. Our approach was to combine theoretical, experimental, and observational studies in close collaboration with Professor Daniel Rothman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Laboratory -scaled experiments were developed and quantitative data on the shape of the pattern and erosion dynamics are obtained with a laser-aided topography technique and fluorescent optical imaging techniques.

Kudrolli, Arshad [Clark University] [Clark University

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

30

OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL FLARE PLASMA WITH THE EUV VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT  

SciTech Connect

One of the defining characteristics of a solar flare is the impulsive formation of very high temperature plasma. The properties of the thermal emission are not well understood, however, and the analysis of solar flare observations is often predicated on the assumption that the flare plasma is isothermal. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides spectrally resolved observations of emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures (e.g., Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and allow for thermal flare plasma to be studied in detail. In this paper we describe a method for computing the differential emission measure distribution in a flare using EVE observations and apply it to several representative events. We find that in all phases of the flare the differential emission measure distribution is broad. Comparisons of EVE spectra with calculations based on parameters derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites soft X-ray fluxes indicate that the isothermal approximation is generally a poor representation of the thermal structure of a flare.

Warren, Harry P.; Doschek, George A. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Mariska, John T. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Electroweak Radiative Corrections to the Parity-violating Asymmetry for SLAC Experiment E158  

SciTech Connect

Electroweak radiative corrections to observable quantities of Moeller scattering of polarized particles are calculated. We emphasize the contribution induced by infrared divergent parts of cross section. The covariant method is used to remove infrared divergences, so that our results do not involve any unphysical parameters. When applied to the kinematics of SLAC E158 experiment, these corrections reduce the parity violating asymmetry by about -6.5% at E = 48 GeV and y = 0.5, and kinematically weighted 'hard' bremsstrahlung effect for SLAC E158 is {approx} 1%.

Zykunov, Vladimir A.; /Gomel State Tech. U.

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

32

Shortwave Spectral Radiative Forcing of Cumulus Clouds from Surface Observations  

SciTech Connect

The spectral changes of the total cloud radiative forcing (CRF) and its diffuse and direct components are examined by using spectrally resolved (visible spectral range) all-sky surface irradiances measured by Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer. We demonstrate: (i) the substantial contribution of the diffuse component to the total CRF, (ii) the well-defined spectral variations of total CRF in the visible spectral region, and (iii) the strong statistical relationship between spectral (500 nm) and shortwave broadband values of total CRF. Our results suggest that the framework based on the visible narrowband fluxes can provide important radiative quantities for rigorous evaluation of radiative transfer parameterizations and can be applied for estimation of the shortwave total CRF.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Long, Charles N.; Flynn, Connor J.

2011-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

33

Observations of x-ray radiation pressure force on individual gold nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect

We report observations of x-ray radiation pressure force on individual single nanocrystals using an x-ray single molecular methodology. The observed gold nanocrystals are linked to the adsorbed protein molecules. We observed the directed Brownian motion of individual linked nanocrystals. The observed force is estimated at about 0.13-0.63 aN. We will be able to control and measure dynamics of micro- or nanocrystalline materials using x-ray radiation pressure force.

Sasaki, Yuji C.; Okumura, Yasuaki; Miyazaki, Takuya; Higurashi, Takashi; Oishi, Noboru [Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Sayou, Hyogo 679-5198, Japan and CREST Sasaki-team, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), Tachikawa 190-0012 (Japan); Biotechnology Research Center, Teikyo University, Miyamae, Kawasaki 216-0001, Japan and CREST Sasaki-team, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), Tachikawa 190-0012 (Japan)

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Power line harmonic radiation observed by satellite: Properties and propagation through the ionosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power line harmonic radiation observed by satellite: Properties and propagation through of power line harmonic radiation events observed by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft. Altogether, 88 with the largest intensities often occur off exact multiples of base power system frequency. This can be explained

Santolik, Ondrej

35

High-sensitivity observations of solar flare decimeter radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new acousto-optic radio spectrometer has observed the 1 - 2 GHz radio emission of solar flares with unprecedented sensitivity. The number of detected decimeter type III bursts is greatly enhanced compared to observations by conventional spectrometers observing only one frequency at the time. The observations indicate a large number of electron beams propagating in dense plasmas. For the first time, we report weak, reversed drifting type III bursts at frequencies above simultaneous narrowband decimeter spikes. The type III bursts are reliable signatures of electron beams propagating downward in the corona, apparently away from the source of the spikes. The observations contradict the most popular spike model that places the spike sources at the footpoints of loops. Conspicuous also was an apparent bidirectional type U burst forming a fish-like pattern. It occurs simultaneously with an intense U-burst at 600-370 MHz observed in Tremsdorf. We suggest that it intermodulated with strong terrestrial interference (cellular phones) causing a spurious symmetric pattern in the spectrogram at 1.4 GHz. Symmetric features in the 1 - 2 GHz range, some already reported in the literature, therefore must be considered with utmost caution.

Arnold O. Benz; Peter Messmer; Christian Monstein

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

36

Determining the radiative properties of pulverized-coal particles from experiments. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive coupled experimental-theoretical study has been performed to determine the effective radiative properties of pulverized-coal/char particles. The results obtained show that the ``effective`` scattering phase function of coal particles are highly forward scattering and show less sensitivity to the size than predicted from the Lorenz-Mie theory. The main reason for this is the presence of smaller size particles associated with each larger particle. Also, the coal/char particle clouds display more side scattering than predicted for the same size range spheres, indicating the irregular shape of the particles and fragmentation. In addition to these, it was observed that in the visible wavelength range the coal absorption is not gray, and slightly vary with the wavelength. These two experimental approaches followed in this study are unique in a sense that the physics of the problem are not approximated. The properties determined include all uncertainties related to the particle shape, size distribution, inhomogeneity and spectral complex index of refraction data. In order to obtain radiative property data over a wider wavelength spectrum, additional ex-situ experiments have been carried out using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer. The spectral measurements were performed over the wavelength range of 2 to 22 {mu}m. These results were interpreted to obtain the ``effective`` efficiency factors of coal particles and the corresponding refractive index values. The results clearly show that the coal/char radiative properties display significant wavelength dependency in the infrared spectrum.

Menguec, M.P.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Observation of the radiative decay D*+-> D+gamma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed a signal for the decay D*(+) --> D(+)gamma at a significance of 4 standard deviations. From the measured branching ratio B(D*(+) --> D(+)gamma)/B(D*(+) --> D(+)pi(0)) = 0.055 +/- 0.014 +/- 0.010 we find B(D*(+) --> D(+)gamma) = 0...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance  

SciTech Connect

Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties: Application to Climate Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties: Application to Climate Studies G. M. McFarquhar and T. Nousiainen Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois M. S. Timlin, S. F. Iacobellis, and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Cloud radiative feedback is the most important effect determining climate response to human activity. Ice clouds reflect solar radiation and absorb thermal emission from the ground and the lower atmosphere and emit infrared radiation to space. The representation of these processes in models affects future climate predictions and there is much uncertainty in the representation of these processes. The size and

40

The waves observed in the ARAKS-East experiment  

SciTech Connect

Data obtained during the second launch of the ARAKS (02.15.1975) regarding wave measurements over a frequency range of 0.1-5.0 MHz, are analyzed and compared with data of the first launch. Results indicate that the difference was mainly attributable to a difference in the rocket flight trajectory planes, the first directed toward the magnetic North, and the second toward the magnetic East. The maximum whistler mode spectra was seen in the 650 kHz vicinity for the second launch, while 150 kHz were recorded during the first. The plasma mode frequency (East launch) showed average levels of signals at receiver input of 0.5-1 mV, which slightly exceeded the level of the plasma mode in the North launch (about 200 micron V). Bernstein modes spectra showed emissions in the vicinity of electron gyrofrequency harmonics which exceeded those of the local plasma frequency, and several phenomena have been observed during electron injection pauses correlated with electron gun operation.

Kushnerevskii, Iu.V.; Pulinets, S.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Photon-Induced Field Desorption Experiments with Laser and Synchroton Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photon-induced field desorption of hydrogen ions from a tungsten emitter has been observed using laser light (4.5 eV). Whereas the laser light leads to thermal desorption, the synchrotron radiation seems to sh...

W. Drachsel; U. Weigmann; S. Jaenicke

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New: Press Briefing by Secretary of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE WHITE HOUSE THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release March 28, 1997 PRESS BRIEFING BY SECRETARY OF ENERGY FEDRICO PENA, ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF ENERGY TARA O'TOOLE, AND ACTING ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY GENERAL JOHN DWYER The Briefing Room 11:10 A.M. EST MS. GLYNN: Good morning, everybody. Today we have a human radiation report here. To brief is Secretary Federico Pena; Tara O'Toole, who is the Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environment, Safety and Health; and John Dwyer, the Acting Associate Attorney General. SECRETARY PENA: Thank you very much. Good morning, everybody. Dr. O'Toole, please come up, and John, join me here to my left and right. Let me begin by reading a statement from the President and then I have an opening comment. I'll introduce Dr. O'Toole and John to make some comments.

43

Radiative reverse shock laser experiments relevant to accretion processes in cataclysmic variables  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the production of radiative reverse shocks in experiments at the Omega-60 laser facility. The ability of this high-intensity laser to impart large energy densities on micron-thin foils makes it feasible to create supersonic plasma flows. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires a sufficiently fast flow (?100 km/s) of a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable shocked layers. The reverse shock forms in the flow once it is impeded. This paper presents the first radiographic data of normal incidence, reverse shockwaves. These experiments are primarily motivated by the contribution of radiative reverse shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) system in which they reside. We show similarity properties to suggest that the experimental production of radiative reserve shocks in the laboratory may be scalable to such astrophysical systems.

Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Sweeney, R.; Grosskopf, M.; Klein, S.; Gillespie, R.; Keiter, P. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States); Loupias, B.; Falize, E. [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

REVERSE RADIATIVE SHOCK LASER EXPERIMENTS RELEVANT TO ACCRETING STREAM-DISK IMPACT IN INTERACTING BINARIES  

SciTech Connect

We present the first results from high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics experiments that explore the hydrodynamic and radiative properties of a reverse shock relevant to a cataclysmic variable system. A reverse shock is a shock wave that develops when a freely flowing, supersonic plasma is impeded. In our experiments, performed on the Omega Laser Facility, a laser pulse is used to accelerate plasma ejecta into a vacuum. This flow is directed into an Al plate in front of which a shock forms in the rebounding plasma. The plasma flow is moving fast enough that it is shocked to high enough temperatures that radiative cooling affects the shock structure. These are the first experiments to produce a radiative reverse shock wave.

Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Huntington, C. M.; Kaczala, D. N.; Klein, S.; Sweeney, R.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Villette, B. [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Plewa, T., E-mail: krauland@umich.edu, E-mail: rpdrake@umich.edu [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Parity violating observables in radiative neutrino pair emission from metastable atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a possibility of measuring parity violating effects in radiative neutrino pair emission from metastable atoms; asymmetric angular distribution of emitted photons from oriented atoms and emergent circular polarization. Their observation, along with the continuous photon energy spectrum which has 6 thresholds, may be interpreted as events being a combined weak and QED process, emission of $\\gamma \

M. Yoshimura; A. Fukumi; N. Sasao; T. Yamaguchi

2009-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

46

Lineal energy and radiation quality in radiation therapy: model calculations and comparison with experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microdosimetry is a recommended method for characterizing radiation quality in situations when the biological effectiveness under test is not well known. In such situations, the radiation beams are described by their lineal energy probability distributions. Results from radiobiological investigations in the beams are then used to establish response functions that relate the lineal energy to the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). In this paper we present the influence of the size of the simulated volume on the relation to the clinical RBE values (or weighting factors). A single event probability distribution of the lineal energy is approximated by its dose average lineal energy () which can be measured or calculated for volumes from a few micrometres down to a few nanometres. The clinical RBE values were approximated as the ratio of the ?-values derived from the LQ-relation. Model calculations are presented and discussed for the SOBP of a 12C ion (290 MeV u?1) and the reference 60Co ? therapy beam. Results were compared with those for a conventional x-ray therapy beam, a 290 MeV proton beam and a neutron therapy beam. It is concluded that for a simulated volume of about 10nm, the ?-ratio increases approximately linearly with the -ratio for all the investigated beams. The correlation between y and ? provides the evidence to characterize a radiation therapy beam by the lineal energy when, for instance, weighting factors are to be estimated.

L Lindborg; M Hultqvist; Carlsson Tedgren; H Nikjoo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Observed reductions of surface solar radiation at Sites in the United States and worldwide from 1961 to 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and there is room for further improvement (World Climate Research Programme, 1991). 2. All Sky Solar Radiation Here I use a new quality-tested global database of monthly mean surface solar radiation time seriesObserved reductions of surface solar radiation at Sites in the United States and worldwide from

48

Water and ice structure in the range 220 - 365K from radiation total scattering experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The past decade or so has witnessed a large number of articles about water structure. The most incisive experiments involve radiation with a wavelength compatible with the observed inter-molecular separations found in water, of order $\\sim 3$\\AA, in other words mostly $$10keV x-rays. Because x-rays are scattered by electrons while neutrons are scattered by nuclei, the two probes give complementary information about the three site-site radial distribution functions for water, namely O-O, O-H and H-H. Here a version of Monte Carlo simulation called Empirical Potential Structure Refinement is used to devise an empirical intermolecular potential which attempts to drive the simulated radial distribution functions as close as possible to the data. New x-ray and neutron scattering data on water in the temperature range 280 - 365K are presented for the first time, alongside a new analysis of some much older neutron data on ice 1h at 220K. This temperature analysis, above and below the water freezing point of water, r...

Soper, Alan K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Observer-based control of a tethered wing wind power system: indoor real-time experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observer-based control of a tethered wing wind power system: indoor real-time experiment Ahmad, a novel wind power system based on a tethered wing is presented. An observer-based control strategy WindPower, Joby energy [8] or Makani Power [9], is composed of one or several airborne wind turbines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

50

Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records  

SciTech Connect

The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department`s ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE`s historical records to independent research and analysis.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

DNA Radiation Environments Program Spring 1991 2-meter box experiments and analyses. [DEfense Nuclear Agency (DNA)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Spring 1991 2-m Box experiments that were performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) at Aberdeen Proving Ground. These studies were sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) under the Radiation Environments Program to obtain measured data for benchmarking the Adjoint Monte Carlo Code System, MASH, Version 1.0. The MASH code system was developed for the Department of Defense and NATO for calculating neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields and shielding protection factors for armored vehicles and military structures against nuclear weapon radiation. In the 2-m Box experiments, neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors were measured in the free-field and as a function of position on an anthropomorphic phantom that was placed outside and inside a borated polyethylene lined steel-walled 2-m box. The data were acquired at a distance of 400-m from the APRF reactor. The purpose of these experiments was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates as a function of detector location on the phantom for cases when the phantom was in the free-field and inside of the box. Neutron measurements were made using a BD-100R bubble detector and gamma-ray measurements were made using thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). Calculated and measured data were compared in terms of the C/M ratio. The calculated and measured neutron and gamma-ray dose rates and reduction factors agreed on the average within the [plus minus]20% limits mandated by DNA and demonstrate the capability of the MASH code system in reproducing measured data in nominally shielded assemblies.

Santoro, R.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Whitaker, S.Y. (Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

First Observation of the Point Spread Function of Optical Transition Radiation Pavel Karataev,1,* Alexander Aryshev,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Observation of the Point Spread Function of Optical Transition Radiation Pavel Karataev,1 Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801, Japan 3 John Adams) of optical transition radiation (OTR) performed at KEK-Accelerator Test Facility extraction line. We have

Sheldon, Nathan D.

53

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Local Scale Observation Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The local scale observation site (LSOS) is the smallest study site (0.8 ha) of the 2002/03 Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) and is located within the Fraser mesocell study area. It was the most intensively measured site of the CLPX, and ...

Janet Hardy; Robert Davis; Yeohoon Koh; Don Cline; Kelly Elder; Richard Armstrong; Hans-Peter Marshall; Thomas Painter; Gilles Castres Saint-Martin; Roger DeRoo; Kamal Sarabandi; Tobias Graf; Toshio Koike; Kyle McDonald

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Experiment Design and First Season Observations with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the instrumentation, experiment design and data reduction for the first season of observations with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), a compact microwave interferometer designed to measure anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) on degree and sub-degree scales (l=100--900). The telescope was deployed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station during the 1999--2000 austral summer and conducted observations of the CMB throughout the following austral winter. In its first season of observations, DASI has mapped CMB fluctuations in 32 fields, each 3.4 deg across, with high sensitivity.

E. M. Leitch; C. Pryke; N. W. Halverson; J. Kovac; G. Davidson; S. LaRoque; E. Schartman; J. Yamasaki; J. E. Carlstrom; W. L. Holzapfel; M. Dragovan; J. K. Cartwright; B. S. Mason; S. Padin; T. J. Pearson; M. C. Shepherd; A. C. S. Readhead

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Solar Flare Chromospheric Line Emission: Comparison Between IBIS High-resolution Observations and Radiative Hydrodynamic Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation in a broad spectral and at a wide height range. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere (lower atmosphere) can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results can be extremely valuable, but has not been attempted so far. We present in this paper such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope's (DST) Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 that we have modeled with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN (Carlsson & Stein 1992, 1997; Abbett & Hawley 1999; Allred et al. 2005). We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in H$\\alpha$ 6563 \\AA\\ and Ca II 8542 \\AA, and with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in X-rays. The latter was used to infer the non-thermal elect...

da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vah; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Liu, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Investigation of the Dynamical, Macrophysical and Radiative Properties of High Clouds Combining Satellite Observations and Climate Model Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the physical mechanism governing the fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis and test of FAT hypothesis with CTT measurements; and 3) the intercomparison of cloud fraction and radiative effects between satellite-based observations and reanalysis product...

Li, Yue

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

57

New phenomena observed by EISCAT during an RF ionospheric modification experiment  

SciTech Connect

An ionospheric RF-modification experiment was carried out using the MPI heating facility and the EISCAT 933-MHz incoherent scatter radar (ISR). The MPI heater was normally operated at 4.04 MHz and modulated 20-s on, 40-s off. The ISR observed waves propagating parallel to B0, and chirped as well as normal plasma line observations were performed. Heater-induced plasma lines were observed only in the first 10-s integration interval, indicating a strong overshoot. These lines are unusual in that multiple simultaneous lines were observed, normally originating within one kilometer of the critical region but sometimes from lower heights, and that the frequency of the most common line is offset some 250 kHz from the heating frequency, with the other lines occurring at greater frequency offsets. Ion power profile observations show the existence of a topside enhanced ion line at the critical density corresponding to the heater frequency. 9 refs.

Isham, B.; Hagfors, T.; Kofman, W.; Thide, B.; Nordling, J. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA) Centre d'Etudes des Phenomenes Aleatoires et Geophysiques, Saint-Martin-d'Heres (France) Institutet for Rymdfysik, Uppsala (Sweden))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Correlation between radiation processes in silicon and long-time degradation of detectors for high energy physics experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution, the correlation between fundamental interaction processes induced by radiation in silicon and observable effects which limit the use of silicon detectors in high energy physics experiments is investigated in the frame of a phenomenological model which includes: generation of primary defects at irradiation starting from elementary interactions in silicon; kinetics of defects, effects at the p-n junction detector level. The effects due to irradiating particles (pions, protons, neutrons), to their flux, to the anisotropy of the threshold energy in silicon, to the impurity concentrations and resistivity of the starting material are investigated as time, fluence and temperature dependences of detector characteristics. The expected degradation of the electrical parameters of detectors in the complex hadron background fields at LHC & SLHC are predicted.

Lazanu, S; Lazanu, Sorina; Lazanu, Ionel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Correlation between radiation processes in silicon and long-time degradation of detectors for high energy physics experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution, the correlation between fundamental interaction processes induced by radiation in silicon and observable effects which limit the use of silicon detectors in high energy physics experiments is investigated in the frame of a phenomenological model which includes: generation of primary defects at irradiation starting from elementary interactions in silicon; kinetics of defects, effects at the p-n junction detector level. The effects due to irradiating particles (pions, protons, neutrons), to their flux, to the anisotropy of the threshold energy in silicon, to the impurity concentrations and resistivity of the starting material are investigated as time, fluence and temperature dependences of detector characteristics. The expected degradation of the electrical parameters of detectors in the complex hadron background fields at LHC & SLHC are predicted.

Sorina Lazanu; Ionel Lazanu

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Plasma dynamics and generation of hard radiations in experiments with cylindrical Z-pinches  

SciTech Connect

A survey of experimental studies on the generation of hard ionizing radiations from dynamic cylindrical Z-pinches is presented. Comprehensive experimental data do not confirm the hypothesis that charged particles responsible for the generation of hard radiations (neutrons and X-rays) are accelerated in short-scale Z-pinch necks (m = 0). Analysis of the experimental data indicates that, in discharges in pure hydrogen and deuterium, these particles are most probably accelerated in the axial direction along H{sub {phi} {approx}} 0 lines by the induction electric field generated during the initiation of the secondary near-wall breakdown, which disconnects the pinch from the power supply. In discharges excited in heavy gases and at high initial current growth rates (I{sub 0} {>=} 10{sup 12} A/s) in experiments with hydrogen and deuterium contaminated with admixtures arriving from the chamber wall, there is an additional acceleration mechanism related to the growth of the resistance of a radiatively cooled Z-pinch.

Matveev, Yu. V. [Academy of Sciences of Abkhazia, Sukhum Physicotechnical Institute, Abkhazia (Georgia)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of radiation exposure for troop observers, Exercise Desert Rock VI, Operation Teapot. Final report 1 Mar-15 Jul 80  

SciTech Connect

The radiation doses to troop observers and volunteer observers for Exercise Desert Rock VI are reconstructed for each applicable shot of Operation Teapot (1955). Initial neutron and gamma radiation doses are determined from transport codes ATR4 and ATR4.1. Residual radiation contours and decay rates are established through a new automated procedure that utilizes raw data in regression analysis to fit space-time models. Troop operations data are combined with the radiological data to determine integrated dose. Uncertainties are calculated for each parameter. The volunteers received the highest observer--1.6 rem gamma and 4.5 rem neutron. The highest dose received by troop observers was 1.4 rem gamma and 1.4 rem neutron at Shot Tesla.

Goetz, J.; McGahan, J.; Kaul, D.; Weitz, R.; Klemm, J.

1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations  

SciTech Connect

Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

Howard Barker; Jason Cole

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.

Robert G. Ellingson

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

65

Observation of High-Frequency Radiation and Anomalous Ion Heating on Low-Density Discharges in Alcator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radiation spectrum ranging from 300 MHz to 5 GHz is observed in low-density discharges in Alcator. At the lower end this spectrum is strongly peaked at a frequency corresponding to the ion plasma frequency. The emission occurs if the ratio of the drift velocity to the thermal speed of the electrons exceeds 0.45 for discharges in hydrogen or 0.2 in deuterium. The onset of the radiation correlates with the production of energetic ions.

A. A. M. Oomens; L. Th. M. Ornstein; R. R. Parker; F. C. Schller; R. J. Taylor

1976-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

66

Recent AGN Observations by the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground?based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for the detection of very high energy gamma rays from Galactic and extra?galactic sources. By utilizing the large collection area provided by the solar mirrors of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque New Mexico STACEE achieves a low energy threshold around 100 GeV for the detection of gamma rays. We briefly describe the STACEE detector and detail recent observations of Active Galactic Nuclei.

J. Kildea; A. Alabiso; D. A. Bramel; J. Carson; C. E. Covault; D. Driscoll; P. Fortin; D. M. Gingrich; D. S. Hanna; A. Jarvis; T. Lindner; R. Mukherjee; C. Mueller; R. A. Ong; R. A. Scalzo; D. A. Williams; J. Zweerink

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Observations of small-scale plasma density depletions in arecibo HF heating experiments  

SciTech Connect

Observations of incoherent scattering of electromagnetic waves at UHF from Langmuir waves by a new scheme involving linear frequency modulation (chirping) of a UHF transmitter and the demodulation (dechirping) of the received signals have been applied during HF heating experiments. These observations show that the high power HF wave used for ionospheric modification creates small-scale plasma depletions instantly on a time scale of 5 ms. For a plasma frequency of 5.1 MHz, plasma frequency gradient of the order of 50 kHz/km, and power density input of the HF heater wave of 8.0 x 10/sup -5/ W/m/sup 2/ the depletion ranged from 3 to 5%. This appears to provide direct evidence that the HF-induced modifications involve Langmuir waves trapped in density cavities. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

Isham, B.; Birkmayer, W.; Hagfors, T.; Kofman, W.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G. (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chrien, Robert E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Darrell L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Watt, Robert G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MM)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B-1 B-1 Appendix B APPENDIX B ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ACCESS TO RECORDS AND INFORMATION RELATING TO HUMAN RADIATION EXPERIMENTS Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Collection at the National Archives, College Park Overview: 665 cubic feet of records from the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments have been deposited at the National Archives and made part of Record Group 220, Presidential Commit- tees, Commissions, and Boards. The collection can be accessed through the Archive's Textual Reference Branch located at Archives II, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, Maryland. The phone number

70

Form 007[09/2011] 1 | P a g e Training & Experience Radiation Producing Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is based on Radiation Protection Training that you have learned in both the classroom and on the Job[09/2011] 3 | P a g e List all places where you have received classroom training in Radiation Protection. 1 and Supplement to Radiation Safety Plan for Radiation Producing Equipment; the Manual and Supplement are located

Rubloff, Gary W.

