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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Solar and Photovoltaic Data from the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory (UO SRML)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The UO SRML is a regional solar radiation data center whose goal is to provide sound solar resource data for planning, design, deployment, and operation of solar electric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. The laboratory has been in operation since 1975. Solar data includes solar resource maps, cumulative summary data, daily totals, monthly averages, single element profile data, parsed TMY2 data, and select multifilter radiometer data. A data plotting program and other software tools are also provided. Shade analysis information and contour plots showing the effect of tilt and orientation on annual solar electric system perfomance make up a large part of the photovoltaics data.(Specialized Interface)

3

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.; Schuch, R.L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.californiasolarcenter.org/history_pv.html http://www.eere.energy.gov/basics/renewable_energy/solar.html http://www.nrel.gov/ncpv/ http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/education/index.htm http://www.nrel.gov/data/pix/searchpix.html http://www.ases.org/ http://www.seia.org/cs/about_solar_energy and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

Oregon, University of

5

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Computer-controlled radiation monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer-controlled radiation monitoring system was designed and installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Multiuser Tandem Laboratory (10 MV tandem accelerator from High Voltage Engineering Corporation). The system continuously monitors the photon and neutron radiation environment associated with the facility and automatically suspends accelerator operation if preset radiation levels are exceeded. The system has proved reliable real-time radiation monitoring over the past five years, and has been a valuable tool for maintaining personnel exposure as low as reasonably achievable.

Homann, S.G.

1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

8

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light shines brilliantly these days at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)". The Secretary of Energy sent these words to be conveyed at the formal opening of...

9

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

Phelps, J.E.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

Radiation monitor reporting requirements  

SciTech Connect

Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes.

Bates, W.F.

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

14

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument Calibrations Weather Observations Measurement Research Support Measurements & Instrumentation Team Center for Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems http://www.nrel.gov/srrl NREL * * * * 1617 Cole Boulevard * * * * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 * * * * (303) 275-3000 Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Mission Provide a unique outdoor research facility for supporting renewable energy conversion technologies and climate change studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE). Objectives * Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations * Develop a Solar Resource Climate Database for Golden, Colorado

15

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Metrology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metrology Laboratory Photo of Solar Radiation Research Laboratory researchers inspecting radiometers mounted to calibration tables at the outside test site. Researchers at the...

16

Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: Calendar year 1975  

SciTech Connect

This is an annual report summarizing the effluent and environmental monitoring program at the Ames Laboratory of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration. An inventory of the radioactive materials and certain chemicals released to the environment is included. A summary of the radioactivity found in the environment is presented. An estimate of the radiation dose to the public resulting from the operations of the Ames Laboratory is stated. (auth)

Voss, M.D.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ULTRA SECURE HIGH RELIABILITY WIRELESS RADIATION MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

Radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities is essential to safe operation of the equipment as well as protecting personnel. In specific, typical air monitoring of radioactive gases or particulate involves complex systems of valves, pumps, piping and electronics. The challenge is to measure a representative sample in areas that are radioactively contaminated. Running cables and piping to these locations is very expensive due to the containment requirements. Penetration into and out of an airborne or containment area is complex and costly. The process rooms are built with thick rebar-enforced concrete walls with glove box containment chambers inside. Figure 1 shows high temperature radiation resistance cabling entering the top of a typical glove box. In some case, the entire processing area must be contained in a 'hot cell' where the only access into the chamber is via manipulators. An example is shown in Figure 2. A short range wireless network provides an ideal communication link for transmitting the data from the radiation sensor to a 'clean area', or area absent of any radiation fields or radioactive contamination. Radiation monitoring systems that protect personnel and equipment must meet stringent codes and standards due to the consequences of failure. At first glance a wired system would seem more desirable. Concerns with wireless communication include latency, jamming, spoofing, man in the middle attacks, and hacking. The Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a prototype wireless radiation air monitoring system that address many of the concerns with wireless and allows quick deployment in radiation and contamination areas. It is stand alone and only requires a standard 120 VAC, 60 Hz power source. It is designed to be mounted or portable. The wireless link uses a National Security Agency (NSA) Suite B compliant wireless network from Fortress Technologies that is considered robust enough to be used for classified data transmission in place of NSA Type 1 devices.

Cordaro, J.; Shull, D.; Farrar, M.; Reeves, G.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MULTI-POINT RADIATION MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

A unique radiation monitor has been developed for performing wide-area field surveys for radiation sources. This device integrates the real-time output of multiple radiation detectors into a hand-held personal computer (e.g., a PDA) containing an intuitive graphical user interface. An independent hardware module supplies high voltage to the detectors and contains a rapid sampling system for transferring the detector count rates through an interface to the PDA. The imbedded firmware can be changed for various applications using a programmable memory card. As presently configured, the instrument contains a series of Geiger-Mueller (GM) tubes in a flexible detector string. This linear array of multiple sensors can be used by US Coast Guard and Customs container inspection personnel to measure radiation intensity in stacks of transport containers where physical access is impeded.

Hofstetter, K; Donna Beals, D; Ken Odell, K; Robert Eakle, R; Russell Huffman, R; Larry Harpring, L

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

22

Instrumentation for environmental monitoring. Volume 3. Radiation  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive survey of instrunnentation for environmental monitoring is being carried out by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory under a grant from the Natioral Science Foundation. Instruments being investigated are those useful for measurements of Air Quality, Water Quality, Radiation, and Biomedical Parameters related to environmental research and monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to this work. The results of the survey are given as (a) descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, (b) critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and (c) recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. The survey material is compiled in 5 loose- leaf volumes which can be periodically updated. An update for volume 3 on radiation instrumentation is presented. New pages are included for insertion in the introductory material and also under the headings nuclear reactors, combination instruments, alpha particle instrumentation, beta particle instrumentation, x and gamma radiation monitoring instrumentation, gamma spectrometry, neutron monitoring instrumentation, personnel dosimetry, radionuclides (strontium -89 and -90, iodine -129 and -131, radium, uranium, plutonium, and instrument notes), and infrared. (WHK)

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More...

24

A laboratory evaluation of color video monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video monitors used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than to identify intruders. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Because color video technology is rapidly changing and because color information is useful for identification purposes, Sandia National Laboratories established a program to evaluate the newest relevant color video equipment. This report documents the evaluation of an integral component, color monitors. It briefly discusses a critical parameter, dynamic range, details test procedures, and evaluates the results.

Terry, P.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Farrel W. Lytle Award was established by the SSRL Organization Executive Committee to promote important technical or scientific accomplishments in synchrotron radiation-based...

26

ORISE: DOE's Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring System (REMS) Monitoring System (REMS) ORISE maintains large database of radition exposure records for the U.S. Department of Energy ORISE staff monitoring radiation data for DOE Rule 10 CFR 835 establishes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational protection rule and requires assessment and recording of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or contamination. The Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) database is the radiation exposure data repository for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors and members of the public. REMS maintains dose records for all monitored individuals dating back to 1969. Aggregated, site-specific data are available on the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System website for all years since 1986. Currently,

27

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999  

SciTech Connect

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collimators for the NSRL Beam Line For some applications we make use of collimators to shape the radiation field. We have a variety of tungsten blocks that can be stacked to...

29

The USDA Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Monitoring Program has been measuring UV radiation since 1994. The initial network of 12 stations employed broadband meters to measure UVB irradiance and included ancillary ...

D. S. Bigelow; J. R. Slusser; A. F. Beaubien; J. H. Gibson

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information presented here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site, ER-B-98-02 Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site,...

32

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories The Low Dose Radiation Program funding encompasses several Scientific Focus Areas (SFAs). The SFAs fund merit-reviewed research at DOE national laboratories. This management approach was created in 2008 by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Science. PNNL's Low Dose Radiation Research Program Scientific Focus Area Linear and Nonlinear Tissue-Signaling Mechanisms in Response to Low Dose and Low Dose-Rate Radiation This program is funded as a U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Focus Area (SFA), and is an integrated cooperative program to understand low dose radiation effects in a complex model system. Coordinating Multidisciplinary Expertise The SFAs are designed to take advantage of the multidisciplinary,

33

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purpose: To use beams of heavy ions provided by the Booster accelerator at Brookhaven to study the effects of simulated space radiation on biological and physical systems, with the goal of developing methods and materials to reduce the risk to human beings on prolonged space missions of the effects of ionizing radiation Sponsor: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Project cost $34 million over 4 years Operating costs Nearly $8 million per year in 2007 Features * beams of heavy ions extracted from the Booster accelerator with masses and energies similar to the cosmic rays encountered in space: * 1-billion electron volt (GeV)/nucleon iron-56 * 0.3-GeV/nucleon gold-97 * 0.6-GeV/nucleon silicon-28 * 1-GeV/nucleon protons * 1-GeV/nucleon titanium

34

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dosimetry Calibration: Primary Ion Chamber Dosimetry Calibration: Primary Ion Chamber Dosimetry Calibration: Secondary Ion Chamber Dosimetry Calibration: Secondary Ion Chamber with Gain Dosimetry Calibration: Scintillator Based Dosimetry Dosimetry Calibration: Primary Ion Chamber The primary method of calibrating the dose delivered at NSRL is via a small ion chamber called a "Calibration Ion Chamber" (aka EGG counter) produced by Far West Technology. This is an air-filled bulb with electrodes for collecting ionization inside a tissue-equivalent plastic cap. The Calibration Ion Chamber is sent back to the manufacturer yearly to be calibrated using a standard gamma ray source (Cs-137). The calibration is based on a standard defied by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) and reported in their ICRU Report 59, 15 December 1998.

35

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Time Users Guide First Time Users Guide The following is a collection of useful facts that First Time Users of NSRL should familiarize themselves with. If you have any questions, contact the NSRL Liaison Physicist (631-344-3072 or 631-344-5830). You MUST have a dry run of your experiment before conducting your first NSRL run. When planning an exposure the time you need for each sample exposure should include time to change samples. If RHIC is running, the sample changing time is approximately 7 minutes. If RHIC is not running, time to change samples is only about 4 minutes. The size of the radiation field that can uniformly expose a set of samples can be as large as 20 x 20 cm2 for most ions and energies. By special request, the NSRL beam can operate in Large Beam mode with a 60 x 60 cm2 usable beam size.

36

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) houses more than 70 instruments to analyze and record solar radiation and surface meteorology data. Learn more about this equipment by exploring the photographs below. Click on a thumbnail to view the full image. Photo of researcher working on an instrument platform in front of the SRRL building. The SRRL is located on South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado, at 39.74° N, 105.18° W, and 1,829 m AMSL. Photo of four researchers working on equipment atop the SRRL instrument deck. The SRRL's instrument deck is 96 ft long and 16 feet wide. Photo of two pyrheliometers mounted to an automatic sun-tracking base. These two SRRL pyrheliometers are mounted to automatically track the sun

37

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Optical Metrology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Metrology Laboratory Optical Metrology Laboratory Photo of a laser and a spectral irradiance calibration system used to create lamp-detector alignment. Researchers use a spectral irradiance calibration alignment jig and a laser beam to align a calibration source and test unit. The NREL Optical Metrology Laboratory ensures that optical radiation resource measurement equipment is calibrated to national or international standards to ensure the quality and traceability of data. NREL considers optical radiation to range from 250 nm to 2,500 nm and to include the ultraviolet (250-400 nm), visible (400-750 nm), near infrared (750-1,100 nm), and shortwave infrared (1,100-2,500 nm) ranges. Activities The Optical Metrology Laboratory provides National Institute of Standards and Technology-traceable measurements for:

38

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSRL NSRL Before studying beam fragmentation at NSRL, it is important to understand exactly what is the question that is being studied. This discussion is divided into Beam Fragmentation for Physicists and Beam Characterization for Biologists. Fragmentation for Physicists The LBL team [1] has conducted an exhaustive program to measure the fragmentation cross sections in heavy ion collisions. They use a pencil-thin beam of ion AB incident on a target ion AT at energy EBeam and look at fragments of the beam ions assuming the fragments are co-moving with the beam, i.e. move at the same velocity as the beam and at zero degrees scattering angle. The fragmentation cross sections have been measured very well down to fragment masses AF equal to half the incident ion mass, AB/2. NSRL has continued the work of the LBL team using scintillators to monitor the small angle scattering of beam and target projectiles. Details of these studies are at Fragmentation Physics (pdf).

39

RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol  

SciTech Connect

The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments. Operations of the HPRR were terminated in 1987 and the reactor was moved to storage at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; however, RADCAL will continue to be operated in accordance with the guidelines of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secondary Calibration Laboratory program and will meet all requirements for testing dosimeters under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). This manual is to serve as the primary instruction and operation manual for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's RADCAL facility. Its purpose is to (1) provide operating protocols for the RADCAL facility, (2) outline the organizational structure, (3) define the Quality Assurance Action Plan, and (4) describe all the procedures, operations, and responsibilities for the safe and proper operation of all routine aspects of the calibration facility.

Bogard, J.S.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activation Decay Times Activation Decay Times The beam used for experimentation at the NSRL facility will result in activation of material exposed to it. All materials irradiated in the NSRL target room are to be controlled as radioactive until surveyed and released by a BNL Radiological Controls Technician (RCT). Samples that have had radioactive tracers such as 3H or 14C added to them shall be controlled as radioactive through out the entire process and will not be released as non-radioactive. When liquid samples are activated, there exists a potential for dispersion of radioactive material through spilling of the sample during handling or manipulation creating a contamination area. Activated samples containing liquids that are manipulated required additional Radiological Training (Benchtop/Dispersable Training), a designated (Posted) radiological area to perform work in, and a Radiation Work Permit (RWP). When samples have had enough time to decay they again become non-dispersible and no special radiological handling is required. Correct and appropriate biological handling techniques always apply regardless of the sample's radiological status.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tech Notes Tech Notes Item Number Title Author(s) Date NSRL-TN-05-001 NSRL Beam Characterization Study I-Hung Chiang, Adam Rusek, Michael Sivertz 10 December 2005 NSRL-TN-05-002 Time of Flight of NSRL Beams I-Hung Chiang, Adam Rusek, Michael Sivertz 18 October 2005 NSRL-TN-06-001 ToF Results From Run 06C I-Hung Chiang, Adam Rusek, Michael Sivertz 15 September 2006 NSRL-TN-07-001 Radiation Levels in the NSRL Target Room Michael Sivertz 27 November 2007 NSRL-TN-09-001 Development of the Pixel Chamber I-Hung Chiang, Adam Rusek, Daniel Ottavio, Dysart Ravenhall and Steve Bellavia 14 July 2009 NSRL-TN-10-001 Iron Beam Characterization Studies at NSRL Michael Sivertz, I-Hung Chiang, Adam Rusek 22 February 2010 NSRL-TN-10-002 Gold Beams at NSRL Michael Sivertz, I-Hung Chiang, Adam Rusek 10 March 2010

42

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earths surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No...

45

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000.

NONE

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999.

None

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1984 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 20 refs., 8 figs., 46 tabs.

Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables.

Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NREL GHP [Geothermal Heat Pump] Showcase: GHP Installation and Intensive in situ and Performance Monitoring at NREL's Solar Radiation and Research Laboratory; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of the geothermal heat pump (GHP) showcase at NREL and how it will help the SRRL site move forward with the goal of being a model of sustainability within the NREL campus, providing an effective demonstration of GHP systems and needed space conditioning for laboratory expansion.

Anderson, E. R.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Triennial update that describes the BNL Environmental Monitoring Program for all media (air, surface water, ground water, etc.) in accordance with DOE ORDER 5400.5

DAUM,M.; DORSCH,WM.; FRY,J.; GREEN,T.; LEE,R.; NAIDU,J.; PAQUETTE,D.; SCARPITTA,S.; SCHROEDER,G.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

LABORATORY MODELLING OF THE EARTH RADIATION BELT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method of the laboratory modelling of the Earth radiation belt is presented. Method can be used for the estimation of consequences of global energetic and communication projects realizations. The radiation belt of the Earth is the inner part of the magnetosphere, in which the geomagnetic field hold charged particles with kinetic energy from 10 KeV to 100 MeV. This belt play the essential role for the sun radiation regime for the Earth and for the electromagnetic waves propagation. As it is well known, even small alteration of solar activity influent essential upon the biological and ecological balance at the Earth for all levels- from viruses and micro-organisms to biological societies and ecological systems at all. The most bright indicator of the solar activity alteration are changes of the pathogenic organisms activity as a result of a displacement of biological equilibrium. But the other phenomena, which are not connected with pathogenic biological objects are very important for thelife on the Earth and ecological balance too, although they can not be so obviously observed.

Dr. Alexander Luchinskiy A; Prof Dr; Yakov S. Shifrin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Background compensation for a radiation level monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

Keefe, D.J.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Optimiziing the laboratory monitoring of biological wastewater-purification systems  

SciTech Connect

Optimization of the laboratory monitoring of biochemical wastewater-treatment systems at coke plants is considered, for the example of OAO Koks. By adopting a methodological approach to determine the necessary data from chemical analysis, it is possible to reduce the time, labor, and materials required for monitoring, without impairing the purification process or compromising the plant's environmental policies.

S.V. Gerasimov [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING--Radiation--Vol3Pt1  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring is being carried out by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory originally under a grant from the National Science Foundation and now by the Office of Health and Environmental Research of the Department of Energy. Instruments being investigated are those useful for measurements in Air Quality, Water Quality, Radiation, and Biomedicine related to environmental research and monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to this work. The results of the survey are given as (a) descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, (b) critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and (c) recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. Information is also given regarding the pollutants to be monitored: their characteristics and forms, their sources and pathways, their effects on the ecosystem, and the means of controlling them through process and regulatory controls.

Authors, Various

1972-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Monitoring hydraulic fracture growth: Laboratory experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors carry out small-scale hydraulic fracture experiments to investigate the physics of hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory experiments are combined with time-lapse ultrasonic measurements with active sources using both compressional and shear-wave transducers. For the time-lapse measurements they focus on ultrasonic measurement changes during fracture growth. As a consequence they can detect the hydraulic fracture and characterize its shape and geometry during growth. Hence, this paper deals with fracture characterization using time-lapse acoustic data. Hydraulic fracturing is used in the oil and gas industry to stimulate reservoir production.

Groenenboom, J.; Dam, D.B. van

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2009  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2009 (FY 2009). Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-two prehistoric archaeological sites, six historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, two historic trails, and two nuclear resources, including Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2009 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations and monitor the effects of ongoing project activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and trespassing citations were issued in one instance, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Braun

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

On-line Monitoring [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-line Monitoring On-line Monitoring Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory On-line Monitoring Project description: On-line process monitoring for laser-beam welding. Category: Project with industrial partner (USCAR) Bookmark and Share Simulated defects and associated responses from a weld sensor developed at Argonne

65

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Rings of Saturn, Sandia's workhorse pulsed-power machine. The Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Foundation seeks to advance science and engineering in the areas of radiation effects sciences, high energy density science, and pulsed-power science and technology to address critical national security issues. Why our work matters We address several issues key to nuclear security and maintaining a safe, secure, and effective nuclear stockpile. For example, radiation effects science ensures that engineered systems are able to operate as intended in the radiation environments they encounter. In addition, high energy density science validates models that are used to certify the performance of the

66

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2010 (FY 2010). Throughout the year, thirty-three cultural resource localities were revisited, including somethat were visited more than once, including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-six prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. The resources that were monitored included seventeen that are routinely visited and sixteen that are located in INL project areas. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and one trespassing incident (albeit sans formal charges) was discovered, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

INL Cultural Resource Management Office

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Test plan for demonstration of Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes tests to demonstrate the capability of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) to monitor airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides and analyze soil, smear, and filter samples for alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides under field conditions. The RTML will be tested during June 1993 at a site adjacent to the Cold Test Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Measurement systems installed in the RTML that will be demonstrated include two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, an x-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer, and four alpha continuous air monitors. Test objectives, requirements for data quality, experimental apparatus and procedures, and safety and logistics issues are described.

McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration of instruments used to detect and measure ionizing radiation has been conducted over the last 20 years at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Radiation Calibration Facility, Building 348. Growth of research facilities, projects in progress, and more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) orders which involve exposure to nuclear radiation have placed substantial burdens on the existing radiation calibration facility. The facility currently does not meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.4 or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N323-1978, which establish calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used in the detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contaminations. Failure to comply with this standard could mean instrumentation is not being calibrated to necessary levels of sensitivity. The Laboratory has also recently obtained a new neutron source and gamma beam irradiator which can not be made operational at existing facilities because of geometry and shielding inadequacies. These sources are needed to perform routine periodic calibrations of radiation detecting instruments used by scientific and technical personnel and to meet BNL`s substantial increase in demand for radiation monitoring capabilities. To place these new sources into operation, it is proposed to construct an addition to the existing radiation calibration facility that would house all calibration sources and bring BNL calibration activities into compliance with DOE and ANSI standards. The purpose of this assessment is to identify potential significant environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at BNL.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Baltimore...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Baltimore Jan. 15-16 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

70

Design and development of a portable gamma radiation monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable gamma radiation monitor has been designed and developed. The monitor can be used effectively in the dose range from 0.07 to 500 mGy/h due to gamma rays of energy greater than 65 keV. The monitor overestimated radiation doses and the uncertainty in the measured dose rate has been found to be {+-}30%. Provision has also been added to use the monitor as an installed radiation monitor. In installed mode, it can be operated from a remote location up to 1 km and the timing history can be stored on a personal computer.

Munir, M.; Khalid, M. [Health Physics Division, Directorate of Systems and Services, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Ahmad, N.; Sohail, S.; Naveed, R. A.; Rafiq, M. Q. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P. O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for 2013  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during 2013. Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is also a cave; fourteen additional caves; seven prehistoric archaeological sites ; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; one nuclear resource (Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a designated National Historic Landmark); and nine historic structures located at the Central Facilities Area. Of the monitored resources, thirty-three were routinely monitored, and five were monitored to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations along with the effects of ongoing project activities. On six occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. In addition, two resources were visited more than once as part of the routine monitoring schedule or to monitor for additional damage. Throughout the year, most of the cultural resources monitored had no visual adverse changes resulting in Type 1determinations. However, Type 2 impacts were noted at eight sites, indicating that although impacts were noted or that a project was operating outside of culturally cleared limitations, cultural resources retained integrity and noted impacts did not threaten National Register eligibility. No new Type 3 or any Type 4 impacts that adversely impacted cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were observed at cultural resources monitored in 2013.

Julie B. Williams; Brenda Pace

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Baltimore...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

occurring background radiation. A twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter, operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System from Joint Base Andrews, will be...

74

Scoping Evaluation to Revise the EPRI Standard Radiation Monitoring Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PWR Standard Radiation Monitoring Program (SRMP) and BWR Radiation Level Assessment and Control (BRAC) program are the cornerstone of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Radiation Management program. These programs provide an essential tie between radiation field generation and chemical and operational changes, but there is some evidence that the trends in these reactor coolant piping dose rates do not correspond to radiation field trends elsewhere in the plant. In an effort to improve corre...

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Radiation Monitoring System for the LHCb Inner Tracker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the LHCb Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) designed to monitor radiation load on the Inner Trackersilicon micro-strip detectors is presented. The RMS comprises Metal Foil Detectors read-out by sensitive Charge Integrators. MFD is a radiation hard detector operating at high charged particle ?uxes. RMS is used to monitor radiation load as well as relative luminosity of the LHCb experiment. The results obtained by the RMS during LHC operation in 20102011 are compared to the Monte-Carlo simulation.

Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V; Alessio, F; Corti, G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

LABORATORY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY 900 VETERAN AVENUE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 AND DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES UCLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 This manuscript is a contribution to the monograph edited by Daniel S. Berman and Dean Mason, entitled "Clinical Nuclear Cardiology". These studies were supported by Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF THE HEART Heinrich R. Schelbert, M.D., Michael E. Phelps, Ph.D. and David E. Kuhl, M.D. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the

78

Radiation monitoring system for the environment and safety project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project RAMSES (Radiation Monitoring System for the Environment and Safety) will provide LHC with a state of the art radiation monitoring and alarm system. RAMSES will survey the LHC accelerator, the LHC experimental areas and the environment of the LHC. The TIS (Technical Inspection and Safety) division will exploit this system to assess radiation risks and to control the releases of radioactivity. In addition, it will be integrated into the control rooms of the LHC accelerator and the LHC experiments. Obviously, RAMSES will already take into account CERN wide needs to renew the radiation monitoring system around the other CERN facilities. The requirements of the system are derived from CERN's own safety standards (CERN's Radiation Protection Manual, SAPOCO), from those of the CERN's two host states and from European standards. The mandate of the project team covers the system specification, prototyping, tendering, installation and integration of radiation monitors and industrial control equipment for sa...

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Scibile, L; Segura, G; Vojtyla, P; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States March 18, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The United States Government has an extensive network of radiation monitors around the country and no radiation levels of concern have been detected. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency RadNet system is designed to protect the public by notifying scientists, in near real time, of elevated levels of radiation so they can determine whether protective action is required. The EPA's system has not detected any radiation levels of concern. In addition to EPA's RadNet system, the U.S. Department of Energy has

80

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2008 (FY 2008). Throughout the year, 45 cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, one butte, twenty-eight prehistoric archaeological sites, three historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, one historic canal construction camp, three historic trails, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2008 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations, confirm the locations of previously recorded cultural resources in relation to project activities, to assess the damage caused by fire-fighting efforts, and to watch for cultural materials during ground disturbing activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources

Brenda R. Pace

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY RESEARCH INVESTIGATION DIRECTED TOWARD EXTENDING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iVP-^"^^? iVP-^"^^? COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY RESEARCH INVESTIGATION DIRECTED TOWARD EXTENDING THE USEFUL RANGE OF THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM Special Technical Report Signal Corps Contract DA-36-039 SC-64630 DA Project No. 3-99-10-022 SC Project No. 102B U. S. Army Laboratory Procurement Office Signal Corps Supply Agency Fort Monmouth, New Jersey The Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York Box 6, Low Memorial Library New York 27, New York March 1, 1956 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY Collected Papers on the AAASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) Special Technical Report

82

United States Environmental Monitoring EPAJ60014-901016 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-062  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPAJ60014-901016 EPAJ60014-901016 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-062 Agency P.O. Box 93478 May 1990 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development - Offsite Environmental lcrgw Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring d ,& Around United States Nuclear Test Areas Calendar Year 1989 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90/016 DOEIDP100539-062 May 1990 Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1989 contributors: C. F. Costa, N. R. Sunderland, S. C. Black, M. W. Chilton, B. B. Dicey, W. G. Phillips, C. A. Fontana, R. W. Holloway, C. K. Liu, A. A. Mullen, V. E. Niemann, C. J. Rizzardi, D. D. Smith, D. J. Thome, E. A. Thompson, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division

83

Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: calendar year 1980  

SciTech Connect

The results and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring programs for the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR) and other Laboratory facilities are presented. The major areas of radiological monitoring were ALRR effluent air, environmental air, effluent water and environmental water. A summary of the radioactivity found in the environment is presented. The ALRR ceased operation on December 1, 1977. Decommissioning activities began January 3, 1978, and are scheduled for completion October 1, 1981. Analysis of air samples collected at the ALRR on-site station showed no radioactivity that could be attributed to ALRR operations. The radiosotope of significance in the ALRR stack effluent was tritium (H-3). The yearly individual dose from H-3 at the exclusion fence was estimated to be 0.016 mRem and the estimated dose to the entire population within an 80 Km (50 mile) radius of the ALRR was 26.6 man-Rem. These values are 0.0032% and 0.026%, respectively, of the doses derived from the concentration guides. On September 1, 1978, the ALRR site was connected to the City of Ames sanitary sewage system. All liquids (except building foundation and roof water) from the ALRR complex are now discharged to the sewage system negating the requirement for monitoring chemical constituents of effluent and environmental waters. In the radioactive liquid waste released to the City of Ames sewage system from the ALRR complex, H-3 was the predominant isotope. After dilution with other waste water from the ALRR complex, the potential dose was not more than 0.68% of the dose derived from the concentration guide. Building foundation and roof water are discharged to a drainage gulch on site.

Voss, M.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Health physics applications of nuclear safeguards radiation monitors  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear safeguards needs fostered the development of radiation monitors whose sensitivity and microprocessor-controlled logic permit detection of small, transient increases in environmental levels of gamma radiation. While this capability was originally developed to detect the diversion of the special nuclear materials /sup 235/U and plutonium, adaptation to health physics monitoring is straigthforward. Applications of the safeguards instruments range from small, handheld instruments used to monitor laundry of salvage-bound materials to more complex systems devoted to monitoring moving vehicles at entry/exit points. In addition to these health physics applications, other new applications for safeguards instruments are being considered.

Fehlau, P.E.; Dvorak, R.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

DOE TEC Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call 10...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Thursday, October 11, 2007, 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. EDT Conference Call Minutes Participants: Chair: Cort Richardson (CSGNE)...

86

Radiation Detection Laboratory The Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Lab is used to explore novel techniques for radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NERS Radiation Detection Laboratory The Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Lab is used to explore novel techniques for radiation detection and characterization for nuclear nonproliferation

Eustice, Ryan

87

Calibration of Radiation Monitors at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation monitors are installed in nuclear power plants to indicate to operators the levels of radioactivity in various processes and at specific plant locations. Plant personnel depend on radiation monitors for accurate and precise data in order to make informed decisions and take appropriate actions during normal, abnormal, and design basis events. As with all electronic measurement systems, error can be introduced by changing environmental conditions, aging components, and replaced parts. The radiati...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

88

PWR Standard Radiation Monitoring Program: 2013 Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Energy Institute/Institute of Nuclear Power Operations/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Radiation Protection RP 2020 Initiative was developed to promote radiation dose reduction by emphasizing radiological protection fundamentals and reducing radioactive source term. EPRI was charged as the technical lead in the area of source term reduction, and EPRIs Radiation Management Program initiated a multi-year program to develop an understanding of source term ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

ORISE Resources: Population Monitoring in Radiation Emergencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into the body Removal of external or internal contamination (decontamination) Radiation dose received and the resulting health risk from the exposure Long-term health...

90

1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Goodrich, M. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University  

SciTech Connect

We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd, 11077, Bowling Green KY 42101 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima The enclosed package represents radiation data collected over the ocean with the fixed-wing aircraft (C-12) on April 5th, April 18th, and May 9th. The data were collected with an array of large thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(T)) crystals and associated readout electronics to produce time and location referenced measurements. These results represent raw data that have been validated. They do not include any further evaluation. AMS C12 Sea Data.csv AMS C12 Sea Data Dictionary.pdf AMS C12 Sea Data.kmz More Documents & Publications Social Security Number Reduction Project 2011 - Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports Appendices for the Basis Document

96

Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

Radev, R

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

97

Adaptable radiation monitoring system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable radioactive-material detection system capable of detecting radioactive sources moving at high speeds. The system has at least one radiation detector capable of detecting gamma-radiation and coupled to an MCA capable of collecting spectral data in very small time bins of less than about 150 msec. A computer processor is connected to the MCA for determining from the spectral data if a triggering event has occurred. Spectral data is stored on a data storage device, and a power source supplies power to the detection system. Various configurations of the detection system may be adaptably arranged for various radiation detection scenarios. In a preferred embodiment, the computer processor operates as a server which receives spectral data from other networked detection systems, and communicates the collected data to a central data reporting system.

Archer, Daniel E. (Livermore, CA); Beauchamp, Brock R. (San Ramon, CA); Mauger, G. Joseph (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Karl E. (Livermore, CA); Mercer, Michael B. (Manteca, CA); Pletcher, David C. (Sacramento, CA); Riot, Vincent J. (Berkeley, CA); Schek, James L. (Tracy, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Circumsolar radiation data: The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory reduced data base  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the content and format of a circumsolar radiation data base assembled by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This 200-megabyte data base contains detailed intensity profiles of the solar and circumsolar region (out to 3{degrees} from the sun's center), the total and spectrally divided direct normal radiation data, and the total hemispherical solar radiation in the horizontal plane and the plane facing the sun. Data are available for 11 locations in the United States covering 1976 to 1981. Measurements were made by four automatic scanning instruments called circumsolar telescopes that operated about 16 hours per day. This data base, the Reduced Data Base, was generated from a larger set to provide data in a more manageable form.

Noring, J.E.; Grether, D.F.; Hunt, A.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 7-1 7.0 SOIL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 7-1 7.0 SOIL MONITORING To Read About Turn........................................................................................................................................................... 7-1 Soil Comparison Levels................................................................................................................................... 7-14 Quality Assurance for the Soil, Foodstuffs, and Biota Monitoring Program

100

Remote Monitoring Technology Guidelines for Radiation Protection: Field Implementation of Remote Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has performed extensive work in developing and promoting radiation protection technologies to control worker exposure and ensure worker safety. This guideline provides radiation protection personnel with a comprehensive approach for implementing remote monitoring technology (RMT) in field activities to control worker exposure. The guideline was prepared by the EPRI RMT Working Group, which focuses on RMT application in radiation protection programs. This document draws heavily from analysis and reco...

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area In March, 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Measuring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. Today, the Department provided the following update on the information gathered by the AMS. This data that was collected and analyzed jointly with the Government of Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). 051311jointdoegojamstraindatafinalv2-110516163951-phpapp01.pptx 050611jointdoegojamsdatav3-110506164802-phpapp02.pptx 042111amsdataapril21v1-110422102404-phpapp02.pptx 041811amsdataapril18v1-110418170107-phpapp02.pptx 040711amsdataapril7v3-110407170243-phpapp02.pptx

102

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area In March, 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Measuring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. Today, the Department provided the following update on the information gathered by the AMS. This data that was collected and analyzed jointly with the Government of Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). 051311jointdoegojamstraindatafinalv2-110516163951-phpapp01.pptx 050611jointdoegojamsdatav3-110506164802-phpapp02.pptx 042111amsdataapril21v1-110422102404-phpapp02.pptx 041811amsdataapril18v1-110418170107-phpapp02.pptx 040711amsdataapril7v3-110407170243-phpapp02.pptx

103

ANNUAL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT OF THE LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Produced Radiation Radionuclide Measurements and ReleaseAccelerators Airborne Radionuclides 1.4. Non-RadioactiveRadiation Release of Radionuclides iv PREFACE In 1976 we

Schleimer Ed, Gary E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

ANNUAL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT OF THE LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY, 1977  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Produced Radiation Radionuclide Measurements and ReleaseRadiation Release of Radionuclides References Distribution90 Panoramic Way 1.2. Radionuclide Measurements and Release

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ANNUAL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT OF THE LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Release of One Curie of Radionuclides. Nuclide M C P (uCi/Produced Radiation Radionuclide Measurements and ReleasePenetrating Radiation Airborne Radionuclides Non-Radioactive

Schleimer Editor, Gary E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Environmental radiation exposure: Regulation, monitoring, and assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive releases to the environment from nuclear facilities constitute a public health concern. Protecting the public from such releases can be achieved through the establishment and enforcement of regulatory standards. In the United States, numerous standards have been promulgated to regulate release control at nuclear facilities. Most recent standards are more restrictive than those in the past and require that radioactivity levels be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Environmental monitoring programs and radiological dose assessment are means of ensuring compliance with regulations. Environmental monitoring programs provide empirical information on releases, such as the concentrations of released radioactivity in environmental media, while radiological dose assessment provides the analytical means of quantifying dose exposures for demonstrating compliance.

Chen, S.Y.; Yu, C.; Hong, K.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

IEC STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents IEC/SC 45B Radiation protection instrumentation and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

Voytchev, Miroslav [IRSN; Ambrosi, P. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB); Behrens, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB); Chiaro Jr, Peter John [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

RADIOLOGICAL EMISSIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING FOR BROOKHAV EN NATIONAL LABORATORY, 1947 - 1961.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has monitored its releases to the environment since its inception in 1947. From 1962 to 1966 and from 1971 to the present, annual reports,were published that recorded the emissions and releases to the environment from Laboratory operations. In 1998, a report was written to summarize the environmental data for the years 1967 to 1970. One of the purposes of the current report is to complete BNL's environmental history by covering the period from 1948 through 1961. The activities in 1947 were primarily organizational and there is no information on the use of radiation at the Laboratory before 1948. An additional objective of this report is to provide environmental data to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The report does not provide an estimate of the doses associated with BNL operations. The report is comprised of two parts. The first part is a summary of emissions, releases, and environmental monitoring information including a discussion of the uncertainties in these data. Part two contains the detailed information on the approach taken to estimate the releases from the fuel cartridge failures at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR). A series of appendices present more detailed information on these events in tabular form. The approach in this report is to be reasonable, conservative, (pessimistic), and transparent in estimating releases from fuel cartridge ruptures. Clearly, reactor stack monitoring records and more extensive records would have greatly improved this effort, but in accordance with Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Appendix 0230 Annex C-9, many of the detailed records from this time were not retained.

MEINHOLD,C.B.; MEINHOLD,A.F. (EDITED BY BOND,P.D.)

2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radiation portal monitor system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal monitoring system has a cosmic ray charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray muons, whilst also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

Morris, Christopher (Los Alamos, NM); Borozdin, Konstantin N. (Los Alamos, NM); Green, J. Andrew (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Gary E. (Los Alamos, NM); Makela, Mark F. (Los Alamos, NM); Priedhorsky, William C. (Los Alamos, NM); Saunders, Alexander (Los Alamos, NM); Schultz, Larry J. (Los Alamos, NM); Sossong, Michael J. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010  

SciTech Connect

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007  

SciTech Connect

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/22/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2211 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 42211 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

114

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/18/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41811 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 41811 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

115

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 3/22/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

211 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 32211 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

116

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/4/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

411 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4411 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

117

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/7/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

711 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4711 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

118

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987  

SciTech Connect

During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

ANNUAL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT OF THE LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. ''Source: AIRBORNE RADIONUCLIDES Gross atmospheric betarelease of one curie of radionuclides. a a Nuclide MPC R aRadiation Airborne Radionuclides Waterborne Radionuclides

Schleimer Editor, G.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

Hausladen, Paul [ORNL; Blessinger, Christopher S [ORNL; Guzzardo, Tyler [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The NOAA Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS)A New Surface Radiation Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new radiation monitoring program, the Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS), that builds upon and takes over from earlier NOAA networks monitoring components of solar radiation [both the visible component (SOLRAD) and ...

B. B. Hicks; J. J. DeLuisi; D. R. Matt

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

General Operational Procedure for Pedestrian Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document outlines the basic conduct of operation (CONOPS) for a pedestrian radiation portal monitor (RPM), provided that the CONOPS is not facility or RPM specific and that it is based on a general understanding of a pedestrian RPM operation. The described CONOPS for a pedestrian RPM is defined by: (1) RPM design and operational characteristics, (2) type of pedestrian traffic, and (3) goal for RPM installation. Pedestrian RPMs normally are deployed for the continuous monitoring of individuals passing through point of control to detect the unauthorized traffic of radioactive/nuclear materials. RPMs generally are designed to detect gamma- and neutron-emitting materials.

Belooussov, Andrei V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

Radiation detectors as surveillance monitors for IAEA safeguards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation detectors used for personnel dosimetry are examined for use under IAEA Safeguards as monitors to confirm the passage or nonpassage (YES/NO) of plutonium-bearing nuclear material at barrier penetrations declared closed. In this application where backgrounds are ill defined, no advantage is found for a particular detector type because of intrinsic efficiency. Secondary considerations such as complexity, ease of tamper-proofing, and ease of readout are used to recommend specific detector types for routine monitoring and for data-base measurements. Recommendations are made for applications, data acquisition, and instrument development.

