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1

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility was established in 1990 to improve...

2

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of...

3

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1-June 30, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

4

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

5

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

6

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

8

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

9

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

10

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

11

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

LR Roeder

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility - annual report 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-ARM-0403 ER-ARM-0403 3 Table of Contents Program Overview ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 The Role of Clouds in Climate .................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Science Goals ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Climate Research Facility: Successful Science Program Leads to User Facility Designation ................................ 5 Sites Around the World Enable Real Observations .......................................................................................................

13

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

14

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

16

DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

17

DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

18

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)  

SciTech Connect

The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

Can Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part II: Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large number of perturbed-physics simulations of version 3 of the Hadley Centre Atmosphere Model (HadAM3) were compared with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) estimates of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and reflected ...

Simon F. B. Tett; Daniel J. Rowlands; Michael J. Mineter; Coralia Cartis

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

22

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

24

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

26

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

27

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

29

Climate Science Measurements Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... comparability and for international acceptance of measurement results and insights concerning climatic ... Global Warming and Greenhouse Gases ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

Sisterson, D. L.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Radiative Forcing of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Can Top Of Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part 1: Tuning.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbed physics configurations of the HadAM3 atmospheric model driven with observed sea surface temperatures (SST) and sea ice were tuned to outgoing radiation observations using a Gauss-Newton line-search optimisation algorithm to adjust the ...

Simon F. B. Tett; Michael J. Mineter; Coralia Cartis; Daniel J. Rowlands; Ping Liu

33

A Year of Radiation Measurements at the North Slope of Alaska Second Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the second quarter metrics are reported in Evaluation of Simulated Precipitation in CCSM3: Annual Cycle Performance Metrics at Watershed Scales. For ARM, the metrics will produce and make available new continuous time series of radiative fluxes based on one year of observations from Barrow, Alaska, during the International Polar Year and report on comparisons of observations with baseline simulations of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM).

S.A. McFarlane, Y. Shi, C.N. Long

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Validation of aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles from routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy with which vertical profiles of aerosol extinction ?ep(?) can be retrieved from ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) routine measurements was assessed using data from two airborne field campaigns, the ARM Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP, May 2003), and the Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE, September 2005). This assessment pertains to the aerosol at its ambient concentration and thermodynamic state (i.e. ?ep(?) either free of or corrected for sampling artifacts) and includes the following ACRF routine methods: Raman Lidar, Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) and in-situ aerosol profiles (IAP) with a small aircraft. Profiles of aerosol optical depth ?p(???, from which the profiles of ?ep(???are derived through vertical differentiation, were measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-14); these data were used as truth in this evaluation. The ACRF IAP ?ep(550 nm) were lower by 16% (during AIOP) and higher by 10% (during ALIVE) when compared to AATS-14. The ACRF MPL ?ep(523 nm) were higher by 24% (AIOP) and 19%-21% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14 but the correlation improved significantly during ALIVE. In the AIOP a second MPL operated by NASA showed a smaller positive bias (13%) with respect to AATS-14. The ACRF Raman Lidar ?ep(355 nm) were higher by 54% (AIOP) and higher by 6% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14. The large bias in AIOP stemmed from a gradual loss of the sensitivity of the Raman Lidar starting about the end of 2001 going unnoticed until after AIOP. A major refurbishment and upgrade of the instrument and improvements to a data-processing algorithm led to the significant improvement and very small bias in ALIVE. Finally we find that during ALIVE the Raman Lidar water vapor densities ?w are higher by 8% when compared to AATS-14, whereas comparisons between AATS-14 and in-situ measured ?w aboard two different aircraft showed small negative biases (0 to -3%).

Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Ferrare, Richard; Clayton, Marian F.; Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John A.; Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P. B.; Gore, W.; Dominguez, Roseanne

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced Precipitation Study The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile Facility...