71

CMOS Imaging Detectors as X-ray Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation Experiments  

SciTech Connect

CMOS imagers are matrix-addressed photodiode arrays, which have been utilized in devices such as commercially available digital cameras. The pixel size of CMOS imagers is usually larger than that of CCD and smaller than that of TFT, giving them a unique position. Although CMOS x-ray imaging devices have already become commercially available, they have not been used as an x-ray area detector in synchrotron radiation experiments. We tested performance of a CMOS detector from Rad-icon (Shad-o-Box1024) in medical imaging, small-angle scattering, and protein crystallography experiments. It has pixels of 0.048 mm square, read-out time of 0.45 sec, 12-bit ADC, and requires a frame grabber for image acquisition. The detection area is 5-cm square. It uses a Kodak Min-R scintillator screen as a phosphor. The sensitivity to x-rays with an energy less than 15 keV was low because of the thick window materials. Since the readout noise is high, the dynamic range is limited to 2000. The biggest advantages of this detector are cost-effectiveness (about 10,000 US dollars) and compactness (thickness < 3 cm, weight < 2 kg)

Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Inoue, Katsuaki [SPring-8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masaki [SPring-8/RIKEN, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

AMIE (ARM MJO Investigation Experiment): Observations of the Madden-Julian Oscillation for Modeling Studies Science Plan  

SciTech Connect

Deep convection in the tropics plays an important role in driving global circulations and the transport of energy from the tropics to the mid-latitudes. Understanding the mechanisms that control tropical convection is a key to improving climate modeling simulations of the global energy balance. One of the dominant sources of tropical convective variability is the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), which has a period of approximately 3060 days. There is no agreed-upon explanation for the underlying physics that maintain the MJO. Many climate models do not show well-defined MJO signals, and those that do have problems accurately simulating the amplitude, propagation speed, and/or seasonality of the MJO signal. Therefore, the MJO is a very important modeling target for the ARM modeling community geared specifically toward improving climate models. The ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) period coincides with a large international MJO initiation field campaign called CINDY2011 (Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011) that will take place in and around the Indian Ocean from October 2011 to January 2012. AMIE, in conjunction with CINDY2011 efforts, will provide an unprecedented data set that will allow investigation of the evolution of convection within the framework of the MJO. AMIE observations will also complement the long-term MJO statistics produced using ARM Manus data and will allow testing of several of the current hypotheses related to the MJO phenomenon. Taking advantage of the expected deployment of a C-POL scanning precipitation radar and an ECOR surface flux tower at the ARM Manus site, we propose to increase the number of sonde launches to eight per day starting in about mid-October of the field experiment year, which is climatologically a period of generally suppressed conditions at Manus and just prior to the climatologically strongest MJO period. The field experiment will last until the end of the MJO season (typically March), affording the documentation of conditions before, during, and after the peak MJO season. The increased frequency of sonde launches throughout the experimental period will provide better diurnal understanding of the thermodynamic profiles, and thus a better representation within the variational analysis data set. Finally, a small surface radiation and ceilometer system will be deployed at the PNG Lombrum Naval Base about 6 km away from the ARM Manus site in order to provide some documentation of scale variability with respect to the representativeness of the ARM measurements.

Long, C; Del Genio, A; Gustafson, W; Houze, R; Jakob, C; Jensen, M; Klein, S; Leung, L Ruby; Liu, X; Luke, E; May, P; McFarlane, S; Minnis, P; Schumacher, C; Vogelmann, A; Wang, Y; Wu, X; Xie, S

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Experimental demonstration of early time, hohlraum radiation symmetry tuning for indirect drive ignition experiments  

SciTech Connect

Early time radiation symmetry at the capsule for indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] will be inferred from the instantaneous soft x-ray re-emission pattern of a high-Z sphere replacing the ignition capsule. This technique was tested on the OMEGA laser facility [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, T. Boehly et al., Laser Part. Beams 11, 317 (1991)] in near full ignition scale vacuum hohlraums using an equivalent experimental setup to the one planned for NIF. Two laser cones entering each laser entrance hole heat the hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 100 eV, mimicking the NIF ignition pulse foot drive. The experiments have demonstrated accuracies of {+-}1.5% ({+-}2%) in inferred P{sub 2}/P{sub 0} (P{sub 4}/P{sub 0}) Legendre mode incident flux asymmetry and consistency between 900 eV and 1200 eV re-emission patterns. We have also demonstrated the expected tuning capability of P{sub 2}/P{sub 0}, from positive (pole hot) to negative (waist hot), decreasing linearly with the inner/outer beams power fraction. P{sub 4}/P{sub 0} on the other hand shows very little variation with power fraction. We developed a simple analytical viewfactor model that is in good agreement with both measured P{sub 2}/P{sub 0} and P{sub 4}/P{sub 0} and their dependence on inner beam power fraction.

Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J.; Thomas, C.; Sorce, C.; Glenn, S.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kline, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

New Revelation of Lightning Ball Observation and Proposal for a Nuclear Reactor Fusion Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, the author brings further details regarding his Lightning Ball observation that were not mentioned in the first one (Ref.1-2). Additionally, he goes more into detail as the three forces that are necessary to allow the residual crescent form the hydrodynamic vortex ring to shrink into a sphere.Further topics are the similarities and analogies between the Lightning Ball formation's theory and the presently undertaken Tokamak-Stellarator-Spheromak fusion reactor experiments. A new theory and its experimental realisation are proposed as to make the shrinking of the hot plasma of reactors into a ball possible by means of the so called long range electromagnetic forces. In this way,the fusion ignition temperature could possibly atteined.

Tar, Domokos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Summary Executive Summary Executive Summary ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ "Our greatness is measured not only in how we . . . do right but also [in] how we act when we know we've done the wrong thing; how we confront our mistakes, make our apologies, and take action." -President Clinton October 3, 1995 In January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) to examine reports that the government had funded and conducted unethical human radiation experiments and releases of radiation during the

76

Radiation Hard Hybrid Pixel Detectors, and a bbbar Cross Section Measurement at the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is placed on the effects of the high radiation environment on the detector operation. Measurements of the charge collection efficiency, interpixel capacitance, and other properties of the pixel sensors as a function of the radiation damage are presented...

Sibille, Jennifer Ann

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Recognition of micro-scale deformation structures in glacial sediments pattern perception, observer bias and the influence of experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recognition of micro-scale deformation structures in glacial sediments ­ pattern perception structures in glacial sediments ­ pattern perception, observer bias and the influence of experience. Boreas is the micromor- phology of glacial sediments. In this paper we investigate the role of an analyst's experience

Weidemann, Christoph

78

Stratiform and Convective Precipitation Observed by Multiple Radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, methods of convective/stratiform precipitation classification and surface rain-rate estimation based on the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) cloud radar measurements were developed and evaluated. Simultaneous and ...

Min Deng; Pavlos Kollias; Zhe Feng; Chidong Zhang; Charles N. Long; Heike Kalesse; Arunchandra Chandra; Vickal V. Kumar; Alain Protat

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Observational bounds on atmospheric heating by aerosol absorption: Radiative signature of transatlantic dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of transatlantic dust Amit Davidi,1 Alex B. Kostinski,2 Ilan Koren,1 and Yoav Lehahn1,3 Received 14 November 2011: Radiative signature of transatlantic dust, Geo- phys. Res. Lett., 39, L04803, doi:10.1029/2011GL050358. 1

Kostinski, Alex

80

Very high-energy observations of the Crab nebula with the GRAAL experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ``Gamma Ray Astronomy at ALmeria'' (GRAAL) experiment uses 63 heliostat-mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 2500 m2 from the CESA-1 field to collect Cherenkov light from airshowers. The detector is located in a central solar tower and detects photon-induced showers with an energy threshold of 250 +- 110 GeV and an asymptotic effective detection area of about 15000 m2. Data sets taken in the period September 1999 - September 2000 in the direction of the Crab pulsar were analysed for high energy gamma-ray emission. Evidence for gamma-ray flux from the Crab pulsar with an integral flux of 2.2 +- 0.4 (stat) $^{+1.9}_{-1.5}$ (syst) x 10$^{-9}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ above threshold and a significance of 4.5 sigma in a total (usable) observing time of 7 hours and 10 minutes on source was found. No evidence for emission from the other sources was seen. The effect of field-of-view restricted to the central part of a detected airshower on the lateral distribution and timing properties of Cherenkov light and their ef...

Arqueros, F; Berenguel, M; Borque, D M; Camacho, E F; Daz, M; Enriquez, R P; Gebauer, H J; Plaga, R

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Very high-energy observations of the Crab nebula with the GRAAL experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ``Gamma Ray Astronomy at ALmeria'' (GRAAL) experiment uses 63 heliostat-mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 2500 m2 from the CESA-1 field to collect Cherenkov light from airshowers. The detector is located in a central solar tower and detects photon-induced showers with an energy threshold of 250 +- 110 GeV and an asymptotic effective detection area of about 15000 m2. Data sets taken in the period September 1999 - September 2000 in the direction of the Crab pulsar were analysed for high energy gamma-ray emission. Evidence for gamma-ray flux from the Crab pulsar with an integral flux of 2.2 +- 0.4 (stat) $^{+1.9}_{-1.5}$ (syst) x 10$^{-9}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ above threshold and a significance of 4.5 sigma in a total (usable) observing time of 7 hours and 10 minutes on source was found. No evidence for emission from the other sources was seen. The effect of field-of-view restricted to the central part of a detected airshower on the lateral distribution and timing properties of Cherenkov light and their effect on an efficient gamma-hadron separation are discussed.

F. Arqueros; J. Ballestrin; M. Berenguel; D. M. Borque; E. F. Camacho; M. Diaz; R. Enriquez; H. -J. Gebauer; R. Plaga

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

82

Infrared observations of eclipses of Io, its thermophysical parameters, and the thermal radiation of the Loki volcano and environs  

SciTech Connect

Observations of Io during eclipses by Jupiter in 1981-1984 are reported. Data obtained at 3.45-30 microns using bolometer system No. 1 on the 3-m IRTF telescope at Mauna Kea are presented in extensive tables and graphs and analyzed by means of least-squares fitting of thermophysical models to the eclipse cooling and heating curves, thermal-radiation calculations for the Io volcanoes, and comparison with Voyager data. Best fits are obtained for a model comprising (1) a bright region with a vertically inhomogeneous surface and (2) a dark vertically homogeneous region with thermal inertia only about 0.1 times that of (1). Little evidence of volcanic-flux variability during the period is found, and the majority (but not all) of the excess thermal IR radiation in the sub-Jovian hemisphere is attributed to the Loki volcano and its lava lake. 35 references.

Sinton, W.M.; Kaminski, C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

APEX-CHAMP+ high-J CO observations of low-mass young stellar objects: IV. Mechanical and radiative feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the embedded stage of star formation, bipolar molecular outflows and UV radiation from the protostar are important feedback processes. Our aim is to quantify the feedback, mechanical and radiative, for a large sample of low-mass sources. The outflow activity is compared to radiative feedback in the form of UV heating by the accreting protostar to search for correlations and evolutionary trends. Large-scale maps of 26 young stellar objects, which are part of the Herschel WISH key program are obtained using the CHAMP+ instrument on the APEX (12CO and 13CO 6-5), and the HARP-B instrument on the JCMT (12CO and 13CO 3-2). Maps are used to determine outflow parameters and envelope models are used to quantify the amount of UV-heated gas and its temperature from 13CO 6-5 observations. All sources in our sample show outflow activity and the outflow force, F_CO, is larger for Class 0 sources than for Class I sources, even if their luminosities are comparable. The outflowing gas typically extends to much greater ...

Y?ld?z, Umut A; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Karska, Agata; Belloche, Arnaud; Endo, Akira; Frieswijk, Wilfred; Gsten, Rolf; van Kempen, Tim A; Leurini, Silvia; Nagy, Zsofia; Prez-Beaupuits, Juan-Pablo; Risacher, Christophe; van der Marel, Nienke; van Weeren, Reinout J; Wyrowski, Friedrich

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Limits to the Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effect Derived from Observations of Ship Tracks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations of the effects of ships on low-level clouds off the west coast of the United States are used to derive limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Christopher D. Walsh

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dosimetry experiences and lessons learned for radiation dose assessment in Korean nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......various long-term plans to reduce radiation...conducted by the regulatory body in Korea...and thorough review in order to apply...body counting, review of inhalation...15). The regulatory body has provided...from various reviews and studies...the mid-term plan for reduction......

Jong Rak Choi; Hee Geun Kim; Tae Young Kong; Jung Kwon Son

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Diurnal Variations of Albedo Retrieved from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five years of measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) have been analyzed to define the diurnal cycle of albedo from 55N to 55S. The ERBS precesses through all local times every 72 days so as to provide data regarding the ...

David A. Rutan; G. Louis Smith; Takmeng Wong

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Chemical behavior of the tropopause observed during the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Regional Transport experiment L. L. Pan,1 K. P. Bowman,2 M. Shapiro,3,4 W. J. Randel,1 R. S. Gao,5 T. Campos,1 C. Davis,1 S. Schauffler,1 B. A. Ridley,1 J. C. Wei,6 and C. Barnet7 Received 9 March 2007

Pan, Laura

88

An Ocean Observing and Prediction Experiment in Prince William Sound, Alaska  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The observing and forecasting conditions of coastal oceans in Alaska is technically challenging because of the mountainous terrain, the notoriously stormy seas, and a complex hydrological system of freshwater from rivers and glaciers. The Alaska Ocean ...

G. Carl Schoch; Yi Chao; Francois Colas; John Farrara; Molly McCammon; Peter Olsson; Gaurav Singhal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Observations of internal tide variability in the far field of the Hawaiian Ridge: The far field component of the Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of the Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME) observations of internal tides in two regions on either side of the Hawaiian Ridge were obtained by tomography thermistors and CTD casts from FLIP. The tomographic observations detect radiation of low internal?tide modes in broad areas while the thermistors and CTD casts measure the local internal?tide variability. These observations are used to estimate the amount of energy carried away from the Ridge by the internal tides to estimate the relative energies of low? and high?mode internal tides and to test numerical models of internal?tide generation. Barotropic currents and pressure were also measured by tomography electromagnetic and pressure sensors so that with careful modeling the energy lost from the barotropic tides at the Ridge can be determined. Thermistor data obtained on one mooring showed that the M2 mode?1 internal tide was mainly phase?locked and carried 1.3 kW/m of energy. Modes 2 and 3 had amplitudes comparable to mode?1 but they were not phase locked. Energy fluxes at three other moorings were 1.2 2.0 and 6.7 kW/m. Energy fluxes obtained by tomography were 0 (1 kW/m) or less; the line?integral data are less susceptible to the interference effects in the outgoing internal waves.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Very highenergy ray observations of the Crab nebula and other potential sources with the GRAAL experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ``Gamma Ray Astronomy at ALmer??�a'' (GRAAL) experiment uses 63 heliostat­mirrors with a total mirror area of an existing tower solar­power plant for this purpose. 2 The GRAAL detector CESA­1 is a heliostat field, 2 ? .360 W) at a height a.s.l. of 505 m. The 63 heliostats used for GRAAL have a mirror area of 39

91

Gravitational radiation from cosmic (super)strings: Bursts, stochastic background, and observational windows  

SciTech Connect

The gravitational wave (GW) signals emitted by a network of cosmic strings are reexamined in view of the possible formation of a network of cosmic superstrings at the end of brane inflation. The reconnection probability p of intersecting fundamental or Dirichlet strings might be much smaller than 1, and the properties of the resulting string network may differ significantly from those of ordinary strings (which have p=1). In addition, it has been recently suggested that the typical length of newly formed loops may differ by a factor {epsilon}<<1 from its standard estimate. Here, we analyze the effects of the two parameters p and {epsilon} on the GW signatures of strings. We consider both the GW bursts emitted from cusps of oscillating string loops, which have been suggested as candidate sources for the LIGO/VIRGO and LISA interferometers, and the stochastic GW background, which may be detectable by pulsar-timing observations. In both cases we find that previously obtained results are quite robust, at least when the loop sizes are not suppressed by many orders of magnitude relative to the standard scenario. We urge pulsar observers to reanalyze a recently obtained 17-yr combined data set to see whether the large scatter exhibited by a fraction of the data might be due to a transient GW burst activity of some sort, e.g., to a near cusp event.

Damour, Thibault [Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques, 91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France); Vilenkin, Alexander [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

93

Inversion Skill for LimitedArea Shelf Modeling --Observational System Simulation Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­scale climatology serves as Truth for the sampling and for the skill assessment. The simulation model is 3­D Truth to within observational error at the data points, within them, and shoreward from them. Skill estimation and forecasting, with many consequences. Significant practical progress has been made. Here we

94

Observational constraints of stellar collapse: Diagnostic probes of nature's extreme matter experiment  

SciTech Connect

Supernovae are Nature's high-energy, high density laboratory experiments, reaching densities in excess of nuclear densities and temperatures above 10MeV. Astronomers have built up a suite of diagnostics to study these supernovae. If we can utilize these diagnostics, and tie them together with a theoretical understanding of supernova physics, we can use these cosmic explosions to study the nature of matter at these extreme densities and temperatures. Capitalizing on these diagnostics will require understanding a wide range of additional physics. Here we review the diagnostics and the physics neeeded to use them to learn about the supernova engine, and ultimate nuclear physics.

Fryer, Chris L., E-mail: fryer@lanl.gov; Even, Wesley [CCS Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)] [CCS Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian W. [Space Radiation Lab, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Space Radiation Lab, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wong, Tsing-Wai [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States) [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

A way forward in the study of the symmetry energy: experiment, theory, and observation  

SciTech Connect

The symmetry energy describes how the energy of nuclear matter rises as one goes away from equal numbers of neutrons and protons. This is very important to describe neutron rich matter in astrophysics. This article reviews our knowledge of the symmetry energy from theoretical calculations, nuclear structure measurements, heavy ion collisions, and astronomical observations. We then present a roadmap to make progress in areas of relevance to the symmetry energy that promotes collaboration between astrophysics and the nuclear physics communities.

Horowitz, Charles; Brown, E F.; Kim, Y.; Lynch, W G.; Michaels, Robert; Ono, A.; Piekarewicz, Jorge; Tsang, M B.; Wolter, H H.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations  

SciTech Connect

Cloud Fraction (CF) is the dominant modulator of radiative fluxes. In this study, we evaluate CF simulations in the IPCC AR4 GCMs against ARM ground measurements, with a focus on the vertical structure, total amount of cloud and its effect on cloud shortwave transmissivity, for both inter-model deviation and model-measurement discrepancy. Our intercomparisons of three CF or sky-cover related dataset reveal that the relative differences are usually less than 10% (5%) for multi-year monthly (annual) mean values, while daily differences are quite significant. The results also show that the model-observation and the inter-model deviations have a similar magnitude for the total CF (TCF) and the normalized cloud effect, and they are twice as large as the surface downward solar radiation and cloud transmissivity. This implies that the other cloud properties, such as cloud optical depth and height, have a similar magnitude of disparity to TCF among the GCMs, and suggests that a better agreement among the GCMs in solar radiative fluxes could be the result of compensating errors in either cloud vertical structure, cloud optical depth or cloud fraction. Similar deviation pattern between inter-model and model-measurement suggests that the climate models tend to generate larger bias against observations for those variables with larger inter-model deviation. The simulated TCF from IPCC AR4 GCMs are very scattered through all seasons over three ARM sites: Southern Great Plains (SGP), Manus, Papua New Guinea and North Slope of Alaska (NSA). The GCMs perform better at SGP than at Manus and NSA in simulating the seasonal variation and probability distribution of TCF; however, the TCF in these models is remarkably underpredicted and cloud transmissivity is less susceptible to the change of TCF than the observed at SGP. Much larger inter-model deviation and model bias are found over NSA than the other sites in estimating the TCF, cloud transmissivity and cloud-radiation interaction, suggesting that the Arctic region continues to challenge cloud simulations in climate models. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF and fail to capture the seasonal variation of CF at middle and low levels in the tropics. The high altitude CF is much larger in the GCMs than the observation and the inter-model variability of CF also reaches maximum at high levels in the tropics. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF by 50-150% relative to the measurement average at low and middle levels over SGP. While the GCMs generally capture the maximum CF in the boundary layer and vertical variability, the inter-model deviation is largest near surface over the Arctic. The internal variability of CF simulated in ensemble runs with the same model is very minimal.

Qian, Yun; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Hailong; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Xie, Shaocheng

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

97

High Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype experiment which uses 32 heliostat mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 1200\\unit{m^2} has been constructed. This prototype, called STACEE-32, was used to search for high energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar. Observations taken between November 1998 and February 1999 yield a strong statistical excess of gamma-like events from the Crab, with a significance of $+6.75\\sigma$ in 43 hours of on-source observing time. No evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar was found, and the upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the observed excess was E_{th}) = (2.2 \\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^{-10}\\unit{photons cm^{-2} s^{-1}}. The observed flux is in agreement with a continuation to lower energies of the power law spectrum seen at TeV energies.

STACEE Collaboration; S. Oser; D. Bhattacharya; L. M. Boone; M. C. Chantell; Z. Conner; C. E. Covault; M. Dragovan; P. Fortin; D. T. Gregorich; D. S. Hanna; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. R. Schuette; C. G. Theoret; T. O. Tumer; D. A. Williams; J. A. Zweerink

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Observations of the Pulsar PSR B1951+32 with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis and results of 12.5 hours of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the EGRET-detected pulsar PSR B1951+32 using the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). STACEE is an atmospheric Cherenkov detector, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that detects cosmic gamma rays using the shower-front-sampling technique. STACEE's sensitivity to astrophysical sources at energies around 100 GeV allows it to investigate emission from gamma-ray pulsars with expected pulsed emission cutoffs below 100 GeV. We discuss the observations and analysis of STACEE's PSR 1951+32 data, accumulated during the 2005 and 2006 observing seasons.

J. Kildea; J. Zweerink; J. Ball; J. E. Carson; C. E. Covault; D. D. Driscoll; P. Fortin; D. M. Gingrich; D. S. Hanna; A. Jarvis; T. Lindner; C. Mueller; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; K. Ragan; D. A. Williams

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

99

Observations of the Pulsar PSR B1951+32 with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis and results of 12.5 hours of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the EGRET-detected pulsar PSR B1951+32 using the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). STACEE is an atmospheric Cherenkov detector, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that detects cosmic gamma rays using the shower-front-sampling technique. STACEE's sensitivity to astrophysical sources at energies around 100 GeV allows it to investigate emission from gamma-ray pulsars with expected pulsed emission cutoffs below 100 GeV. We discuss the observations and analysis of STACEE's PSR 1951+32 data, accumulated during the 2005 and 2006 observing seasons.

Kildea, J; Ball, J; Carson, J E; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Jarvis, A; Lindner, T; Mller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Further Experiments on the Uniformity of Distribution of the Cosmic Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

More careful and prolonged observations on the small, daily variation before reported in the measured intensities of the cosmic rays, the new observations being made under such conditions as to eliminate the possibility of a slight temperature effect suggested by Bowen and Millikan's recent explanation of ionization-pressure relations in high-pressure electroscopes, yield the definite result that within the limits of the author's present observational uncertainty which is of the order of a third of a percent, the sun has no direct influence on cosmic-ray intensities. New evidence is presented that if observed and apparently systematic variations of the order of a third of a percent are in fact real they are best interpreted as the result of small changes in the blanketing effect of the earth's atmosphere due to air currents.

Robert A. Millikan

1932-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 476 (2002) 758764 Observation of radiation induced latchup in the readout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to high levels of radiation resulting in an ionizing radiation dose of more than 200 krad and displacement with a radia- tion hard technology that can resist up to radiation dose levels greater than 1 Mrad. Both chips were fabricated according to almost identical designs. 2. Estimation of dose and fluence NA50

Ramello, Luciano

102

Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Target Material Radiation Damage Studies Using Energetic Protons of the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Production (BLIP) Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the future multi-MW accelerators is the LBNE Experiment where Fermilab aims to produce a beam of neutrinos with a 2.3 MW proton beam as part of a suite of experiments associated with Project X. Specifically, the LBNE Neutrino Beam Facility aims for a 2+ MW, 60 -120 GeV pulsed, high intensity proton beam produced in the Project X accelerator intercepted by a low Z solid target to facilitate the production of low energy neutrinos. The multi-MW level LBNE proton beam will be characterized by intensities of the order of 1.6 e+14 p/pulse, {\\sigma} radius of 1.5 -3.5 mm and a 9.8 microsecond pulse length. These parameters are expected to push many target materials to their limit thus making the target design very challenging. To address a host of critical design issues revealed by recent high intensity beam on target experience a series of experimental studies on radiation damage and thermal shock response conducted at BNL focusing on low-Z materials have been undertaken with the latest one focusing on LBNE.