Fehlau, P.E.; Dowdy, E.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D. [comps.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, May 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site May 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Independent Oversight Abbreviations i Executive Summary iii 1 Introduction 1 2 Positive Attributes 3 3 Program Enhancements 5 4 INL Site Environmental Monitoring Program 7 4.1 Overall Assessment 7 4.2 Crosscutting Concerns and Recommendations 7 4.3 Media-Specific Perspectives and Recommendations 11 4.3.1 Air Monitoring 11 4.3.2 Liquid Effluent Monitoring 12 4.3.3 Soil Monitoring 12 4.3.4 Agricultural Products and Game Animals Monitoring 13

126

MASTER UCRL-9537 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Lawrence Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MASTER MASTER UCRL-9537 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Berkeley, California Contract No.W-7405-eng-48 A NHARMONIC POTENTIAL CONSTANTS AND THEIR DEPENDENCE UPON BOND LENGTH Dudley R. Herschbach and Victor W. Laurie January 1961 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

127

UCRL-5257 Rev. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UCRL-5257 Rev. UCRL-5257 Rev. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Radiation Laboratory Liver more : California Contract No. W- 7405 -eng -48 PEACEFUL USES OF FUSION Edward Teller July 3, 1958 Printed for the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission f . DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account by an agency of t h e United States United States Government nor of their employees, or assumes any legal accuracy, completeness, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and

128

Dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume at Mound Laboratory, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dig-face monitoring system consists of onsite hardware for collecting information on changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface soil during the hazardous site excavation. A prototype dig-face system was take to Mount Laboratory for a first trial. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of {sup 232}Th, {sup 227}Ac, and assorted debris. The system was used to monitor a deep excavation aimed at removing {sup 227}Ac-contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were used to scan across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed. A 3-D image of the contamination plumes was developed; the radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the {sup 227}Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate {sup 232}Th plume.

Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.J.; Carpenter, M.V.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

United States Environmental Monitoring EPA-600/4-81-047 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-043  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA-600/4-81-047 EPA-600/4-81-047 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP/00539-043 Agency P.O. Box 15027 June 1981 Las Vegas NV 891 14 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1980 prepared for the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank EPA-60014-81-047 DOE/DP/00539-043 June 1981 OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT Radiation moni t o r i ng around U n i t e d States nuclear t e s t areas, calendar y e a r 1980 D. D. Smith, R. F. Grossman, W. D. Corkern, D. J. Thorn6 and R. G. Patzer Envi ronmental Moni t o r i ng Systems Laboratory Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 and J. L. Hopper Reynol ds E l e c t r i c a l & Engineering Company, Inc.

130

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Coherent Diffraction Radiation Longitudinal Beam Profile Monitor for CTF3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A setup for the investigation of Coherent Diffraction Radiation (CDR) from a conducting screen as a tool for noninvasive longitudinal electron beam profile diagnostics has been designed and installed in the Combiner Ring Measurement (CRM) line of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3, CERN). In this report the status of the monitor development and results on the interferometric measurements of CDR spectra are presented. The CDR signal correlation with an RF pickup and a streak camera is reported. The future plans for the system improvements are also discussed

Micheler, Maximilian; Boorman, Gary; Karataev, Pavel; Lekomtsev, Konstantin; Molloy, Stephen; Corsini, Roberto; Dabrowski, Anne; Lefevre, Thibaut

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of Laboratory Measurement of Geophysical Properties for Monitoring of CO 2 Sequestration Larry R. Myer (LRMyer@lbl.gov; 510/486-6456) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Science Division One Cyclotron Road, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Introduction Geophysical techniques will be used in monitoring of geologic sequestration projects. Seismic and electrical geophysical techniques will be used to map the movement of CO 2 in the subsurface and to establish that the storage volume is being efficiently utilized and the CO 2 is being safely contained within a known region. Rock physics measurements are required for interpretation of the geophysical surveys. Seismic surveys map the subsurface velocities and attenuation while electrical surveys map the conductivity. Laboratory measurements are required to convert field

133

1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/Instrumentation: NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) Developed at: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD)

135

BNL Laboratory hoods: rationalization for exemption from monitoring and reporting requirements  

SciTech Connect

During an ERDA safety and health inspection, Brookhaven National Laboratory was cited for failure to monitor and report the amount of airborne contaminants released to the environment via laboratory hoods. However, an analysis of potential environment releases of radiological and nonradiological contaminants from these hoods illustrate that even under worst case situations, emissions of these contaminants would not endanger the community air quality. Brookhaven is therefore requesting an exemption from the ERDA requirement. Rationalization supporting this request is presented in this report. (auth)

White, O. Jr.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation & Chemical Risk Mgmt. Argonne assists technical problems as diverse as chemically and radiologically contaminated soil, military munitions disposal areas, and groundwater...

137

Intelligent mirror monitor and controller for synchrotron radiation beam lines  

SciTech Connect

A microprocessor-based, stand-alone mirror monitor and control system has been developed for synchrotron radiation beam lines. The operational requirements for mirror position and tilt angle, including the parameters for controlling the number of steps, direction, speed and acceleration of the driving motors, may be programmed into EPROMS. The instruction sequence to carry out critical motions will be stored in a program buffer. A manual control knob is also provided to fine tune the mirror position if desired. A synchronization scheme for the height and tilt motions maintains a fixed mirror angle during insertion. Absolute height and tilt angle are displayed. Electronic (or programmable) tilt angle limits are provided to protect against damage from misalignment of high power beams such as focussed wiggler beams. A description of mirror drives with a schematic diagram is presented. Although the controller is made for mirror movers, it can be used in other applications where multiple stepping motors perform complex synchronized motions.

Xu, X.L.; Yang, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method for monitoring irradiated fuel using Cerenkov radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for monitoring irradiated nuclear fuel inventories located in a water-filled storage pond wherein the intensity of the Cerenkov radiation emitted from the water in the vicinity of the nuclear fuel is measured. This intensity is then compared with the expected intensity for nuclear fuel having a corresponding degree of irradiation exposure and time period after removal from a reactor core. Where the nuclear fuel inventory is located in an assembly having fuel pins or rods with intervening voids, the Cerenkov light intensity measurement is taken at selected bright sports corresponding to the water-filled interstices of the assembly in the water storage, the water-filled interstices acting as Cerenkov light channels so as to reduce cross-talk. On-line digital analysis of an analog video signal is possible, or video tapes may be used for later measurement using a video editor and an electrometer. Direct measurement of the Cerenkov radiation intensity also is possible using spot photometers pointed at the assembly.

Dowdy, E.J.; Nicholson, N.; Caldwell, J.T.

1980-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Struckmeyer, R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

Struckmeyer, R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

1997 LMITCO Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the calendar year 1997 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs and compares 1997 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standard, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends indicating a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. With the exception of one nitrogen sample in the disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond, compliance with permits and applicable regulations was achieved. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that public health and the environment were protected.

Andersen, B.; Street, L.; Wilhelmsen, R.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Hydrogen Water Chemistry Effects on BWR Radiation Buildup: Volume 1: Laboratory Results and Plant Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diverse laboratory experiments and a review of the most recent dose rate data from operating plants identify some of the key factors responsible for the increase in shutdown radiation fields at a number of BWRs following implementation of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). These insights suggest strategies to minimize radiation field increases under HWC and to avoid possible problems during chemical decontamination.

1994-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

145

Community radiation monitoring program. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Community Radiation Monitoring Program (CRMP) is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), a division of the University and Community College System of Nevada, and the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the University of Utah (UUNEL). The thirteenth year of this program began in the fall of 1992, and the work continues as an integral part of the DOE--sponsored long-term offsite radiological monitoring effort that has been conducted by EPA and its predecessors since the inception of nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The CRMP began by enhancing and centralizing environmental monitoring and sampling equipment at 15 communities in the then-existing EPA monitoring network around the NTS, and has since expanded to 19 locations in Nevada, Utah, and California. The primary objectives of this program are still to increase the understanding by the people who live in the area surrounding the NTS of the activities for which DOE is responsible, to enhance the performance of radiological sampling and monitoring, and to inform all concerned of the results of these efforts. One of the primary methods used to improve the communication link with the people in the potentially impacted area has been the hiring and training of local citizens as Station Managers and program representatives in those selected communities in the offsite area. These mangers, active science teachers wherever possible, have succeeded through their training, experience, community standing, and effort in becoming a very visible, able, and valuable asset in this link.

Cooper, E.N.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Environmental radiation real-time monitoring system permanently installed near Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

An environmental radiation real-time monitoring system with high pressure ionization chamber was developed. It has been installed permanently in the vicinity of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, the first built in mainland China. The system consists of four basic components: environmental radiation monitors; data communication network; a data processing center; and a remote terminal computer situated in Hangzhou. It has provided five million readings of environmental radiation levels as of January 1993. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Minde Ding; Peiru Sheng; Zhangji Zhi [Suzhou Nuclear Research Institute, Jiangsu (China)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Monitoring Data from the Chemical Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (2003 - 2006)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was a 1.9 acre site used from 1962 until 1985 for disposal of chemical wastes. The wastes were generated by research at Sandia's laboratories. The excavation of the CWL and the removal of 2000 intact chemical containers was completed safely and successfully. Contaminated soils were also removed for treatment or disposal. An "in-site" chemiresistor sensor was developed for the project that provided continuous monitoring of volatile organic compounds in the air, soil, and water. The monitoring data, collected from March, 2003 through April, 2006 is summarized and presented at this website.

Ho, Cliff (Sandia National Laboratories)

148

Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a particle radiation monitor II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

Grant, C E; Bautz, M W; O'Dell, S L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

LABORATORY OF NUCLEAR MEDICIhF ARD RADIATION BIOLOGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDICIhF ARD RADIATION BIOLOGY MEDICIhF ARD RADIATION BIOLOGY . - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORMA 90024 Ah" DEPARTXENT OF RADIOLOGY UCLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 This work was p a r t i a l l y supported by ERDA Contract gEY-76-C-03-0012 and N I H g r a n t 7-R01-GM-24839-01. Prepared for U.S. Energy Research and Development Administrat ion under C o n t r a c t gEY-76-C-03-0012 ECAT: A New Computerized Tomographic Imaging System for Positron-Emitting Michael E. Phelps, Edward J . Hoffman Sung-Cheng Huang and David E . Kuhl Radiopharmaceuticals DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

150

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, BL6-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory TXM Overview | TXM Imaging | Researchers | Publications TXM SRL null Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy Capabilities The transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) on beam line 6-2c at SSRL is capable of 2D imaging and tomography of many materials including biological and environmental samples, and complex hierarchical systems such as fuel cells and battery electrodes, with chemical information, at 30 nm resolution. The field of view (FOV) is 30 microns, but samples can be raster scanned to increase the FOV while maintaining the same resolution. Because the microscope is equipped with optics that can be used from ~5 to 14 keV, it is useful for characterizing metal distribution and chemical states by imaging at X-ray absorption edges for many metals involved in energy materials. 3D elemental mapping is accomplished via acquisition of tomography above and below the X-ray absorption edge. 2D mapping of chemical states is accomplished with XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) imaging, in which many images are acquired along the X-ray absorption edge of a metal, and constructed spectra can be compared to those for model compounds of known structure. It is also possible to acquire 3D XANES tomography, in which chemical states can be mapped in 3D.

151

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNLs R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are located downstream of control technologies and just before discharge to the atmosphere. The need for monitoring airborne emissions of hazardous chemicals is established in the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit and in notices of construction. Based on the current potential-to-emit, the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit does not contain general monitoring requirements for BOP facilities. However, the permit identifies monitoring requirements for specific projects and buildings. Needs for future monitoring will be established by future permits issued pursuant to the applicable state and federal regulations. A number of liquid-effluent discharge systems serve the BOP facilities: sanitary sewer, process sewer, retention process sewer, and aquaculture system. Only the latter system discharges to the environment; the rest either discharge to treatment plants or to long-term storage. Routine compliance sampling of liquid effluents is only required at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Liquid effluents from other BOP facilities may be sampled or monitored to characterize facility effluents or to investigate discharges of concern. Effluent sampling and monitoring for the BOP facilities depends on the inventories, activities, and environmental permits in place for each facility. A description of routine compliance monitoring for BOP facilities is described in the BOP FEMP.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Establishment of the Radiation Detection Laboratory at Fisk University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic CdZnTe (CZT) semiconducting crystals are highly suitable for the room temperature-based detection of gamma radiation. The surface preparation of Au contacts on surfaces of CZT detectors is typically conducted after (1) polishing to remove artifacts from crystal sectioning and (2) chemical etching, which removes residual mechanical surface damage however etching results in a Te rich surface layer that is prone to oxidize. Our studies show that CZT surfaces that are only polished (as opposed to polished and etched) can be contacted with Au and will yield lower surface currents. Due to their decreased dark currents, these as-polished surfaces can be used in the fabrication of gamma detectors exhibiting a higher performance than polished and etched surfaces with relatively less peak tailing and greater energy resolution.032}

Arnold Burger, Ph.D.

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988  

SciTech Connect

For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986  

SciTech Connect

1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

1998 Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the calendar year 1998 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1998 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The INEEL complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the exception of nitrogen samples in a disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

L. V. Street

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION MONITORING IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - HISTORY AND RESULTS 25 YEARS AFTER  

SciTech Connect

This article describes results of the radiation environmental monitoring performed in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ) during the period following the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. This article presents a brief overview of five comprehensive reports generated under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 (Washington Savannah River Company LLC, Subcontract No. AC55559N, SOW No. ON8778) and summarizes characteristics of the ChEZ and its post-accident status and the history of development of the radiation monitoring research in the ChEZ is described. This article addresses characteristics of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ, its major goals and objectives, and changes of these goals and objectives in the course of time, depending on the tasks associated with the phase of mitigation of the ChNPP accident consequences. The results of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ during the last 25 years are also provided.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INLs High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INLs HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten-rhenium and platinum rhodium thermocouples can be avoided. INL is also developing an Ultrasonic Thermometry (UT) capability. In addition to small size, UTs offer several potential advantages over other temperature sensors. Measurements may be made near the melting point of the sensor material, potentially allowing monitoring of temperatures up to 3000 C. In addition, because no electrical insulation is required, shunting effects are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce acoustic discontinuities to the sensor, as this enables temperature measurements at several points along the sensor length. As discussed in this paper, the suite of temperature monitors offered by INL is not only available to ATR users, but also to users at other MTRs.

J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area- 3/25/11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams.

160

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area- 3/29/11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area-5/6/11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams.

162

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area- 5/13/11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams.

163

Development of a New Analysis Tool for Evaluating and Correcting for Weather Conditions that Constrain Radiation Portal Monitor Performance  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed the Adaptable, Multiplatform, Real-Time Analysis Package (AMRAP) for the continuous measurement of environmental radionuclide decay. AMRAP is a completely open source visualization and analysis package capable of combining a variety of data streams into an array of real-time plots. Once acquired, data streams are analyzed to store static images and extract data based on previously defined thresholds. AMRAP is currently used at ORNL to combine data streams from an Ortec Detective high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, a TSA Systems radiation portal monitor (RPM), and an Orion weather station. The combined data are used to study the rain-induced increase in RPM background radiation levels. RPMs experience an increase in background radiation during precipitation due to the deposition of atmospheric radionuclides on the ground. Using AMRAP results in a real-time analysis workstation specifically dedicated to the study of RPM background radiation levels. By means of an editable library of common inputs, AMRAP is adaptable to remote monitoring applications that would benefit from the real-time visualization and analysis of radiation measurements. To study rain-induced increases in background radiation levels observed in radiation portal monitors (RPMs), researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a software package that allows data with different formats to be analyzed and plotted in near real time. The Adaptable, Multiplatform, Real-Time Analysis Package (AMRAP) was developed to operate in the background and capture plots of important data based on previously defined thresholds. After executing AMRAP, segments of a data stream can be captured without additional post-processing. AMRAP can also display previously recorded data to facilitate a detailed offline analysis. Without access to these capabilities in a single software package, analyzing multiple continuously recorded data streams with different formats is impractical. Commercially available acquisition software packages record and analyze radiation measurements but are not designed to perform real-time analysis in conjunction with data from other vendors. The lack of collaboration between vendors is problematic when research requires different data streams to be correlated in time and immediately analyzed. AMRAP was specifically developed to provide a solution to this problem. AMRAP is a completely open source visualization and analysis package capable of plotting and analyzing data from different vendors in near real time.

Guzzardo, Tyler [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing...

165

Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Enewetak Island (Figure 1) (Bell et al., 2002). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining the cost and estimating the effectiveness of potential remedial measures, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for the Enewetak Atoll population group along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating in the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

1993 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1993 at the Bettis-Pittsburgh Site are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that environmental releases during 1993 were in accordance with applicable Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Second annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring and field investigations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, striving to provide an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. Results are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) program. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The remedial investigation for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator and conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. This report also includes information from other site-specific remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) for contaminated sites at ORNL and data from other ongoing monitoring programs conducted by other organizations [e.g., the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance monitoring conducted by the Environmental Surveillance and Protection Section]. This information is included to provide an integrated basis to support ER decision making. This report summarizes information gathered through early 1993. Annual data, such as annual discharges of contaminants, are reported for calendar year 1992.

Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A. [eds.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radiation monitoring with CVD Diamonds and PIN Diodes at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has been using two polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamonds and 12 silicon PIN diodes for radiation monitoring and protection of the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT). We have used the pCVD diamonds for more than 3 years, and the PIN diodes for 7 years. We will describe the SVT and SVT radiation monitoring system as well as the operational difficulties and radiation damage effects on the PIN diodes and pCVD diamonds in a high-energy physics environment.

Bruinsma, M.; Burchat, P.; Curry, S.; Edwards, A.J.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kirkby, D.; Majewski, S.; Petersen, B.A.; /UC, Irvine /SLAC /Ohio State U.

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

169

Solar Radiation Research Data from the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Baseline Monitoring Station (BMS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The SRRL BMS at Golden Colorado makes available both live and stored irradiance and meteorlogical data. Data sets range from 1981 to the present and are freely available through a variety of specialized interfaces. In addition to tools such as a data plotting program, the web site offers images from a live sky cam, images from the YES Sky imager, and from the EKO Sky Scanner. Spectral data, solar calendars, and wind rose data are also available. (Specialized Interface)

170

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area U.S. Department of Energy Releases Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area March 22, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Today the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. The information has also been shared with the government of Japan as part of the United States' ongoing efforts to support Japan with the recovery and response effort. On March 15, 33 experts from the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) arrived in Japan along with more than 17,200 pounds of equipment. After initial deployments at U.S. consulates and military installations in Japan, these teams have utilized their unique skills,

171

Direct Environmental Penetrating Radiation Data Summaries from DPRNET at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Naturally occurring external penetrating radiation originates from terrestrial and cosmic sources in the form of gamma rays, neutral particles, and charged particles. Human-made radiation consists of the same types of radiation. To evaluate natural and human-made direct penetrating radiation (DPR) in the ambient environment, LANL's environmental monitoring program uses thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Read the overview (from which this text is copied) at http://www.lanl.gov/environment/air/dprnet.shtml for an understanding of cosmic, terrestrial, and man-made DPR. LANL maintains a network of more than 100 data collecting stations. These stations are on-site, at the perimeters of the site, and in communities located throughout the region. They also include seven albedo TLDs. Quarterly dose summaries for each station are available in tabular form 1999 through the present. Annual dose summaries date back to 1974.

172

Radiation Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 'fllis condition of ac{")nll)(l.rator dri.ft rate r.)etwe.Cl'l t11o..t ()f lllc\\:--Jter cllld part drift rates becomes Elpparcnt whorl tlle two drift curveBJ ...

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents the 2011 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure.Clarification is given on Reporting Data regarding: reporting Total Organ Dose (TOD); reporting Total Skin Dose (TSD), and Total Extremity Dose (TExD) ; and Special individuals reporting.