36

Surface Radiation Budget and Climate Classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface radiation budget of a region is strongly tied to its climate. An 8-yr climatology of surface radiation budget components for 2.5° regions over the earth is examined in order to learn how the regional climate and surface radiation are ...

G. Louis Smith; Anne C. Wilber; Shashi K. Gupta; Paul W. Stackhouse Jr.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Climate Forcing by Changing Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By how much does changing radiation from the sun influence the earth’s climate, presently and in the recent past, compared with other natural and anthropogenic processes? Current knowledge of the amplitudes and timescales of solar radiative ...

Judith Lean; David Rind

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Measurements and Standards for the Climate Change ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements and Standards for the Climate Change Science Program (+$5 million). ... Shutterstock. Challenge. The climate is changing. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

40

METHOD FOR MEASURING RADIATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring an unknown integrated quantity of radiation with a condenser ionization chamber is described. The chamber is initially charged to a predetermined voltage by a voltage source. The chamber is then removed from the source and exposed to an unknown quantity of radiation for a period of time. The quantity of radiation to which the chamber was exposed is then measured by detecting the magnitude of the pulse of current necessary to recharge the chamber of its initial value through a suitable impedance. The current pulse is amplified and measured directly by a suitable pulse height analyzing system. (AEC)

Roesch, W.C.; McCall, R.C.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

42

Abstract Radiative Cooling in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive radiative cooling of buildings has been an underachieving concept for decades. The few deployments have generally been in dry climates with low solar angles. The greatest need for cooling is in the tropics. The high humidity endemic to many of these regions severely limits the passive cooling available per radiative area. To wrest temperature relief from humid climates, not just nocturnal cooling but solar irradiance, both direct and indirect, must be addressed. This investigation explores the extent to which thermal radiation can be used to cool buildings in the tropics. It concludes that inexpensive materials could be fabricated into roof panels providing passive cooling day and night in tropical locations with an unobstructed view of sky.

Aubrey Jaffer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

44

Antarctic Clouds and Radiation within the NCAR Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate and improve the treatment of clouds and radiation by the climate models of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), simulations by the NCAR Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3), as well as the recently released ...

Keith M. Hines; David H. Bromwich; Philip J. Rasch; Michael J. Iacono

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Contribution of Radiative Feedbacks to Orbitally Driven Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative feedbacks influence Earth's climate response to orbital forcing, amplifying some aspects of the response while damping others. To better understand this relationship, the GFDL Climate Model, version 2.1 (CM2.1), is used to perform ...

Michael P. Erb; Anthony J. Broccoli; Amy C. Clement

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

An Earth Outgoing Longwave Radiation Climate Model. Part II: Radiation with Clouds Included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Earth outgoing longwave radiation (OLWR) climate model was constructed for radiation budget studies. The model consists of the upward radiative transfer parameterization of Thompson and Warren, the cloud cover model of Sherr et al., and a ...

Shi-Keng Yang; G. Louis Smith; Fred L. Bartman

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Two-Dimensional Radiation-Turbulence Climate Model. I: Sensitivity to Cirrus Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the thermodynamic energy balance between radiation and vertical plus horizontal dynamic transports, a two-dimensional radiation-turbulence climate model is developed. This model consists of a broadband solar and IR radiation transfer ...

Szu-Cheng S. Ou; Kuo-Nan Liou

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Constraints on Climate Sensitivity from Radiation Patterns in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimated range of climate sensitivity, the equilibrium warming resulting from a doubling of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, has not decreased substantially in past decades. New statistical methods for estimating the climate ...

Markus Huber; Irina Mahlstein; Martin Wild; John Fasullo; Reto Knutti

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Radiative heating rate The heating rate due to the divergence of long and shortwave radiative flux. Categories Radiometric, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 : Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS

50

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all of the direct solar radiation (that originating from thea suitable site for solar radiation measurements. A requestused to estimate the solar radiation per unit wavelength at

Grether, D.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

52

A Solar Radiation Model for Use in Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar radiation routine has been developed for use in climate studies. It includes the absorption and scattering due to ozone, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide, clouds, and aerosols. Rayleigh scattering is also included. The UV and visible ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

TURAC—A New Instrument Package for Radiation Budget Measurements and Cloud Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric radiation flux measurements and the resulting surface radiation budget are important quantities for greenhouse effect and climate change investigations. Accurate net shortwave and longwave fluxes, in conjunction with numerical ...