Simos, N; Hurh, P; Mokhov, N; Kotsina, Z

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Analyses of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) multiple data sets for studying cloud absorption Z. Li and A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environment Service, Environment Canada from aircraft observations was 37% of the incoming solar irradiance, almost twice that of model

Li, Zhanqing

104

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part 2: Protecting Future Human Subjects Part 2: Protecting Future Human Subjects Part 2: Protecting Future Human Subjects ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Overview The success of the effort to open the historical record will be measured, in part, by whether we avoid repeating the mistakes of the past. ACHRE's review of human radiation experiments raised questions of whether the current system of protection is adequate for all types of human subjects research. The measures described below will strengthen the protection of human subjects and address ACHRE's findings. Federal responsibilities for maintaining ethics in human subjects research are dispersed in several agencies and committees in the

105

Observations of radiation in the space radiation environment and its effect on commercial off-the-shelf electronics in low-Earth orbit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...orbits, the space radiation environment is particularly hostile...applications of the space environment: new results and interdisciplinary...approach requires design engineers to have a good knowledge of the environment to which their systems...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Precipitation and soil impacts on partitioning of subsurface moisture in Avena barbata: Observations from a greenhouse experiment  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of two grassland soils and precipitation regimes on soil-moisture dynamics. We set up an experiment in a greenhouse, and monitored soil moisture dynamics in mesocosms planted with Avena barbata, an annual species found in California grasslands. By repeating the precipitation input at regular intervals, we were able to observe plant manipulation of soil moisture during well-defined periods during the growing season. We found that the amount of water partitioned to evapotranspiration, seepage, and soil storage varied among different growth stages. Further, both soil type and precipitation regimes had a significant impact on redistributing soil moisture. Whereas in the low-precipitation treatments most water was released to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration, major losses from the high-precipitation treatment occurred as gravity drainage. Observations from this study emphasize the importance of understanding intra-seasonal relationships between vegetation, soil, and water.

Salve, R.; Torn, M.S.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Advanced photoelectric effect experiment beamline at Elettra: A surface science laboratory coupled with Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect

We report the main characteristics of the advanced photoelectric effect experiments beamline, operational at Elettra storage ring, featuring a fully independent double branch scheme obtained by the use of chicane undulators and able to keep polarization control in both linear and circular mode. The paper describes the novel technical solutions adopted, namely, (a) the design of a quasiperiodic undulator resulting in optimized suppression of higher harmonics over a large photon energy range (10-100 eV), (b) the thermal stability of optics under high heat load via cryocoolers, and (c) the end station interconnected setup allowing full access to off-beam and on-beam facilities and, at the same time, the integration of users' specialized sample growth chambers or modules.

Panaccione, G.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Krizmancic, D.; Annese, E.; Giovanelli, L.; Maccherozzi, F.; Salvador, F.; De Luisa, A.; Benedetti, D.; Gruden, A.; Bertoch, P.; Rossi, G. [TASC Laboratory, INFM-CNR, S.S. 14-Km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Polack, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cocco, D.; Sostero, G.; Diviacco, B. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 Km 163.5, Area Science Park, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Hochstrasser, M.; Maier, U.; Pescia, D. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); and others

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences with 100Gbps Network Applications Mehmet Balman, Eric Pouyoul, Yushu Yao, E. Wes Bethel Burlen Loring, Prabhat, John Shalf, Alex Sim, and Brian L. Tierney Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA {mbalman,epouyoul,yyao,ewbethel,bloring,prabhat,jshalf,asim,btierney}@lbl.gov ABSTRACT 100Gbps networking has finally arrived, and many research and educational institutions have begun to deploy 100Gbps routers and services. ESnet and Internet2 worked together to make 100Gbps networks available to researchers at the Supercomputing 2011 con- ference in Seattle Washington. In this paper, we describe two of the first applications to take advantage of this network. We demon- strate a visualization application that enables remotely located sci- entists to gain insights from large datasets. We also demonstrate climate

109

The Radiated Energy Budget of Chromospheric Plasma in a Major Solar Flare Deduced From Multi-Wavelength Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents measurements of the energy radiated by the lower solar atmosphere, at optical, UV, and EUV wavelengths, during an X-class solar flare (SOL2011-02-15T01:56) in response to an injection of energy assumed to be in the form of nonthermal electrons. Hard X-ray observations from RHESSI were used to track the evolution of the parameters of the nonthermal electron distribution to reveal the total power contained in flare accelerated electrons. By integrating over the duration of the impulsive phase, the total energy contained in the nonthermal electrons was found to be $>2\\times10^{31}$ erg. The response of the lower solar atmosphere was measured in the free-bound EUV continua of H I (Lyman), He I, and He II, plus the emission lines of He II at 304\\AA\\ and H I (Ly$\\alpha$) at 1216\\AA\\ by SDO/EVE, the UV continua at 1600\\AA\\ and 1700\\AA\\ by SDO/AIA, and the WL continuum at 4504\\AA, 5550\\AA, and 6684\\AA, along with the Ca II H line at 3968\\AA\\ using Hinode/SOT. The summed energy detected by these in...

Milligan, Ryan O; Dennis, Brian R; Hudson, Hugh S; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Allred, Joel C; Chamberlin, Phillip C; Ireland, Jack; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Mixed-phase clouds, thin cirrus clouds, and OLR over the tropics: observations, retrievals, and radiative impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of clouds are formed by deep convection and convergence of water vapor. Thus, it is very important to understand the radiative energy balance of the tropics and the effect of clouds on the radiation field. For mixed-phase clouds, error analyses pertaining...

Lee, Joonsuk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

111

Observation of photoassisted polarization switching in BiFeO3 thin films probed by terahertz radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation Kouhei Takahashi and Masayoshi Tonouchia Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan Received 16 October 2006; accepted 1 January 2007; published online film using terahertz radiation as the probe. The illumination of femtosecond laser pulses with a center

Tonouchi, Masayoshi

112

A new technique of radiation thermometry using a consumer digital camcorder: Observations of red glow at Aso volcano, Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We newly developed a technique of radiation thermometry using a Sonys consumer digital camcorder. Our system is not only convenience and cost effective but with a better performance than previous infrared the...

Takeshi Saito; Satoshi Sakai; Isao Iizawa; Eriko Suda

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Dropouts of the outer electron radiation belt in response to solar wind stream interfaces: global positioning system observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radiation belt in response to solar wind stream interfaces: global...Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada We present a statistical study...examined statistically for 67 solar wind stream interfaces (SIs...global positioning system|solar wind| 1. Introduction (a...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part 1: Openness in Government Part 1: Openness in Government Part 1: Openness in Government ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Overview Throughout our nation's history, the government has needed to operate with some secrecy to protect our nation's security. At the same time, Americans have recognized that the government's power to act in secret conflicts with core democratic principles. Misuse of secrecy feeds a sense of mistrust in government that can undermine our cohesion as a nation. During the Cold War, the government funded human radiation experiments, some of which were secret. It is imperative that the public have access to the record of the government's activities. The

115

Assessment of the Effect of Air Pollution Controls on Trends in Shortwave Radiation over the United States from 1995 through 2010 from Multiple Observation Networks  

SciTech Connect

Long term datasets of total (all-sky) and clear-sky downwelling shortwave (SW) radiation, cloud cover fraction (cloudiness) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are analyzed together with aerosol concentration from several networks (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM) in the United States (US). Seven states with varying climatology are selected to better understand the effect of aerosols and clouds on SW radiation. This analysis aims to test the hypothesis that the reductions in anthropogenic aerosol burden resulting from substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides over the past 15 years across the US has caused an increase in surface SW radiation. We show that the total and clear-sky downwelling SW radiation from seven sites have increasing trends except Penn State which shows no tendency in clear-sky SW radiation. After investigating several confounding factors, the causes can be due to the geography of the site, aerosol distribution, heavy air traffic and increasing cloudiness. Moreover, we assess the relationship between total column AOD with surface aerosol concentration to test our hypothesis. In our findings, the trends of clear-sky SW radiation, AOD, and aerosol concentration from the sites in eastern US agree well with our hypothesis. However, the sites in western US demonstrate increasing AOD associated with mostly increasing trends in surface aerosol concentration. At these sites, the changes in aerosol burden and/or direct aerosol effects alone cannot explain the observed changes in SW radiation, but other factors need to be considered such as cloudiness, aerosol vertical profiles and elevated plumes.

Gan, Chuen-Meei; Pleim, Jonathan; Mathur, Rohit; Hogrefe, Christian; Long, Charles N.; Xing, Jia; Roselle, Shawn; Wei, Chao

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends

Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Initial optical-transition radiation measurements of the electron beam for the Boeing free-electron-laser experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential for characterization of electron beams at ? 100 MeV at the Boeing Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility by optical-transition radiation (OTR) techniques has been demonstrated as an important complement to other diagnostic means. Electron beam properties such as spatial profile and position, current intensity, emittance and energy were studied using OTR. Initial examples including transport through the 5 m wiggler and the resolution of Cherenkov radiation and spontaneous-emission radiation competitive sources are discussed.

A.H. Lumpkin; R.B. Fiorito; D.W. Rule; D.H. Dowell; W.C. Sellyey; A.R. Lowrey

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Discovery potential of xenon-based neutrinoless double beta decay experiments in light of small angular scale CMB observations  

SciTech Connect

The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has probed an expanded angular range of the CMB temperature power spectrum. Their recent analysis of the latest cosmological data prefers nonzero neutrino masses, with ?m{sub ?} = (0.320.11) eV. This result, if confirmed by the upcoming Planck data, has deep implications on the discovery of the nature of neutrinos. In particular, the values of the effective neutrino mass m{sub ??} involved in neutrinoless double beta decay (??0?) are severely constrained for both the direct and inverse hierarchy, making a discovery much more likely. In this paper, we focus in xenon-based ??0? experiments, on the double grounds of their good performance and the suitability of the technology to large-mass scaling. We show that the current generation, with effective masses in the range of 100 kg and conceivable exposures in the range of 500 kgyear, could already have a sizeable opportunity to observe ??0? events, and their combined discovery potential is quite large. The next generation, with an exposure in the range of 10 tonyear, would have a much more enhanced sensitivity, in particular due to the very low specific background that all the xenon technologies (liquid xenon, high-pressure xenon and xenon dissolved in liquid scintillator) can achieve. In addition, a high-pressure xenon gas TPC also features superb energy resolution. We show that such detector can fully explore the range of allowed effective Majorana masses, thus making a discovery very likely.

Gmez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martn-Albo, J.; Vidal, J. Muoz; Pea-Garay, C., E-mail: gomez@mail.cern.ch, E-mail: jmalbos@ific.uv.es, E-mail: jmunoz@ific.uv.es, E-mail: penya@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de Valencia Calle Catedrtico Jos Beltrn, 2, 46090 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hubble diagrams of soft and hard radiation sources in the graviton background: to an apparent contradiction between supernova 1a and gamma-ray burst observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the sea of super-strong interacting gravitons, non-forehead collisions with gravitons deflect photons, and this deflection may differ for soft and hard radiations. As a result, the Hubble diagram would not be a universal function and it will have a different view for such sources as supernovae in visible light and gamma-ray bursts. Observations of these two kinds are compared here with the limit cases of the Hubble diagram.

Michael A. Ivanov

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Magnetic storm acceleration of radiation belt electrons observed by the Scintillating Fibre Detector (SFD) onboard EQUATOR-S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the 500±67300 km, 4° inclination EQUATOR-S orbit show that the increase of the energetic electron ¯ux of electrons in the outer radiation belt has been attributed to Pc 5 band ULF waves excited by high speed solar wind ¯ow associated with magnetic storms (Rostoker et al., 1998). The main features

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

THE PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION MODEL FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: INTERPRETING FOUR OBSERVED CORRELATIONS  

SciTech Connect

We show that the empirical E{sub p}-L, {Gamma}-L, E{sub p}-{Gamma}, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}}-E{sub p} correlations (where L is the time-averaged luminosity of the prompt emission, E{sub p} is the spectral peak energy, {Gamma} is the bulk Lorentz factor, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}} is the emission efficiency of gamma-ray bursts, GRBs) are well consistent with the relations between the analogous parameters predicted in the photospheric radiation model of the prompt emission of GRBs. The time-resolved thermal radiation of GRB 090902B does follow the E{sub p}-L and {Gamma}-L correlations. A reliable interpretation of the four correlations in alternative models is still lacking. These may point toward a photospheric origin of prompt emission of some GRBs.

Fan Yizhong; Wei Daming; Zhang Fuwen [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Binbin, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: bbzhang@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Impact of New Technologies on Radiation Oncology Events and Trends in the Past Decade: An Institutional Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review the type and frequency of patient events from external-beam radiotherapy over a time period sufficiently long to encompass significant technology changes. Methods and Materials: Ten years of quality assurance records from January 2001 through December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed to determine the frequency of events affecting patient treatment from four radiation oncology process steps: simulation, treatment planning, data entry/transfer, and treatment delivery. Patient events were obtained from manual records and, from May 2007 onward, from an institution-wide database and reporting system. Events were classified according to process step of origination and segregated according to the most frequently observed event types. Events from the institution-wide database were evaluated to determine time trends. Results: The overall event rate was 0.93% per course of treatment, with a downward trend over time led by a decrease in treatment delivery events. The frequency of certain event types, particularly in planning and treatment delivery, changed significantly over the course of the study, reflecting technologic and process changes. Treatments involving some form of manual intervention carried an event risk four times higher than those relying heavily on computer-aided design and delivery. Conclusions: Although the overall event rate was low, areas for improvement were identified, including manual calculations and data entry, late-day treatments, and staff overreliance on computer systems. Reducing the incidence of pretreatment events is of particular importance because these were more likely to occur several times before detection and were associated with larger dosimetric impact. Further improvements in quality assurance systems and reporting are imperative, given the advent of electronic charting, increasing reliance on computer systems, and the potentially severe consequences that can arise from mistakes involving complex intensity-modulated or image-guided treatments.

Hunt, Margie A., E-mail: huntm@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pastrana, Gerri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Amols, Howard I. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Killen, Aileen [Quality of Care Initiative, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Quality of Care Initiative, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Assessment of NASA GISS CMIP5 and Post-CMIP5 Simulated Clouds and TOA Radiation Budgets Using Satellite Observations. Part II: TOA Radiation Budget and CREs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Part I of this study (Stanfield et al. 2014), the NASA GISS CMIP5 (C5) and Post-CMIP5 (P5) simulated cloud properties were assessed utilizing multiple satellite observations, with a particular focus on the southern mid-latitudes (SMLs). This ...

Ryan E. Stanfield; Xiquan Dong; Baike Xi; Anthony D. Del Genio; Patrick Minnis; David Doelling; Norman Loeb

124

OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION-MEDIATED SHOCKS IN THE PROMPT PHASE OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

A shock that forms below the photosphere of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow is mediated by Compton scattering of radiation advected into the shock by the upstream fluid. The characteristic scale of such a shock, a few Thomson depths, is larger than any kinetic scale involved by several orders of magnitude. Hence, unlike collisionless shocks, radiation-mediated shocks cannot accelerate particles to nonthermal energies. The spectrum emitted by a shock that emerges from the photosphere of a GRB jet reflects the temperature profile downstream of the shock, with a possible contribution at the highest energies from the shock transition layer itself. We study the properties of radiation-mediated shocks that form during the prompt phase of GRBs and compute the time-integrated spectrum emitted by the shocked fluid following shock breakout. We show that the time-integrated emission from a single shock exhibits a prominent thermal peak, with the location of the peak depending on the shock velocity profile. We also point out that multiple shock emission can produce a spectrum that mimics a Band spectrum.

Levinson, Amir, E-mail: Levinson@wise.tau.ac.il [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

Explaining the observed long coherence effects by 2D photon echo experiments in photosynthetic EET : Two-Component Phonon Spectrum model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a simple stochastic model which successfully explains the long coherence effects observed in photosynthetic Excitation Energy Transport (EET) by 2D photon echo experiments of G. S. Engel et. al. (Nature, {\\bf 446} 782, (2007)). Our Two-Component Phonon Spectrum (TCPS) model is based upon the division of phonon degrees of freedom into a systematic component which is treated through polaron transformation and a stochastic component which is treated through dynamical disorder. This model successfully explains the observed long coherence upto $ \\sim 600 fsec$ in EET experiments.

Singh, Navinder; Amritkar, R E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves hematologic toxicity in particular. Although the long-term efficacy of current treatment options remains disappointing, the improved therapeutic index of IMRT may aid in generalizing its use and allowing the addition of novel approaches such as intraperitoneal immunotherapy.

Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A Balloon Observation of the Thermal Radiation from the Circumsolar Dust Cloud in the 1983 Total Eclipse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the totality on June 11, 1983 in East Java, Indonesia, a near infrared photometric observation of the solar corona was made using a stratospheric balloon, which was successfully launched by a joint...? fro...

T. Maihara; K. Mizutani; N. Hiromoto

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Regional-scale chemical transport modeling in support of the analysis of observations obtained during the TRACE-P experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the TRACE-P experiment G. R. Carmichael,1 Y. Tang,1 G. Kurata,3 I. Uno,2 D. Streets,4 J.-H. Woo,1 H. Huang,1 J. Yienger,1 B. Lefer,5 R. Shetter,5 D. Blake,6 E. Atlas,5 A. Fried,5 E. Apel,5 F. Eisele the TRACE-P experiment is used to evaluate how well the CFORS/STEM-2K1 regional-scale chemical transport

Clarke, Antony

129

Investigation of Thin Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties on the Basis of Satellite Observations and Fast Radiative Transfer Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of ?CALIOP. the frequency is scaled by dividing the largest frequency in each ?CALIOP bin. Data are from collocated MODIS and CALIOP measurements made in August 2006. ............... 126 5.7 Daytime frequencies of (a) cloud, (b) ice cloud, (c...) and Stubenrauch et al. (2006) investigated the climatology of thin cirrus properties. 1.2.2 Limb-view-instrument-based observations Limb-view-instruments observe cloud or atmosphere by eliminating the signals from the surface and therefore increase the SNRs...

Wang, Chenxi

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

New emission line at ~3.5 keV - observational status, connection with radiatively decaying dark matter and directions for future studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent works of [1402.2301,1402.4119], claiming the detection of extra emission line with energy ~3.5 keV in X-ray spectra of certain clusters of galaxies and nearby Andromeda galaxy, have raised considerable interest in astrophysics and particle physics communities. A number of new observational studies claim detection or non-detection of the extra line in X-ray spectra of various cosmic objects. In this review I summarize existing results of these studies, overview possible interpretations of the extra line, including intriguing connection with radiatively decaying dark matter, and show future directions achievable with existing and planned X-ray cosmic missions.

Iakubovskyi, Dmytro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Very high-energy c-ray observations of the Crab nebula and other potential sources with the GRAAL experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Almeria'' (GRAAL) experiment uses 63 heliostat-mirrors with a total mirror area of %2500 m2 from the CESA of heliostat fields for c-ray astronomy are pointed out. In particular the effect of field- of-view restricted-rays from cosmic sources. In addition some gen- eral lessons we learnt about the heliostat-field approach

132

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for the Unmanned Aircraft System Data Impact on Tropical Cyclone Track Forecasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft systems (HALE UAS) are capable of extended flights for atmospheric sampling. A case study was conducted to evaluate the potential impact of dropwindsonde observations from HALE UAS on tropical ...

N. C. Priv; Yuanfu Xie; Steven Koch; Robert Atlas; Sharanya J. Majumdar; Ross N. Hoffman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Building Public Trust - Actions to Respond to the Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part 3: Righting Past Wrongs Part 3: Righting Past Wrongs Part 3: Righting Past Wrongs ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Overview The ACHRE report reviewed in detail several case studies of government-supported human radiation research including: the injections of plutonium into 18 hospital patients during and after World War II, research with prisoners, and research on patients who were exposed to total body irradiation in clinical settings. The Advisory Committee also considered issues related to certain radiation exposures associated with government activities that the Advisory Committee concluded should not be considered "human

134

Recent progress in the development of large area silica aerogel for use as RICH radiator in the Belle II experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report recent progress in the development of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter to be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector, which is currently being upgraded at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. The production of approximately 450 aerogel tiles with refractive indices of either 1.045 or 1.055 was completed in May, 2014, and the tiles are now undergoing optical characterization. Installation of the aerogels was tested by installing them into a partial mock-up of the support structure.

Makoto Tabata; Ichiro Adachi; Hideyuki Kawai; Shohei Nishida; Takayuki Sumiyoshi

2014-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

135

Recent progress in the development of large area silica aerogel for use as RICH radiator in the Belle II experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report recent progress in the development of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter to be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector, which is currently being upgraded at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. The production of approximately 450 aerogel tiles with refractive indices of either 1.045 or 1.055 was completed in May, 2014, and the tiles are now undergoing optical characterization. Installation of the aerogels was tested by installing them into a partial mock-up of the support structure.

Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Nishida, Shohei; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Observations of Large Scale Sidereal Anisotropy in 1 and 11 TeV cosmic rays from the MINOS experiment  

SciTech Connect

The MINOS Near and Far Detectors are two large, functionally-identical, steel-scintillating sampling calorimeters located at depths of 220 mwe and 2100 mwe respectively. The detectors observe the muon component of hadronic showers produced from cosmic ray interactions with nuclei in the earth's atmosphere. From the arrival direction of these muons, the anisotropy in arrival direction of the cosmic ray primaries can be determined. The MINOS Near and Far Detector have observed anisotropy on the order of 0.1% at 1 and 11 TeV respectively. The amplitude and phase of the first harmonic at 1 TeV are 8.2 {+-} 1.7(stat.) x 10{sup -4} and (8.9 {+-} 12.1(stat.)){sup o}, and at 11 TeV are 3.8 {+-} 0.5(stat.) x 10{sup -4} and (27.2 {+-} 7.2(stat.)){sup o}.

de Jong, J.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Personal Experience Reducing Radiation Exposures: Protecting Family in Kiev during the First Two Weeks after Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect

The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident occurred in 1986. The plume from the explosions and fires was highly radioactive and resulted in very high exposure levels in the surrounding regions. This paper describes how the people in Kiev, Ukraine, a city 90 miles (120 km) south of Chernobyl, and in particular one individual in that city, Professor Vitaly Eremenko, became aware of the threat before the official announcement and the steps he took to mitigate potential impacts to his immediate family. The combination of being informed and using available resources led to greatly reduced consequences for his family and, in particular, his newborn granddaughter. He notes how quickly word of some aspects of the hazard spread in the city and how other aspects appear to not have been understood. Although these events are being recalled as the 20th anniversary of the terrible event approaches, the lessons are still pertinent today. Threats of possible terrorist use of radiation dispersal devices makes knowledge of effective individual actions for self-protection from radiation exposures a topic of current interest.

Eremenko, Vitaly A.; Droppo, James G.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Very high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Crab nebula and other potential sources with the GRAAL experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ``Gamma Ray Astronomy at ALmeria'' (GRAAL) experiment uses 63 heliostat-mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 2500 m2 from the CESA-1 field at the ``Plataforma Solar de Almeria'' (PSA) to collect Cherenkov light from air showers. The detector is located in a central solar tower and detects photon-induced showers with an energy threshold of 250 +- 110 GeV and an asymptotic effective detection area of about 15000 m2. A comparison between the results of detailed Monte-Carlo simulations and data is presented. Data sets taken in the period September 1999 - September 2000 in the direction of the Crab pulsar, the active galaxy 3C 454.3, the unidentified gamma-ray source 3EG 1835+35 and a ``pseudo source'' were analyzed for high energy gamma-ray emission.Evidence for a gamma-ray flux from the Crab pulsar with an integral flux of 2.2 +- 0.4 (stat) ^+1.7_-1.3 (syst) x 10^-9 cm^-2 sec^-1 above threshold and a significance of 4.5 sigma in a total measuring time of 7 hours and 10 minutes on source was found. No eviden...

Arqueros, F; Berenguel, M; Borque, D M; Camacho, E F; Daz, M; Gebauer, H J; Enriquez, R P; Plaga, R

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Very high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Crab nebula and other potential sources with the GRAAL experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ``Gamma Ray Astronomy at ALmeria'' (GRAAL) experiment uses 63 heliostat-mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 2500 m2 from the CESA-1 field at the ``Plataforma Solar de Almeria'' (PSA) to collect Cherenkov light from air showers. The detector is located in a central solar tower and detects photon-induced showers with an energy threshold of 250 +- 110 GeV and an asymptotic effective detection area of about 15000 m2. A comparison between the results of detailed Monte-Carlo simulations and data is presented. Data sets taken in the period September 1999 - September 2000 in the direction of the Crab pulsar, the active galaxy 3C 454.3, the unidentified gamma-ray source 3EG 1835+35 and a ``pseudo source'' were analyzed for high energy gamma-ray emission.Evidence for a gamma-ray flux from the Crab pulsar with an integral flux of 2.2 +- 0.4 (stat) ^+1.7_-1.3 (syst) x 10^-9 cm^-2 sec^-1 above threshold and a significance of 4.5 sigma in a total measuring time of 7 hours and 10 minutes on source was found. No evidence for emission from the other sources was found. Some difficulties with the use of heliostat fields for gamma-ray astronomy are pointed out. In particular the effect of field-of-view restricted to the central part of a detected air shower on the lateral distribution and timing properties of Cherenkov light are discussed. Upon restriction the spread of the timing front of proton induced showers sharply decreases and the reconstructed direction becomes biased towards the pointing direction. This is shown to make efficient gamma-hadron separation difficult.