Rao, Nimi; Hagemeyer, Derek

2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

174

NEPA CX Determination SS-SC-11-02 for Radiation Portal Monitor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 for Radiation Portal Monitor 2 for Radiation Portal Monitor National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination A. SSO NEPA Control #: SS-SC-11-02 B. Brief Description of Proposed Action: SLAC has a long-term schedule for the disassembly and disposition (D&D) of metal objects released for offsite disposal from the SLAC B-Factory Detector (BaBar) and the upgraded SLAC positron-electron collider (PEP-II) experiments. As part of this effort, SLAC is proposing to install and operate a radiation portal monitor (RPM) to measure high-energy gamma radioisotopes of trucks transporting metals offsite. The proposed structure comprises two upright columns, one on either side of a turnout lane along the road toward SLAC's south gate at Alpine Road. Vehicles exiting the site will be directed to drive between the columns to have their cargo

175

DOE TEC Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call 10_11_07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Thursday, October 11, 2007, 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. EDT Conference Call Minutes Participants: Chair: Cort Richardson (CSG/NE) Members: Mel Massaro (DOT/FRA), Ed Wilds (State of Connecticut), Vernon Jensen (Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska), Sean Kice (SSEB), Ralph Hail (Norfolk Southern), Pat Edwards (CSG/NE), Kevin Blackwell (DOT/FRA), Larry Stern (CVSA), Sarah Wochos (CSG/MW), Tim Runyon (CSG/MW), Christina Nelson (NCSL), Tony Dimond (BLET), Matt Dennis & Doug Osborn (SNL), Jim Williams (WIEB), Ralph Best & Steve Schmid (BSC) Contractor Support: John Smegal (Legin) Summary: Cort Richardson welcomed the participants to the inaugural Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group conference call and thanked them for their interest. He indicated that his

176

Transparency demonstration of underground radiation and environmental monitoring  

SciTech Connect

One of the legacies of the nuclear weapon and nuclear power cycles has been the generation of large quantities of nuclear waste and fissile materials. As citizens of this planet, it is everyone's responsibility to provide for safe, secure, transparent, disposal of these waste nuclear materials. The Sandia Cooperative Monitoring Center sponsored a Transparency Monitoring Workshop where the use of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was identified as a possible transparency demonstration test bed. Three experiments were conceived as jumpstart activities to showcase the effective use of the WIPP infrastructure as a Transparency Demonstration Test Bed. The three experiments were successfully completed and demonstrated at the International Atomic Energy Association sponsored International Conference on Geological Repositories held in Denver Colorado November 1999. The design and coordination of these efforts is the subject of this paper.

SCHOENEMAN,BARRY D.; HOFER,DENNIS

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

2001 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, West Mifflin Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2001 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 2001 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the U.S. Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that any potential risk posed by these residues is much less than the risks encountered in normal everyday life.

NONE

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

2003 Environmental Monitoring Report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Pittsburgh Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2003 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 2003 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the U.S. Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that any potential risk posed by these residues in much less than the risks encountered in normal everyday life.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Circumsolar radiation data: The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory reduced data base. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the content and format of a circumsolar radiation data base assembled by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This 200-megabyte data base contains detailed intensity profiles of the solar and circumsolar region (out to 3{degrees} from the sun`s center), the total and spectrally divided direct normal radiation data, and the total hemispherical solar radiation in the horizontal plane and the plane facing the sun. Data are available for 11 locations in the United States covering 1976 to 1981. Measurements were made by four automatic scanning instruments called circumsolar telescopes that operated about 16 hours per day. This data base, the Reduced Data Base, was generated from a larger set to provide data in a more manageable form.

Noring, J.E.; Grether, D.F.; Hunt, A.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Surveillance Plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Surveillance Plan has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12--18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring phase. This Surveillance Plan presents the technical and quality assurance surveillance activities for the various WAG 6 environmental monitoring and data evaluation plans and implementing procedures.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Research in radiation monitoring survey instrumentation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Two low-power solid-state prototype readout units were developed, an LED display and a LCD display. This display output was in a bar-graph format, covering four-decades of information, with 10-segments per decade. The displays accept a frequency input, which is standardly available from several portable radiation-survey instruments. Both readout units will operate on two D-cell batteries (3.0 Volt), with a typical current drain requirement of 0.3 MA for the LED display and 30..mu..A for the LCD display. A wide-range electrometer circuit was also developed. The circuit covers an input current range from 10/sup -13/ A to 10/sup -8/ A. The output signal is a pulse whose frequency is directly proportional to input current. The circuit requires no high-megohm resistors, and is autoranging. Several candidate input amplifiers were analyzed and evaluated for use with the electrometer circuit.

Blalock, T.V.; Kennedy, E.J.; Phillips, R.G.; Walker, E.W. Jr.

1978-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

Solar Radiation Monitoring Station (SoRMS): Humboldt State University, Arcata, California (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A partnership with HSU and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

Wilcox, S..; Andreas, A.

184

Solar Radiation Monitoring Station (SoRMS): Humboldt State University, Arcata, California (Data)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A partnership with HSU and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

Wilcox, S..; Andreas, A.

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

185

Development and Laboratory Trials of the Light-Based High-Resolution Target Movement Monitor for Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was the number one cause of all fatalities at underground coal mines in the United States US and resulted in nine for Monitoring Convergence at Underground Mines D. B. Apel1 ; B. R. Gray2 ; R. H. Moss3 ; S. E. Watkins4 ; and T headings: Ground motion; Monitoring; Lasers; Mining. Introduction In 2005, the fall of a roof or back

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

186

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 15, No. 4: Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1995. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

Struckmeyer, R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Standard guide for application of radiation monitors to the control and physical security of special nuclear material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide briefly describes the state-of-the-art of radiation monitors for detecting special nuclear material (SNM) (see 3.1.11) in order to establish the context in which to write performance standards for the monitors. This guide extracts information from technical documentation to provide information for selecting, calibrating, testing, and operating such radiation monitors when they are used for the control and protection of SNM. This guide offers an unobtrusive means of searching pedestrians, packages, and motor vehicles for concealed SNM as one part of a nuclear material control or security plan for nuclear materials. The radiation monitors can provide an efficient, sensitive, and reliable means of detecting the theft of small quantities of SNM while maintaining a low likelihood of nuisance alarms. 1.2 Dependable operation of SNM radiation monitors rests on selecting appropriate monitors for the task, operating them in a hospitable environment, and conducting an effective program to test, calibrat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Application of the EPRI Standard Radiation Monitoring Program for PWR Radiation Field Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NEI/INPO/EPRI RP 2020 Initiative was developed to promote radiation dose reduction by emphasizing radiological protection fundamentals and reducing radioactive source term. EPRI was charged as the technical lead in the area of source term reduction. EPRI's Radiation Management program initiated a multi-year program to develop an understanding of source term generation and transport with the eventual goal of providing plant specific recommendations for source term reduction. Reinstatement of the Stand...

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Monitoring exposure to atomic bomb radiation by somatic mutation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic bomb survivors are a population suitable for studying the relationship between somatic mutation and cancer risk because their exposure doses are relatively well known and their dose responses in terms of cancer risk have also been thoroughly studied. An analysis has been made of erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA) gene mutations in 1,226 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The GPA mutation frequency (Mf) increased slightly but significantly with age at the time of measurement and with the number of cigarettes smoked. After adjustment for the effect of smoking, the Mf was significantly higher in males than in females and higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. All of these characteristics of the background GPA Mf were in accord with those of solid tumor incidence obtained from an earlier epidemiological study of A-bomb survivors. Analysis of the dose effect on Mf revealed the doubling dose to be about 1.20 Sv and the minimum dose for detection of a significant increase to be about 0.24 Sv. No significant dose effect for difference in sex, city, or age at the time of bombing was observed. Interestingly, the doubling dose for the GPA Mf approximated that for solid cancer incidence (1.59 Sv). And the minimum dose for detection was not inconsistent with the data for solid cancer incidence. The dose effect was significantly higher in those diagnosed with cancer before or after measurement than in those without a history of cancer. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic mutations are the main cause of excess cancer risk from radiation exposure. 27 refs., 2 figs.

Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Radiation Transport Thomas A. Brunner Joint Russian-American Five-Laboratory Conference on  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Forms of Approximate Forms of Approximate Radiation Transport Thomas A. Brunner Joint Russian-American Five-Laboratory Conference on Computational Mathematics/Physics 19-23 June 2005 Vienna, Austria Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. The Diffusion Approximation * Taylor Expand Intensity in Angle * Fast, robust, and accurate numerical solutions * Flux can be larger than energy density - More stuff moving than is there to move * Flux Limited Diffusion improves robustness - Limits flux so that it's not larger than energy density - Many different flux limiters Spherical Harmonics (PN) * Intensity expanded further in angle than diffusion

191

Radon Monitoring and Early Low Background Counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

Thomas, K. J.; Mei, D.-M. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Heise, J. [Sanford Laboratory at Homestake, Lead, SD 57754 (United States); Durben, D. [Black Hills State University, Spearfish, SD 57799 (United States); Salve, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

Radon monitoring and early low background counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

Thomas, K.J.; Mei, D.M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Overview of Nonintercepting Beam-Size Monitoring with Optical Diffraction Radiation  

SciTech Connect

The initial demonstrations over the last several years of the use of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as nonintercepting electron-beam-parameter monitors are reviewed. Developments in both far-field imaging and near-field imaging are addressed for ODR generated by a metal plane with a slit aperture, a single metal plane, and two-plane interferences. Polarization effects and sensitivities to beam size, divergence, and position will be discussed as well as a proposed path towards monitoring 10-micron beam sizes at 25 GeV.

Lumpkin, Alex H. [Fermilab, Batavia IL 60510 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

Meteorological Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Meterological monitoring of various climatological parameters (eg., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Radiation Control Program - Partners in Site Restoration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Management and Integration (M&I) contract for all five of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) facilities to Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a world renowned national laboratory and research and development facility, the BJC mission involves executing the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. In addition to BJC's M&I contract, UT-Battelle, LLC, a not-for-profit company, is the Management and Operating (M&O) contractor for DOE on the ORNL site. As part of ORNL's EM program, legacy inactive facilities (i.e., reactors, nuclear material research facilities, burial grounds, and underground storage tanks) are transferred to BJC and are designated as remediation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), or long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M) facilities. Facilities operated by both UT-Battelle and BJC are interspersed throughout the site and are usually in close proximity. Both UT-Battelle and BJC have DOE-approved Radiation Protection Programs established in accordance with 10 CFR 835. The BJC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program adapts to the M&I framework and is comprised of a combination of subcontracted program responsibilities with BJC oversight. This paper focuses on the successes and challenges of executing the BJC RADCON Program for BJC's ORNL Project through a joint M&I contractor relationship, while maintaining a positive working relationship and partnership with UT-Battelle's Radiation Protection organization.

Jones, S. L.; Stafford, M. W.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time M. Splitt University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Recent work in this area by Charles Wade (1987) lays out the groundwork for monitoring data quality for projects with large networks of instruments such as the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Wade generated objectively analyzed fields of meteorological variables (temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind) and then compared the objectively analyzed value at the sensor location with the value produced by the sensor. Wade used a Barne's objective analysis scheme to produce objective data values for a given meteorological variable (q) in two- dimensional space. The objectively analyzed value should

197

Overview of fiber radiation effects testing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Fiber optics offer potential benefits in diagnostic measurements associated with nuclear testing. Such applications require that optical fibers be located in close proximity to a nuclear test and provide a reliable data transmission path during exposure to intense radiation. The Los Alamos effort has thus concentrated on measurement and understanding of radiation effects in optical fibers at very short times (< 100 ns) after (and during) irradiation. This is in contrast to most other studies that concentrate on times of interest in military, nuclear power, or standard telecommunication applications (1 ms to years). The Los Alamos program has included laboratory tests with intense electron pulse facilities (Febetron 705 and 706) and a fast pulsed electron linac (located at EG and G, Inc. in Santa Barbara, California). In addition, several measurements have been conducted on nuclear tests and some of that data has been released in unclassified publications. This program has used fibers for many data transmission applications. Fibers have also been used as signal transducers by utilizing radiation-to-light conversion processes within the fiber. Past, present, and future activities in this program are discussed.

Lyons, P.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The prototype of a detector for monitoring the cosmic radiation neutron flux on ground  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a comparison between the results of experimental tests and Monte Carlo simulations of the efficiency of a detector prototype for on-ground monitoring the cosmic radiation neutron flux. The experimental tests were made using one conventional {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source in several incidence angles and the results were compared to that ones obtained with a Monte Carlo simulation made with MCNPX Code.

Lelis Goncalez, Odair; Federico, Claudio Antonio; Mendes Prado, Adriane Cristina; Galhardo Vaz, Rafael; Tizziani Pazzianotto, Mauricio [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - IEAv/DCTA - Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Semmler, Renato [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP - Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

199

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Stephens, Natural and Fallout Radioactivity in the Sar.Patterson and A. R. Smith, Fallout and Natural Background inVariations in the rate of fallout deposition. 3. Variations

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind of the stack of nuclear reactor but not down wind. OnS i t e and at several nuclear reactor s i t e s . They havefrom the stack of nuclear power reactor, may have strong

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM)Technologies for End-Use Load Disaggregation: Laboratory Evaluation I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a laboratory evaluation to assess the cost versus accuracy performance of residential non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM) technology. NILM is an evolving technology that can be deployed for utility and customer applications, such as end-use load disaggregation, energy audits, real-time customer information and appliance or load diagnostics. Commercial NILM products for utility and customer applications continue to emerge, although most products available today ...

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cable Polymer Aging and Condition Monitoring Research at Sandia National Laboratories Under the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes cable polymer aging and condition monitoring research performed at Sandia National Laboratories under the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) Program from 2000 to 2005. The research results apply to low-voltage cable insulation and jacket materials that are commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants. The research builds upon and is linked to research performed at Sandia from 1977 through 1986, sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Aged and unaged specimens from t...

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

76 76 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 100 150 200 250 Direct Normal Irradiance (W/m 2 ) Eugene Hermiston Burns 3. All-sky direct normal irradiance increases 5% per decade Eppley NIP Conclusions Annual average all-sky total and direct normal irradiance measurements show an overall increase in Oregon between 1980 and 2007. Two measurement sites show statistically significant increases in clear- sky direct normal irradiance in background periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo [6] (1987- 2008), consistent with the hypothesis that a reduction in anthropogenic aerosols may contribute to the increase in surface irradiance. References 1. Long, C.N. and T. P. Ackerman, 2000: J. Geophys. Res., 105(D12), 15,609-15,626. 2. Long, C.N., and K.L. Gaustad, 2004: Atmospheric Radiation

204

Field Operations Procedures Manual for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Effective Personnel Exposure Control in Shortened Refueling Outages: Final Report: Review of Remote Monitoring Systems in Radiation Protection Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote monitoring technology (RMT) significantly enhances worker protection and reduces worker radiation exposure, particularly during shortened refueling outages. This report provides a brief description of the hardware and features of remote monitoring systems, then focuses on nuclear plant experiences in applying such systems for enhanced radiation protection. It also discusses EPRI's RMT research program and formation of the RMT Working Group to support research in this area. Such information will gr...

2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

206

Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

Biological monitoring and abatement program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this plan is to evaluate the receiving streams` biological communities for the duration of the permit and meet the objectives for the ORNL BMAP as outlined in the NPDES permit (Appendix). The ORNL BMAP will focus on those streams in the WOC watershed that (1) receive NPDES discharges and (2) have been identified as ecologically impacted. In response to the newly issued NPDES permit, the tasks that are included in this BMAP plan include monitoring biological communities (fish and benthic invertebrates), monitoring mercury contamination in fish and water, monitoring polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in fish, and evaluating temperature loading from ORNL outfalls. The ORNL BMAP will evaluate the effects of sediment and oil and grease, as well as the chlorine control strategy through the use of biological community data. Monitoring will be conducted at sites in WOC, First Creek, Fifth Creek, Melton Branch, and WOL.

Kszos, L.A.; Anderson, G.E.; Gregory, S.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Schilling, E.M.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phipps, T.L. [CKY, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Monitoring Program annual report for 2011.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/California Environmental Monitoring Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/California Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2010 program report describes the activities undertaken during the previous year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Environmental Monitoring Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/California.

Holland, Robert C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

1964-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington States Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

212

Developing a Methodology for Characterizing the Effects of Building Materials Natural Radiation Background on a Radiation Portal Monitoring System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trafficking of radioactive material, particularly special nuclear material (SNM), has long been a worldwide concern. To interdict this material the US government has installed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) around the globe. Building materials surrounding an RPM can greatly effect the detectors background radiation levels due to Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). In some cases this effect is so great that the initial RPM setup had to be rebuilt. This thesis develops a methodology for quick and efficient determination of the specific activity and composition of building materials surrounding a RPM to predict background levels, therefore determining the minimum detectable quantity (MDQ) of material. This methodology builds on previous work by Ryan et al by generating material and source cards for a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) deck, based on an experimental RPM setup to predict the overall gamma background at a site. Gamma spectra were acquired from samples of building materials and analyzed to determine the specific activity of the samples. A code was developed to estimate the elemental composition of building materials using the gamma transmission of the samples. These results were compared to previous Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) on the same samples. It was determined that densitometry provided an elemental approximation within 5% of that found through NAA. Using the specific activity and material composition, an MCNP deck was used to predict the gamma background levels in the detectors of a typical RPM. These results were compared against actual measurements at the RPM site, and shown to be within 10% of each other.

Fitzmaurice, Matthew Blake 1988-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

APPLICATION OF BAYESIAN AND GEOSTATISTICAL MODELING TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF CS-137 AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Cs-137 concentrations above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency risk-based threshold of 0.23 pCi/g may increase the risk of human mortality due to cancer. As a leader in nuclear research, the INL has been conducting nuclear activities for decades. Elevated anthropogenic radionuclide levels including Cs-137 are a result of atmospheric weapons testing, the Chernobyl accident, and nuclear activities occurring at the INL site. Therefore environmental monitoring and long-term surveillance of Cs-137 is required to evaluate risk. However, due to the large land area involved, frequent and comprehensive monitoring is limited. Developing a spatial model that predicts Cs-137 concentrations at unsampled locations will enhance the spatial characterization of Cs-137 in surface soils, provide guidance for an efficient monitoring program, and pinpoint areas requiring mitigation strategies. The predictive model presented herein is based on applied geostatistics using a Bayesian analysis of environmental characteristics across the INL site, which provides kriging spatial maps of both Cs-137 estimates and prediction errors. Comparisons are presented of two different kriging methods, showing that the use of secondary information (i.e., environmental characteristics) can provide improved prediction performance in some areas of the INL site.

Kara G. Eby

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Third annual environmental restoration monitoring and assessment report for FY 1994 of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring, field investigations, and assessments conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, providing an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. The results presented are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This information forms a basis for prioritizing sites and for selecting, implementing, and evaluating remedial actions. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) Project. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The Remedial Investigation Plan (DOE 1992) for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator and the major conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. During FY 1992, the remedial investigation activities were integrated with a series of environmental monitoring and SI activities at ORNL that address pathways and processes important for contaminant movement to gain a more integrated perspective of contamination movement at the watershed scale.

Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A.; Guth, M.A.S. [eds.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Determining the Impact of Concrete Roadways on Gamma Ray Background Readings for Radiation Portal Monitoring Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissolution of the Soviet Union coupled with the growing sophistication of international terror organizations has brought about a desire to ensure that a sound infrastructure exists to interdict smuggled nuclear material prior to leaving its country of origin. To combat the threat of nuclear trafficking, radiation portal monitors (RPMs) are deployed around the world to intercept illicit material while in transit by passively detecting gamma and neutron radiation. Portal monitors in some locations have reported abnormally high gamma background count rates. The higher background data has been attributed, in part, to the concrete surrounding the portal monitors. Higher background can ultimately lead to more material passing through the RPMs undetected. This work is focused on understanding the influence of the concrete surrounding the monitors on the total gamma ray background for the system. This research employed a combination of destructive and nondestructive analytical techniques with computer simulations to form a model that may be adapted to any RPM configuration. Six samples were taken from three different composition concrete slabs. The natural radiologcal background of these samples was determined using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector in conjunction with the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) and Genie 2000 software packages. The composition of each sample was determined using thermal and fast neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. The results from these experiments were incorporated into a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MNCP) photon transport simulation to determine the expected gamma ray count rate in the RPM due to the concrete. The results indicate that a quantitative estimate may be possible if the experimental conditions are optimized to eliminate sources of uncertainty. Comparisons of actual and simulated count rate data for 137Cs check sources showed that the model was accurate to within 15%. A comparison of estimated and simulated count rates in one concrete slab showed that the model was accurate to within 4%. Subsequent sensitivity analysis showed that if the elemental concentrations are well known, the carbon and hydrogen content could be easily estimated. Another sensitivity analysis revealed that the small fluctuations in density have a minimal impact on the gamma count rate. The research described by this thesis provides a method by which RPM end users may quantitatively estimate the expected gamma background from concrete foundations beneath the systems. This allows customers to adjust alarm thresholds to compensate for the elevated background due to the concrete, thereby increasing the probability of intercepting illicit radiological and nuclear material.