C. Ruckstuhl; R. Philipona

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

56

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the generation of monsoons. Because the dust can block incoming solar energy, and because solar energy drives weather and climate, scientists around the world are looking for ways...

57

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Campus-Wide Measures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Campus-Wide Measures Have Greater Potential Pursuing climate neutrality on research campuses fits into the bigger picture of addressing the impacts of climate change and...

58

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

Ackerman, T

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resolved Radiative Transfer Model: MODTRAN……….131 APMEXModerate Imaging Spectroradiometer MODTRAN MODerate spectralprovide by MODTRAN…………………………………………………………………………133 Table 4.2

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Radiation and the Irreversible Thermodynamics of Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attempts to link the theory of irreversible thermodynamics to the study of climate have utilized an entity which has been identified as the entropy production rate. However, this entity does not properly account for irreversibility due to the ...

Christopher Essex

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An Integrated Surface Radiation Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated surface radiation measurement system has been developed to measure the surface radiation exchange flux. The system employs upward- and downward-looking Eppley pyrgeometers and pyranometers to separately measure four components: ...

A. C. Delany; S. R. Semmer

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

63

ICRCCM Phase 2: Verification and calibration of radiation codes in climate models  

SciTech Connect

Following the finding by the InterComparison of Radiation Codes used in Climate Models (ICRCCM) of large differences among fluxes predicted by sophisticated radiation models that could not be sorted out because of the lack of a set of accurate atmospheric spectral radiation data measured simultaneously with the important radiative properties of the atmosphere, our team of scientists proposed to remedy the situation by carrying out a comprehensive program of measurement and analysis called SPECTRE (Spectral Radiance Experiment). SPECTRE will establish an absolute standard against which to compare models, and will aim to remove the hidden variables'' (unknown humidities, aerosols, etc.) which radiation modelers have invoked to excuse disagreements with observation. The data to be collected during SPECTRE will form the test bed for the second phase of ICRCCM, namely verification and calibration of radiation codes used in climate models. This should lead to more accurate radiation models for use in parameterizing climate models, which in turn play a key role in the prediction of trace-gas greenhouse effects.

Ellingson, R.G.; Wiscombe, W.J.; Murcray, D.; Smith, W.; Strauch, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Interactions between Vegetation and Climate: Radiative and Physiological Effects of Doubled Atmospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and physiological effects of doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on climate are investigated using a coupled biosphere–atmosphere model. Five 30-yr climate simulations, designed to assess the radiative and physiological effects ...

L. Bounoua; G. J. Collatz; P. J. Sellers; D. A. Randall; D. A. Dazlich; S. O. Los; J. A. Berry; I. Fung; C. J. Tucker; C. B. Field; T. G. Jensen

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their interactions and coupling with the Earth's surface. BNL is actively...

66

Aerosol Radiative Impact on Spectral Solar Flux at the Surface, Derived from Principal-Plane Sky Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate measurements of the spectral solar flux reaching the surface in cloud-free conditions are required to determine the aerosol radiative impact and to test aerosol models that are used to calculate radiative forcing of climate. Spectral ...

Y. J. Kaufman; D. Tanré; B. N. Holben; S. Mattoo; L. A. Remer; T. F. Eck; J. Vaughan; Bernadette Chatenet

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Method and Apparatus for Measuring Radiation Quantities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a compact dosimeter for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation by the use of solutions which undergo a visible color change upon exposure to a predetermined quantity of radiation.

Roberts, N.O.