F. Arqueros; J. Ballestrin; M. Berenguel; D. M. Borque; E. F. Camacho; M. Diaz; H. -J. Gebauer; R. Enriquez; R. Plaga

2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assimilation of observations of radiation level into an atmospheric transport model: A case study with the particle filter and the ETEX tracer dataset  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric transport models and observations from monitoring networks are commonly used aids for forecasting spatial distribution of contamination in case of a radiological incident. In this study, we assessed the particle filter data-assimilation technique as a tool for ensemble forecasting the spread of radioactivity. We used measurements from the ETEX-1 tracer experiment and model results from the NPK-Puff atmospheric dispersion model. We showed that assimilation of observations improves the ensemble forecast compared to runs without data assimilation. The improvement is most prominent for nowcasting: the mean squared error was reduced by a factor of 7. For forecasting, the improvement of the mean squared error resulting from assimilation of observations was found to dissipate within a few hours. We ranked absolute model values and observations and calculated the mean squared error of the ranked values. This measure of the correctness of the pattern of high and low values showed an improvement for forecasting up to 48h. We conclude that the particle filter is an effective tool in better modeling the spread of radioactivity following a release.

Paul H. Hiemstra; Derek Karssenberg; Arjan van Dijk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

142

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

Conard, R.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

SciTech Connect

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

Gorham, P.W.

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Toward a Diurnal Climatology of Cold-Season Turbulence Statistics in Continental Stratocumulus as Observed by the Atmospheric Radiation Millimeter- Wavelength Cloud Radars  

SciTech Connect

Numerous observational studies of marine stratocumulus have demonstrated a pronounced diurnal cycle. At night, longwave flux divergence at the top of the cloud drives negatively buoyant eddies that tend to keep the boundary layer well mixed. During the day, solar absorption by the cloud tends to reduce the turbulent intensity and often decouples the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into cloud- and sub-cloud circulations. The delicate balance between turbulent intensity, entrainment, and fluxes dictates cloud geometry and persistence, which can significantly impact the shortwave radiation budget. Millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) have been used to study the turbulent structure of boundary layer stratocumulus (e.g. Frisch et al. 1995; Kollias and Albrecht 2000). Analysis is confined to nondrizzling or lightly drizzling cloud systems for which precipitation contamination is negligible. Under such assumptions the Doppler velocity field becomes a proxy for vertical velocity. Prior research has mainly consisted of a few case studies of specific cloud systems using radar scan strategies optimized for this particular cloud type. The MMCR operating at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility is broadly configured to be able to detect many different cloud types over a broad range of reflectivities and altitudes, so it is not specifically optimized for PBL clouds. Being in more-or-less continuous operation since the end of 1996, it does, however, have the advantage of long data coverage, which suggests that statistically significant measures of the diurnal cycle of turbulence should be attainable. This abstract summarizes the first few steps toward this goal, using 7 months of cold season MMCR data.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.; Childers, M.E.; Donner, K.M.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The {sup 237}Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination.

Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Meningeal HemangiopericytomaExperience From the SEER Database  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) on cause-specific survival in patients with meningeal hemangiopericytomas. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1990-2008 was queried for cases of surgically resected central nervous system hemangiopericytoma. Patient demographics, tumor location, and extent of resection were included in the analysis as covariates. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to analyze cause-specific survival. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine which factors were associated with cause-specific survival. Results: The mean follow-up time is 7.9 years (95 months). There were 76 patients included in the analysis, of these, 38 (50%) underwent gross total resection (GTR), whereas the other half underwent subtotal resection (STR). Postoperative RT was administered to 42% (16/38) of the patients in the GTR group and 50% (19/38) in the STR group. The 1-year, 10-year, and 20-year cause-specific survival rates were 99%, 75%, and 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, postoperative RT was associated with significantly better survival (HR = 0.269, 95% CI 0.084-0.862; P=.027), in particular for patients who underwent STR (HR = 0.088, 95% CI: 0.015-0.528; P<.008). Conclusions: In the absence of large prospective trials, the current clinical decision-making of hemangiopericytoma is mostly based on retrospective data. We recommend that postoperative RT be considered after subtotal resection for patients who could tolerate it. Based on the current literature, the practical approach is to deliver limited field RT to doses of 50-60 Gy while respecting the normal tissue tolerance. Further investigations are clearly needed to determine the optimal therapeutic strategy.

Stessin, Alexander M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Sison, Cristina [Department of Biostatistics, the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York (United States); Nieto, Jaime; Raifu, Muri [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York (United States); Li, Baoqing, E-mail: bal9018@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy spectra and spectrally resolved one-dimensional fluence images of self-emitted charged-fusion products (14.7MeV D3He protons) are routinely measured from indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments utilizing ignition-scaled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A striking and consistent feature of these images is that the fluence of protons leaving the ICF target in the direction of the hohlraum's laser entrance holes (LEHs) is very nonuniform spatially, in contrast to the very uniform fluence of protons leaving through the hohlraum equator. In addition, the measured nonuniformities are unpredictable, and vary greatly from shot to shot. These observations were made separately at the times of shock flash and of compression burn, indicating that the asymmetry persists even at ~0.52.5ns after the laser has turned off. These phenomena have also been observed in experiments on the OMEGA laser facility with energy-scaled hohlraums, suggesting that the underlying physics is similar. Comprehensive data sets provide compelling evidence that the nonuniformities result from proton deflections due to strong spontaneous electromagnetic fields around the hohlraum LEHs. Although it has not yet been possible to uniquely determine whether the fields are magnetic (B) or electric (E), preliminary analysis indicates that the strength is ~1MG if B fields or ~109Vcm?1 if E fields. These measurements provide important physics insight into the ongoing ignition experiments at the NIF. Understanding the generation, evolution, interaction and dissipation of the self-generated fields may help to answer many physics questions, such as why the electron temperatures measured in the LEH region are anomalously large, and may help to validate hydrodynamic models of plasma dynamics prior to plasma stagnation in the center of the hohlraum.

C K Li; A B Zylstra; J A Frenje; F H Sguin; N Sinenian; R D Petrasso; P A Amendt; R Bionta; S Friedrich; G W Collins; E Dewald; T Dppner; S H Glenzer; D G Hicks; O L Landen; J D Kilkenny; A J Mackinnon; N Meezan; J Ralph; J R Rygg; J Kline; G Kyrala

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Airborne Remote Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the airborne data collected during the 2002 and 2003 Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). These data include gamma radiation observations, multi- and hyperspectral optical imaging, optical altimetry, and passive and active ...

Don Cline; Simon Yueh; Bruce Chapman; Boba Stankov; Al Gasiewski; Dallas Masters; Kelly Elder; Richard Kelly; Thomas H. Painter; Steve Miller; Steve Katzberg; Larry Mahrt

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Single electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta elec- tron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

D. M. Asner; R. F. Bradley; L. de Viveiros; P. J. Doe; J. L. Fernandes; M. Fertl; E. C. Finn; J. A. Formaggio; D. Furse; A. M. Jones; J. N. Kofron; B. H. LaRoque; M. Leber; E. L. McBride; M. L. Miller; P. Mohanmurthy; B. Monreal; N. S. Oblath; R. G. H. Robertson; L. J Rosenberg; G. Rybka; D. Rysewyk; M. G. Sternberg; J. R. Tedeschi; T. Thummler; B. A. VanDevender; N. L. Woods

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

Observation of Coherently-Enhanced Tunable Narrow-Band Terahertz Transition Radiation from a Relativistic Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunch Train  

We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (?f/f ~ =20% at f ~ = 0.5 THz) THz transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

Piot, P [Northern Illinois U.; Fermilab; Sun, Y E [Fermilab; Maxwell, T J [Fermilab; Northern Illinois U.; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A H [Fermilab; Rihaoui, M M [Northern Illinois U.; Thurman-Keup, R [Fermilab

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

152

Symptomatic Outcomes in Relation to Tumor Expansion After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: Single-Institutional Long-Term Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The effect of transient tumor expansion after conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) on the symptomatic outcomes is not well-known. Methods and Materials: This study enrolled 201 consecutive patients who received SRT for vestibular schwannoma. A conventional fractionation schedule was applied in 194 patients (97%), and 142 (71%) received a total dose of 50 Gy. The median follow-up time was 72 months. Results: The maximum diameter was 9 mm or less in 13 patients, 10-19 mm in 79 patients, 20-29 mm in 87 patients, and 30 mm or greater in 22 patients. At presentation, tumor size of 20 mm or greater was significantly associated with loss of serviceable hearing and trigeminal neuropathy. After SRT, tumor expansion was observed in 42 patients (21%). By tumor size, tumor expansion was observed in 0%, 11.4%, 25.6%, and 50% of patients with tumors of 9 mm or less, 10-19 mm, 20-29 mm, and 30 mm or greater, respectively, in diameter. The tumor expansion was significantly associated with an increased risk of hydrocephalus requiring shunt placement (P=.004), loss of serviceable hearing (P=.0064), and worsening of facial (P<.0001) and trigeminal nerve (P<.0001) functions. Spontaneous tumor shrinkage was observed in 29 of those 42 patients, mostly within 2 years after the expansion, and the majority of the worsened symptoms except for hearing resolved once the tumor had shrunk. As a result, salvage surgical resection for symptomatic relief was required in only 5% of patients. Conclusions: Fractionated SRT could be safely applied even for medium- to large-sized ({>=}20 mm) tumors. However, greater knowledge of the risks and consequences, including transient symptomatic worsening, and the time span of expansion will be required for the follow-up of patients after SRT to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention.

Aoyama, Hidefumi, E-mail: h-aoyama@med.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan) [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Onodera, Shunsuke [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takeichi, Norihito [Department of Otolaryngology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Onimaru, Rikiya [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Terasaka, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

New Insights into the 243Am 48Ca Reaction Products Previously Observed in the Experiments on Elements 113, 115, and 117  

SciTech Connect

Results of a new series of experiments on the study of production cross sections and decay properties of the isotopes of element 115 in the reaction {sup 243}Am + {sup 48}Ca are presented. Twenty-one new decay chains originating from {sup 288}115 were established as the product of the 3n-evaporation channel by measuring the excitation function at three excitation energies of the compound nucleus {sup 291}115. The decay properties of all newly observed nuclei are in full agreement with those we measured in 2003. At the lowest excitation energy E* = 33 MeV, for the first time we registered the product of the 2n-evaporation channel, {sup 289}115, which was also observed previously in the reaction {sup 249}Bk + {sup 48}Ca as the daughter nucleus of the decay of {sup 293}117. The maximum cross section for the production of {sup 288}115 is found to be 8.5 pb at E* {approx} 36 MeV.

Oganessian, Yuri Ts. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Abdullin, F. Sh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Dmitriev, S. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Gostic, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hamilton, Joseph [Vanderbilt University; Henderson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Itkis, M. G. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Moody, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Polyakov, A. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Ramayya, A. V. [Vanderbilt University; Roberto, James B [ORNL; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Sagaidak, R. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Shaughnessy, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Shirokovsky, I. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Stoyer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Subbotin, V. G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Sukhov, A. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Tsyganov, Yu. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Utyonkov, V. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Voinov, A. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Vostokin, G. K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Exploiting simultaneous observational constraints on mass and absorption to estimate the global direct radiative forcing of black carbon and brown carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a leading climate warming agent, yet uncertainties on the global direct radiative forcing (DRF) remain large. Here we expand a global model simulation (GEOS-Chem) of BC to include the ...

Schwarz, J. P.

155

A PC-Based Computer Program for the Estimation of the Radiation Dose in in Vitro and in Vivo Boron Neutron Capture Irradiation Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) microdosimetry of charged particle radiation depends on total boron concentration and intracellular boron distribution. Due to the inhomogeneity of boron distribution in...

Ruud Verrijk; Rene Huiskamp; Adrian C. Begg

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

CORRELATIONS OF THE ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS WITH EXTRAGALACTIC OBJECTS AS OBSERVED BY THE TELESCOPE ARRAY EXPERIMENT  

SciTech Connect

We search for correlations between the positions of extragalactic objects and the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with primary energy E ? 40 EeV as observed by the surface detector array of the Telescope Array (TA) experiment during the first 40 months of operation. We examine several public astronomical object catalogs, including the Veron-Cetty and Veron catalog of active galactic nuclei. We count the number of TA events correlated with objects in each catalog as a function of three parameters: the maximum angular separation between a TA event and an object, the minimum energy of the events, and the maximum redshift of the objects. We determine the combination of these parameters that maximizes the correlations, and we calculate the probability of having the same levels of correlations from an isotropic distribution of UHECR arrival directions. No statistically significant correlations are found when penalties for scanning over the above parameters and for searching in several catalogs are taken into account.

Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Hanlon, W. [High Energy Astrophysics Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Aida, R. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Azuma, R.; Fukuda, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Cheon, B. G.; Cho, E. J. [Department of Physics and The Research Institute of Natural Science, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J. [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Cho, W. R. [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujii, T. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); and others

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Sn Plasma Focus Discharge for EUV Radiation Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small plasma focus device was constructed for the EUV radiation experiment. The storage energy of capacitor bank is 3.4 kj and the maximum discharge current is 140 kA. Although the device was not well optimized for strong pinch EUV radiation was observed from the focus plasma. The plasma dynamics was affected by electrode material and the use of Sn electrode was proved to be effective for producing Sn plasma.

Keiichi Takasugi; Takeshi Umeda; Ena Kiuchi; Takuya Hayashi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Impacts of Representing the Correlation of Errors in Radar Data Assimilation. Part I: Experiments with Simulated Background and Observation Estimates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In radar data assimilation, statistically optimal analyses are sought by minimizing a cost function in which the variance and covariance of background and observation errors are correctly represented. Radar observations are particular in that they ...

Dominik Jacques; Isztar Zawadzki

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Intercomparison of Variational Data Assimilation and the Ensemble Kalman Filter for Global Deterministic NWP. Part I: Description and Single-Observation Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An intercomparison of the Environment Canada variational and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation systems is presented in the context of global deterministic NWP. In an EnKF experiment having the same spatial resolution as the inner ...

Mark Buehner; P. L. Houtekamer; Cecilien Charette; Herschel L. Mitchell; Bin He

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Health Physics Practices and Experience at Duke Power Company  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Radiation Protection and Health Physics Practices and Experience in Operating Reactors Internationally / Nuclear Safety

Lionel Lewis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Quantum vacuum radiation in optical glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent experimental claim of the detection of analogue Hawking radiation in an optical system [PRL 105 (2010) 203901] has led to some controversy [PRL 107 (2011) 149401, 149402]. While this experiment strongly suggests some form of particle creation from the quantum vacuum (and hence it is per se very interesting), it is also true that it seems difficult to completely explain all features of the observations by adopting the perspective of a Hawking-like mechanism for the radiation. For instance, the observed photons are emitted parallel to the optical horizon, and the relevant optical horizon is itself defined in an unusual manner by combining group and phase velocities. This raises the question: Is this really Hawking radiation, or some other form of quantum vacuum radiation? Naive estimates of the amount of quantum vacuum radiation generated due to the rapidly changing refractive index --- sometimes called the dynamical Casimir effect --- are not encouraging. However we feel that naive estimates could be misleading depending on the quantitative magnitude of two specific physical effects: "pulse steepening" and "pulse cresting". Plausible bounds on the maximum size of these two effects results in estimates much closer to the experimental observations, and we argue that the dynamical Casimir effect is now worth additional investigation.

Stefano Liberati; Angus Prain; Matt Visser

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Acceleration and Classical Electromagnetic Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classical radiation from an accelerated charge is reviewed along with the reciprocal topic of accelerated observers detecting radiation from a static charge. This review commemerates Bahram Mashhoon's 60th birthday.

E. N. Glass

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

DarkLight radiation backgrounds  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

Kalantarians, N. [Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton VA 23668 (United States); Collaboration: DarkLight Collaboration

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

DarkLight radiation backgrounds  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

Kalantarians, Narbe [University of Texas

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA 2 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 USA 3 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM) experiments utilizing ignition-scaled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A striking

166

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

167

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

168

The flying radiation case  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Applied Theoretical and Computational Physics Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

Houze, Jr., Robert A. [University of Washington Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

171

Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

172

Radiative Muon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The theory of radiative muon capture is developed. The discussion includes both parity conserving and nonconserving effects. The Gell-Mann weak magnetic term and the induced pseudoscalar are included, along with comparable relativistic effects in the nucleons. The theory is applied to light nuclei and especially to the radiative Godfrey reaction ?-+C126??+?+B125. An experiment to detect the induced pseudoscalar directly is proposed.

Jeremy Bernstein

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Re-examining the health effects of radiation and its protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The health effects of radiation from atomic explosions in Japan were completely different from those due to radiation from the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan. The sudden exposure to acute radiation in extremely high doses killed Japanese people, and harmed the survivors in lower doses as shown by increased cancer mortality, especially the leukemia based on the LNT model. The chronic radiation received by the residents unknowingly in the Co-60 contaminated apartments in Taiwan, even in higher doses, caused no excess cancer deaths; on the contrary their spontaneous cancer deaths were sharply reduced to only about 2.5% of that of the general population, and hereditary defects in their offspring were only 5%??7% of those of the normal population. Therefore, the residents in the Co-60 contamination apartments had coincidently accomplished a human experiment of the health effects to human beings. The chronic radiation received from the Co-60 contaminated houses is quite similar to the radiation exposure to the workers and public in the peaceful use of nuclear energy and medical radiation. Acute radiation from a nuclear accident could harm a limited number of people, but the chronic radiation might benefit people, such as in the case of the Chernobyl accident. People should not be fearful of chronic exposure to low radiation and the traditional radiation protection policy and practices used in past 60 years should be revised based on the health effects observed in Taiwan.

Y.C. Luan; M.C. Shieh; S.T. Chen; H.T. Kung; K.L. Soong; Y.C. Yeh; T.S. Chou; W.C. Fang; S.L. Yao; C.J. Pong; S.H. Mong; J.T. Wu; J.M. Wu; H.J. Jen; W.L. Chen; W.P. Deng; M.F. Wu; M.L. Shen; C.P. Sun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

Nelson, Carl [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Bai, Harrison [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Neboori, Hanmanth [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Drexel Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Takita, Cristiane [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Motwani, Sabin [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Jones, Tiffanie [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Goyal, Sharad [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)] [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

176

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le confrencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrle des zones et les prcautions prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

178

Infrared radiation: Herschel revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The year 2000 marks the 200th anniversary of Herschels discovery of infrared radiation. Using a car light in place of the Sun and a liquid crystal sheet instead of thermometers the experiment is an effective classroom demonstration of invisible light.

Erin E. Pursell; Richard Kozlowski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

High pressure--high temperature research using high energy synchrotron radiation at the TRISTAN accumulation ring  

SciTech Connect

High energy synchrotron radiation emitted from the bending magnet of the TRISTAN accumulation ring (6.5 GeV) at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics has been used for the high pressure--high temperature diffraction experiments using a multianvil press system, MAX80. Owing to the specific features of high energy synchroton radiation, significant improvements have been brought to the high pressure research. The wide energy range of diffraction spectrum leads to an increase in the number of observable diffraction peaks in an energy-dispersive method, resulting in an increase in the accuracy of the measurements of the lattice and thermal parameters. Due to the high penetrating power of radiation, diffraction patterns can be taken in a short time from materials containing heavy elements or materials surrounded by a metal foil. Typical examples of high pressure--high temperature experiments with high energy synchrotron radiation are also described.

Kikegawa, T.; Shimomura, O.; Iwasaki, H.; Sato, S.; Mikuni, A.; Iida, A.; Kamiya, N.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ray tracing of Jovian kilometric radiation  

SciTech Connect

Results of computer ray tracing of Jovian kilometric from 56.2 kHz to 1 MHz in a model Jovian magnetosphere with an Io torus are presented. Ray tracing calculations indicate that the Io torus presents a propagation barrier to the radiation and that the Jovian kilometric radiation must be generated in the L-O mode from a source near Jupiter on field lines passing through the Io torus. One effect of the Io torus is to refract the rays away from the magnetic equator forming a shadow zone at radial distances beyond the torus. In general, at radial distances greater than 10 Jovian radii, as the wave frequency increases (>200 kHz) so does the magnetic latitude of the shadow zone. These and other features of the ray tracing calculations are in good qualitative agreement with the observations from the plasma wave receiver and planetary radio astronomy experiment on board both Voyager 1 and 2.

Green, J.L.; Gurnett, D.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Reducing Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

183

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

184

Radiation from accelerated branes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

Mohab Abou-Zeid and Miguel S. Costa

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

Radiative muon capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown by relating the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture to that of radiative pion capture, that the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture proposed recently by Hwang and Primakoff differs from the others mainly by Low's counter terms. Despite the fact that the "original" transition amplitude does not violate seriously the conservation of the hadronic electromagnetic current, Low's counter terms, as introduced via Low's prescription to secure the presence of small conservation-of-hadronic-electromagnetic-current-breaking terms, are confirmed to be of numerical importance. Further, it is found in the "elementary-particle" treatment of radiative muon capture that the uncertainty arising from the nuclear structure can be reduced to become negligible. Therefore, an exclusive radiative muon capture experiment can in principle differentiate the Hwang-Primakoff theory from the others and yet provide a comprehensive test of partial conservation of axial-vector current.RADIOACTIVITY Theories of radiative muon capture, linearity hypothesis versus Low's prescription; nuclear structure and PCAC.

W -Y. P. Hwang

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Image Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Gallery Image Gallery These are images, photographs, and charts presented or developed for Low Dose Radiation Research Investigators’ Meetings. They may be used for presentations or reports. To save, right click on the picture, then choose "Save picture as." U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 1980. various sources 1980 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 2006. various sources 2006 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources in the United States for 2006. man-made 2006 Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience (Rem) Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience

187

Higgs Boson Yukawa Form Factors from Supersymmetric Radiative Fermion Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent discovery of the Higgs-like resonance at $125\\,\\rm{GeV}$ has opened up new avenues in the search for beyond standard model physics. Hints of such extensions could manifest themselves as modifications in the Higgs-fermion couplings and other Higgs related observables. In this work, we study aspects of a class of models where the light fermion masses are radiatively generated. Specifically, we consider models where the light fermion masses, partially or completely, arise from chiral violation in the soft supersymmetry-breaking sector. In these models, the radiatively generated Higgs-fermion Yukawa form factors have non-trivial characteristics and will modify Higgs-fermion couplings from their standard model expectations. A radiatively generated fermion mass could also potentially contribute to large anomalous magnetic moments; this is particularly interesting in the case of the muon where a persistent discrepancy, at the level of around $3\\,\\sigma$, has existed between experiment and theory. Deviatio...

Thalapillil, Arun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Sound radiation due to rapid deformation of an impacted plate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sound radiation due to forced deformation of an impacted plate was investigated. An initial sound pressure pulse due to rapid local deformation of a plate was generated before the radiation from natural modes of the plate occurred. On the axis of impact near the plate a distinct pressure pulse is observed to reproduce the velocity waveform of the plate at the opposite side of the impact point. Data from experiments involving impact of spheres on plates differing in size and material properties are presented to show the plate behavior and the radiated soundpressure. Theoretical results were obtained from an analytical model in which impulsive acceleration of a plate with Gaussian spatial distribution is convoluted with the acceleration?time history of the actual impact. Theoretical results for the on?axis pressure are compared with the experimental results.

Adnan Akay; Reginald O. Cook

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos Soares

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

190

Measurement of radiation impedance of stepped piston radiator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was noted in a paper given in 1972 [A. H. Lubell J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 52 1310 (1972)] that the radiation mass of a stepped piston underwater loudspeaker was approximately half of the value expected from simple piston theory. Recently the integral equation approach was used to compute the radiation impedance for the Lubell Laboratories model 98 underwater loudspeaker and new measurements were made. This paper reviews the measurement and data reduction procedures and compares measured and theoretical radiation impedances. The original observation of reduced radiation mass is supported. A companion paper covers the integral equation computation. [This work was supported by Lubell Laboratories Inc.

Alan H. Lubell

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Plasma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... JUST over ten years ago the first book on plasma physics as a subject in its own right appeared; in a gradually swelling stream ... been surprisingly few monographs. One topic which has had scant coverage in any form is plasma radiation (except for spectral-line radiation which has been dealt with very fully in ...