Ryan, Christopher Michael

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Site Inspection and Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites November 2012 LMS/S09415 ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

217

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory, September 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of the Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ........................................................................................................................1 2.0 Background .................................................................................................................1 3.0 Scope ...........................................................................................................................2 4.0 Results .........................................................................................................................2

218

United States Environmental Monitoring EPA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United United States Environmental Monitoring EPA 600/R-93/141 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory January 1992 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 89193-3478 Research and Development _EPA Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1991 Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientificand Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak ridge,TN 39831; pricesavailablefrom (615) 576-8401 Availableto the publicfrom the NationalTechnicalInformationService, U.S. Departmentof Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 Price Code: PrintedCopyof MicroficheA01 Frontand back cover: CommunityMonitorStation (front) and Whole BodyLaboratory(back), Craig A. Tsosle EnvironmentalMonitoringSystemsLaboratory-LasVegas, Nevada Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report:

219

Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory.

Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A survey of monitoring and assay systems for release of metals from radiation controlled areas at LANL.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a recent effort in waste minimization has focused on scrap metal from radiological controlled areas (RCAs). In particular, scrap metal from RCAs needs to be dispositioned in a reasonable and cost effective manner. Recycling of DOE scrap metals from RCAs is currently under a self-imposed moratorium. Since recycling is not available and reuse is difficult, often metal waste from RCAs, which could otherwise be recycled, is disposed of as low-level waste. Estimates at LANL put the cost of low-level waste disposal at $550 to $4000 per cubic meter, depending on the type of waste and the disposal site. If the waste is mixed, the cost for treatment and disposal can be as high as $50,000 per cubic meter. Disposal of scrap metal as low-level waste uses up valuable space in the low-level waste disposal areas and requires transportation to the disposal site under Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations for low-level waste. In contrast, disposal as non-radioactive waste costs as little as $2 per cubic meter. While recycling is unavailable, disposing of the metal at an industrial waste site could be the best solution for this waste stream. A Green Is Clean (GIC) type verification program needs to be in place to provide the greatest assurance that the waste does not contain DOE added radioactivity. This paper is a review of available and emerging radiation monitoring and assay systems that could be used for scrap metal as part of the LANL GIC program.

Gruetzmacher, K. M. (Kathleen M.); MacArthur, D. W. (Duncan W.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Monte Carlo-Based Field Calibration of Radiation Monitors for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerators / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (PART 3) / Radiation Protection

C. Theis; D. Forkel-Wirth; D. Lacarrre; S. Roesler; H. Vincke

222

Lab-Based Measurement of Remediation Techniques for Radiation Portal Monitors (Initial Report)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) deployed by the Second Line of Defense (SLD) are known to be sensitive to the natural environmental radioactive background. There are several techniques used to mitigate the effects of background on the monitors, but since the installation environments can vary significantly from one another the need for a standardized, systematic, study of remediation techniques was proposed and carried out. This study is not meant to serve as the absolute last word on the subject. The data collected are, however, intelligible and useful. Some compromises were made, each of which will be described in detail. The hope of this initial report is to familiarize the SLD science teams with ORNL's effort to model the effect of various remediation techniques on simple, static backgrounds. This study provides a good start toward benchmarking the model, and each additional increment of data will serve to make the model more robust. The scope of this initial study is limited to a few basic cases. Its purpose is to prove the utility of lab-based study of remediation techniques and serve as a standard data set for future use. This importance of this first step of standardization will become obvious when science teams are working in parallel on issues of remediation; having a common starting point will do away with one category of difference, thereby making easier the task of determining the sources of disagreement. Further measurements will augment this data set, allowing for further constraint of the universe of possible situations. As will be discussed in the 'Going Forward' section, more data will be included in the final report of this work. Of particular interest will be the data taken with the official TSA lead collimators, which will provide more direct results for comparison with installation data.

Livesay, Jake [ORNL; Guzzardo, Tyler [ORNL; Lousteau, Angela L [ORNL

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

with heavy ions was carried out at the AGS accelerator. To simulate the less than 1-GeV energy spectrum of galactic cosmic rays and solar radiation better, NASA and Brookhaven...

224

Nasa Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

To simulate the less than 1-GeV energy spectrum of galactic cosmic rays and solar radiation better, NASA and Brookhaven have worked together to build the NSRL based at...

225

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

226

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Best management practices plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan has been developed as part of the environmental monitoring program at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The BMP Plan describes the requirements for personnel training, spill prevention and control, environmental compliance, and sediment/erosion control as they relate to environmental monitoring activities and installation of Monitoring Station 4 at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The application of formal software engineering methods to the unattended and remote monitoring software suite at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Unattended and Remote Monitoring (UNARM) system is a collection of specialized hardware and software used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to institute nuclear safeguards at many nuclear facilities around the world. The hardware consists of detectors, instruments, and networked computers for acquiring various forms of data, including but not limited to radiation data, global position coordinates, camera images, isotopic data, and operator declarations. The software provides two primary functions: the secure and reliable collection of this data from the instruments and the ability to perform an integrated review and analysis of the disparate data sources. Several years ago the team responsible for maintaining the software portion of the UNARM system began the process of formalizing its operations. These formal operations include a configuration management system, a change control board, an issue tracking system, and extensive formal testing, for both functionality and reliability. Functionality is tested with formal test cases chosen to fully represent the data types and methods of analysis that will be commonly encountered. Reliability is tested with iterative, concurrent testing where up to five analyses are executed simultaneously for thousands of cycles. Iterative concurrent testing helps ensure that there are no resource conflicts or leaks when multiple system components are in use simultaneously. The goal of this work is to provide a high quality, reliable product, commensurate with the criticality of the application. Testing results will be presented that demonstrate that this goal has been achieved and the impact of the introduction of a formal software engineering framework to the UNARM product will be presented.

Determan, John Clifford [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Longo, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Michel, Kelly D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Selection of liquid-level monitoring method for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive liquid low-level waste tanks, remedial investigation/feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

Several of the inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contain residual wastes in liquid or solid (sludge) form or both. A plan of action has been developed to ensure that potential environmental impacts from the waste remaining in the inactive LLLW tank systems are minimized. This document describes the evaluation and selection of a methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in inactive LLLW tanks. Criteria are established for comparison of existing level monitoring and leak testing methods; a preferred method is selected and a decision methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in the tanks is presented for implementation. The methodology selected can be used to continuously monitor the tanks pending disposition of the wastes for treatment and disposal. Tanks that are empty, are scheduled to be emptied in the near future, or have liquid contents that are very low risk to the environment were not considered to be candidates for installing level monitoring. Tanks requiring new monitoring equipment were provided with conductivity probes; tanks with existing level monitoring instrumentation were not modified. The resulting data will be analyzed to determine inactive LLLW tank liquid level trends as a function of time.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Analysis and numerical simulation of a laboratory analog of radiatively induced cloud-top entrainment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations using the One-Dimensional-Turbulence model are compared to water-tank measurements [B. J. Sayler and R. E. Breidenthal, J. Geophys. Res. 103 (D8), 8827 (1998)] emulating convection and entrainment in stratiform clouds driven by cloud-top cooling. Measured dependences of the entrainment rate on Richardson number, molecular transport coefficients, and other experimental parameters are reproduced. Additional parameter variations suggest more complicated dependences of the entrainment rate than previously anticipated. A simple algebraic model indicates the ways in which laboratory and cloud entrainment behaviors might be similar and different.

Kerstein, Alan R.; Sayler, Bentley J. (Black Hills State University); Wunsch, Scott Edward (Johns Hopkins University); Schmidt, Heiko (Tech. University Cottbus); Nedelec, Renaud (Ecole Centrale Marseille)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Groundwater quality sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of energy and managed by martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, February 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a progress report for the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of February 1992. The progress and activities in six categories were described in the report. The categories are reactor, tritium, separations, environmental, waste management, and general. Each category described numerous and varied activities. Some examples of these activities described are such things as radiation monitoring, maintenance, modifications, and remedial action.

Ferrell, J.M. [comp.; Ice, L.W. [ed.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

234

NIST: Physical Measurement Laboratory - Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fellowships: SURFing the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... Optical, Radiation, and Chemical Physics. ... involves PML's Quantum Physics Division. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

235

Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Apparatus and method for OSL-based, remote radiation monitoring and spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compact, OSL-based devices for long-term, unattended radiation detection and spectroscopy are provided. In addition, a method for extracting spectroscopic information from these devices is taught. The devices can comprise OSL pixels and at least one radiation filter surrounding at least a portion of the OSL pixels. The filter can modulate an incident radiation flux. The devices can further comprise a light source and a detector, both proximally located to the OSL pixels, as well as a power source and a wireless communication device, each operably connected to the light source and the detector. Power consumption of the device ranges from ultra-low to zero. The OSL pixels can retain data regarding incident radiation events as trapped charges. The data can be extracted wirelessly or manually. The method for extracting spectroscopic data comprises optically stimulating the exposed OSL pixels, detecting a readout luminescence, and reconstructing an incident-energy spectrum from the luminescence.

Smith, Leon Eric (Richland, WA); Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA); Bowyer, Theodore W. (Oakton, VA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

237

Apparatus And Method For Osl-Based, Remote Radiation Monitoring And Spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compact, OSL-based devices for long-term, unattended radiation detection and spectroscopy are provided. In addition, a method for extracting spectroscopic information from these devices is taught. The devices can comprise OSL pixels and at least one radiation filter surrounding at least a portion of the OSL pixels. The filter can modulate an incident radiation flux. The devices can further comprise a light source and a detector, both proximally located to the OSL pixels, as well as a power source and a wireless communication device, each operably connected to the light source and the detector. Power consumption of the device ranges from ultra-low to zero. The OSL pixels can retain data regarding incident radiation events as trapped charges. The data can be extracted wirelessly or manually. The method for extracting spectroscopic data comprises optically stimulating the exposed OSL pixels, detecting a readout luminescence, and reconstructing an incident-energy spectrum from the luminescence.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA); Smith, Leon Eric (Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

I United States Env~ronmental Monitoring EPA-600.4-83-032 Env~ronmental Protect~on Systems Laboratory DOE 'DPt'0539-048  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United States Env~ronmental Monitoring United States Env~ronmental Monitoring EPA-600.4-83-032 Env~ronmental Protect~on Systems Laboratory DOE 'DPt'0539-048 Agency P 0 Box 15027 J u l y 1983 Las Vegas NV 891 14-5027 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report Radation monitoring around *bi/ United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982 prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank EPA-600/4-83- 032 DOE/DP/00539-048 J u l y 1983 OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT Radi a t i o n moni t o r i ng around U n i t e d States n u c l e a r t e s t areas, calendar y e a r 1982 compiled by S. C. Black, R. F. Grossman, A. A. Mullen, G. D. P o t t e r and D. D. Smith, and Nuclear R a d i a t i o n Assessment D i v i s i o n prepared f o r t h e U.S. Department o f Energy under Interagency Agreement

239

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Instrumentation and monitoring of a full-scale shaft seal installed at atomic energy of canada limited's underground research laboratory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Atomic Energy of Canada Limiteds Underground Research Laboratory was built to allow study of concepts for the long-term disposal of Canadas used nuclear fuel in (more)

Holowick, Blake

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Tracking Accuracy of a Real-Time Fiducial Tracking System for Patient Positioning and Monitoring in Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In radiation therapy there is a need to accurately know the location of the target in real time. A novel radioactive tracking technology has been developed to answer this need. The technology consists of a radioactive implanted fiducial marker designed to minimize migration and a linac mounted tracking device. This study measured the static and dynamic accuracy of the new tracking technology in a clinical radiation therapy environment. Methods and Materials: The tracking device was installed on the linac gantry. The radioactive marker was located in a tissue equivalent phantom. Marker location was measured simultaneously by the radioactive tracking system and by a Microscribe G2 coordinate measuring machine (certified spatial accuracy of 0.38 mm). Localization consistency throughout a volume and absolute accuracy in the Fixed coordinate system were measured at multiple gantry angles over volumes of at least 10 cm in diameter centered at isocenter. Dynamic accuracy was measured with the marker located inside a breathing phantom. Results: The mean consistency for the static source was 0.58 mm throughout the tested region at all measured gantry angles. The mean absolute position error in the Fixed coordinate system for all gantry angles was 0.97 mm. The mean real-time tracking error for the dynamic source within the breathing phantom was less than 1 mm. Conclusions: This novel radioactive tracking technology has the potential to be useful in accurate target localization and real-time monitoring for radiation therapy.

Shchory, Tal [Navotek Medical, Ltd., Yokneam (Israel); Schifter, Dan; Lichtman, Rinat [Tel Aviv Medical Center (Israel); Neustadter, David, E-mail: david.n@navotek.co [Navotek Medical, Ltd., Yokneam (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center (Israel)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Lead, Uranium, and Nickel Compound Data from the XAFS Library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is intended to be a reference library of XAFS spectra for various lead, uranium, and nickel compounds. Compounds are organized by central atom and all spectra are transmission data. Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy metals and metalloids (biominerals, Fe- and Mn-oxides, biofilms, and organic materials), (c) Reactions at environmental interfaces, including sorption, precipitation and dissolution processes that affect the bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants, and (d) Microbial transformations of metals and anions. SSRL-based MES research utilizes synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), x-ray standing wave (XSW) spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy (PES) because of their unique capabilities to probe structure/composition relationships in complex, non-crystalline, and dilute materials. [copied from http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/mes/index.html

243

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. ... OH. US Air Force Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Wright-Patterson - Base, OH [100548- 0] PA. ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Online Image-based Monitoring of Soft-tissue Displacements for Radiation Therapy of the Prostate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Emerging prolonged, hypofractionated radiotherapy regimens rely on high-dose conformality to minimize toxicity and thus can benefit from image guidance systems that continuously monitor target position during beam delivery. To address this need we previously developed, as a potential add-on device for existing linear accelerators, a novel telerobotic ultrasound system capable of real-time, soft-tissue imaging. Expanding on this capability, the aim of this work was to develop and characterize an image-based technique for real-time detection of prostate displacements. Methods and Materials: Image processing techniques were implemented on spatially localized ultrasound images to generate two parameters representing prostate displacements in real time. In a phantom and five volunteers, soft-tissue targets were continuously imaged with a customized robotic manipulator while recording the two tissue displacement parameters (TDPs). Variations of the TDPs in the absence of tissue displacements were evaluated, as was the sensitivity of the TDPs to prostate translations and rotations. Robustness of the approach to probe force was also investigated. Results: With 95% confidence, the proposed method detected in vivo prostate displacements before they exceeded 2.3, 2.5, and 2.8 mm in anteroposterior, superoinferior, and mediolateral directions. Prostate pitch was detected before exceeding 4.7 Degree-Sign at 95% confidence. Total system time lag averaged 173 ms, mostly limited by ultrasound acquisition rate. False positives (FPs) (FP) in the absence of displacements did not exceed 1.5 FP events per 10 min of continuous in vivo imaging time. Conclusions: The feasibility of using telerobotic ultrasound for real-time, soft-tissue-based monitoring of target displacements was confirmed in vivo. Such monitoring has the potential to detect small clinically relevant intrafractional variations of the prostate position during beam delivery.

Schlosser, Jeffrey [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States) [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Salisbury, Kenneth [Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States) [Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Hristov, Dimitre, E-mail: dhristov@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

CRADA with Teledyne Electronic Technologies and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-096): The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system. Final letter report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the ``Exposure-to- Risk`` monitoring system in an actual occupational environment. The system is a unique combination of existing hardware with proprietary software to create an integrated means of assessing occupational exposures to volatile organic compounds. One component of this system utilizes a portable mass spectrometer developed by Teledyne Electronic Technologies. Integration of the system was accomplished under Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding. Commercialization of the system will take place following demonstration in an actual occupational environment, and will include, in part, Teledyne Electronic Technologies. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system will benefit DOE by overcoming present-day limitations in worker health protection monitoring. There are numerous sites within the` DOE complex where many different hazardous chemicals are used on a routine basis. These chemicals range from paint stripers and cleaning solvents to chemical warfare agents, each having its own degree of potential adverse health risk to a worker. Thus, a real concern for DOE is to ensure that a worker is properly monitored to assess any adverse health risk from exposure to potentially hazardous chemicals. With current industrial hygiene technologies, this is an arduous task. The Exposure-to-Risk monitoring system integrates a patented breath-inlet device connecting a subject`s exhaled breath directly with a field-portable mass spectrometer with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to estimate the target tissue dose following a chemical exposure. Estimation of the adverse health risk prediction follows from the exposure/dose calculation based on currently accepted methodologies. This new system can determine, in the field, the possible adverse health risks on a daily basis to an individual worker.

Thrall, K.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fading in CaF/sub 2/(Tm/Dy) TL phosphors used in environmental radiation monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermoluminescence dosimetry technique is currently used for occupational dosimetry and monitoring of supervised areas in the medical and industrial use of ionizing radiation. Recently, the problems about the potential effects of low dose levels, as those due to natural radiation or in the proximity of nuclear facilities, has produced a continuing interest in the study of thermoluminescent dosemeters for the measurement of environmental exposure. Undoubtedly, TLDs offer a number of advantages over other devices available for these purposes: they are small, relatively inexpensive, stable integrating detectors, which can be used in large number, placed everywhere, and assembled in a variety of arrangements. The aim of this paper is to report the fading observed for two different kind of calcium fluoride submitted to different climate conditions over storage time. CaF/sub 2/ (Dy/Tm) have been chosen because of their high sensitivity which makes them very useful in environmental dosimetry. On the other hand, the lower limit of the absorbed dose for CaF/sub 2/ is about 10/sup -6/Gy while for LiF is about 5x10/sup -5/Gy. Because the environmental absorbed dose in Italy is about 7x10/sup -5/Gy/month it is evident the usefulness of CaF/sub 2/ with respect to LiF.

Bacci, C.; Draghi, V.; Furetta, C.; Rispoli, B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EXPERIENCE MONITORING FOR LOW LEVEL NEUTRON RADIATION AT THE H-CANYON AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy contractors are required to monitor external occupational radiation exposure of an individual likely to receive an effective dose equivalent to the whole body of 0.1 rem (0.001sievert) or more in a year. For a working year of 2000 hours, this translates to a dose rate of 0.05 mrem/hr (0.5 {micro}Sv/hr). This can be a challenging requirement for neutron exposure because traditional surveys with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters are difficult to conduct, particularly at low dose rates. A modified survey method was used at the Savannah River Site to find low dose rates in excess of 0.05 mrem/hr. An unshielded He{sup 3} detector was used to find elevated gross slow neutron counts. Areas with high count rates on the unshielded He{sup 3} detector were further investigated with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters and thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters were placed in the area of interest. An office area was investigated with this method. The data initially suggested that whole body neutron dose rates to office workers could be occurring at levels significantly higher than 0.1 rem (0.001sievert). The final evaluation, however, showed that the office workers were exposed to less than 0.1 rem/yr (0.001sievert/yr) of neutron radiation.

HOGUE, MARK

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

For the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) A method of generating electrical current from light Photovoltaic Cell A cell that generates an electrical current when illuminated by light­ also called a solar cell Photovoltaic Module A group of photovoltaic cells connected together Resistance An electrical component that resists current flow turning

Oregon, University of

252

DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program - Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program DOELAP Regulatory Basis 10 CFR 835.402, Individual Monitoring, as amended DOELAP Program Administration DOE-STD 1111-98, DOE Laboratory...

253

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

New technologies for item monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

Abbott, J.A. [EG & G Energy Measurements, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Waddoups, I.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

257

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ionizing Radiation Division of the Physics Laboratory supports the ... meaningful, and compatible measurements of ionizing radiations (x rays ...