1950-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Arm Mobile Facility and Its First International Deployment: Measuring Radiative Flux Divergence in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) was recently developed to enable collection of detailed climate data in locations not currently sampled by ARM's five fixed sites. The AMF includes a comprehensive suite of active ...

Mark A. Miller; Anthony Slingo

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2010, DOESC-ARM-10-029 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

70

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2011, DOESC-ARM-11-022 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

71

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Method for radiation detection and measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength. 9 figures.

Miller, S.D.

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

73

Method for radiation detection and measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the sun, while for pyrheliometry and solar collectionlens and a sun- shade to prevent direct solar radiation fromby the solar disc and a circle 30 from the sun's center.

Hunt, A.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Forward In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change Research Program coordinated by the Committee on Earth Sciences (CES) of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The recent heightened concern about global warming from an enhanced greenhouse effect has prompted the Department to accelerate the research to improve predictions of climate change. The emphasis is on

76

Mission to Planet Earth: Role of Clouds and Radiation in Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of clouds in modifying the earth's radiation balance is well recognized as a key uncertainty in predicting any potential future climate change. This statement is true whether the climate change of interest is caused by changing emissions ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Edwin F. Harrison; Robert D. Cess; Michael D. King; David A. Randall

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Effects of Ocean Biology on the Penetrative Radiation in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of phytoplankton on the seasonal cycle and the mean global climate is investigated in a fully coupled climate model. The control experiment uses a fixed attenuation depth for shortwave radiation, while the attenuation depth in the ...

Patrick Wetzel; Ernst Maier-Reimer; Michael Botzet; Johann Jungclaus; Noel Keenlyside; Mojib Latif

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Climate Collections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional/Global > Climate Collections Regional/Global > Climate Collections Climate Collections Overview Climate encompasses the statistics of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, rainfall, atmospheric particle count, and numerous other meteorological elements in a given region over long periods of time. Climate can be contrasted to weather, which is the present condition of these same elements over periods up to two weeks. The climate collections project includes data sets containing measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and cloud cover and include station measurements as well as gridded mean values. The ORNL DAAC Climate Collections Data archive includes 10 data products from the following categories:

79

Clear Skies A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models-an Update R. G. Ellingson and F. Baer Department of...

80

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM's). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM's under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM's to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Preliminary Analysis of Surface Radiation Measurement Data Quality...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

primary radiation flux measurements at the SGP extended facilities are obtained from the Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS). In this study, we examine the radiation...

82

The Effect of Tropospheric Aerosols on the Earth's Radiation Budget: A Parameterization for Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guided by the results of doubling-adding solutions to the equation of radiative transfer, we develop a simple technique for incorporating in climate models the effect of the background tropospheric aerosol on solar radiation. Because the ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Robert D. Cess; Franz B. Yurevich

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Estimation of Daytime Net Radiation from Shortwave Radiation Measurements and Meteorological Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in surface net radiation Rn control the earth’s climate, the hydrological cycle, and plant photosynthesis. However, Rn is not readily available. This study develops a method to estimate surface daytime Rn from solar shortwave radiation ...

Kaicun Wang; Shunlin Liang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2001.  