T. J. M. BOYD

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Plasma Radiation by Rough Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent observation of a peak of scattered radiation at the plasma frequency from thin metal foils irradiated with light can be explained in terms of a small amount of surface roughness of the foils.

Edward A. Stern

1967-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radiation Incident on Tilted Collectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For solar energy system design purposes, observations of solar radiation on a horizontal surface must be converted to values on a tilted energy collector. An empirical conversion relationship, introduced by Liu and Jordan (1960) and based on ...

P. J. Robinson

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Posters Radiation Singularities, Multiple Scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mean C 1 0.75 and Levy index 1.35 (as empirically observed) and apply to it the Radiative Transfer Equation in the perfect scattering case. We have analytical and numerical...

195

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Channeling Radiation from Relativistic Positrons in LiF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unusual features of radiation spectra from relativistic positrons channeled in the ionic crystal LiF have been observed.

B. L. Berman; S. Datz; R. W. Fearick; J. O. Kephart; R. H. Pantell; H. Park; R. L. Swent

1982-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

On the Phenomenology of Tachyon Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a brief overview of the different kinds of electromagnetic radiations expected to come from (or to be induced by) space-like sources (tachyons). New domains of radiation are here considered; and the possibility of experimental observation of tachyons via electromagnetic radiation is discussed.

Ron Folman; Erasmo Recami

1995-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radiation Minimum Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frost resulting from cooling of vegetation by nocturnal radiation is a serious agricultural problem. Because of the number of variables involved attacks on this problem from a purely theoretical point of view have met with only moderate success. It seems logical to suppose that an instrument might be devised which would speed up the natural radiation processes and enable an observer to obtain in a few hours a measure of the cooling which occurs naturally over a period of 12 to 14 hr. Such an instrument could serve as a frost warning device. This paper describes the construction of a radiation device and presents experimental evidence to show that it can be used as a predictor of freezing temperatures at vegetation level.

Francis K. Davis Jr.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ionizing-Radiation Resistance in the Desiccation-Tolerant CyanobacteriumChroococcidiopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...differences between radiation-resistant and radiation-susceptible microorganisms...after exposure to high doses of X rays ranging...cultures used for radiation experiments were 3-month-old...Goleta, Calif.). Estimation of survival. To determine...

Daniela Billi; E. Imre Friedmann; Kurt G. Hofer; Maria Grilli Caiola; Roseli Ocampo-Friedmann

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field #12;Rel.dose=25 In actual FRIB system, estimated rel.dose would be ~10. rel.dose=25 is close for any radiated samples. Rel.dose=25 gives slightly higher Ic than rel.dose=2.5 in some magnetic fields field As radiation dose increases, Ic decreases monotonically for bot

McDonald, Kirk

204

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

205

Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation Period Workshop at Annual Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Science Team Meeting D. A. Randall Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado R. T. Cederwall Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California * Study previous observation simulation system experiments (OSSEs) (i.e., Bill Frank, Pennsylvania State University [PSU]) and conduct OSSEs as necessary to evaluate data network. * Implement additional "boundary" facilities and investigate possible interim capabilities for upcoming SCM IOPs. * Improve resolution of wind profiles observed in lowest 1 km, using data sources such as towers of opportunity, doppler sodar, and doppler radar.

206

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments Completed / Terminated ATF Experiments AE01 - Micro-undulator FEL Experiment. Spokesperson: I. Ben-Zvi, BNL. (1992 - 1997) AE02. - Inverse FEL Accelerator. Spokesperson: A. van Steenbergen, BNL. [Yale, Columbia]. (1992-1997) AE03 - Laser Grating Accelerator Experiment. Spokesperson: R. Fernow, BNL. [Princeton, LANL]. (1992- 1996) AE05 - Nonlinear-Compton Scattering. Spokesperson: K. McDonald, Princeton (1992-) AE06 - Inverse Cherenkov Acceleration. Spokesperson: W. Kimura, STI Optronics. [UCSB,BNL]. (1992-1997) AE08 - Far Infrared Radiation Source. Spokesperson J. Walsh, Dartmouth. [Oxford, BNL]. (1992 - 1994) AE09. - Photocathode R&D. Spokesperson: T. Rao, BNL. (1992 - ) AE10. - High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL. Spokesperson: L.H. Yu, BNL. [ANL] (1992 - 2001)

207

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

208

Radiation Damage in Titanate Ceramics Used for Plutonium Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

Results from radiation damage experiments are discussed with respect to the immobilization of Pu declared excess to the weapons programs. The ceramics are titanate-based.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

210

Observed Southern Ocean Cloud Properties and Shortwave Reflection. Part I: Calculation of SW Flux from Observed Cloud Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the reflection of shortwave radiation over the Southern Ocean to the cloud properties there is estimated using observations from a suite of passive and active satellite instruments in combination with radiative transfer ...

Daniel T. McCoy; Dennis L. Hartmann; Daniel P. Grosvenor

211

Ignition Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Experiments The goal of many NIF experiments is to create a self-sustaining "burn" of fusion fuel (the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium) that produces as much or...

212

Radiation protection: Natural radiation risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... radiation to which humans are exposed consists of four components - cosmic, gamma, internal, radon. The relative contribution that each makes to the sum is shown in the chart. ... but exposure of the whole body to terrestrial gamma rays and of the lungs to radon daughters are influenced by the nature and location of housing. Gamma rays are emitted ...

M. C. O'Riordan

1983-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

Macroscopic observables  

SciTech Connect

We study macroscopic observables defined as the total value of a physical quantity over a collection of quantum systems. We show that previous results obtained for an infinite ensemble of identically prepared systems lead to incorrect conclusions for finite ensembles. In particular, exact measurement of a macroscopic observable significantly disturbs the state of any finite ensemble. However, we show how this disturbance can be made arbitrarily small when the measurements are of finite accuracy. We demonstrate a general trade-off between state disturbance and measurement coarseness as a function of the size of the ensemble. Using this trade-off, we show that the histories generated by any sequence of finite accuracy macroscopic measurements always generate a consistent family in the absence of large-scale entanglement for sufficiently large ensembles. Hence, macroscopic observables behave 'classically' provided that their accuracy is coarser than the quantum correlation length scale of the system. The role of these observable is also discussed in the context of NMR quantum information processing and bulk ensemble quantum state tomography.

Poulin, David [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Macroscopic observables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study macroscopic observables defined as the total value of a physical quantity over a collection of quantum systems. We show that previous results obtained for an infinite ensemble of identically prepared systems lead to incorrect conclusions for finite ensembles. In particular, exact measurement of a macroscopic observable significantly disturbs the state of any finite ensemble. However, we show how this disturbance can be made arbitrarily small when the measurements are of finite accuracy. We demonstrate a general trade-off between state disturbance and measurement coarseness as a function of the size of the ensemble. Using this trade-off, we show that the histories generated by any sequence of finite accuracy macroscopic measurements always generate a consistent family in the absence of large-scale entanglement for sufficiently large ensembles. Hence, macroscopic observables behave classically provided that their accuracy is coarser than the quantum correlation length scale of the system. The role of these observable is also discussed in the context of NMR quantum information processing and bulk ensemble quantum state tomography.

David Poulin

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

The BaR-SPOrt Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BaR-SPOrt (Balloon-borne Radiometers for Sky Polarisation Observations) is an experiment to measure the linearly polarized emission of sky patches at 32 and 90 GHz with sub-degree angular resolution. It is equipped with high sensitivity correlation polarimeters for simultaneous detection of both the U and Q stokes parameters of the incident radiation. On-axis telescope is used to observe angular scales where the expected polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMBP) peaks. This project shares most of the know-how and sophisticated technology developed for the SPOrt experiment onboard the International Space Station. The payload is designed to flight onboard long duration stratospheric balloons both in the Northern and Southern hemispheres where low foreground emission sky patches are accessible. Due to the weakness of the expected CMBP signal (in the range of microK), much care has been spent to optimize the instrument design with respect to the systematics generation, observing time efficiency and long term stability. In this contribution we present the instrument design, and first tests on some components of the 32 GHz radiometer.

M. Zannoni; S. Cortiglioni; G. Bernardi; E. Carretti; S. Cecchini; C. Macculi; E. Morelli; C. Sbarra; G. Ventura; L. Nicastro; J. Monari; M. Poloni; S. Poppi; V. Natale; M. Baralis; O. Peverini; R. Tascone; G. Virone; A. Boscaleri; E. Pascale; G. Boella; S. Bonometto; M. Gervasi; G. Sironi; M. Tucci; R. Nesti; R. Fabbri; P. de Bernardis; M. De Petris; S. Masi; M. V. Sazhin; E. N. Vinyajkin

2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

216

Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of {sup 57}Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2{plus_minus}0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1{1/2} natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

Brown, D.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Aharonov-Bohm radiation  

SciTech Connect

A solenoid oscillating in vacuum will pair produce charged particles due to the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interaction. We calculate the radiation pattern and power emitted for charged scalar particles. We extend the solenoid analysis to cosmic strings and find enhanced radiation from cusps and kinks on loops. We argue by analogy with the electromagnetic AB interaction that cosmic strings should emit photons due to the gravitational AB interaction of fields in the conical spacetime of a cosmic string. We calculate the emission from a kink and find that it is of similar order as emission from a cusp, but kinks are vastly more numerous than cusps and may provide a more interesting observational signature.

Jones-Smith, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Vachaspati, Tanmay [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Digestion Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blank in Bulletin] BULLETIN NO. 291 FEBRUARY, 1922 DIGESTION EXPERIMENTS This is the sixth bulletin in a series whose object is to ascertain the Aceding value of Texas feeding stuffs by means of digestion experiments. Previous bulletins... The productive values and the values for digestible protein in t Bulletin have been calculated from the results of digestion esperiine? with sheep. The method of conducting the experiments is described Bulletins Nos. 147 and 166 of this Station. The production...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Radiating gravastars  

SciTech Connect

Considering a Vaidya exterior spacetime, we study dynamical models of prototype gravastars, made of an infinitely thin spherical shell of a perfect fluid with the equation of state p = ?, enclosing an interior de Sitter spacetime. We show explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, an unstable gravastar, a stable gravastar or a 'bounded excursion' gravastar, depending on how the mass of the shell evolves in time, the cosmological constant and the initial position of the dynamical shell. This work presents, for the first time in the literature, a gravastar that emits radiation.

Chan, R. [Coordenao de Astronomia e Astrofsica, Observatrio Nacional, Rua General Jos Cristino, 77, So Cristvo 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, M.F.A. da [Departamento de Fsica Terica, Instituto de Fsica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua So Francisco Xavier 524, Maracan 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Jaime F. Villas da [Instituto de Biocincias, Departamento de Cincias Naturais, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Pasteur 458, Urca, CEP 22290-240, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wang, Anzhong, E-mail: chan@on.br, E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com, E-mail: jfvroch@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu [GCAP-CASPER, Department of Physics, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Millimeter and Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Atmospheric Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B Near-Infrared Radiative Transfer Model B.15 Near-Infrared Observations of Neptunes Clouds with the133 6.2 Near-infrared spectroscopy . . . . . .

Cook, Statia Honora Luszcz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Natural and Radiation Carcinogenesis in Man. III. Radiation Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mice. NATURAL AND RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN MAN. 3. RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS. | Journal Article | Japan Neoplasms etiology Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced Radiation Genetics | JAPAN NEOPLASM ETIOLOGY NEOPLASMS, RADIATION-INDUCED RADIATION...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Ly?. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (?) has increased slightly from ? = 0.94 0.04 in 2009 to ? = 1.01 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Saul, L.; Wurz, P. [University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Frisch, P. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gruntman, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mueller, H. R. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earths radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

Jefferson, A

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Title Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors de Boer, Gijs, William D. Collins, Surabi Menon, and Charles N. Long Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 11 Start Page 11937 Pagination 11937-11949 Abstract Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

226

Aerosol Radiative Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions.in Winter ZCAREX-2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions in Winter ZCAREX-2001 G. S. Golitsyn, I. A. Gorchakova, and I. I. Mokhov Institute of Atmospheric Physic Moscow, Russia Introduction Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) is estimated for winter clear-sky conditions from measurements during ZCAREX-2001-Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment in February-March, 2001 at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS) of the A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS. ARF in the shortwave range is determined by the difference between the net fluxes of the solar radiation, calculated with and without the aerosol component of the atmosphere. The estimates of ARF are made for conditions with high surface albedo. Data Used The following data of atmospheric characteristics observed during winter are used for the

227

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

229

Hydronuclear experiments  

SciTech Connect

Hydronuclear experiments, a method for assessing some aspects of nuclear weapon safety, were conducted at Los Alamos during the 1958 to 1961 moratorium on nuclear testing. The experiments resulted in subcritical multiplying assemblies or a very slight degree of supercriticality and, in some cases, involved a slight, but insignificant, fission energy release. These experiments helped to identify so-called one-point safety problems associated with some of the nuclear weapons systems of that time. The need for remedial action was demonstrated, although some of the necessary design changes could not be made until after the resumption of weapons testing at the end of 1961.

Thorn, R.N.; Westervelt, D.R.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1...

231

Radiation Effects in Fission and Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the prediction of Wigner disease [1...] and the subsequent observation of anisotropic growth of the graphite used in the Chicago Pile, the effects of radiation on materials has been an important technolog...

G. Robert Odette; Brian D. Wirth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

234

Parallelization of Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning(RTTP) : A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to treat cancer- ous tumors. This paper reports our experiences with the parallelization of a real-world 3-D radiation therapy treat- ment planning (RTTP) system on a wide range of plat at the tumor in a patient from different directions, thereby concentrating radiation dose in the tumor

Chaudhary, Vipin

235

Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Sole, Claudio V., E-mail: cvsole@uc.cl [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro [Service of General Surgery, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Gmez-Esp, Marina [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Blanco, Jose [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); Institute of Research Investigation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran, Madrid (Spain); and others

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

In situ observations of the ionized environment of Mars: the antenna impedance measurements experiment, AIM, proposed as part of the Mars advanced radar for subsurface and ionospheric sounding, MARSIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the priority is not very high, one of the scientific objectives of the Mars Express mission is to study the interaction of the Martian atmosphere with the interplanetary medium. Regarding Mars, the term atmosphere must be interpreted in its broadest sense, that is including the exospheric neutral and charged particles of planetary origin, which both extend deeply into the interplanetary medium and strongly interact with it. The antenna impedance measurements (AIM) experiment has been proposed within this framework. The main idea was to take advantage of the presence of a radar antenna onboard the Mars Express Orbiter and to measure its self-impedance in a frequency bandwidth that contains the plasma frequency. Both the real and imaginary parts of the antenna impedance are functions of the total plasma density and electron temperature. Consequently, with about 700g of electronics, box, cables, and a rather simple interface to the radar antenna it becomes possible to monitor two local aeronomical parameters that play a fundamental role in the interaction between the Martian environment and the solar wind. Due to its lower-frequency bandwidth (8kHz2 MHz), which allows a full coverage from the shocked solar wind down to the ionosphere, its capability of measuring the electron temperature, and the reliability of its measurements the AIM experiment perfectly complements the Mars advanced radar for subsurface and ionospheric sounding (MARSIS) ionospheric investigations. In particular, careful computations show that the electron temperature can hardly be derived from the passive electric field measurements planned to be made by MARSIS. Unfortunately, due to a too late decision about the additional payload selection, the proposal of AIM as part of the MARSIS has been rejected.

J.G Trotignon; H.-C Sran; C Bghin; N MeyerVernet; R Manning; R Grard; H Laakso

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Background. Extensive research on the health effects of radiation using standard epidemiological and toxicological approaches has been done for decades to characterize responses of populations and individuals to high radiation doses, and to set exposure standards to protect both the public and the workforce. These standards were set using models that extrapolated from the cancers observed following exposure to high doses of radiation to predicted, but not measurable, changes in cancer frequency at low radiation doses. The use of models was necessary because of our inability to detect changes in cancer incidence following low doses of radiation. Historically, the predominant approach has been the Linear-no-Threshold model (see Wikipedia entry) and collective dose concept that assumes each unit of radiation, no

238

RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. <' ," . . * . RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED . 370 Lexl.ngton Avenue New York 17# New York jq.5' L- Contract No. A T (30-l)-2093 with the United States Atom ic Energy Commission F O A M SEPARATION Progress Report for March, 1959 Abstract Appreciable cesium enrichment in the foam has been obtained using the system sodium tetraphenyl boron-Geigy reagent. Enrichment ratios varied from 1.5 to 3.5 depending upon operating conditions. The en- richment appears to depend on the ratio of the sodium tetraphenyl boron to Geigy reagent rather than on the absolute values of the indi- vidual concentrations. Further experiments are being conducted to verify and extend the range of results. Continuous countercurrent column operation has been continued.

239

Radiation cooling and gain calculation for C VI 182 A line in C/Se plasma  

SciTech Connect

A model is developed which is capable of describing the evolution of gain resulting from both rapid radiative and expansion cooling of a recombining, freely expanding plasma. It is demonstrated for the particular case of a carbon/selenium plasma that the cooling rate which leads to optimal gain can be achieved by adjusting the admixture of an efficiently radiating material (selenium) in the gain medium (carbon). Comparison is made to a recent observation of gain in a recent NRL/Rochester experiment with carbon/selenium plasma for the n = 3 ..-->.. 2 transition in C VI occurring at 182 A. The predicted maximum gain is approx.10 cm/sup -1/, as compared to observation of 2 to 3 cm/sup -1/.

Nam, C.H.; Valeo, E.; Suckewer, S.; Feldman, U.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

On the Classical Radiation of Accelerated Electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the properties of the radiation from a high energy accelerated electron, as recently observed in the General Electric synchrotron. An elementary derivation of the total rate of radiation is first presented, based on Larmor's formula for a slowly moving electron, and arguments of relativistic invariance. We then construct an expression for the instantaneous power radiated by an electron moving along an arbitrary, prescribed path. By casting this result into various forms, one obtains the angular distribution, the spectral distribution, or the combined angular and spectral distributions of the radiation. The method is based on an examination of the rate at which the electron irreversibly transfers energy to the electromagnetic field, as determined by half the difference of retarded and advanced electric field intensities. Formulas are obtained for an arbitrary charge-current distribution and then specialized to a point charge. The total radiated power and its angular distribution are obtained for an arbitrary trajectory. It is found that the direction of motion is a strongly preferred direction of emission at high energies. The spectral distribution of the radiation depends upon the detailed motion over a time interval large compared to the period of the radiation. However, the narrow cone of radiation generated by an energetic electron indicates that only a small part of the trajectory is effective in producing radiation observed in a given direction, which also implies that very high frequencies are emitted. Accordingly, we evaluate the spectral and angular distributions of the high frequency radiation by an energetic electron, in their dependence upon the parameters characterizing the instantaneous orbit. The average spectral distribution, as observed in the synchrotron measurements, is obtained by averaging the electron energy over an acceleration cycle. The entire spectrum emitted by an electron moving with constant speed in a circular path is also discussed. Finally, it is observed that quantum effects will modify the classical results here obtained only at extraordinarily large energies.

Julian Schwinger

1949-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

242

Emplacing experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose that understandings of the role of space and place in everyday life are of value to designing the environment of Role Playing Games (RPGs). We compare aspects of space and place in spatial experiences while moving through terrains in physical ... Keywords: place, space, video games

David Browning; Steven Stanley; Michael Fryer; Nicola J Bidwell

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee Charter 1. Purpose The committee reviews functional changes to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) and Personnel Protection System (PSS) used to provide personnel protection and area exclusion related to APS accelerators, storage ring and other radiation handling areas. The RSPP Committee advises APS management on radiation safety matters. At the request of APS Management the committee reviews projects, recommends radiation safety policy, and evaluates accident investigation conclusions. 2. Membership Members are appointed by the APS Division Directors and APS Director for their knowledge and background in Interlock Systems, Radiation Safety, Accelerator Operations and Work on the Experiment Floor.

244

Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators  

SciTech Connect

At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

Nikolai V. Mokhov

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico, D.F., 04510 (Mexico)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

248

Building Knowledge through Families of Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Knowledge through Families of Experiments Victor R. Basili, Fellow, IEEE, Forrest Shull, and build models that represent the common observations about the discipline. This paper discusses building knowledge in an incremental manner through the replication of experiments within families

Basili, Victor R.

249

Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of ionizing radiation protection and safety. The course curriculum combines...

250

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation emitted by the earth. This instrument is onboard a European Union geostationary weather satellite launched in December 2005; it is collecting data over Niamey and the...

251

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

252

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

253

Atmospheres and radiating surfaces of neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a breakthrough in the studies of thermal radiation of neutron stars. Observations with modern space telescopes have provided a wealth of valuable information. Being correctly interpreted, this information can elucidate physics of superdense matter in the interiors of these stars. The theory of formation of thermal spectra of neutron stars is based on the physics of plasmas and radiative processes in stellar photospheres. It provides the framework for interpretation of observational data and for extracting neutron-star parameters from these data. This paper presents a review of the current state of the theory of surface layers of neutron stars and radiative processes in these layers, with the main focus on the neutron stars that possess strong magnetic fields. In addition to the conventional deep (semi-infinite) atmospheres, radiative condensed surfaces of neutron stars and "thin" (finite) atmospheres are also considered.

Potekhin, A Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient uv-b radiation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

typically been conducted under low levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation, a naturally occurring mutagen... . We conducted experi- ments to test whether the inclusion of...

255

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................10 AREA RADIATION SURVEYS AND CONTAMINATION CONTROL...........................................11.....................................................................................................13 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT meetings of the Radiation Safety Committee where new users and uses of radioactive materials, radiation

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

256

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

257

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Design for a High Energy Density Kelvin-Helmholtz Experiment  

SciTech Connect

While many high energy density physics (HEDP) Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments have been fielded as part of basic HEDP and astrophysics studies, not one HEDP Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) experiment has been successfully performed. Herein, a design for a novel HEDP x-ray driven KH experiment is presented along with supporting radiation-hydrodynamic simulation and theory.

Hurricane, O A

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air- tantly, what radiation dose people may have received. An independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP, additionalProjectworkcouldresultin revisions of these dose estimates. April 21, 1994 Companion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

262

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

263

Reception of longitudinal vector potential radiation with a plasma antenna  

SciTech Connect

To help resolve the long-running debate between physicists and engineers regarding the existence of the magnetic vector potential, herewith we describe an experiment demonstrating reception of time-harmonic vector potential radiation at 1.3 GHz.

Zimmerman, Robert K. Jr. [Sigma Space Corporation, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [Sigma Space Corporation, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Radiation Testing of Consumer High-Speed LSI Chips for the Next Space VLBI Mission, VSOP-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed two types of radiation testing on high-speed LSI chips to test their suitability for use in wideband observations by the Japanese next space VLBI mission, VSOP-2. In the total ionization dose experiment we monitored autocorrelation spectra which were taken with irradiated LSI chips and the source current at intervals up to 1,000 hours from the ionization dose, but we could not see any change of these features for the chips irradiated with dose rates expected in the VSOP-2 mission. In the single event effect experiment, we monitored the cross correlation phase and power spectra between the data from radiated and non-radiated devices, and the source current during the irradiation of heavy-ions. We observed a few tens of single event upsets as discrete delay jumps for each LSI. We estimated the occurrence rate of single events in space as between once a few days to once a month. No single event latch-up was seen in any of the LSIs. These results show that the tested LSIs have sufficient tolerance to the environment for space VLBI observations.

Kiyoaki Wajima; Noriyuki Kawaguchi; Yasuhiro Murata; Hisashi Hirabayashi

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

ATLAS APPROVED EXPERIMENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8MAY98 8MAY98 Exp # Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 433-9 Miller Ion Irradiations of Anisotropic High-Tc Superconductors: Probing Dynamics of Magnetic Vortices 2 651-2 Paul Accelerator-Mass-Spectrometry Measurements of Natural 236U Concentrations with the ECR-ATLAS System 4 667-2 Janssens Unsafe Coulex of the 238,239Pu Nuclei 4 669-2 Carpenter Excited States Associated with Different Shapes in 178Hg and Neighboring Odd-A Nuclei 4 673-2 Lister A Study of Radiative Decay from High Lying States in 24Mg 5 689-2 Freeman Spectroscopy of Odd Tin Isotopes Approaching 100Sn 5 693-2 Reiter Structure and Formation Mechanism of Heavy Elements - Request for additional beam time for Experiment 693 - 6 706 Kwok Heavy-Ion Lithography on High Temperature Superconductors 2 708 Yu In-Beam Spectroscopy Study of the Proton Emitter 109I with Recoil-Decay Tagging Technique

266

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

267

SPECIAL SEMINAR - The NOTTE experiment, or how to become a Total Solar Eclipse chaser  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The NOTTE experiment (Neutrino Oscillations with Telescope during Total Eclipse) aims at searching for visible photons emitted through a possible radiative decay of solar neutrinos. The experiment and the expeditions organized by a group of physicists and astrophysicists from INFN and INAF Bologna hunting for Total Solar Eclipses from 1998 to 2006 wil be described. The results of observations performed during total solar eclipse expeditions in 2001 (Zambia) and 2006 (Sahara desert, Libya) are presented and a beautiful photo gallery will be shown. Other peculiar observations that can be made during a solar eclipse are also illustrated. The seminar will be followed by a brief presentation of future camps for solar eclipse chasers and scientists organized in 2008 in Russia, Kazakhstan, China and Mongolia, in 2009 in Shanghai and on the Easter Island in 2010.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Integral method for the calculation of Hawking radiation in dispersive media II. Asymmetric asymptotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analogue gravity experiments make feasible the realisation of black hole spacetimes in a laboratory setting and the observational verification of Hawking radiation. Since such analogue systems are typically dominated by dispersion, efficient techniques for calculating the predicted Hawking spectrum in the presence of strong dispersion are required. In the preceding paper, an integral method in Fourier space is proposed for stationary $1+1$-dimensional backgrounds which are asymptotically symmetric. Here, this method is generalised to backgrounds which are different in the asymptotic regions to the left and right of the scattering region.