258

NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE LABORATORY SELF-AUDIT CHECKLIST Office of Environmental Health and Safety Title: Radiation Safety Self-Audit Checklist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE LABORATORY SELF-AUDIT CHECKLIST Office of Environmental Health and Safety Title for Handling Packages Containing Nuclear Substances" posters posted. Storage area signed, included 24 hour contact information Nuclear Substance Permit and all attachments posted (eg. Conditions ­ general, special

Beaumont, Christopher

259

Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

Ajemian, R.C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Proceedings of the First International Symposium on the Biological Interpretation of Dose from Accelerator-Produced Radiation, Held at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley, California, March 13--16, 1967  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the meeting was to provide a companion meeting to the ''First Symposium on Accelerator Radiation Dosimetry and Experience'' which was held November 3-5, 1965, at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This first symposium was limited in scope to an intensified discussion of dosimetry techniques. The biology which is associated with high energy radiation was specifically excluded, since it was the original plan to hold a second symposium devoted entirely to biology. Thus the present Symposium was a sequel to the first and they were inseparable in their objectives. Since those attending the BNL Symposium were almost entirely health physicists with a background in physical science and actively engaged in the solution of radiation protection problems at high energy accelerators, it was felt that it would be necessary to begin the BID Symposium with a general review session on radiation biology, in order to provide a biological background for the proper understanding of the later sessions. This first session was arranged to give the health physicist a meaningful transition from fundamental radiobiological considerations to current new research activities in high energy biology. In our opinion, and also based on the comments of several of those attending these objectives were quite well attained. The talks by Bond, Robertson, Brustad, Wolff, and Patt were quite exhaustive as an introduction to the several areas of specialization in radiobiology. The overall purpose of the meeting was of course to inform the health physicists about the state of knowledge in advanced biological research as it might apply to their problems. It has often been said that it takes a long time for laboratory findings to be applied in practical situations, but this is certainly not true in radiobiology. Through this conference and others like it, the most recent understanding of high energy radiobiology is available to the practicing health physicist and is probably used fairly effectively. In addition, much of this material applies equally well to reactor and space radiation problems, and some of the participants were from these areas as well.

Wallace, R. (ed.)

1967-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

263

Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment & Supplies Equipment & Supplies John Bargar, SSRL Scientist Equipment is available to serve disciplines from biology to material science. All laboratories contain the following standard laboratory equipment: pH meters with standard buffers, analytical balances, microcentrifuges, vortex mixers, ultrasonic cleaning baths, magnetic stirrers, hot plates, and glassware. Most laboratories offer ice machines and cold rooms. Specialty storage areas for samples include a -80 freezer, argon and nitrogen glove boxes, radiation contamination areas, inert atmosphere chambers, and cold rooms. For specific information please see: Equipment Inventory Checkout Equipment & Supplies To view equipment inventory by laboratory, refer to the following pages: Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Inventory

264

RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL AT KNOLLS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

One of Its Monograph Series The Industrial Atom.'' Disposal of radioactive wastes from KAPL is considered with respect to the three physical categories of waste--solid, liquid, and airborne---and the three environmental recipients ---ground, surface water, and atmosphere. Solid waste-handling includes monitoring radiation levels, segregation, collection, processing, packaging, storing if necessary, and shipping to a remote burial ground at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Liquid waste is collected by controlled drain systems, monitored for radioactivity content, and stored if necessary or released to the Mohawk River. Exhaust air is cleaned before released and con tinuously monitored. rhe environment is monitored to assure safe and proper disposal of wastes. The cost of operations and the depreciation of facilities incurred by KAPL for disposing of radioactive contaminated waste is less than 0.7% per year of the tofal cost of the Laboratory. (auth)

Manieri, D.A.; Truran, W.H.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Merril Eisenbud, January 26, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Merril Eisenbud was interviewed on January 26, 1995 by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Following a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Eisenbud relates his remembrances as the AEC`s first industrial hygienist, the setting up of AEC`s Health and Safety Laboratory, monitoring radioactive fallout, and use or exposure of humans to radiation.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Independent Oversight Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - May 2010 Independent Oversight Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - May 2010 May 2010 Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho...

267

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

1985 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program is designed to determine that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1985 are summarized in this report. Detailed data are not included in the main body of the report, but are tabulated and presented in Appendix D. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratoy; concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory; and the 1984 strontium-90 data which was not available for inclusion in the 1984 Environmental Monitoring Report. In 1985, the results of the surveillance program demonstraed that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Weapon and Force Protection Center...

270

NIST: Physical Measurement Laboratory - William R. Ott  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... space experiments, from the first Skylab measurements of solar radiation to ... the Physics Laboratory's development of measurement methods and ...

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

271

National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is one of 17 National Laboratories in the United States and is one of the two located in New Mexico. The Laboratory has...

272

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

273

DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program administration  

SciTech Connect

This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP), organizational responsibilities, and the accreditation process. DOELAP evaluates and accredits personnel dosimetry and radiobioassay programs used for worker monitoring and protection at DOE and DOE contractor sites and facilities as required in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The purpose of this technical standard is to establish procedures for administering DOELAP and acquiring accreditation.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M until decommissioning activities begin.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stacking Samples: General Considerations Stacking Samples: General Considerations Stacking Samples: The Paradoxical Effect of Shielding Samples on a Table (or The Advantages of Foam Sample Holders) Stacking Samples: General Considerations When planning beam time requests, an important consideration is how many samples can be exposed at the same time. The large beam spot with uniform illumination (about 20 x 20 cm2) allows for as many as four T75 flasks or six T25 flasks to be contained within the beam center. Under certain conditions it is possible to stack multiple samples along the beam direction. The effect of stacked samples can either increase the dose or decrease the dose depending on the heavy ion being used, the beam energy, and other considerations. The details of dose delivery need careful consideration before sample stacking is utilized.

276

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flipper: Flipper: When exposing cell samples to the NSRL Beam, some users keep the cell samples in sample containers (such as the T25 or T75 bottles) with only a small amount of medium to keep the cells healthy. Putting the cells into the beam usually involves orienting the containers so that the cells are no longer covered by the medium. This can cause the cells to dry out or become damaged, degrading the results, so it became important to keep the time-out-of-medium to a minimum. To that end, users make use of the remote sample flipper which allows the containers to remain horizontal until immediately before the beam is delivered. The experimenter can then "flip" the samples up into the beam for the exposure, and then flip them back down as soon as the exposure is complete. This means that the cells will be out of their medium for typically less than a minute instead of the ~4-5 minutes required for the complete access. Pictures of the sample flipper in horizontal and vertical position illustrate the procedure. Controls for the sample flipper are a simple manual switch that the experimenters operate, with the help of NSRL operators.

277

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uniformity and Profile: Uniformity and Profile: Although the beam profile at NSRL can be tuned to a variety of shapes and sizes, the most common profile used in radiobiology experiments is a "square" beam with a uniform center of approximately 20 x 20 cm2. A picture of this beam profile captured with the Digital Beam Imager is shown below. Figure 1: Beam Profile observed using the Digital Beam Imager showing four T75 flasks with a small amount of medium in the bottom of each flask. False color indicates the beam intensity is uniform across the 20 x 20 cm2 exposure area. Note that the foam used to hold the flasks is not registered by any change in intensity, and is essentially invisible in this image. Hot spots at the periphery are a by-product of octupole focusing magnets.

278

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spill Structure: Spill Structure: Under normal operating conditions, the Booster uses a 3.8 second cycle, with the extracted beam delivered during a 0.3-0.4 second interval. This is called the "Slow Extracted Beam", or SEB. Schematically, this would look like figure 1. Figure 1: Spill schematic of the beam delivery to NSRL. In reality, the beam delivered to NSRL is not uniformly distributed in time, but has time structure on many different levels. An ion chamber in the beam shows the slow time structure of extracted beam. Figure 2 shows the beam intensity as a function of time during normal slow extraction. Figure 2: Ion Chamber measurement of the time structure of the NSRL Beam Intensity during standard slow extracted beam. Vertical axis is proportional to beam intensity, horizontal axis is in milliseconds.

279

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Species and Energies Used Previously at NSRL Ion Species and Energies Used Previously at NSRL Ion Species [1] Energy [2] (MeV/nucleon) Maximum Intensity [3] (ions per spill) LET [4] (keV/m) H-1 50 - 2500 6.4 x 1011 1.26 - 0.21 He-4 50 - 1000 0.88 x 1010 5.01 - 0.89 C-12 65 - 1000 1.2 x 1010 36.79 - 8.01 O-16 50 - 1000 0.4 x 1010 80.50 - 14.24 Ne-20 70 - 1000 0.10 x 1010 96.42 - 22.25 Si-28 93 - 1000 0.3 x 1010 151 - 44 Cl-35 500 - 1000 0.2 x 1010 80 - 64 Ar-40 350 0.02 x 1010 105.8 Ti-48 150 - 1000 0.08 x 1010 265 - 108 Fe-56 50 - 1000 0.2 x 1010 832 - 150 Kr-84 383 403 Xe-131 228 1204 Ta-181 292 - 313 1827 - 1896 Au-197 76 - 165 1 x 107 4828 - 3066 Sequential Field (Fe/H) 1000 Various 150/0.2 Solar Particle Event [5] 30 - 180 Various 1.26 - 0.21 [1] Different isotopes of some ions are also available. With the

280

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Holder Layout: Sample Holder Layout: NSRL maintains a wide variety of sample holders ready for users to mount standard sample containers in. This includes holders for four T75 flasks, six T25 flasks, and several arrangements for small test tubes. If you cannot make use of the existing sample holders, then NSRL staff can fabricate a custom sample holder to fit your needs. Most sample holders are carved out of low-mass polyethylene foam shown in the photographs below using a hot-wire cutter. This foam produces minimal scatter and fragmentation of the incoming heavy ion beam. It is sized for easy fitting into the sample flipper. If the sample holder you need is not already available, we can usually make up a custom holder for you on short notice. Figure 1 shows the Hot Wire Foam Cutter.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illumination Levels in NASA Support Rooms in Medical and NSRL Facilities Illumination Levels in NASA Support Rooms in Medical and NSRL Facilities A. Readings in Medical Room Macro-Environment Micro-Environment Macro-Environment Micro-Environment (in Foot Candles) (in Foot Candles) (in Lux) (in Lux) 9-274 21.5 3.5 231 37.7 11-143 58 3.8 624 40.9 11-211 58 4.2 624 45.2 11-212 35 4.5 377 48.4 11-213 44 4.3 474 46.3 11-214 36.5 5.5 393 59.2 11-221 51 6.2 549 66.7 11-231 24.5 2.9 264 31.2 11-232 37.5 3.5 404 37.7 11-244 35.5 2.8 382 30.1 B. Readings in NSRL Room Macro-Environment Micro-Environment Macro-Environment Micro-Environment (in Foot Candles) (in Foot Candles) (in Lux) (in Lux) A-1 57 24 613 258 A-2 81.5 32 877 344 A-3 51 11.8 549 127 Top of Page Last Modified: July 15, 2008

282

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

293 MeVn) Oxygen (284, 600 MeVn) Silicon (208, 305, 381, 403, 598, 834, 977 MeVn) Chlorine (501, 531 MeVn) Titanium (978 MeVn) Iron (89, 114, 151, 263, 306, 585, 598, 963...

283

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which is regenerated in the Dosimetry control room with a V-102 module. It is a TTL level, and it needs a level shift for VME. Any simple NIM-level pulse can be used to...

284

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the NSRL Target Room Abstract This note reports the results of measurements for the thermal neutron and charged particle flux at locations throughout the NSRL target room when...

285

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

esteemed member of the international scientific community as a teacher and researcher in electrical engineering, applied physics and materials science. Bill spent the past 40...

286

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bragg curves: At the beginning of each day, the kinetic energy of the NSRL Beam is measured using the technique known as the Bragg Peak. For some low-LET beams, the amount of...

287

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SunShot Initiative awardee posters describing the different technologies within the four subprograms of the DOE Solar Program (Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar Power, Soft Costs, and Systems Integration).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the room containing the Cs-137 gamma source. The source is lowered into the ground to shield users from it when not in use, and raised using a hand pulley system to give the...

289

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Development Award honors a pioneer at the forefront of accomplishments in NMR, EPR, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy who was dedicated to the pursuit of the...

290

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incubator: Incubator: NSRL has available an incubator that has been modified to allow samples requiring strict environmental controls to be placed in the beam for long exposures. The incubator provides a temperature and humidity controlled enclosure, and has thin kapton windows to allow passage of the beam with minimal interaction. Ports in the incubator allow for calibration inside the incubator. The incubator itself can be mounted on the rails in the target room so that users can prepare their samples in the cell preparation rooms, and then roll the incubator into the target room for easy placement in the beam. The dimensions of the inside of the incubator are [need numbers here]. Several photographs below show the incubator mounted on the beamline rails in the NSRL Target Room ready to take beam.

291

DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet  

SciTech Connect

This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

ORAU

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

292

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94  

SciTech Connect

This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L. [eds.] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

ASHRAE's Living Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE recently remodeled its headquarters building in Atlanta with the intention of making the building a LEED Gold building. As part of that renovation the building was enhanced with additional sensors and monitoring equipment to allow it to serve as a Living Laboratory for use by members and the general public to study the detailed energy use and performance of buildings. This article provides an overview of the Living Laboratory and its capabilities.

Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Brambley, Michael R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

By Asher Tubman for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the distance of a light from the panel and the brightness of the small light bulbs, there was a variety light bulb in the lamp affected the current put out by the cell. These kits really provided a great, current or voltage in the circuit. Some examples included looking at how the wavelength of light

Oregon, University of

297

By Raghu Parthasarathy for the Meyer for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the light source. One can also use a try of hot water to warm the cell. Be careful to keep the water away to cool the cells. Use a tray of hot water or sunlight to warm the cells. You'll need to compare/20/2011 PVActivity7:Outputvs.PVCellTemperature© To investigate PV cell output dependence on temperature

Oregon, University of

298

Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental monitoring stations, canyons Stations supporting Santa...

299

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Ames Laboratory Former...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ames Laboratory Former Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Workers at the Ames National Laboratory Covered DOE Site:...

300

Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Laboratory Reagents  

SciTech Connect

Replaced by WMH-310, Section 4.17. This document outlined the basic methodology for preparing laboratory reagents used in the 222-S Standards Laboratory. Included were general guidelines for drying, weighing, transferring, dissolving, and diluting techniques common when preparing laboratory reagents and standards. Appendix A contained some of the reagents prepared by the laboratory.

CARLSON, D.D.

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

Historical Photographs: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory [Small Image] 1. A whole body counter (circa 1964) at the Berkeley Donner Laboratory. Such counters were used in human radiation tracer studies and for measuring AEC worker radiation exposure. (294Kbytes) [Small Image] 2. Early treatment for Parkinson's disease at the Berkeley Donner Laboratory (134Kbytes) [Small Image] 3. Donner Laboratory carbon-14 metabolic study apparatus (146Kbytes) [Small Image] 4. Respiration analysis using injected radioactive tracers at Donner Laboratory (circa 1968). (217Kbytes) [Small Image] 5. A patient under a positron camera. The camera was a diagnostic tool developed at Donner Laboratory, Berkeley, to photograph radioactive tracer concentrations. Unlike a whole body scanner, this device photographs a single, specific area of the body. (146Kbytes)

303

Replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this project is to replace the existing Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory (HPIL) with a new facility to provide a safe environment for maintaining and calibrating radiation detection instruments used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The existing HPIL facility provides portable health physics monitoring instrumentation and direct reading dosimetry procurement, maintenance and calibration of radiation detection instruments, and research and development support-services to the INEL and others. However, the existing facility was not originally designed for laboratory activities and does not provide an adequate, safe environment for calibration activities. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508). Based on the environmental analysis in the attached EA, the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and 40 CFR Parts 1508.18 and 1508.27. The selected action (the proposed alternative) is composed of the following elements, each described or evaluated in the attached EA on the pages referenced. The proposed action is expected to begin in 1997 and will be completed within three years: design and construction of a new facility at the Central Facility Area of the INEL; operation of the facility, including instrument receipt, inspections and repairs, precision testing and calibration, and storage and issuance. The selected action will result in no significant environmental impacts.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.llnl.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2010: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses System International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary.

Jones, H E; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S J; Coty, J D; Dibley, V R; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; MacQueen, D H; Wegrecki, A M; Armstrong, D H; Brigdon, S L; Heidecker, K R; Hollister, R K; Khan, H N; Lee, G S; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L E; Salvo, V J; Schwartz, W W; Terusaki, S H; Wilson, K R; Woods, J M; Yimbo, P O; Gallegos, G M; Terrill, A A; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Blake, R G; Woollett, J S; Kumamoto, G

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-36, 108-F Biological Laboratory, and for the 116-F-15, 108-F Radiation Crib, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-003  

SciTech Connect

The 116-F-15 waste site is the former location of the 108-F Radiation Crib that was located in the first floor of the 108-F Biological Laboratory. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

306

Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

307

Idaho National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Idaho National Laboratory Review Reports 2013 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project of the Idaho Site, April 2013 Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 Review Reports 2012 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Idaho Site, November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project, November 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Idaho National Laboratory, July 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review, June 2012

308

Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

format. HEADLINES... 2012 Annual Report 2012 draft data available through the REMS query tool 2012 Submittal Notification REMS Reporting Guide, containing the required format...

309

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology E. Andrews Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environment University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado E. Andrews, J. A. Ogren, P. J. Sheridan, and J. M. Harris Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado P. K. Quinn Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Seattle, Washington Abstract The uncertainties associated with assumptions of generic aerosol properties in radiative transfer codes are unknown, which means that these uncertainties are frequently invoked when models and

310

Mitsuru Uesaka Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory ,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plasma cathode by 12 TW, 50 fs laser and its application to radiation chemistry Mitsuru Uesaka Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory , University of Tokyo June 26, 2004...

311

Other Locales W. Clements Los Alamos National Laboratory Los...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory .Site Scientist: Tom Ackerman, The Pennsylvania State University .Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment (PROBE) Coordinator: Dave Renne, National Renewable...

312

Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Management Commitment B. Training C. Monitoring of Individual Radiation Exposures D. Program Reviews 1 of Radiation A. Research Applications 1. Non-Human User 2. Animal Use 3. Human Use B. Clinical Applications C Materials Chapter VI: Occupational Exposure to Radiation and Personnel Monitoring and Bioassay Program #12;A

Grishok, Alla

313

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-96-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-96-07 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-96-07 December 18, 1996 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to the University of California related to an Unauthorized Facility Modification at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (EA-96-07) This refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the circumstances surrounding two issues involving modifications associated with or affecting [a facility] at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These two issues included an unauthorized modification of [radiation] monitors in the TSFF and a sump modification in the basement of [a building], which contains some [facility] safety features. On July 16-17, 1996, the DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation conducted an on-site

315

BNL Center for Radiation Chemistry Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department | Photo- and Radiation Chemistry | Group Members Welcome to the Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Radiation Chemistry Research LEAF Logo CRCR Logo Graphic Pop-up...

316

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

317

Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field" office has allowed WIPP to offer its mine operations infrastructure and space in the underground to researchers requiring a deep underground setting with dry conditions and very low levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Please contact Roger Nelson, chief scientist of the Department of

318

The Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)...

319

Radiation protection at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

High Precision Long-Term Monitoring of Radiatively Active and Related Trace Gases at Surface Sites and from Aircraft in the Southern Hemisphere Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Routine high precision measurements of atmospheric CO2, CH4, CO, H2, N2O, and CO2 stable isotopes are conducted by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia). Of particular relevance to global monitoring of ...

R. J. Francey; L. P. Steele; R. L. Langenfelds; B. C. Pak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa January 18, 2006 - 10:47am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is placing a new, portable atmospheric laboratory with sophisticated instruments and data systems in Niger, Africa, to gain a better understanding of the potential impacts of Saharan dust on global climate. Dust from Africa's Sahara desert-the largest source of dust on the planet-reaches halfway around the globe. Carried by winds and clouds, the dust travels through West African, Mediterranean, and European skies, and across the Atlantic into North America. Unfortunately, Africa is one of the most under-sampled climate regimes in the world, leaving scientists to

322

Using Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an Three Dimensional Cell Culture and Tissue Architecture to Monitor an Adaptive Response in Mammary Epithelial Cells Mina Bissell Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Exposure of tissues to ionizing radiation results in targeted effect on cells as well as non-targeted effects on tissues. Although, targeted effects such as the DNA damage response have been studied extensively, non-targeted effects leading to modification in tissue architecture and tumor progression have been less studied and are not well understood. The mammary gland is a tissue that has been shown to be susceptible to tumor formation and cancer progression following exposure to ionizing radiation. In conjunction with the laboratories of Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff and Catherine Park we showed previously that in the presence of TGF-β,

323

Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring based on presentations from a condition monitoring workshop organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2009 and on additional references.

Sheng, S; Veers, P.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Renewable Energy Laboratory  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

success of any solar energy success of any solar energy installation depends largely on the site's solar resource. Therefore, detailed knowledge of an area's solar resource is critical to installation planning and siting. To help with these efforts, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) have updated the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). Since 1992, the database has provided solar planners and designers, building architects and engineers, renewable energy analysts, and countless others with extensive solar radiation information. The 1991-2005 NSRDB contains hourly solar radiation (including global, direct, and diffuse) and meteorological data for 1,454 stations. This update builds on the 1961-1990 NSRDB, which contains

325

DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update Presented at the 32nd Annual International Dosimetry and Records Symposium, June 3-6, Scottsdale, AZ  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slide-show presents the 2012 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure, compares those data with last year and the last five years, and clarifies reporting data.

none,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site May 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety...

328

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters B. Sparn, L. Earle, D. Christensen, J. Maguire, and E. Wilson National Renewable Energy Laboratory C.E. Hancock Mountain Energy...

329

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

330

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

An automatic conveyor-type laundry monitoring system, whlch monitors laboratory coats and coveralls for both alpha and beta-gamma contamination, was developed and installed at the Hanford Laundry Facility to improve monitoring efficiency and control. The instrument employs eight alpha and seven beta-gamma scintillation large-area detectors, a garment conveyor, solid state circuitry, and appropriate signaling devices. Oarments are manually placed on hangers which are then placed onto an automatic loading mechanism. Each garment is conveyed past detectors where it is monitored for beta-gamma and alpha contamination. Contaminated garments are rejected and dropped into a special contniner if spot contamination exceeds 1000 disintegrations per minute (dis/min) of alpha or 5000 dis/min of mixed fission products. The garments which are not rejected pass through for folding and distribution. The system, which requires only one attendant, can effectively monitor 500 garments per standard shift. System operation was fully successful for ten months. (auth)

Rankin, M.O.; Spear, W.G.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

F F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE ' i A N D OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1978 Nuclear Radiation Assessment D i v i s i o n Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 October 1979 This work performed under a Memorandum o f Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539 for t h e U.S. DEPARTMENT O F ENERGY OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE A N D OTHER TEST AREAS USED F O R UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1978 by R. F. Grossman Nuclear Radi a t i o n Assessment D i v i s i o n Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 This work performed under a Memorandum o f Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539

332

Betsy Sutherland - Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Betsy M. Sutherland (Deceased) Brookhaven National Laboratory From: 07/01/1977 - 10/7/2009 Passed Areas of Interest Betsy Sutherland heads the Biology Department's User Support Team for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL. The NSRL project, carried out jointly with BNL's Collider-Accelerator and Medical Departments, provides the only source in the US of high energy heavy charged particles, used in assessing the effects of space radiation on biological systems, materials and instruments. The Biology Department NSRL support team consists of eight scientific, professional and administrative staffers. They provide scientific and facilities support to over 200 User groups from all over the world, and collaborate in development and maintenance of the NSRL. Betsy Sutherland also chairs the BNL Scientific Advisory Committee for Radiation Research, advisory to NASA and to the BNL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear and Particle Physics on research at the NSRL.

333

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

334

Containment & Surveillance Systems Laboratory (CSSL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Containment & Surveillance Systems Laboratory Containment & Surveillance Systems Laboratory May 30, 2013 The Containment and Surveillance Systems Laboratory is an arm of the highly acclaimed ORNL Safeguards Technology Integration Center. This lab is used to evaluate and develop custom technology, as well as integrate, mock up, and stage equipment for evaluation deployments for a variety of containment and surveillance applications. Activities in this lab focus on integrating technology for sealing, monitoring, and tracking nuclear material in a variety of environments. It is well suited for developing, integrating, and deploying active and passive tamper-indicating devices and enclosures, unattended and remote monitoring systems, and wired and wireless attribute-monitoring systems. Applications

335

Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - October 2012 October 2012 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Lead Planning Activities [HIAR LLNL-2012-10-23] The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Independent Oversight activity was to maintain site operational awareness of key nuclear safety performance areas, monitor ongoing site oversight and planning activities for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) nuclear facilities, and identify and initiate coordination of future HSS oversight activities at the site, including planned HSS targeted reviews planned for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013. Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -

336

Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety requirements. Refer to the SSRL or LCLS Safety Offices for further guidance. Upon Arrival Upon Arrival Once you arrive you must complete training and access forms before accessing the Sample Preparation Laboratories (SPL). All Sample Prep Lab doors are locked with access key codes. Once your SPL

337

2010 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Gnome-Coach (Gnome) Site in New Mexico (Figure 1). Groundwater monitoring consisted of collecting hydraulic head data and groundwater samples from the wells on site. Historically, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had conducted these annual activities under the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP). LM took over the sampling and data collection activities in 2008 but continues to use the EPA Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, to analyze the water samples. This report summarizes groundwater monitoring and site investigation activities that were conducted at the site during calendar year 2010.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

2010 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Gnome-Coach (Gnome) Site in New Mexico. Groundwater monitoring consisted of collecting hydraulic head data and groundwater samples from the wells on site. Historically, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had conducted these annual activities under the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP). LM took over the sampling and data collection activities in 2008 but continues to use the EPA Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, to analyze the water samples. This report summarizes groundwater monitoring and site investigation activities that were conducted at the site during calendar year 2010.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Energy Management and Control Systems and their Use for Performance Monitoring in the LoanSTAR Program, Technical Report prepared for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Energy and Environment Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis program, pre- and post-retrofit energy consumption for each building is monitored using conventional field data acquisition systems. This report summarizes continuing investigations into the usefulness of existing Energy Management and Control Systems to perform this same data collection task.

Heinemeier, K. E.; Akbari, H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1996 Site Environmental Report Vol. I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sampling of Airborne Radionuclides Ambient Air MonitoringRadiation Airborne Radionuclides Berkeley Lab Site4- 1. Most Significant Radionuclides Used at L B N L During

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microelectronics at Sandia Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The microelectronics capability at Sandia Laboratories spans the complete range of component activity from initial design to final assembly into subsystems and systems. Highly reliable, radiation-tolerant devices and integrated circuits can be designed, fabricated, and incorporated into printed circuit assemblies or into thick- or thin-film hybrid microcircuits. Sandia has an experienced staff, exceptional facilities and aggressive on-going programs in all these areas. The authors can marshall a broad range of skills and capabilities to attack and solve problems in design, fabrication, assembly, or production. Key facilities, programs, and capabilities in the Sandia microelectronics effort are discussed in more detail in this booklet.

Spencer, W.J.; Gregory, B.L.; Franzak, E.G.; Hood, J.A.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 4, 2013 Lecture series begins yearlong commemoration of 70th anniversary LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, Jan. 3, 2013-In commemoration of its 70th anniversary, Los Alamos National Laboratory kicks off a yearlong lecture series on Wednesday, Jan. 9, at 5:30 p.m. with a presentation about homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau at the Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos. - 2 - The inaugural lecture is based on a book by local writers Dorothy Hoard, Judy Machen and Ellen McGehee about the area's settlement between 1887 and 1942. On hikes across the Pajarito Plateau, Hoard envisioned the Los Alamos area before modern roads and bridges made transportation much easier. The trails she walked

343

Annual report shows potential INL radiation dose well below safe regulatory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual report shows potential INL radiation dose well below safe Annual report shows potential INL radiation dose well below safe regulatory limits Annual report shows potential INL radiation dose well below safe regulatory limits August 9, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Tim Jackson, DOE-Idaho Operations Office 208-526-8484 The U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office reported this month that radiation from the site falls well below limits established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The annual report's conclusions are supported by direct environmental monitoring data routinely taken during the year, and show that activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site are protective of human health and the environment. Data shows that the INL site potential radiation dose is less than 1% of

344

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Department of Energy National Laboratories  

Idaho National Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Department of Energy National Laboratories. Laboratory or Facility Website ...

346

Monitoring and Mitigation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion FINAL REPORT DOE FEW 49297 YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Monitoring and Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion Submitted to: Nancy C. Comstock U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office By: YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 The submitted manuscript has been created by the University of Chicago as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on

347

Historical Photographs: Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Image 4. An Oak Ridge National Laboratory employee having a blood test to detect radiation exposure (circa 1950). (169Kbytes) Small Image 5. Aerial view of the Oak Ridge...

348

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, March 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation March 1963. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1963-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, April 1964  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, applied mathematics, programming operation, and radiation protection are discussed.

1964-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-96-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-07 6-07 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory - EA-96-07 December 18, 1996 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to the University of California related to an Unauthorized Facility Modification at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (EA-96-07) This refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the circumstances surrounding two issues involving modifications associated with or affecting [a facility] at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These two issues included an unauthorized modification of [radiation] monitors in the TSFF and a sump modification in the basement of [a building], which contains some [facility] safety features. On July 16-17, 1996, the DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation conducted an on-site

351

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Thermally Conductive Graphite Foam - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Thermoelectric devices Radiators EMI shielding Patent ... Materials Science UT-Battelle, LLC Oak Ridge National Laboratory Office Phone: 865.576.9682

353

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

354

1987 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental monitoring program is to determine whether: facility operations, waste treatment, and control systems functioned as designed to contain environmental pollutants; and the applicable environmental standards and effluents control requirements were met. This annual report for calendar year 1987 follows the recommendations given by the Department of Energy (DOE) but has been broadened to meet site-specific environmental monitoring needs. This program includes the sampling and analysis for radioactivity, water quality indices, metals, and organic compounds. 32 refs., 17 figs., 70 tabs.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Raciometry J. W. Griffin, Technical Monitor ARM Instrument Development Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. W. Griffin, Technical Monitor J. W. Griffin, Technical Monitor ARM Instrument Development Program Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, Washington the end of FY93 are noted. Fiscal Year 1993 is the third and final year of the initial (3-year) funding cycle for ARM- funded instrument development projects. That is, IDP principal investigators will be required to submit a new proposal in order to be considered for funding beyond September 30, 1993. As for the first funding cycle, continuation proposals will be peer-reviewed and funding awarded on a competitive basis. Goals of the Instrument Development Program The primary goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Instrument Development Program (lOP) is to develop fieldable atmospheric sensing systems which 1) provide a needed atmospheric observation/

356

RADIATION PROTECTION AND DECONTAMINATION IN ISOTOPE LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect

An accident trolley is described that contains everything needed if an accident with radioactive materials occurs. Instructions for decontamination are given and measures to be taken after mishaps with open isotopes are recommended. Cleansing and treatment of laundry that is contaminated with radioactive materials are discussed and an active laundry is described. (auth)

Schanze, U.O.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Ris National Laboratory DTU Radiation Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the environment are global fallout from nuclear weapons testing and discharges from reprocessing plants for spent nuclear fuel. The global fallout has resulted in a concentration of 99 Tc in the North Atlantic of about 5

358

Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at BNL and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1993. To evaluate the effect of BNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, ground water and vegetation were made at the BNL site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances, of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possible related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) to the Peconic River exceeded on five occasions, three for residual chlorine and one each for iron and ammonia nitrogen. The chlorine exceedances were related to a malfunctioning hypochlorite dosing pump and ceased when the pump was repaired. While the iron and ammonia-nitrogen could be the result of disturbances to the sand filter beds during maintenance. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of ground water and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) under the Inter Agency Agreement (IAG). Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment, and that the environmental impacts at BNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public or to the environment. This report meets the requirements of DOE Orders 5484. 1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Virtual Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

Piet Hut

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Status and outlook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of NREL's Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project during fiscal year 1991. Currently, the primary focus of the SRRAP is to produce a 1961--1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base, providing hourly values of global horizontal, diffuse, and direct normal solar radiation at approximately 250 sites around the United States. Because these solar radiation quantities have been measured intermittently at only about 50 of these sites, models were developed and applied to the majority of the stations to provide estimates of these parameters. Although approximately 93% of the data base consists of modeled data this represents a significant improvement over the SOLMET/ERSATZ 1952--1975 data base. The magnitude and importance of this activity are such that the majority of SRRAP human and financial in many other activities, which are reported here. These include the continued maintenance of a solar radiation monitoring network in the southeast United States at six Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU's), the transfer of solar radiation resource assessment technology through a variety of activities, participation in international programs, and the maintenance and operation of NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. 17 refs.

Renne, D.; Riordan, C.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1994.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory's operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possibly related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant to the Peconic River exceeded. on ten occasions, one each for fecal coliform and 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand (avg.) and eight for ammonia nitrogen. The ammonia and Biochemical Oxygen Demand exceedances were attributed to the cold winter and the routine cultivation of the sand filter beds which resulted in the hydraulic overloading of the filter beds and the possible destruction of nitrifying bacteria. The on-set of warm weather and increased aeration of the filter beds via cultivation helped to alleviate this condition. The discharge of fecal coliform may also be linked to this occurrence, in that the increase in fecal coliform coincided with the increased cultivation of the sand filter beds. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of groundwater and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement. Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment, and that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public or to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

NAIDU,J.R.; ROYCE,B.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

1986 environmental monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1986 are summarized in this report. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates and halogens; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the organics, radioactivity, and water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; and the concentrations of organics, radioactivity, and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory. In 1986, the results of the surveillance program demonstrated that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Laboratory Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

LANL: Ion Beam Materials Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to materi- als research through the use of ion beams. Current major research areas include surface characterization through ion beam analysis techniques, surface modification and materials synthesis through ion implantation technology, and radiation damage stud- ies in gases, liquids, and solids. The laboratory's core is a 3.2 MV tandem ion accelerator and a 200 kV ion implanter together with several beam lines. Attached to each beam line is a series of experimental stations that support various research programs. The operation of IBML and its interactions with users are organized around core facilities and experimental stations. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities as well as supports

365

Behavioral Perspectives on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratoryof Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory wind speed and solar radiation. Normalization also

Ingle, Aaron

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ergonomics problems and solutions in biotechnology laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The multi-functional successful ergonomics program currently implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be presented with special emphasis on recent findings in the Biotechnology laboratory environment. In addition to a discussion of more traditional computer-related repetitive stress injuries and associated statistics, the presentation will cover identification of ergonomic problems in laboratory functions such as pipetting, radiation shielding, and microscope work. Techniques to alleviate symptoms and prevent future injuries will be presented.

Coward, T.W.; Stengel, J.W.; Fellingham-Gilbert, P.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Overview - WIPP Effluent Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program Compliance with Title 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart A Environmental Standards for Management and Storage L. Frank-Supka, D. J. Harward, S. C. Casey May 2005 INTRODUCTION This document provides an overview of the effluent air monitoring activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program is designed to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radiation protection standards for management and storage of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste and transuranic (TRU)-waste at the WIPP. The standards issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Subpart A. The standards require the

368

Robot Reworked to Analyze Radiation in Japan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

TALON robots from the Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory are helping the Government of Japan monitor radioactivity levels at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

369

Strategic Laboratory Leadership Program | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Erik Gottschalk (F); Devin Hodge (A); Jeff Chamberlain (A); Brad Ullrick (A); Bill Rainey (J). Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Strategic Laboratory Leadership...

370

Evaluation of internal contamination levels after a radiological dispersal device incident using portal monitors  

SciTech Connect

Following a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) incident, it may be necessary to evaluate the internal contamination levels of a large number of potentially affected individuals to determine if immediate medical follow-up is necessary. Since the current laboratory capacity to screen for internal contamination is limited, rapid field screening methods can be useful in prioritizing individuals. This study evaluated the suitability of a radiation portal monitor for such screening. A model of the portal monitor was created for use with models of six anthropomorphic phantoms in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5 (MCNP) X-5 Monte Carlo Team (MCNP A General Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5. LA-CP-03-0245. Vol. 2. Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2004.). The count rates of the portal monitor were simulated for inhalation and ingestion of likely radionuclides from an RDD for each of the phantoms. The time-dependant organ concentrations of the radionuclides were determined using Dose and Risk Calculation Software Eckerman, Leggett, Cristy, Nelson, Ryman, Sjoreen and Ward (Dose and Risk Calculation Software Ver. 8.4. ORNL/TM-2001/190. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2006.). Portal monitor count rates corresponding to a committed effective dose E(50) of 10 mSv are reported.

Palmer, R.C. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ansari, A. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Manger, Ryan P [ORNL; Freibert, E.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reflred - Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power bumps due to weather conditions affecting the electrical supply), so use with caution. Be careful when mixing monitor and time data in the ...

372

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directorate Directorate Subject: Controlled Access to the VUV Ring Number: LS-ESH-0013 Revision: D Effective: 5/17/2012 Page 1 of 8 M. Buckley B. Chmiel E. Zitvogel Prepared By: Approved By: Approved By: *Approval signatures on file with master copy. Revision Log 1.0 PURPOSE Controlled access to the NSLS VUV ring is necessary for maintaining personnel safety and stability to the accelerator beam and equipment. 2.0 SCOPE The NSLS VUV ring area is a controlled area that has several personnel hazards. These hazards primarily consist of radiation and electrical. All persons entering the VUV ring need to be aware of these hazards prior to entry. Personnel requiring access to the VUV Ring during non-maintenance periods must follow the Controlled Access requirements within this procedure. Controlled access is the monitoring and

373

Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

1982 environmental monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1982 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. 30 references, 9 figures, 18 tables.

Day, L.E.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

1981 environmental monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1981 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium and iodine concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in sediments and biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. 28 references, 9 figures, 20 tables.

Naidu, J.R.; Olmer, L.L. (eds.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Highlights in Radiation Research - A Timeline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

survivors. 1947 Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) created to study the biological effects of radiation on Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Brookhaven National Laboratory...

377

Recommendations for Improving Consistency in the Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Therefore, it is critical to have a ... Brookhaven National Laboratory, Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File ... Physics The Radiation Safety Journal, Vol. ...

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

378

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uwe Arp. Dr. Uwe Arp is a physicist in the Ultraviolet Radiation Group of the Sensor Science Division in the Physical Measurement Laboratory. ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCES AT LAWRENCE BERKELEYNATIONAL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford are allocated beam time (shifts) to perform a variety of research. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHT SOURCES AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY AND STANFORD LINEAR...

380

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multidimensional Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multidimensional Analysis of Human Epithelial Cell Response to Low Dose Radiation Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA. (Jointly funded by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A. (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

ORGANISATIONAL CHART 2009 Laboratory: Research, Development and Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORGANISATIONAL CHART 2009 Laboratory: Research, Development and Services *reports to the Director. Sampani Radiation Protection of the Center G. Pantelias* HEALTH PHYSICS & ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH LABORATORY. Kainourgiakis RADIATION PROTECTION & HEALTH PHYSICS OF THE REACTOR F. Tzika SUPPORT TO GAEC I. A. Papazoglou

383

ORR Deer Hunt Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose for the initiation of deer hunts on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was deer population control to reduce collisions with vehicles and maintain a healthy herd and habitat. As of 1997, thirteen annual deer hunts have been conducted on the ORR. The deer hunt monitoring program (DHMP) has two components -- a field screening monitoring program and a confirmatory laboratory analysis program of both retained and randomly selected released deer samples.

Scofield, P.A.; Teasley, N.A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing use of post combustion NOx control systems such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) has heightened the need for reliable continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. This report describes laboratory tests conducted to assess the ability of the Norsk Elektro Optik's (NEO) LaserGas II tunable diode laser monitor to measure ammonia under highly controlled conditions over a typical range of process conditions.

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY is....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scattering June 12-18, 2010 - Argonne National Laboratory June 19-26, 2010 - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory...

386

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima...

387

State Laboratory Contacts IL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information IL. Idaho. ... State of Iowa Metrology Laboratory Ellsworth Community College 1100 College Ave. ...