Scott Robertson

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

269

"Millikan oil drops" as quantum transducers between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pairs of Planck-mass-scale drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e., "Millikan oil drops"), when levitated in the presence of strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. A Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves back into EM waves, should be practical to perform. This would open up observations of the gravity-wave analog of the Cosmic Microwave Background from the extremely early Big Bang, and also communications directly through the interior of the Earth.

Raymond Y. Chiao

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Radiative Muon Capture in Calcium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The branching ratio relative to ordinary muon capture and the photon asymmetry relative to the muon-spin direction were measured for radiative muon capture in Ca40. For ~ 1200 photon events, the partial branching ratio is Rk>57MeV=(21.11.4)10-6, and the asymmetry for k>63.5 MeV is +0.900.50. A fit of the photon spectrum to the theory of Rood, Yano, and Yano gives the value gP?=(6.51.6)gA for the pseudoscalar-coupling constant. These results are in disagreement with earlier experiments.

R. D. Hart; C. R. Cox; G. W. Dodson; M. Eckhause; J. R. Kane; M. S. Pandey; A. M. Rushton; R. T. Siegel; R. E. Welsh

1977-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

On the realization of Bell observables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how Bell observables on a bipartite quantum system can be obtained by local observables via a controlled-unitary transformation. For continuous variables this result holds for the Bell observable corresponding to the non-conventional heterodyne measurement on two radiation modes, which is connected through a 50-50 beam-splitter to two local observables given by single-mode homodyne measurements. A simple scheme for a controlled-unitary transformation of continuous variables is also presented, which needs only two squeezers, a parametric downconverter and two beam splitters.

Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Paolo Perinotti

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqua thermodynamic experiment Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Their Meridional Energy Transports Summary: is applied to a study of the total heat transport estimated from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE... to the pristine...

273

Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms  

SciTech Connect

An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

275

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

First Plasma Wave Observations at Uranus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ring plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected...kilometers. BRIDGE, H.S., PLASMA OBSERVATIONS NEAR URANUS...RADIO-EMISSION FROM URANUS AT 0.5 MHZ, ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL...SATURN BY THE VOYAGER PLASMA-WAVE INSTRUMENT, ICARUS...position where the 97.2-kHz radiation was blocked...

D. A. GURNETT; W. S. KURTH; F. L. SCARF; R. L. POYNTER

1986-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

277

On surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols: models and observations  

SciTech Connect

The effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and sulphate aerosols on near-surface temperature is investigated using a version of the Hadley Centre atmospheric model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. The scattering of sunlight by sulphate aerosols is represented by appropriately enhancing the surface albedo. On doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, the global mean temperature increases by 5.2 K. An integration with a 39% increase in CO{sub 2}, giving the estimated change in radiative heating due to increases in greenhouse gases since 1900, produced an equilibrium warming of 2.3 K, which, even allowing for oceanic inertia, is significantly higher than the observed warming over the same period. Furthermore, the simulation suggests a substantial warming everywhere, whereas the observations indicate isolated regions of cooling, including parts of the northern midlatitude continents. The addition of an estimate of the effect of scattering by current industrial aerosols (uncertain by a factor of at least 3) leads to improved agreement with the observed pattern of changes over the northern continents and reduces the global mean warming by about 30%. Doubling the aerosol forcing produces patterns that are still compatible with the observations, but further increase leads to unrealistically extensive cooling in the midlatitudes. The diurnal range of surface temperature decreases over most of the northern extratropics on increasing CO{sub 2}, in agreement with recent observations. The addition of the current industrial aerosol had little detectable effect on the diurnal range in the model because the direct effect of reduced solar heating at the surface is approximately balanced by the indirect effects of cooling. Thus, the ratio of the reduction in diurnal range to the mean warming is increased, in closer agreement with observations. Results from further sensitivity experiments with larger increases in aerosol and CO{sub 2} are presented.

Mitchell, J.F.B.; Davis, R.A.; Ingram, W.J.; Senior, C.A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Americans' Average Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

NA

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

280

First Intrinsic Anisotropy Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first results of observations of the intrinsic anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with the Cosmic Background Imager from a site at 5080 m altitude in northern Chile. Our observations show a sharp decrease in C_l in the range l=400 - 1500. The broadband amplitudes we have measured are deltaT(band) = 58.7 (-6.3, +7.7) microK for l = 603 (-166, +180) and 29.7 (-4.2, +4.8) microK for l = 1190 (-224, +261), where these are half-power widths in l. Such a decrease in power at high l is one of the fundamental predictions of the standard cosmological model, and these are the first observations which cover a broad enough l range to show this decrease in a single experiment. The C_l we have measured enable us to place limits on the density parameter, Omega(tot) = 0.7 (90% confidence).

S. Padin; J. K. Cartwright; B. S. Mason; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; J. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; W. L. Holzapfel; S. T. Myers; J. E. Carlstrom; E. M. Leitch; M. Joy; L. Bronfman; J. May

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiation: Facts, Risks and Realities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Radiation 3 Understanding Radiation Risks 6 Naturally Occurring (Background) Radiation 7 Man-Made Radiation, beta particles and gamma rays. Other types, such as x-rays, can occur naturally or be machine-produced. Scientists have also learned that radiation sources are naturally all around us. Radiation can come from

282

Overview and Experimental Program of the Levitated Dipole Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the experiment. #12;Why is dipole confinement interesting? Simplest confinement field High- confinement occurs naturally in magnetospheres ( ~ 2 in Jupiter) Possibility of fusion power source with near- classical energy tori Design Radiation Shield Outer Vacuum Shell

283

SCIPP 11/06 Fundamentals of LHC Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCIPP 11/06 Fundamentals of LHC Experiments Jason Nielsen Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics is proportional to 4 /. For example, radiation losses per turn were 0.2 µW for each electron in the LEP collider

California at Santa Cruz, University of

284

Radiative Decay of the Muon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiative decay of the muon, ?+?e++?+?e+??, has been measured using muons from the Columbia University Nevis synchrocyclotron. The decay products e+ and ? were observed at relative angles near 180, using scintillation counters and two 9-in.10-in. NaI crystals, which enabled simultaneous measurement of the positron and ? energies. The pulses from the crystals were displayed on oscilloscopes and photographed, and the measured amplitudes of these pulses were calibrated using the positron spectrum of the nonradiative decay. The two-dimensional energy spectrum for positrons and ?'s was obtained for about 900 events, after subtraction of background. This spectrum and the measured rate, obtained by normalizing to the nonradiative decay, were compared with theoretical predictions for the radiative decay. The results were in good agreement with the theory, within statistics, for the case of pure V-A coupling.

E. Bogart; E. DiCapua; P. Nmethy; A. Strelzoff

1967-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

The photonuclear neutron and gamma-ray backgrounds in the fast ignition experiment  

SciTech Connect

In the fast-ignition scheme, very hard x-rays (hereinafter referred to as {gamma}-rays) are generated by Bremsstrahlung radiation from fast electrons. Significant backgrounds were observed around the deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron signals in the experiment in 2010. In this paper the backgrounds were studied in detail, based on Monte Carlo simulations, and they were confirmed to be {gamma}-rays from the target, scattered {gamma}-rays from the experimental bay walls ({gamma}{sup Prime }-rays), and neutrons generated by ({gamma}, n) reactions in either the target vacuum chamber or the diagnostic instruments ({gamma}-n neutrons).

Arikawa, Y.; Nagai, T.; Hosoda, H.; Abe, Y.; Kojima, S.; Fujioka, S.; Sarukura, N.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka Suita (Japan); Ozaki, T. [National Institution Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-city, Gifu (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Human Impact on Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation during the Industrial Era  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study the direct and diffuse solar radiation changes are estimated, and they contribute to the understanding of the observed global dimming and the more recent global brightening during the industrial era. Using a multistream radiative ...

Maria M. Kvalevg; Gunnar Myhre

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Differential Damage in Bacterial Cells by Microwave Radiation on the Basis of Cell Wall Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...consistent when the microwave radiation was repeated. Changes in the...NaCl was exposed to microwave radiation at 600 W, and its temperature...U200; Hitachi Co., Tokyo, Japan). All the experiments were...cells were treated by microwave radiation, the shape of the cells was...

Im-Sun Woo; In-Koo Rhee; Heui-Dong Park

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Measurement of the radiation field surrounding the Collider Detector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

We present here the first direct and detailed measurements of the spatial distribution of the ionizing radiation surrounding a hadron collider experiment. Using data from two different exposures we measure the effect of additional shielding on the radiation field around the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Employing a simple model we parameterize the ionizing radiation field surrounding the detector.

K. Kordas et al.

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Dynamics Observatory/ EVE Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Frequently Asked and model solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations due to solar flares, solar rotation, and solar and structure of the Sun. What is solar variability? Solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

290

Observation of suppressed terahertz absorption in photoexcited graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When light is absorbed by a semiconductor, photoexcited charge carriers enhance the absorption of far-infrared radiation due to intraband transitions. We observe the opposite behavior in monolayer graphene, a zero-gap ...

Frenzel, Alex James

291

Hard synchroton radiation and gas desorption processes at a copper absorber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developments with high energy synchrotron radiation machines such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) under construction at Grenoble present the particular problem of the absorption of radiation at localities in the region of bending magnets where the power density can attain levels of around 400 W/mm2 at a critical energy of about 20 keV. In the present article we describe an investigation of the gas desorption and of photocurrent generation in a test facility at the Wiggler beam line at LURE Orsay which was designed to simulate and explore the conditions of operation at the local absorber sites in the ESRF. The experiment allowed in particular for varying angles of incidence of the radiation on an absorber and for surveys of photocurrents both from the absorber and over the surface of the vacuum enclosure. The observations of gas desorption are shown to follow most closely a model of photon induced desorption in which a significant role is assigned to fluorescenceradiation from the absorber.

B. A. Trickett; D. Schmied; E. M. Williams

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Accomplishments of the Instantaneous Radiative Flux (IRF) Working Group August 2006 AERI Observations at Southern Great Plains Improve Infrared Radiative Transfer Models Turner et al., JAS, 2004 * AERI observations used to evaluate clear sky IR radiative transfer models * Long-term comparisons have improved - Spectral line database parameters - Water vapor continuum absorption models * Reduced errors in computation of downwelling radiative IR flux by approx 4; current uncertainty is on the order of 1.5 W/m 2 AERI - (Pre-ARM Model) AERI - (Model in 2003) 1 RU = 1 mW / (m 2 sr cm -1 ) Excellent Agreement in Clear Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer Between Obs and Calcs Shortwave Flux Bias (Solid) Shortwave Flux RMS (Hatched) W m -2 * Comparison of shortwave radiative flux at the surface

293

Single electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta elec- tron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta sp...

Asner, D M; de Viveiros, L; Doe, P J; Fernandes, J L; Fertl, M; Finn, E C; Formaggio, J A; Furse, D; Jones, A M; Kofron, J N; LaRoque, B H; Leber, M; McBride, E L; Miller, M L; Mohanmurthy, P; Monreal, B; Oblath, N S; Robertson, R G H; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Rysewyk, D; Sternberg, M G; Tedeschi, J R; Thummler, T; VanDevender, B A; Woods, N L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)  

SciTech Connect

The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

297

RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics  

SciTech Connect

A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Recent Cosmic Inflation Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization (BICEP2) observations are believed as an evidence for the cosmic inflation. BICEP2 provided a first direct evidence for the inflation, determined its energy scale and debriefed witnesses for the quantum gravitational processes. The ratio of scalar-to-tensor fluctuations $r$ which is the canonical measurement of the gravitational waves, was estimated as $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$. Apparently, this value agrees well with the upper bound value corresponding to PLANCK $r\\leq 0.012$ and to WMAP9 experiment $r=0.2$. It is believed that the existence of a minimal length is one of the greatest predictions leading to modifications in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle or a GUP at the Planck scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting recent BICEP2 observations through quantum gravity or GUP. We estimate the slow-roll parameters, the tensorial and the scalar density fluctuations which are characterized by the scalar field $\\phi$. Taking into account the background (matter and radiation) energy density, $\\phi$ is assumed to interact with the gravity and with itself. We first review the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) Universe and then suggest modification in the Friedmann equation due to GUP. By using a single potential for a chaotic inflation model, various inflationary parameters are estimated and compared with the PLANCK and BICEP2 observations. While GUP is conjectured to break down the expansion of the early Universe (Hubble parameter and scale factor), two inflation potentials based on certain minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model result in $r$ and spectral index matching well with the observations. Corresponding to BICEP2 observations, our estimation for $r$ depends on the inflation potential and the scalar field. A power-law inflation potential does not.

Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Abdel Magied Diab

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Skyshine Benchmark Experiment Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......both calculate skyshine radiation and accurately model...users of the code. | Radiation Safety and Shielding Design...Models, Statistical Radiation Dosage Radiation Protection...Sensitivity and Specificity Software Software Validation...

Ian R. Terry

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

300

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Radiation.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An average American's exposure is about 620 millirems per year from naturally occurring and other sources. Other Factors Background radiation varies with location....

302

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

303

Radiation Safety September 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................... 8 2.6 RUA Holder........................................................................................................ 11 3.3 Radiation Use Authorization (RUA).......................................................................................... 11 3.4 Review of RUA Applications

California at Irvine, University of

304

Radiative polarization of electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a new method of calculating the radiative polarization of electrons in homogeneous magnetic fields, using the modified electron propagation function.

Julian Schwinger and Wu-yang Tsai

1974-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD  

SciTech Connect

Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

Kurzeja, R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

Thompson, M C; Badakov, H; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G; Hogan, M; Ischebeck, R; Kirby, N; Siemann, R; Walz, D; Muggli, P; Scott, A; Yoder, R

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}z = 20 {mu}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {mu}m / OD = 325 {mu}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

Thompson, M. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 90095 (United States); Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travis, G. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, California, 90095 (United States); Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California, 94309 (United States); Muggli, P. [University of Southern California Los Angeles, California, 90089 (United States); Scott, A. [UCSB Department of Physics, Santa Barbara, California, 93106 (United States); Yoder, R. [Manhattan College, Riverdale, New York, 10471 (United States)

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Radon in context of natural radiation exposure: the Czech experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......doses from ingestion of water are reasonably avertable...and intervention (remediation of existing exposure...effective dose caused by water containing 1000 Bq l1...radon concentrations in ground water vary from some Becquerel......

J. Hulka

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for understanding

Pennycook, Steve

310

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM

Pennycook, Steve

311

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposedAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 Fig. F.1. The hydrogen atom and its

Pennycook, Steve

312

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation G-3 Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

313

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

314

Theory of Modulation Effects in Resonant-Nuclear-Disorientation Experiments. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis is made of modulation effects in resonant-disorientation experiments on radio-active nuclei which have been polarized by hyperfine interaction at low temperatures. The degree of destruction of the ?- and ?-radiation anisotropy is calculated by assuming that, because of the inhomogeneous broadening, the modulation results in individual nuclear-spin packets experiencing a series of resonant passages. The effect of each passage is characterized by the adiabatic parameter. Between passages the spin-lattice relaxation is assumed to follow the theory of Gabriel. The methods apply for any spin; detailed results are given for spin-1 nuclei. This is the first quantum-mechanical treatment of the effect of a resonant-frequency-modulated rf field on the radiations from oriented nuclei. It is shown that if the rf field is sufficiently large complete destruction of the radiation anisotropy is expected. This has not been observed in experiments on ferromagnetic metals and suggests that in these the nuclear interaction is more complicated than that of the nuclear magnetic moments with the static magnetic field and the enhanced applied rf field. The results of the calculations should apply for nonmagnetically ordered samples and possibly for ferromagnets with weak hyper-fine interactions.

G. V. H. Wilson; J. A. Barclay; C. G. Don

1972-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument Calibrations Weather Observations Measurement Research Support Measurements & Instrumentation Team Center for Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems http://www.nrel.gov/srrl NREL * * * * 1617 Cole Boulevard * * * * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 * * * * (303) 275-3000 Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Mission Provide a unique outdoor research facility for supporting renewable energy conversion technologies and climate change studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE). Objectives * Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations * Develop a Solar Resource Climate Database for Golden, Colorado

316

Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) will raise and lower a heavily instrumented tethered balloon system at regular intervals in the lower 2 kilometers of the atmosphere at Oliktok Point. Data obtained during the ALTOS campaign will provide a statistically significant set of observed in situ cloud properties for validating retrieval algorithms and help scientists reduce the uncertainty in the radiative forcing and heating rates on hourly time scales. The data will also help researchers gain a better understanding of the driving processes that control climate changes and determine the state of the Arctic climate system. Collaborators Science Team: The Pennsylvania State University, Stratton

317

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Continuous Intercomparison of Radiation Codes (CIRC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intercomparison of Intercomparison of Radiation Codes (CIRC) * Sponsored by ARM and endorsed by GEWEX Radiation Panel * Aims to become the standard for documenting the performance of SW and LW RT codes in Large-Scale Models * Goal is to have RT codes of IPCC models report performance against the CIRC cases * Phase I to be launched in the following weeks: http://www.circ-project.org Differences from previous intercomparisons: * Observation-tested LBL calculations to used as radiative benchmarks * Benchmark results are publicly available * ARM observations provide input (largely select BBHRP cases) * Flexible structure and longer lifespan than previous intercomparisons Core team: Oreopoulos, Mlawer, Delamere, Shippert CIRC Practical Challenges * For input and reference calculations to be credible, a reasonable level of

319

Gravitational Radiation and Very Long Baseline Interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational waves affect the observed direction of light from distant sources. At telescopes, this change in direction appears as periodic variations in the apparent positions of these sources on the sky; that is, as proper motion. A wave of a given phase, traveling in a given direction, produces a characteristic pattern of proper motions over the sky. Comparison of observed proper motions with this pattern serves to test for the presence of gravitational waves. A stochastic background of waves induces apparent proper motions with specific statistical properties, and so, may also be sought. In this paper we consider the effects of a cosmological background of gravitational radiation on astrometric observations. We derive an equation for the time delay measured by two antennae observing the same source in an Einstein-de Sitter spacetime containing gravitational radiation. We also show how to obtain similar expressions for curved Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes.

Ted Pyne; Carl R. Gwinn; Mark Birkinshaw; T. Marshall Eubanks; Demetrios N. Matsakis

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern Boundary-Layer Observations Over the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site During the November Flux-Profiler Test s. P. Oncley and J. Van Baelen National Center for Atmospheric Research(8) Boulder, CO 80307-3000 Introduction Resu Its Figure 1 shows the raw data from two of the ten profile patterns flown during this experiment. Each aircraft profile consisted of a descent to the profiler site followed by 3-5 legs at increasing heights. Note that because of this flightpattern, the downward and upward profiles may differ due to temporal changes during the time of the pattern (about 50 minutes) and due to horizontal gradients. The profiler was operated in DBS mode alternating between two sets of three beams. Thus, two sets of consensus- averaged winds were available. Finally, several

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Power line harmonic radiation: A systematic study using DEMETER spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power line harmonic radiation: A systematic study using DEMETER spacecraft F. Nemec a,b,*, O of a systematic survey of Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft. DEME- TER frequency spacing corresponds well to the power system frequency at anticipated source locations. Moreover

Santolik, Ondrej

322

Observing dynamos in cool stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main aim of this paper is to introduce the most important observables that help us to investigate stellar dynamos and compare those to the modeling results. We give an overview of the available observational methods and data processing techniques that are suitable for such purposes, with touching upon examples of inadequate interpretations as well. Stellar observations are compared to the solar data in such a way, which ensures that the measurements are comparable in dimension, wavelength, and timescale. A brief outlook is given to the future plans and possibilities. A thorough review of this topic was published nearly a decade ago (Berdyugina 2005), now we focus on the experience that have been gathered since that time.

Kovari, Zsolt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Acceleration radiation and the Planck scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A uniformly accelerating observer perceives the Minkowski vacuum state as a thermal bath of radiation. We point out that this field-theory effect can be derived, for any dimension higher than two, without actually invoking very high energy physics. This supports the view that this phenomenon is robust against Planck-scale physics and, therefore, should be compatible with any underlying microscopic theory.

I. Agullo; J. Navarro-Salas; G. J. Olmo; L. Parker

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DDE ESTIMATED DOSE FROM CONCEPTION TO DECLARATION: DDE Radiation Safety Officer Signature for increased protection from ionizing radiation for declared pregnant radiation workers. The radiation dose of the occupational dose limit of 50 mSv (5.0 rem). The CPMC Radiation Safety Office will provide education

Jia, Songtao

325

RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · Radiation therapist - a health professional who designs, calculates (plans) and provides the radiation dose and monitors the delivery of radiation therapy, taking into account the protection and safety of patientsRADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE #12;A Career in Radiation Oncology YOUR CHOICE SAVE LIVES

Tobar, Michael

326

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......occupational illness to personnel, major damage...acceptable levels. Selection of control measures...or equipment operating correctly in...99 103 to 104 Personnel life safety...and abnormal operating conditions under...radiation risk to personnel, public and...worker radiation training) reduces the......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disable this safety function and...circuits and software. Other required...source in case of radiation monitors. Feedback...from other non-safety systems to prevent...write and check software. The expected...logic systems for safety functions can...levels of prompt radiation hazard. ACS......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Risks from ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... RADON indoors now accounts for nearly half of the average UK population exposure to ionizing radiation ... exposure to ionizing radiation. We believe that the extent of the variation in exposure to radon in the United Kingdom and else-where and its magnitude in relation to exposures from ...

R. H. Clarke; T. R. E. Southwood

1989-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The origin of the galactic center annihilation radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of the e+?e? annihilation radiation from the Galactic Center suggest that something truly extraordinary is occurring there. We review the observations of this intense time?varying 0.511 MeV emission and discuss the implications of these and other recent observations of the positron production process the annihilation region and the fundamental nature of the Galactic Center source.

R. E. Lingenfelter; R. Ramaty

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Radiation Weighting Factors and High Energy Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......generally inadequate for high energy radiation. In order to determine...appropriate wR values in the high energy region, several criteria are...are proposed for neutrons of energy above 100 MeV and for protons above 10 MeV. The wR value for muons is confirmed to be practically......

M. Pelliccioni

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Radiative ablation to low-Z matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Eight beams of 0.35-?m laser with pulse duration of about 1.0 ns and energy of 260 J per beam were injected into a cylindrical cavity to generate intense x-ray radiation on the Shengguang II high power laser facility. Plastic foils with a thickness in the range of about 3.045 ?m were attached on the diagnostic hole of the cavity and ablated by the intense x-ray radiation. The radiative energy transport through plastic foils with different thicknesses has been studied experimentally. The burn-through time of the plastic foils has been obtained. For comparison, we also simulated the experimental results with Planckian and non-Planckian x-ray spectrum source, respectively. It is shown that for thick plastic foil the simulation with non-Planckian x-ray spectrum source is in good agreement with the experiment.

Jiamin Yang; Jiatian Sheng; Yaonan Ding; Yunsheng Li; Shaoen Jiang; Tinggui Feng; Zhijian Zheng; Kexu Sun; Wenghai Zhang; Yanli Cui; Jiushen Cheng

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Introduction to nuclear resonant scattering with synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the use of synchrotron radiation has enjoyed increasing interest in applications to topics of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The development was initiated by the pioneering experimental work of Gerdau et al. following the original proposal of Ruby to use synchrotron radiation for the excitation of low energy nuclear resonances. From the early experiments it was clear that synchrotron radiation experiments with nuclear resonances would only succeed if familiar energy resolved measurements were replaced with a new time resolved technique. During the last decade, the authors experienced the refinement of this novel method for obtaining hyperfine parameters. This exciting development-materialized because of more intense synchrotron radiation sources at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), powerful new avalanche photo diode detectors, and improved high energy resolution monochromators. Simultaneously the tools for evaluation of the novel time spectra were created, e.g., Sturhahn and Gerdau developed extensive computer codes based on the theoretical descriptions of Hannon and Trammel. Many beautiful demonstrations of the basic features of the coherent elastic scattering channel using Bragg- and Laue-reflections from single crystals deepened the understanding of nuclear resonant scattering. The concepts leading to the application of synchrotron radiation to elastic and inelastic nuclear resonant scattering are discussed. The resulting new experimental techniques are compared to conventional Moessbauer spectroscopy. A survey of situations that favor experiments with synchrotron radiation is offered.

Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E.E.; Toellner, T.S.; Hession, P.; Hu, M.; Sutter, J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Archeops: A CMB anisotropy balloon experiment measuring a broad range of angular scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is the oldest photon radiation that can be observed, having been emitted when the Universe was about 300,000 year old. It is a blackbody at 2.73 K, and is almost perfectly isotropic, the anisotropies being about one part to 100,000. However, these anisotropies, detected by the COBE satellite in 1992, constrain the cosmological parameters such as the curvature of the Universe. Archeops is a balloon-borne experiment designed to map these anisotropies. The instrument is composed of a 1.5 m telescope and bolometers cooled at 85 mK to detect radiation between 150 and 550 GHz. To lower parasitic signals, the instrument is borne by a stratospheric balloon during the arctic night. This instrument is also a preparation for the Planck satellite mission, as its design is similar to HFI. We discuss here the results of the first scientific flight from Esrange (near Kiruna, Sweden) to Russia on January 29th 2001, which led to a 22 % (sub)millimetre sky coverage unprecedented at this resolution. Here, we put some emphasis on interstellar dust foreground emission observations.

F. -Xavier Desert; the Archeops Collaboration

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

336

Motion-induced radiation from electrons moving in Maxwell's fish-eye  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In \\u{C}erenkov radiation and transition radiation, evanescent wave from motion of charged particles transfers into radiation coherently. However, such dissipative motion-induced radiations require particles to move faster than light in medium or to encounter velocity transition to pump energy. Inspired by a method to detect cloak by observing radiation of a fast-moving electron bunch going through it by Zhang {\\itshape et al.}, we study the generation of electron-induced radiation from electrons' interaction with Maxwell's fish-eye sphere. Our calculation shows that the radiation is due to a combination of \\u{C}erenkov radiation and transition radiation, which may pave the way to investigate new schemes of transferring evanescent wave to radiation.

Liu, Yangjie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Sky Cover from MFRSR Observations  

SciTech Connect

The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their model clear-sky counterparts are two main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumulus clouds. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumulus clouds. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward 10.1126/science.331.6024...radiation, workers at the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant wear protective gear...Candidate radiation drugs inch forward. | News | 0 (E)-4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone...

Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

340

The edge observed : island landscape for a marine biology facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the concept of edges through observation and design. The intent of the observation/design is to understand and to illustrate possibilities for design that will enrich the experience of the built ...

Stringer, Geraldine A

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN ULTRARELATIVISTIC OUTFLOWS  

SciTech Connect

Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for the equation of radiative transfer in ultrarelativistic opaque jets. The solution describes the initial trapping of radiation, its adiabatic cooling, and the transition to transparency. Two opposite regimes are examined. (1) Matter-dominated outflow. Surprisingly, radiation develops enormous anisotropy in the fluid frame before decoupling from the fluid. The radiation is strongly polarized. (2) Radiation-dominated outflow. The transfer occurs as if radiation propagated in vacuum, preserving the angular distribution and the blackbody shape of the spectrum. The escaping radiation has a blackbody spectrum if (and only if) the outflow energy is dominated by radiation up to the photospheric radius.

Beloborodov, Andrei M., E-mail: amb@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

342

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

343

Radiation prevents much cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence reviewed here supports the concept that chronic exposure to ionising radiation can dramatically decrease cancer incidence and mortality. This evidence includes an inverse relationship between radiation levels and cancer induction and/or mortality in: over 200 million people in the USA; 200 million people in India; 10,000 residents of Taipei who live in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; high radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; almost 300,000 homes with radon in the USA; non-smokers in high radon areas of Saxony, Germany.

T.D. Luckey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Biophysics and synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book, contains contributions to the conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation held in July 1986 at Frascati. It is devoted to advances in the resolution of biological molecule structure obtainable through synchroton radiation studies. The use of synchroton radiation has firmly established x-ray spectroscopy of biological molecules. More detailed knowledge on the local structure of active sites of metalloproteins, as well as a number of studies on the interaction of metal ions with other important biological macromolecular systems are presented. This new method for protein structure analysis is a major improvement for the rapidly expanding field of protein engineering.

Bianconi, A.; Castellano, C.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Kinetic equilibration from a radiative transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetic equilibration during the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision is studied using a radiative transport model. Thermalization is found to dominate over expansion with medium regulated cross sections. Pressure anisotropy shows an approximate alpha_s scaling when radiative processes are included. It approaches an asymptotic time evolution on a time scale of 1 to 2 fm/c. Energy density is also found to approach an asymptotic time evolution that decreases slower than the ideal hydro evolution. These observations indicate that viscosity is important during the early longitudinal expansion phase of a relativistic heavy ion collision.

Bin Zhang

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Scattering by an electromagnetic radiation field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motion of test particles in the gravitational field associated with an electromagnetic plane wave is investigated. The interaction with the radiation field is modeled by a force term {\\it \\`a la} Poynting-Robertson entering the equations of motion given by the 4-momentum density of radiation observed in the particle's rest frame with a multiplicative constant factor expressing the strength of the interaction itself. Explicit analytical solutions are obtained. Scattering of fields by the electromagnetic wave, i.e., scalar (spin 0), massless spin $\\frac12$ and electromagnetic (spin 1) fields, is studied too.

Donato Bini; Andrea Geralico

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

350

Magnetic reconnection with radiative cooling. I. Optically thin regime  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic reconnection processes in many high-energy-density astrophysical and laboratory plasma systems are significantly affected by radiation; hence traditional, nonradiative reconnection models are not applicable to these systems. Motivated by this observation, the present paper develops a Sweet-Parker-like theory of resistive magnetic reconnection with strong radiative cooling. It is found that, in the case with zero guide field, intense radiative cooling leads to a strong plasma compression, resulting in a higher reconnection rate. The compression ratio and the reconnection layer temperature are determined by the balance between ohmic heating and radiative cooling. The lower temperature in a radiatively cooled layer leads to a higher Spitzer resistivity and, hence, a higher reconnection rate. Several specific radiative processes (bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and inverse Compton) in the optically thin regime are considered for both the zero- and strong-guide-field cases, and concrete expressions for the reconnection parameters are derived, along with the applicability conditions.

Uzdensky, Dmitri A. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Physics Department, UCB-390, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); McKinney, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4060 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Time Users Guide First Time Users Guide The following is a collection of useful facts that First Time Users of NSRL should familiarize themselves with. If you have any questions, contact the NSRL Liaison Physicist (631-344-3072 or 631-344-5830). You MUST have a dry run of your experiment before conducting your first NSRL run. When planning an exposure the time you need for each sample exposure should include time to change samples. If RHIC is running, the sample changing time is approximately 7 minutes. If RHIC is not running, time to change samples is only about 4 minutes. The size of the radiation field that can uniformly expose a set of samples can be as large as 20 x 20 cm2 for most ions and energies. By special request, the NSRL beam can operate in Large Beam mode with a 60 x 60 cm2 usable beam size.

352

Development of Radiation Hard Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trackers of the present LHC experiments mainly use silicon pixel detectors in the innermost regions close to the interaction point, while silicon micro-strip detectors are used at larger radii. The next phases of the LHC will present new challenges for the operation of the tracking detectors in terms of radiation levels and data rates. For ATLAS, CMS and LHCb radiation levels will amount to levels of the order of hundreds of Mrad and 10^16 NIEL (1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm^2) in the innermost layers. Higher granularity and a reduction in material budget especially for the layers close to the IP are under development to further improve the impact parameter resolution. The choice of sensors for the trackers will be driven by the need to meet these requirements. A short overview on the status of the R&D on silicon sensors suitable for this challenging environment will be given, covering the presently used but also newly emerging technologies such as CMOS based silicon sensors. The capabilities of tec...

Riedler, P; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Experiment Hazard Class 10.2 - UV Light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - Ultraviolet Light 2 - Ultraviolet Light Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of ultraviolet radiation generating equipment.Ultraviolet light (UV) is non-ionizing radiation in the 180 to 400-nanometer wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Ultraviolet light poses hazards: Eyes hazards - inflammation, cataracts, retinal damage Skin hazards - sunburn, accelerate wrinkling, increased risk of skin cancer Invisible Possible ozone generation Experiment Category Experiments involving only experiment hazard class 10.2 qualify for medium risk. The addition of other hazard classes may require the experiment to be categorized as high risk and undergo additional reviews. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Shield or contain UV as close to the source as

354

PARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the radiative transport equation on parallel computers. Mathematical libraries developed by third parties the discrete ordi- nates method. They observed that the global nature of radiative transport resultedPARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD Gautham

Utah, University of

355

Physiological Responses of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi to DNA Damage Caused by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...before and after radiation and was in good...performed at a sublethal dose of 2,000 Gy to...our preliminary estimation reveals that 0...been observed for radiation-resistant Chroococcidiopsis...caused by ionizing radiation. | The mechanisms...furiosus, survive high doses of ionizing gamma...

Edmond Jolivet; Fujihiko Matsunaga; Yoshizumi Ishino; Patrick Forterre; Daniel Prieur; Hannu Myllykallio

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

357

Long-Term Observations of Indoor and Outdoor Radon Concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Long-Term Observations of Indoor and Outdoor...Lapere Two sets of data obtained by long-term observations of radon concentration...phosphogypsum was used. Around a nuclear waste storage place containing radium, 22 dosemeters......

J. Uyttenhove; R. Lapere

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Radiation Induced Mammary Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Induced Mammary Cancer R.L. Ullrich * R.J. Preston # * Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77550 # Biology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831, U.S.A Over the last......

R.L. Ullrich; R.J. Preston

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

Dai, Pengcheng

362

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

Dai, Pengcheng

363

A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon ranksum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ? P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ? P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic curricula for the radiation oncology clerkship.

Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Observations of the Icy Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

366

Electron Beam Diagnostics using Coherent Cherenkov Radiation in Aerogel  

SciTech Connect

The use of coherent Cherenkov radiation as a diagnostic tool for longitudinal distribution of an electron beam is studied in this paper. Coherent Cherenkov radiation is produced in an aerogel with an index of refraction close to unity. An aerogel spectral properties are experimentally studied and analyzed. This method will be employed for the helical IFEL bunching experiment at Neptune linear accelerator facility at UCLA.

Tikhoplav, R.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B. [UCLA Physics Dept., Los Angeles, CA 90066 (United States); Ruelas, M. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Marina Del Ray, CA 90292 (United States)

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Radiation and viral DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

368

Observables of Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

Methoden Wetenschappelijk and Observational  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methoden Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Fact-free and Observational Science #12;Data · Part of modern science is based on observation ­How do we do this? ­And what are the pitfalls? · Knowing how to observe is an important step in experimental design #12;Three kinds of science · There are (in my view) three ways

Steels, Luc

370

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

371

Oral Histories: Radiation Biologist Marvin Goldman, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Radiation Biologist Marvin Goldman, Ph.D. Conducted December 22, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments September 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Educational Background and Early Involvement in Radiation Research Brookhaven Acquaintances and Early Hospital Research (Circa 1952) Vulnerable Populations and Acceptable Risks Research at the University of Rochester (1952-57) Relationship with Newell Stannard and Stafford Warren (1952-57) Participation in "Project Sunshine" and Move to the University of California, Davis (Mid '50s to '58) Participation in Beagle Studies at the University of California at Davis (1958 to '60s) Budget Concerns and Goldman's Other Radiation Research Projects (1965 to Late '60s)

372

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan, Pat Concannon & John H.J. Petrini The goal of this program is to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the NBS1 gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. Patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage. It is unclear whether humans heterozygous for the mutations associated with NBS are radiation sensitive and results from cell culture experiments give conflicting results. In collaboration with John Petrini at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City we developed a mouse model of this disorder and are directly testing the hypothesis

373

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

374

Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bands Campaign (RHUBC) D. Turner and E. Mlawer RHUBC Breakout Session 2008 ARM Science Team Meeting 13 March, 2008 Norfolk, Virginia Motivation * Radiative heating/cooling in the mid-troposphere modulate the vertical motions of the atmosphere - This heating/cooling occurs primarily in water vapor absorption bands that are opaque at the surface * Approximately 40% of the OLR comes from the far-IR * Until recently, the observational tools were not available to evaluate the accuracy of the far-IR radiative transfer models - Spectrally resolved far-IR radiances, accurate PWV * Need to validate both clear sky (WV) absorption and cirrus scattering properties in these normally opaque bands Scientific Objectives * Conduct clear sky radiative closure studies in order to reduce uncertainties

375

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

376

Appendix G: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix G: Radiation #12;#12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

377

Appendix A: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix A: Radiation #12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

378

Oak Ridge Integrated Center for Radiation Materials Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORIC Home ORIC Home About ORIC Contacts Specialists Capabilities Irradiation Campaigns Nuclear Fuels Radiation Effects and Defect Modeling Structural Materials Dual Purpose Radiological Characterization Equipment Working with Us Related Links HFIR MSTD NSTD NNFD Comments Welcome to Oak Ridge Integrated Center for Radiation Materials Science & Technology The Oak Ridge National Laboratory ranks among the founding laboratories for the scientific field of radiation materials science. Since the creation of the laboratory, we have maintained strong ties to both the technology and scientific underpinning of nuclear materials research as evidenced by the experience and capabilities across our research divisions. The capabilities at ORNL enjoys include the highest neutron flux nuclear

379

Proteasome Structures Affected by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effect of ionizing radiation on 26S but...radiation doses, and immediately...the dose range 1 to 20 Gy...ionizing radiation induced a...38), ionizing radiation (39...over a wide range of radiation doses and further...

Milena Pervan; Keisuke S. Iwamoto; and William H. McBride

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

148 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 18, NO. 1, JANUARY 1, 2006 Radiation Resistance of Single-Frequency 1310-nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments, and for space and medical applications. Typical radiation doses in medical applications range to ionizing radiation using 200-MeV/c proton beams are reported. Twelve powered lasers survived a total radiation dose of up to 22.3 Mrad. One of the two not-powered lasers survived a total dose of 1.5 Mrad

Ye, Jingbo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Radiation Safety Analysis for FELL Addition E. C. Schreiber, R. S. Canon, P. G. O'Shea, H. R. Weller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems. We also present our estimations for the types and amounts of shielding re­ quired to bring dose of the North Carolina Regulations for Protection Against Radiation defines the maximum dose rate in public outside the building will not experience significant radiation levels. Radiation dose distributions

Saskatchewan, University of

382

Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

383

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

SciTech Connect

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earths energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical parameterizations that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the AprilMay 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Low?frequency sound radiation and scattering from bubble clouds.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent experimental evidence has shown that when wave breaking occurs low?frequency (LF?200 Hz) sound is produced and LF scatter has a different characteristic than expected from rough sea surface scattering. These effects have been attributed to the bubbles produced during wave breaking which are convected to depth by the breaking turbulence vorticity and Langmuir circulation as observed by Thorpe [S. Thorpe Oceanic White Caps edited by E. Monahan and G. MacNiocaill (Reidel Boston 1986) pp. 5758]. While the radiation and scatteringcharacteristics at frequencies greater than 1 kHz are explained by incoherent scatter from the observed bubble size and space distributions the lower frequency phenomena are not easily explained. However if bubble plumes and clouds produced in the wave breaking have appreciable volume fractions (?10?5) then LF sound radiation and scattering can be explained by classical theories. This paper reviews the scattering and radiation from bubbleclouds in water as a function of volume fraction. When the cloud is compact coherent and collective scatter are shown to occur. The natural frequency of radiation is shown to be described by a modified Minnaert result while the backscatter target strength is described by the first?order volume mode. These analytical results agree with experimental sound radiation and scatter measurements. Finally the collective radiation of bubble plumes and clouds is discussed as a possible explanation of the observed ocean low?frequency scattering and radiation phenomena. [Work sponsored by ONR 11250A and NUSC IR.

William M. Carey

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Experiment Hazard Class 8.3 - X-Ray Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 - X-Ray Generators 3 - X-Ray Generators Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of X-Ray Generators (other than the APS storage ring). As specified in LMS-PROC-109 a Radiation Generating Device (RGD) must be registered with the Argonne RGD Safety Officer using the ANL-847 form. The RGD will be assigned an inventory number, hazard class, RWP requirement, and inspection and survey frequencies. Experiment Category Experiments the Experiment Hazard Class are always categorized as High Risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - As determined in LMS-PROC-109. Samples chambers and all beam paths are fully enclosed by barriers. Class 2 and higher RGDs require an interlock to fail-safe beam shutter/beam stop or radiation

388

Atomic Collapse Observed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

389

Hot Pot Field Observations  

SciTech Connect

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hot Pot Field Observations  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

391

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

392

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Audible radiation monitor  

SciTech Connect

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Scaling 2XIIB impurity radiation to BPNS  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the author computes the radiative power losses which would be expected from the beam-plasma neutron source, which is proposed as a neutron source for doing accelerated end-of-life testing of fusion reactor materials. The source is based on a high density tritium target, bombarded with a deuterium beam of energy 120 to 150 keV. Oxygen was observed to be a major source of power loss for beam injection into the 2XIIB device, and the author considers that problem here. Oxygen impurities are a small component of the beam. The analysis indicates that higher charge states are reached in this device, resulting in less power radiation from oxygen impurities, and the beam is expected to attain higher purity levels at pulse lengths in the seconds range, than was observed in the past for millisecond pulse lengths.

Molvik, A.W.

1993-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

Tunable terahertz radiation source  

SciTech Connect

Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Archeops: A balloon experiment to measure CMB anisotropies with a broad range of angular sizes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is the oldest photon radiation that can be observed, having been emitted when the Universe was about 300,000 year old. It is a blackbody at 2.73 K, and is almost perfectly isotropic, the anisotropies being about one part to 100,000. However, these anisotropies, detected by the COBE satellite in 1992, constrain the cosmological parameters such as the curvature of the Universe. Archeops is a balloon-borne experiment designed to map these anisotropies. The instrument is composed of a 1.5 m telescope and bolometers cooled at 85 mK to detect radiation between 150 and 550 GHz. To lower atmosphere parasitic signal, the instrument is lifted at 32 km altitude with a stratospheric balloon during the arctic night. This instrument is also a preparation for the Planck satellite mission, as its design is similar. We discuss here the results of the first scientific flight from Esrange (near Kiruna, Sweden) to Russia on January 29th 2001, which led to a 22 % (sub)millimetre sky coverage unprecedented at this resolution.

A. Benoit; the Archeops Collaboration

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Study of impurities in the Tandem Mirror Experiment using extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Impurities in the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) have been studied using extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy. Three time-resolving absolutely-calibrated normal-incidence monochromators, one on each section of TMX, were used to study the impurity emissions in the wavelength range of 300 A to 1600 A. The instruments on the east end cell and central cell were each capable of obtaining spatially-resolved profiles from 22 chords of the plasma simultaneously while the instrument on the west end cell monitored the central chord. The impurities identified in TMX were carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and titanium. Emphasis was placed upon determining the impurity densities and radiated power losses of the central cell; results indicate that the impurity concentrations were low - less than 0.4% for each species - and that less than 10% of the total net trapped neutral beam power was lost to radiation. The use of titanium gettering on the central cell walls was observed to decrease the brightnesses of singly- and doubly-ionized carbon and oxygen in the central cell plasma. In the end cells, oxygen was the main impurity with a concentration of about 1.5% and was injected by the neutral beams; the other impurities had concentrations of about 0.5%. Radiation losses from the end cells were negligible.

Strand, O.T.

1982-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Global Lightning Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flash Rate Global distribution of lightning from a combined nine years of observations of the NASA OTDGlobal Lightning Observations #12;Optical Transient Detector ( launched April, 1995 ) Lightning Imaging Sensor ( launched November, 1997 ) Lightning Detection from Low Earth Orbit #12;LIS on TRMM #12

California at Berkeley, University of

400

Observations on European Agriculture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

attempted to save as much as possime or tne the r )f applying it to the land. nure pilc ing or pi .. 7 3s run in reserving ,. ., Fig. 2-Manure pile, Grignon (France) Experiment Station. The pump for elevating the liquids is at the left, to the rear... attempted to save as much as possime or tne the r )f applying it to the land. nure pilc ing or pi .. 7 3s run in reserving ,. ., Fig. 2-Manure pile, Grignon (France) Experiment Station. The pump for elevating the liquids is at the left, to the rear...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hadroproduction of the Iota Meson observed in the K/sub s/K/sub s/. pi. /sup 0/ final state  

SciTech Connect

Results from an experiment studying the C=+1K/sub s/K/sub s/..pi../sup O/ system produced ..pi../sup /minus plus//p interactions at 21.4 GeV/c are presented. It is shown that the structure present in the data between 1.4 and 1.5 GeV/c/sup 2/ has mass and width consistent with the (1460) observed in J//PSI/ radiative decay and most probably has J/sup PC/=O/sup /minus plus//. 19 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Cason, N.M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Bishop, J.M.; Biswas, N.N.; Busenitz, J.K.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Fortner, M.R.; Fortney, L.R.; Goo, J.; Goshaw, A.T.; Kenney, V.P.; Kirsch, L.E.; Kramer, M.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; McCrory, E.M.; Morris, T.W.; Piekarz, H.; Piekarz, J.; Platner, E.D.; Poster, R.A.; Rath, M.G.; Robertson, W.J.; Ruchti, R.C.; Saulys, A.C.; Shephard, W.D.; Zogrofou, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Origins and consequences of radiation…induced centrosome aberrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar, Nisarg Shah, Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia, Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY. Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator

403

National Solar Radiation Data Base | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Radiation Data Base Solar Radiation Data Base Dataset Summary Description The National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) is the most comprehensive collection of solar data freely available. The 1991 - 2005 NSRDB contains hourly solar radiation (including global, direct, and diffuse) and meteorological data for 1,454 stations. NCDC's Integrated Surface Data (ISD) were the key data source for this effort, with much of the solar data modeled/estimated based on the surface observations. This dataset builds on the 1961-1990 NSRDB, which contains data for 239 stations. These data are extremely useful in estimating solar energy potential across the U.S., and in estimating heating/cooling requirements for buildings based on heat-gain from solar radiation. More information available at http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/reds/

404

Origin of Cosmic Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I give a brief overview of cosmic ray physics, highlighting some key questions and how they will be addressed by new experiments.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

405

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Configuration Options: Vortex detector, Si(111) Analyzer CrystalPhoto Multiplier Tube, Si(111) Data Collection Mode: Transmission Reflection Have you had previous experience...

406

The Static Universe Hypothesis: Theoretical Basis and Observational Tests of the Hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the axiom of the unrestricted repeatability of all experiments, Bondi and Gold argued that the universe is in a stable, self-perpetuating equilibrium state. This concept generalizes the usual cosmological principle to the perfect cosmological principle in which the universe looks the same from any location at any time. Consequently, I hypothesize that the universe is static and in an equilibrium state (non-evolving). New physics is proposed based on the concept that the universe is a pure wave system. Based on the new physics and assuming a static universe, processes are derived for the Hubble redshift and the cosmic background radiation field. Then, following the scientific method, I test deductions of the static universe hypothesis using precise observational data primarily from the Hubble Space Telescope. Applying four different global tests of the space-time metric, I find that the observational data consistently fits the static universe model. The observational data also show that the average absolute magnitudes and physical radii of first-rank elliptical galaxies have not changed over the last 5 to 15 billion years. Because the static universe hypothesis is a logical deduction from the perfect cosmological principle and the hypothesis is confirmed by the observational data, I conclude that the universe is static and in an equilibrium state.

Thomas B. Andrews

2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

RADIATION ALERT User Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not contaminate the Inspector by touching it to radioactive surfaces or materials. If contamination is suspected Environmental Area Monitoring 16 Checking for Surface Contamination 16 5 Maintenance 17 Calibration 17, and x-ray radiation. Its applications include: · Detecting and measuring surface contamination

Haller, Gary L.

408

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Solar energy: Radiation nation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Australia receives more solar radiation per square metre, on average, than any other continent. Although turning this ... to make use of its heat. We spoke to Australian proponents of two very different solar-thermal systems, both rather confusingly known as ...

Carina Dennis

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect

Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. (Psoriasis Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

413

Assessing exposure to radiation  

SciTech Connect

Since the founding of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been world leaders in evaluating the risks associated with radiation. Ultrasensitive tools allow us not only to measure radionuclides present in the body but also to reconstruct the radiation dose from past nuclear events and to project the levels of radiation that will still be present in the body for 50 years after the initial intake. A variety of laboratory procedures, including some developed here, give us detailed information on the effects of radiation at the cellular level. Even today, we are re-evaluating the neutron dose resulting from the bombing at Hiroshima. Our dose reconstruction and projection capabilities have also been applied to studies of Nagasaki, Chernobyl, the Mayak industrial complex in the former Soviet Union, the Nevada Test Site, Bikini Atoll, and other sites. We are evaluating the information being collected on individuals currently working with radioactive material at Livermore and elsewhere as well as previously collected data on workers that extends back to the Manhattan Project.