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

388

Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2012 October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - October 2012 October 2012 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Lead Planning Activities [HIAR LLNL-2012-10-23] The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Independent Oversight activity was to maintain site operational awareness of key nuclear safety performance areas, monitor ongoing site oversight and planning activities for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) nuclear facilities, and identify and initiate coordination of future HSS oversight activities at the site, including planned HSS targeted reviews planned for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013. Independent Activity Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - October 2012 More Documents & Publications

390

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil Reservoirs and Aquifers Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About This Technology

391

Deploying Server-side File System Monitoring at NERSC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Shalf, and H. Wasserman. Nersc-6 workload analysis andDeploying Server-side File System Monitoring at NERSC AndrewUselton NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Uselton, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

Yin, Y.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Technology Deployment Centers Advanced Power Sources Laboratory Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Trisonic Wind Tunnel Hypersonic Wind Tunnel High Altitude Chamber Explosive Components Facility Ion Beam Laboratory Materials Science and Engineering Center Pulsed Power and Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Weapon and Force Protection Center Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility Research Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) The ESEF complex contains several independent laboratories for experiments and advanced diagnostics in the fields of thermodynamics, heat transfer,

395

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University of Massachusetts, Amherst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Wind monitoring equipment, and wind roses are included in APPENDIX B. July 24, 2009 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 9, if the wind speed July 24, 2009 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 13 University of Massachusetts

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

396

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) prepared this ''Environmental Monitoring Plan'' (EMP) to meet the requirements in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' (DOE 1991) and applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 (see WSS B93 and B94 in Appendix B). ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' is followed as a best management practice; under Work Smart Standards, LLNL complies with portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 as shown in Appendix B. This document is a revision of the May 1999 EMP (Tate et al. 1999) and is current as of March 1, 2002. LLNL is one of the nation's premier applied-science national security laboratories. Its primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable, and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. LLNL's programs in advanced technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science apply LLNL's unique capabilities and enhance the competencies needed for this national security mission. LLNL's mission also involves working with industrial and academic partners to increase national competitiveness and improve science education. LLNL's mission is dynamic and has changed over the years to meet new national needs. In keeping with the Laboratory's mission, the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) have top priority. LLNL's policy is to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage. The environment, safety, and health are to be priority considerations in the planning and execution of all work activities at the Laboratory (LLNL 2001). Furthermore, it is the policy of LLNL to comply with applicable ES&H laws, regulations, and requirements. Under Contract 48, Appendix F, the Laboratory commits to minimizing its waste streams and to avoiding adverse impacts to the environment from its operations (UC/DOE 2001).

Althouse, P E; Biermann, A; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Clark, L M; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Gouveia, F J; Grayson, A; Harrach, R J; Hoppes, W G; Jones, H; Mathews, S; Merrigan, J R; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, B; Williams, R

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

1983 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1983 are summarized. The amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data includes external radiation levels; radioactivity of air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. The amounts of radioactivity released in airborne and liquid effluents from laboratory facilities to the environment were within allowable standards as stipulated in DOE Order 5480.1. Other pollutants, such as metals, organic compounds, etc., in the effluents released from the Laboratory were well below federal, state and local standards as applied to site specific conditions. 34 references, 9 figures, 17 tables.

Day, L.E.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

399

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Photo of two researchers standing on a platform near a solar tracker at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory gathers solar radiation and meteorological data on South Table Mountain. NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar radiation components since 1981. Since then, it has expanded its expertise to include integrated metrology, optics, electronics, and data acquisition capabilities. In addition, the SRRL provides facilities for outdoor performance testing of new research instrumentation and energy conversion devices such as photovoltaic modules. The SRRL is located on NREL's South Table Mountain site in Golden, Colorado, where it has excellent solar access because of its unrestricted

400

Correlation between predicted and observed levels of airborne tritium at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory site boundary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, a computer code based on the Gaussian plume model is used to estimate radiation doses from routine or accidental release of airborne radioactive material. Routine releases of tritium have been used as a test of the overall uncertainty associated with these estimates. The ration of concentration to release rate at distances from the two principal release points to each of six site boundary sampling locations has been calcuated using local meteorological data. The concentration of airborne tritiated water vapor is continuously measured at the six sampling stations as part of the Laboratory's environmental monitoring program. Comparison of predicted with observed annual tritiated water concentrations in 1978 showed an average ratio of 2.6 with a range of from 0.97 to 5.8.

Lindeken, C.L.; Silver, W.J.; Toy, A.J.; White, J.H.

1980-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Batch Jobs Completed Parallel Jobs Usage Reports Hopper Benchmark Monitoring Edison Benchmark Monitoring Carver Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems...

402

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

403

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory This facility provides assistance to users from federal laboratories, U.S. industry and academia in the following areas: (1) testing and characterizing radiation detector materials and devices; and (2) determining the relationships between the physical properties of the detector materials and the device response. Systems of interest include scintillators and room-temperature semiconductors for detection arrays of x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons. User Support The facility's special capabilities include: low-noise environment to test solid-state detectors for x-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron response mass spectrometry to quantify contaminants in detectors and detector-grade materials photoluminescence and thermally-stimulated current to measure

404

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

Durham, Michael D. (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard J. (Aurora, CO); Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO); Sagan, Francis J. (Lakewood, CO); Marmaro, Roger W. (Littleton, CO); Wilson, Kevin G. (Littleton, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

J. R. Forbes S. L. Ansley M. Leecaster

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Database activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-disciplinary lab in the DOE system of research laboratories. Database activities are correspondingly diverse within the restrictions imposed by the dominant relational database paradigm. The authors discuss related activities and tools used in RHIC and in the other major projects at BNL. The others are the Protein Data Bank being maintained by the Chemistry department, and a Geographical Information System (GIS)--a Superfund sponsored environmental monitoring project under development in the Office of Environmental Restoration.

Trahern, C.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Prompt radiation detectors to monitor target conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lessons learned by basic scientists in the study of experimental nuclear physics can often go unnoticed by cyclotron operator's intent on meeting a demanding schedule of tracer production. Prompt neutrons and gammas are the signature that the desired reaction is occurring, providing a robust measure of the expected yield.

Barnhart, T. E.; Engle, J. W.; Valdovinos, H. F.; Severin, G. W.; Nickles, R. J. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Hevesy Laboratory, Danish Technical University, Riso (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

409

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

410

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

411

By Stanley Micklavzina, Asher Tubman, and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) of light on the PV cell output current. To answer the question of why fluorescent bulbs are more voltmeter 2 Lamps Light Filters 60W Incandescent Bulb Compact Fluorescent Bulb (13W Comparable light of wavelength (color) of light on the output of a solar cell. Using an incandescent light bulb, the current

Oregon, University of

412

By Stanley Micklavzina, Asher Tubman, and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the cell is the same for all measurements. Also to keep the lamps from getting too hot, we suggest and voltage output of photovoltaic cells when connected to various loads. This activity includes an optional extra investigation related to power curves, an engineering characteristic of the PV cell

Oregon, University of

413

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

414

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE A N D OTHER TEST AREAS USED F O R UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1979 Nuclear R a d i a t i o n Assessment D i v i s i o n Environmental M o n i t o r i n g Systems Laboratory U. S. Envi ronmental P r o t e c t i o n Agency Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 A p r i l 1980 T h i s work performed under Memorandum o f ' Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539 f o r t h e U.S. Department o f Energy This page intentionally left blank OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1979 G. D. P o t t e r , R. F. Grossman, W. A. B l i s s , D. J . Tlom6 Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Envi ronmental P

415

BATT Fabrication Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientist working in battery lab BATT Fabrication Laboratory The BATT Fab Lab (Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Fabrication Laboratory) conducts battery cell...

416

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY - Energy  

Laboratory Plan FY 2010-2019 June2,2010 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Accelerating Innovation Alane for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery June 2012

417

ARM - Laboratory Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive Data Management Facility Data Quality Program Engineering Support External Data Center Laboratory Partners Nine DOE national laboratories share the responsibility of...

418

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located...

419

EML: Environmental Measurements Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security and Privacy Notices History of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory The Manhattan ProjectAtomic Energy Commission (1942 1975) Our Laboratory traces its roots...

420

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratorys (LLNL) primary mission is research and development in support of national security. As a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

New Brunswick Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports New Brunswick Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the New Brunswick Laboratory, July 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the New...

422

Enforcement Letter, Sandia National Laboratories - February 27, 1998 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratories - February 27, National Laboratories - February 27, 1998 Enforcement Letter, Sandia National Laboratories - February 27, 1998 February 27, 1998 Issued to Sandia Corporation related to Work Control Deficiencies associated with operating Radiation Generating Devices at Sandia National Laboratories. This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE's) evaluation of Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL's) report of potential noncompliances with the requirements of 10 CFR 835 (Occupational Radiation Protection). The noncompliances, which involved operational and work control deficiencies related to the use of three radiation generating devices (RGDs), were identified on October 1, 1997, and reported to DOE on October 21, 1997, in the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). Enforcement Letter, Sandia National Laboratories - February 27, 1998

423

DATA RECOVERY EFFORTS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, AND SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

Abstract was already submitted. Could not find the previous number. Would be fine with attaching/update of old number. Abstract Below: Modern nuclear facilities will have significant process monitoring capability for their operators. These systems will also be used for domestic safeguards applications, which has led to research over new diversion-detection algorithms. Curiously missing from these efforts are verification and validation data sets. A tri-laboratory project to locate the existing data sets and recover their data has yielded three major potential sources of data. The first is recovery of the process monitoring data of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, which now has a distributable package for algorithm developers. The second data set is extensive sampling and process data from Savannah River National Laboratorys F- and H-canyon sites. Finally, high fidelity data from the start-up tests at the Barnwell Reprocessing Facility is in recovery. This paper details the data sets and compares their relative attributes.

Richard Metcalf; Saleem Salaymeh; Michael Ehinger

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Monitor 1979  

SciTech Connect

The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF).

Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

427

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

RADIOISOTOPE AND RADIATION APPLICATIONS. Quarterly Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was given of the possible hazards to consumers from radioisotope residues in consumer products. A laboratory demonstration was given of the use of Mn/sup 54/ to facilitate removal of manganese from process feed water. lt was found in the hazards evaluation that the "worst case" of radiation exposure from residual radioisotopes in steel gives a radiation exposure somewhat less than the maximum allowable dose levels for occupational exposure. Initial study indicates that for actual cases, the radiation exposures to be expected from radioisotope residues in steel products would ordinarily be small compared to natural background. An exception to this generalization might be found when a longer lived isotope like Mn/sup 54/ was present. Preliminary results of the laboratory demonstnation of using Mn/sup 54/ to monitor the removal of manganese from feed water indicated that the method may allow a considerable improvement in accuracy of process control. The study of the mechanism of formation of free radicals in polymeric materials was continued. Emphasis was placed on examination of the effect of structural factors on the efficiency of free-radical site formation in acrylate polymers. The investigation was extended to include an examination of the effect on free-radical formation of the constituents on the carbon atom located alpha to the ester group. Polymethylacrylate, polymethylmethacrylate, and polymethyl- alpha -chloroacrylate were used in this study. Measurement of the volatile products from the irradiation of the polymethyl- alpha -chloroacrylate was completed. The data substantiated earlier findings which indicated that the point of attack in free-radical formation occurs on the ester side chain. (auth)

Sunderman, D.N., ed.

1961-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Five-Laboratory  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Refer to LA-UR-05-3594 Refer to LA-UR-05-3594 Agenda for the Five-Laboratory Conference on Computational Mathematics 19-23 June 2005 Повестка дня конференции пяти лабораторий по вычислительной математике 19-23 июня 2005 г. Agenda for the 5LC 2005 Refer to LA-UR-05-3594 1 Monday 20 June 2005 08:15 J. Kamm, LANL Welcome to the Five-Lab Conference Session 1A Deterministic Transport Chairman: N. Gentile, LLNL 08:30 R. Shagaliev, VNIIEF VNIIEF Methods for Numerical Simulations of Multi- dimensional Problems of Radiation and Particle Transport 09:30 Deterministic Transport: Labs' Perspectives J. Chang H. Scott S. Pautz A. Shestakov LANL LLNL SNL VNIITF 10:30 Break Session 1B Deterministic Transport

431

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seed Money Fund Overview The Seed Money Fund of the ORNL LDRD program supports innovative ideas that have the potential of enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical...

432

About Berkeley Lab: Laboratory Director, Associate Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009, replacing former laboratory Director Steve Chu, who was sworn in as U.S. Energy Secretary. Before becoming interim director, Alivisatos was the deputy director of Berkeley...

433

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Laboratory Directed Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encouraging creative research to innovate solutions for our nation's greatest challenges. National laboratories have been entrusted with the role of serving as incubators for...

434

Annual Report Alfvn Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is plasma research using small-scale laboratory experiments, where low-density plasmas are generated

Haviland, David

435

National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

436

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory Management (Quality) Systems. NISTIR 7028 Type Evaluation Quality Manual Template. This NISTIR has been ...

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

437

State Laboratory Contacts AC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State Laboratory Contact Information AC. Alabama. Mailing Address, ... PDF. Alaska. Mailing Address, Contact Information. Alaska ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. ... A 600 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer. Analytical Data Compilation Reference Materials. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Los Alamos National Laboratory solar program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for passive solar tasks performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1982. Results on test cell experiments for the 1981-1982 winter are reported, as are Class A performance monitoring, passive cooling, both residential and commercial economic cooling assessments, and thermal effects of distributed mass in passive buildings.

Reisfeld, S.K.; Neeper, D.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

442

Department of Energy National Laboratories  

Office of Science laboratory National Nuclear Security Administration laboratory Office of Fossil Energy laboratory Office of Energy Efficiency and ...

443

National Laboratories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Name Address City, State; Ames Laboratory: Ames Laboratory: Ames, IA: Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 S. Cass Avenue: Argonne, IL: Brookhaven ...

444

NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Status and outlook. FY 1991 annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of NREL`s Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project during fiscal year 1991. Currently, the primary focus of the SRRAP is to produce a 1961--1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base, providing hourly values of global horizontal, diffuse, and direct normal solar radiation at approximately 250 sites around the United States. Because these solar radiation quantities have been measured intermittently at only about 50 of these sites, models were developed and applied to the majority of the stations to provide estimates of these parameters. Although approximately 93% of the data base consists of modeled data this represents a significant improvement over the SOLMET/ERSATZ 1952--1975 data base. The magnitude and importance of this activity are such that the majority of SRRAP human and financial in many other activities, which are reported here. These include the continued maintenance of a solar radiation monitoring network in the southeast United States at six Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU`s), the transfer of solar radiation resource assessment technology through a variety of activities, participation in international programs, and the maintenance and operation of NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. 17 refs.

Renne, D.; Riordan, C.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Record Series Descriptions: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley Laboratory LBL Business Manager/Research and Development Administrative Files Life Sciences Division Administrative Files of Baird Whaley,Administrator Administrative Files of Administrative Assistants to the Directors of the Biology and Medicine Division and Donner Laboratory Donner Clinic and Donner Pavilion Patients/Subjects Index Card Master File Donner Laboratory Clinical Logs and Notebooks Donner Laboratory R&D Project Case Files High-Altitude/Decompression Studies Patient Medical Records Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Historical Files Statistical Summaries Thomas Budinger Files Patricia Durbin Files John W. Gofman Files Joseph G. Hamilton Records Joseph G. Hamilton Materials: Edwin M. McMillan Papers Hardin Jones Files John Hundale Lawrence Files

446

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

1984 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program has been designed to ensure that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. A listing, as required by DOE Order 5484.1 of BNL facilities, of environmental agencies and permits is provided in the Environmental Program Information Section 3.0, Table B. Since the aquifer underlying Long Island has been designated a ''sole source'' aquifer, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Drinking Water Standards have been used in the assessment of ground water data. However, the limits prescribed in the regulations are not directly applicable to the monitoring well data since (1) the standards apply to a community water supply system, i.e., one serving more than 25 individuals, and (2) the standards represent an annual average concentration. Since the monitoring wells are not components of the Laboratory's water supply system, the EPA drinking water standards are employed as reference criteria to which the surveillance well data is compared. The standards also serve as guidance levels for any appropriate remedial action. 36 refs., 9 figs., 40 tabs.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

L. V. Street

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

National Laboratories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Name Address City, State; Ames Laboratory: Ames Laboratory: Ames, IA: Argonne National Laboratory: 9700 S. Cass Avenue: Argonne, IL: Brookhaven National Laboratory

452

COMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Data 2.1 Performance and Utilization Data 2.2 Failure Data 5 5 6 3. Preliminary Analysis 3.1 Load Profiles 3.2 Failure Profiles 7 3.3 Analysis and Discussion of Preliminary Results Some ReliabilityCOMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY I I STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES DEPARTMENT OF ElECTRiCAl

Stanford University

453

Safe Handling Of Nuclear Substances Undergraduate Laboratories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safe Handling Of Nuclear Substances Undergraduate Laboratories There are three main hazards associated with working with unsealed sources of nuclear substances. These are: 1. Skin contamination and/or deposition of the nuclear substance in the body 2. Spread of contamination 3. External radiation In teaching

Beaumont, Christopher

454

Independent Oversight Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - May  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - May 2010 Independent Oversight Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - May 2010 May 2010 Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an assessment of environmental monitoring and surveillance at the DOE Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site during March through April 2010. The assessment was performed at the request of the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID). HSS reports directly to the Secretary of Energy, and this INL sitewide environmental monitoring program assessment was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations with

455

Chemical Kinetics and Properties from the Radiation Chemistry Data Center (RCDC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

RCDC was established at the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory in 1965, as part of the National Standard Reference Data System.

456

UNARM (Unattended and Remote Monitoring) an overview of Los Alamos activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonproliferation and nuclear safeguards activities by agencies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) require the means to ensure that only authorized activities occur during periods when an inspector is not present. Unattended monitoring systems are designed to minimize human resource requirements both during inspection visits and in the period between visits via installation of a primarily automated monitoring system. This system is capable of meeting or exceeding human inspection reliability and consistency. Implementation of an unattended monitoring system should also provide less expensive continuous coverage of the inspected facility over the lifetime of the inspections when compared to the cost of inspector time and travel. Furthermore, a transition to remote monitoring systems, while decreasing cost and time burdens to an inspection agency, simultaneously provides for a unified safeguards approach that is not facility dependent. A second generation of unattended and remote monitoring (UNARM) systems has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. These systems allow for more efficient use of inspection resources and more rigorous coverage of nuclear facilities. These systems incorporate several types of sensors that are capable of low-level intercommunication to enable a comprehensive and multi-layered coverage of facility operations. These systems utilize data from radiation, motion, video, and balanced magnetic switch sensors, for example. When information from all sensors is combined together, an unambiguous reconstruction of facility operations can be assembled.

Alvar, K. R. (Kenneth R.); Belian, A. B. (Anthony B.); Bosler, G. E.; Browne, M. C. (Michael C.); Buck, S. E. (Steven E.); Butler, G. W. (Gilbert W.); Dreicer, Jared S.; Halbig, J. K. (James K.); Hsue, S.-T. (Sin-Tao); Klosterbuer, S. F. (Shirley F.); Parker, R. F. (Robert F.); Pelowitz, D. G. (David G.); Stewart, M. (Maco); Sprinkle, J. K. (James K.); Veal, K. D. (Kevin D.); West, J. D. (James D.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

NIST Ionizing Radiat. Div. - 2004: Strategic Focus 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... electronic radiation monitors ("pagers"), isotope identifier instruments ... 2003, DOE recognized this program as one of the top-ten programs relevant to ...

458

The Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) maintains a wide variety...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-ACO4-94AL85000. The Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) and Sandia's Radiation Protection organization maintain a variety...

459

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation August 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1961-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation October 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation monitoring laboratory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation September 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1961-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May, 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation process, reactor technology employee relations, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, and radiation protection are discussed.

1962-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation August 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

464

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation July 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation March 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1961  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation October 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1961-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1962  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation June 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1962-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

468

Reflectivity of the Atmosphere-Inhomogeneous Surfaces System: Laboratory Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two- and three-dimensional solutions of the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. Such solutions have not been verified experimentally. A laboratory experiment simulates such a system to test ...

Yuri Mekler; Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469