Walter, K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

COR Summary of Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE COR SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE Effective January 1, 2012 CORs who are applying for certification must demonstrate past contracting, acquisition, procurement, program/project management, and general business experience. This experience is based on a set of competencies. Some of the competencies are listed below to use as a reference when you are documenting your previous experience. Use this template to document your experience. Experience should be supported by a written confirmation from the cognizant Contracting Officer/Contract Specialist showing the contract number, title and date(s) to which the experience applied. Once you have completed this document, please forward it and its supporting statement(s) to your Site Acquisition Career Manager (SACM) as part of your application for COR certification.

415

Observational Neutrino Astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...models and nu-clear energy generation in stars...from stars, high-energy neutrino experiments...an Olympic-sized swimming pool. The most impor-tant...VOL. 147 percent efficiency) by the simple pro-cedure...neu-trino of a given energy, incident on a Cl...

John N. Bahcall

1965-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of external surfaces by naturally occurring atomic oxygen. CCD detectors are particularly vulnerable to damage damage. A comprehensive discussion of the types of radiation damage known to occur in CCDs is beyond1 ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment Michael R. Jones Space Telescope Science

Sirianni, Marco

417

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

418

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports September 24, 2013 Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report...

419

Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Radiation Exposure Welcome The Occupational Radiation Exposure Information page on this web page is intended to provide the latest available information on radiation exposure to...

420

Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers. Final report: [Draft  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study (NSWS) was designed to determine whether there is an excess risk of leukemia or other cancers associated with exposure to low levels of gamma radiation. The study compares the mortality experience of shipyard workers who qualified to work in radiation areas to the mortality of similar workers who hold the same types of jobs but who are not authorized to work in radiation areas. The population consists of workers from six government and two private shipyards.

Matanoski, G.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mathematical Problems of Radiative Equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in turn with the cases of purely absorbing and grey material in local radiative equilibrium (Schwarzschild-Milne model) and that of monochromatic radiative equilibrium with scattering but zero emissivity (Schuster ...

1935-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist) senior subject matter expert for health physics/radiation safety at the sites. You will...

423

Radiation damage to scintillator in the D0 luminosity monitor  

SciTech Connect

We report the result of evaluating radiation damage to Bicron BC408 plastic scintillator used in the D0 Luminosity Monitor during Run IIa. The Luminosity Monitor provides pseudo-rapidity coverage over the range 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4, with the radiation dose in Run IIa estimated to be 0.5 MRad for the region closest to the beams. We find the light yield is degraded by 10-15% due to radiation damage by comparing new and old scintillator in four observables: (1) visual inspection, (2) optical transmittance, (3) response to the radioactive source of {sup 90}Sr and (4) light yield for cosmic rays.

Casey, Brendan; DeVaughan, Kayle; /Brown U. /Nebraska U.; Enari, Yuji; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.; Yacoob, Sahal; /Northwestern U.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Super?bandgap radiation in a?Si  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nature of the super?bandgap radiation observed in a?Si and a?Si:H is investigated. This broad spectrum postulated to arise from localized states above the mobility gap exhibits many remarkable features. These same features occur in radiation from porous quartz but in that case the effect is known to be surface related.2 Using the Raman spectrum for calibration the strength of the signal from a?Si has been studied as a function of surface preparation. The results suggest the possibility that the radiation is a surface contaminant effect unrelated to the bulk states of the material.

B. A. Wilson

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Measurements of Dust Oscillations with Laser Heterodyne Receiver of Scattered Radiation  

SciTech Connect

We performed the experiments on measurement of vibration amplitudes for microparticles in gas and water with laser heterodyne receiver of scattered radiation. The measured vibration amplitude values are about 20 nm.

Serozhkin, Yuriy; Venger, Yevgen [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 41 Nauky Prospect, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

426

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Merril Eisenbud, January 26, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Merril Eisenbud was interviewed on January 26, 1995 by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Following a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Eisenbud relates his remembrances as the AEC`s first industrial hygienist, the setting up of AEC`s Health and Safety Laboratory, monitoring radioactive fallout, and use or exposure of humans to radiation.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Retinal Degeneration and Ionizing Radiation Hypersensitivity in a Mouse Model for Cockayne Syndrome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitive to a single dose of ionizing radiation at doses up to 10 Gy. In marked...least within the age range investigated, the...photoreceptor cells for ionizing radiation. This finding underscores...experiment (cumulative dose, 35 kJ/m2). The...

Theo G. M. F. Gorgels; Ingrid van der Pluijm; Renata M. C. Brandt; George A. Garinis; Harry van Steeg; Gerard van den Aardweg; Gerard H. Jansen; Jan M. Ruijter; Arthur A. B. Bergen; Dirk van Norren; Jan H. J. Hoeijmakers; Gijsbertus T. J. van der Horst

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

428

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments Data Quality of Quality Measurement Experiments S. Bottone and S. Moore Mission Research Corporation Santa Barbara, California Introduction Quality Measurement Experiments (QME) are a special class of Value-Added Products (VAP). QMEs add value to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program datastreams by providing for continuous assessment of the quality of incoming data based on internal consistency checks, comparisons between independent similar measurements, or comparisons between measurements and modeled results. Like any datastream, QME datastreams need to be checked for data quality. For each QME, we analyze a representative sample of files from the ARM data archive to determine 'typical' values of the QME variables. We then design outlier tests, specific to each variable, to be applied to

429

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued) ... Examines nuclear instrumentation available from several major U.S. manufacturers. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

DOE Radiation Records Contacts List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

431

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

433

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

Ingersoll, D.T. (comp.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Ingersoll, J.K. (comp.) (Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing ...

H. F. Kraybill; D. C. Brunton

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

Strom, Daniel J.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

Radiative proton-antiproton annihilation to a lepton pair  

SciTech Connect

The annihilation of proton and antiproton to an electron-positron pair, including radiative corrections due to the emission of virtual and real photons is considered. The results are generalized to leading and next-to leading approximations. The relevant distributions are derived and numerical applications are given in the kinematical range accessible to the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility.

Ahmadov, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Bytev, V. V.; Kuraev, E. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Tomasi-Gustafsson, E. [CEA, IRFU, SPhN, Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France, and CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, UMR 8608, 91405 Orsay (France)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

A mesoscopic description of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a formulation of the nanoscale radiative heat transfer (RHT) using concepts of mesoscopic physics. We introduce the analog of the Sharvin conductance using the quantum of thermal conductance. The formalism provides a convenient framework to analyse the physics of RHT at the nanoscale. Finally, we propose a RHT experiment in the regime of quantized conductance.

Svend-Age Biehs; Emmanuel Rousseau; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

440

A comparison of approximate models for radiation in gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Approximate equations for radiative heat transfer equations coupled to an equation for the temperature are stated and a comparative numerical study of the different approximations is given. The approximation methods considered here range from moment methods to simplified PN-approximations. Numerical experiments and comparisons in different space dimensions and for various physical situations are presented.

M. Frank; M. Seaid; A. Klar; R. Pinnau; G. Thommes; J. Janicka

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The contribution of collision cascades to sputtering and radiation damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Experiments within nuclear reactors are difficult...researchers turned to particle accelerators for better-controlled...struck by a particle of nuclear radiation and initiates...beam of ions from an accelerator with 10100 kV applied...attempts to cross into the vacuum as sputtered atoms...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Experimental and theoretical study of red-shifted solitonic resonant radiation in photonic crystal fibers and generation of radiation seeded Raman solitons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The red shifted solitonic resonant radiation is a fascinating phase matching phenomenon that occurs when an optical pulse, launched in the normal dispersion regime of photonic crystal fiber, radiates across the zero dispersion wavelength. The formation of such phase-matched radiation is independent of the generation of any optical soliton and mainly governed by the leading edge of input pump which forms a shock front. The radiation is generated at the anomalous dispersion regime and found to be confined both in time and frequency domain. We experimentally investigate the formation of such radiations in photonic crystal fibers with detailed theoretical analysis. Our theoretical predictions corroborate well with experimental results. Further we extend our study for long length fiber and investigate the interplay between red-shifted solitonic resonant radiation and intrapulse Raman scattering (IPRS). It is observed that series of radiation-seeded Raman solitons are generated in anomalous dispersion regime.

Bose, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Rik; Pal, Mrinmay; Bhadra, Shyamal K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

445

Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations of Atmospheric Water for Climate Research J. B. Snider, D. A. Hazen, A. J. Francavilla, W. B. Madsen, and M. D. Jacobson National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Surface-based microwave and infrared radiometers have been employed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) in climate research since 1987. The ability of these systems to operate continuously and unattended for extended periods of time has provided significant new information on atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid. These data are being employed to improve our understanding of cloud-radiation feedback mechanisms, an understanding

446

DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009  

SciTech Connect

A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Radiation Chemistry of Advanced TALSPEAK Flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of initial experiments designed to understand the radiation chemistry of an Advanced TALSPEAK process for separating trivalent lanthanides form the actinides. Biphasic aerated samples were irradiated and then analyzed for post-irradiation constituent concentrations and solvent extraction distribution ratios. The effects of irradiation on the TALSPEAK and Advanced TALSPEAK solvents were similar, with very little degradation of the organic phase extractant. Decomposition products were detected, with a major product in common for both solvents. This product may be responsible for the slight increase in distribution ratios for Eu and Am with absorbed dose, however; separation factors were not greatly affected.

Mincher, Bruce; Peterman, Dean; Mcdowell, Rocklan; Olson, Lonnie; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

448

Performance of aerogel as Cherenkov radiator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerogel with index of refraction around 1.03 has been studied as Cherenkov radiator in a test at CERN PS using a ?? and a mixed ?+/p beam of momenta between 6 and 10GeV/c. The Cherenkov photons were detected by means of four large HPD tubes designed and constructed at CERN. Results on the photoelectron yield, the Cherenkov angle and its resolution, and the ?/p separation are obtained. The performances measured demonstrate that a RICH with aerogel is a viable detector for experiments with high multiplicity of particles in the final state.

T Bellunato; M Calvi; C Matteuzzi; M Musy; P Negri; A Braem; E Chesi; C Hansen; D Liko; C Joram; N Neufeld; J Sguinot; P Weilhammer; A.R Buzykaev; E.A Kravchenko; A.P Onuchin; A.F Danilyuk; S Easo; S Wotton; S Jolly

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Electroweak Radiative Corrections to Muon Capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electroweak radiative corrections to muon capture on nuclei are computed and found to be sizable. They enhance the capture rates for hydrogen and helium by 2.8% and 3.0% respectively. As a result, the value of the induced pseudoscalar coupling, g_P^exp, extracted from a recent hydrogen 1S singlet capture experiment is increased by about 21% to g_P^exp = 7.3 +/- 1.2 and brought into good agreement with the prediction of chiral perturbation theory, g_P^theory=8.2 +/- 0.2. Implications for helium capture rate predictions are also discussed.

A. Czarnecki; W. J. Marciano; A. Sirlin

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Measurements of Relative K Radiative Decay Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relative radiative decay rates were measured for K-shell vacancies for elements between Z=62and92 with a high-resolution Ge(Li) spectrometer. The ratios ?2?1, ?1??1, and ?2??1 (Siegbahn notation) were determined, with ?2?1 significantly higher (4-14%) than those reported by Beckman but in excellent agreement with recent Hartree-Slater calculations of Scofield. The ratios ?1??1 and ?2??1 do not agree with either Beckman's experiment or Scofield's calculations.

P. J. Ebert and V. W. Slivinsky

1969-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

451

Performance studies of the ATLAS transition radiation tracker barrel using SR1 cosmics data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to measure Nature at the energy scale often associated with electroweak symmetry breaking. When it comes online in 2008, the LHC and ATLAS will work to discover, among other things, the Higgs boson and any other signatures for physics beyond the Standard Model. As part of the ATLAS Inner Detector, the Transition Radiation Tracker will be an important part of ATLASs ability to make precise measurements of particle properties. This paper summarizes work done to study and categorize the performance of the TRT, using a combination of cosmic ray test data from the SR1 facility and Monte Carlo. In general, it was found that the TRT is working well, with module-level eciencies around 90 % and module-level noise just above 2 %. Reasonably good agreement was observed with Monte Carlo, though there are some apparently pathological dierences between the two that deserve further attention.

Wall, R

452

Study of the Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for charmonium and other new states is performed in a study of exclusive initial-state-radiation production of D Dbar events from electron-positron annihilations at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb-1 and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage ring. The D Dbar mass spectrum shows clear evidence of the psi(3770) plus other structures near 3.9, 4.1, and 4.4 GeV/c^2. No evidence for Y(4260) -> D Dbar is observed, leading to an upper limit of B(Y(4260) -> D Dbar)/B(Y(4260) -> J/psi pi+ pi-) < 1.0 at 90 % confidence level.

The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Observations of the Eyewall Structure of Typhoon Sinlaku (2008) during the Transformation Stage of Extratropical Transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A unique dataset observing the life cycle of Typhoon Sinlaku was collected during The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Pacific Asian Regional Campaign (T-PARC) in 2008. In this study observations of the ...

Annette M. Foerster; Michael M. Bell; Patrick A. Harr; Sarah C. Jones

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Terahertz radiation mixer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

455

Time encoded radiation imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Radiation Emergencies Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstrations Procedure Demonstrations Note: RealPlayer is needed for listening to the narration that accompany these demonstrations. Real Player Dressing To Prevent the Spread of Radioactive Contamination This demonstration shows how your team can dress to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Click to begin presentation on dressing to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Preparing The Area This demonstration shows basic steps you can take to gather equipment and prepare a room to receive a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material. Click to begin presentation on preparing a room to receive a radioactive contaminated patient. Removing Contaminated Clothing This demonstration shows the procedure for removing clothing from a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material.

457

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Medical radiation protection in next decade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......towards increasing radiation safety levels. Whether...users whenever the radiation dose to the patient...human errors and software-related problems...global view of radiation protection in medicine...increasing radiation safety levels. Whether......

Madan M. Rehani; Eliseo Vano

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

$\\mu$-$\\tau$ reflection symmetry and radiative corrections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The $\\mu$-$\\tau$ reflection symmetry is compatible with current neutrino oscillation data and easily realized under family symmetries. We prove that this symmetry preserves $\\theta_{23}=45^\\circ$, $\\delta=\\pm90^\\circ$, $\\rho,\\sigma=0,90^\\circ$, and can be embedded into the seesaw mechanism. The $\\mu$-$\\tau$ reflection symmetry preserved at a high energy scale $\\Lambda_\\text{FS}$ will be broken by radiative corrections and result in deviations of $\\theta_{23}$ from $45^\\circ$ and $\\delta$ from $\\pm90^\\circ$ at the electroweak scale. We develop an analytical method to derive the corrections to all the mixing parameters. We perform a numerical analysis in the MSSM for $\\delta=-90^\\circ$ at $\\Lambda_\\text{FS}$, and observe that $\\theta_{23}>45^\\circ$ in the normal mass ordering, $\\theta_{23}<45^\\circ$ in the inverted mass ordering, and the sizable correction to $\\delta$ prefers a negative sign. These deviations have definite directions and can be tested in the future neutrino oscillation experiments.

Zhou, Ye-Ling

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Asymmetric radiative equilibria in tokamak edge and the detached plasma transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nonlinear saturated state of the radiative thermal-condensation instability responsible for the phenomenon of multifaceted asymmetric radiation observed in tokamak edge plasmas has been investigated. The essential problem to study two-dimensional thermal equilibria where perpendicular and parallel heat conduction balances the radiated power and heat flux to the limiter. In certain reasonable limits, the nonlinear Poissons equation can be solved exactly to display many features of the observed detached plasma transition. Numerical results taking realistic temperature dependences for thermal-conductivity coefficients and a common coronal radiation model are also presented.

P. K. Kaw, S. Deshpande, K. Avinash, and S. Rath

1990-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation observation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Parametric Channeling Radiation and its Application to the Measurement of Electron Beam Energy  

SciTech Connect

We have proposed a method for observing parametric channeling radiation (PCR) and of applying it to the measurement of electron beam energy. The PCR process occurs if the energy of the channeling radiation coincides with the energy of the parametric X-ray radiation (PXR). The PCR process can be regarded as the diffraction of 'virtual channeling radiation'. We developed a scheme for beam energy measurement and designed an experimental setup. We also estimated the beam parameters, and calculated the angular distributions of PXR and PCR. These considerations indicate that the observation of PCR is promising.

Takabayashi, Y. [SAGA Light Source, 8-7 Yayoigaoka, Tosu, Saga 841-0005 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

462

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Collateral  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collateral Damage Collateral Damage Using targeted irradiation to understand radiation-induced effects in bystander cells chromosomal A typical example of chromosomal instability induction measured by chromosome-type aberrations in primary human lymphocytes at delay time post-irradiation of a fraction of the cell population. Similar types of aberrations were observed in whole irradiated population but were not observed in untreated cells. Munira Kadhim Background: It has long been understood that radiation exposure can influence cellular changes. Studies indicate that even very low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha-particle irradiation, such as that from environmental radon, can affect cells. Radiation-induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells and as a

463

ARM - Field Campaign - Shortwave Radiation and Aerosol Intensive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsShortwave Radiation and Aerosol Intensive Observation govCampaignsShortwave Radiation and Aerosol Intensive Observation Periods Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Shortwave Radiation and Aerosol Intensive Observation Periods 1998.08.03 - 1998.08.28 Lead Scientist : Warren Wiscombe For data sets, see below. Summary Wednesday, August 5, 1998: IOP Opening Activities: The IOP updates for the Shortwave/Aerosol/BDRF will be composed from notes taken during briefing sessions lead by Don Cahoon and company each night at the Marland Mansion in Ponca City. IOP Status as of 8/4/98 Weather forecasts indicate that cloudy conditions will prevail for the next few days. The Helicopter is on standby for clear sky conditions. Model output indicates clear sky's may move in later this week.

464

Coherence in Spontaneous Radiation Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By considering a radiating gas as a single quantum-mechanical system, energy levels corresponding to certain correlations between individual molecules are described. Spontaneous emission of radiation in a transition between two such levels leads to the emission of coherent radiation. The discussion is limited first to a gas of dimension small compared with a wavelength. Spontaneous radiation rates and natural line breadths are calculated. For a gas of large extent the effect of photon recoil momentum on coherence is calculated. The effect of a radiation pulse in exciting "super-radiant" states is discussed. The angular correlation between successive photons spontaneously emitted by a gas initially in thermal equilibrium is calculated.

R. H. Dicke

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Los Angeles Physics Teachers Alliance Group (LAPTAG) Plasma Physics Experiments 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this is a fiber optic based spectrometer so the plasma experiments can be expanded to study line radiation source and a turbo pump with controller) were purchased inexpensively from a financially unsuccessful

Carter, Troy

466

Final Report: Levitated Dipole Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Since the very first experiments with the LDX, research progress was rapid and significant. Initial experiments were conducted with the high-field superconducting coil suspended by three thin rods. These experiments produced long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges, lasting more than 10 s, having peak beta values of 20% [Garnier et al., Physics of Plasmas, 13 (2006) 056111]. High- beta, near steady-state discharges have been maintained in LDX for more than 20 seconds, and this capability made LDX the longest pulse fusion confinement experiment operating in the U.S. fusion program. A significant measure of progress in the LDX research program was the routine investigation of plasma confinement with a magnetically-levitated dipole and the resulting observations of confinement improvement. In both supported and levitated configurations, detailed measurements were made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. High-temperature plasma was created by multi frequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 GHz, 6.4 GHz, 10.5 GHz and 28 GHz allowing control of heating profiles. Depending upon neutral fueling rates, the LDX discharges contain a fraction of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV. Depending on whether or not the superconducting dipole was levitated or supported, the peak thermal electron temperature was estimated to exceed 500 eV and peak densities to approach 1e18 m?3. We have found that levitation causes a strong inwards density pinch [Boxer et al., Nature Physics, 6 (2010) 207] and we have observed the central plasma density increase dramatically indicating a significant improvement in the confinement of a thermal plasma species.

Kesner, Jay [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Mauel, Michael [Columbia University

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

468

Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas tar...

DiGiovine, B; Holt, R J; Rehm, K E; Raut, R; Robinson, A; Sonnenschein, A; Rusev, G; Tonchev, A P; Ugalde, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

470

Anisotropic radiation elds: causality and quantum statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation transport 5 2.1 Radiation transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Closures The transport of radiation through a medium is described by the radiation transport equation for the radiative is used to describe anisotropic radiation. Because the two moment equations do not form a closed set

Honingh, Aline

471

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earths surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Fertilizer Experiments with Cotton.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBRARY. A & M COLLEGE, CAMPUS I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 469 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY Fertilizer Experiments with Cotton AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE... of seven years experiments with fertilizers on cotton at Troup, Nacogdoches, Angleton, College Station, Beeville, Tem- ple, and Denton, Texas, are reported in this Bulletin. The Kirvin fine sandy loam at Troup and the Nacogdoches and Ruston fine sandy...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Irish Potato Fertilizer Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO 101 January, 1908. ish Potato Fertilizer Experiments - Postoffice, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD. (Board of Directors... was sc Be Irish Potato Fl nents W. S. Hotchkiss and E. J. Kyle. e fertilizer work with the Irish potato at Troupe was first planned fall of 1902. The results which were gotten upon harvesting the the spring of 1903 were so opposed, especially...

Hotchkiss, W.S.; Kyle, E. J. (Edwin Jackson)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A study of low Q/sup 2/ radiative Bhabha scattering  

SciTech Connect

This thesis presents a study of electron-positron scattering, via nearly real photon exchange, where in the process one or more high energy photons are produced. The motivations behind the work are twofold. Firstly, the study is a sensitive test of the theory of electron-photon interactions, quantum electrodynamics. A deviation from the theory could indicate that the electron is a composite particle. Secondly, a thorough understanding of this process is necessary for experiments to be done in the near future at the Stanford Linear Collider and the LEP facility at CERN. Calculations for the process to third and fourth order in pertubation theory are described. Methods for simulating the process by a Monte Carlo event generator are given. Results from the calculations are compared to data from the Mark II experiment at the PEP storage ring. The ratio of measured to calculated cross sections are 0.993 /+-/ 0.017 /+-/ 0.015 and 0.99 /+-/ 0.16 /+-/ 0.08 for final states with one and two observed photons respectively, where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. The excellent agreement verifies the calculations of the fourth order radiative correction. No evidence for electron substructure is observed.

Karlen, D.A.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Geometric Doppler Effect: Spin-Split Dispersion of Thermal Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A geometric Doppler effect manifested by a spin-split dispersion relation of thermal radiation is observed. A spin-dependent dispersion splitting was obtained in a structure consisting of a coupled thermal antenna array. The effect is due to a spin-orbit interaction resulting from the dynamics of the surface waves propagating along the structure whose local anisotropy axis is rotated in space. The observation of the spin-symmetry breaking in thermal radiation may be utilized for manipulation of spontaneous or stimulated emission.

Nir Dahan; Yuri Gorodetski; Kobi Frischwasser; Vladimir Kleiner; Erez Hasman

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

476

A Simple Eclipse Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the experiment above cited may be produced in one of three ways: first, by roughening the surface of the pin's head; secondly, by dust on the edges of ...

W. G. ROYAL-DAWSON

1912-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

477

CASL Test Stand Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Test Stand Experience Stephen Hess, EPRI Heather Feldman, EPRI Brenden Mervin, EPRI Martin Pytel, EPRI Rose Montgomery, TVA Bill Bird, TVA Fausto Franceschini,...

478

Operating Experience Committee Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and the ability to learn from experience are attributes consistently evident in High Reliability Organizations. These organizations are learning organizations, which have...

479

Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA is a mechanism by which randomly produced stochastic energy deposition events can lead to nonrandom types of damage along DNA manifested distal to the sites of the initial energy deposition. Electron migration along DNA is significantly influenced by the DNA base sequence and DNA conformation. Migration along 7 base pairs in oligonucleotides containing guanine bases was observed for oligonucleotides irradiated in solution which compares to average migration distances of 6 to 10 bases for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in solution and 5.5 base pairs for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in cells. Evidence also suggests that electron migration can occur preferentially in the 5{prime} to 3{prime} direction along DNA. Our continued efforts will provide information regarding the contribution of electron transfer along DNA to formation of locally multiply damaged sites created in DNA by exposure to ionizing radiation.

Fuciarelli, A.F.; Sisk, E.C.; Miller, J.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Zimbrick, J.D. [National Research Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Smith-Purcell Radiation from Rough Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation of a charged particle moving parallel to a inhomogeneous surface is considered. Within a single formalism periodic and random gratings are examined. For the periodically inhomogeneous surface we derive new expressions for the dispersion relation and the spectral-angular intensity. In particular, for a given observation direction two wavelengths are emitted instead of one wavelength of the standard Smith-Purcell effect. For a rough surface we show that the main contribution to the radiation intensity is given by surface polaritons induced on the interface between two media. These polaritons are multiply scattered on the roughness of surface and convert into real photons. The spectral-angular intensity is calculated and its dependence on different parameters is revealed.

Gevorkian, Zh S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z