SciTech Connect

Our Changing Climate--Is our climate really changing? How do we measure climate change? How can we predict what Earth's climate will be like for generations to come? One focus of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to improve scientific climate models enough to achieve reliable regional prediction of future climate. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the global mean surface temperature has increased by 0.5-1.0 F since the late 19th century. The 20th century's 10 warmest years all occurred in the last 15 years of the century, with 1998 being the warmest year of record. The global mean surface temperature is measured by a network of temperature-sensing instruments distributed around the world, including ships, ocean buoys, and weather stations on land. The data from this network are retrieved and analyzed by various organizations, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the World Meteorological Organization. Worldwide temperature records date back to 1860. To reconstruct Earth's temperature history before 1860, scientists use limited temperature records, along with proxy indicators such as tree rings, pollen records, and analysis of air frozen in ancient ice. The solar energy received from the sun drives Earth's weather and climate. Some of this energy is reflected and filtered by the atmosphere, but most is absorbed by Earth's surface. The absorbed solar radiation warms the surface and is re-radiated as heat energy into the atmosphere. Some atmospheric gases, called greenhouse gases, trap some of the re-emitted heat, keeping the surface temperature regulated and suitable for sustaining life. Although the greenhouse effect is natural, some evidence indicates that human activities are producing increased levels of some greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Scientists believe that the combustion of fossil fuels is responsible for the increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. According to the EPA, the burning of fossil fuels for cars and trucks, the heating of homes and businesses, and the operation of power plants account for approximately 98% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. The increase of greenhouse gases will, theoretically, enhance the greenhouse effect by trapping more of the heat energy emitted by Earth's surface, thus increasing the surface temperatures on a global scale. Scientists expect that the global average surface temperature could rise 1-4.5 F in the next 50 years and as much as 10 F in the next century. Global warming could potentially have harmful effects on human health, water resources, forests, agriculture, wildlife, and coastal areas. A few degrees of warming might lead to more frequent and severe heat waves, worsened air pollution with adverse effects on human respiratory health, and wider spread of tropical disease such as malaria. The world's hydrologic cycle might be affected by an increase in evaporation and, thus, in precipitation. An increase in evaporation will increase atmospheric water vapor, a significant natural greenhouse gas. The increase in water vapor might further enhance the global warming caused by the greenhouse effect. This is known as a positive feedback. The increase in water vapor could also change the amount of clouds present in the atmosphere, which could reduce temperatures in a negative feedback. Many interrelated factors affect the global climate and are responsible for climate change. Predicting the outcome of the interactions among the many factors is not easy, but it must be addressed. The ARM Program is taking a lead in this effort by collecting vast amounts of data whose analysis will improve our forecasting models for both daily weather and long-term climate. For more information on the ARM Program, please visit our web site at www.arm.gov.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our Changing Climate--Is our climate really changing? How do we measure climate change? How can we predict what Earth's climate will be like for generations to come? One focus of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to improve scientific climate models enough to achieve reliable regional prediction of future climate. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the global mean surface temperature has increased by 0.5-1.0 F since the late 19th century. The 20th century's 10 warmest years all occurred in the last 15 years of the century, with 1998 being the warmest year of record. The global mean surface temperature is measured by a network of temperature-sensing instruments distributed around the world, including ships, ocean buoys, and weather stations on land. The data from this network are retrieved and analyzed by various organizations, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the World Meteorological Organization. Worldwide temperature records date back to 1860. To reconstruct Earth's temperature history before 1860, scientists use limited temperature records, along with proxy indicators such as tree rings, pollen records, and analysis of air frozen in ancient ice. The solar energy received from the sun drives Earth's weather and climate. Some of this energy is reflected and filtered by the atmosphere, but most is absorbed by Earth's surface. The absorbed solar radiation warms the surface and is re-radiated as heat energy into the atmosphere. Some atmospheric gases, called greenhouse gases, trap some of the re-emitted heat, keeping the surface temperature regulated and suitable for sustaining life. Although the greenhouse effect is natural, some evidence indicates that human activities are producing increased levels of some greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Scientists believe that the combustion of fossil fuels is responsible for the increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. According to the EPA, the burning of fossil fuels for cars and trucks, the heating of homes and businesses, and the operation of power plants account for approximately 98% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. The increase of greenhouse gases will, theoretically, enhance the greenhouse effect by trapping more of the heat energy emitted by Earth's surface, thus increasing the surface temperatures on a global scale. Scientists expect that the global average surface temperature could rise 1-4.5 F in the next 50 years and as much as 10 F in the next century. Global warming could potentially have harmful effects on human health, water resources, forests, agriculture, wildlife, and coastal areas. A few degrees of warming might lead to more frequent and severe heat waves, worsened air pollution with adverse effects on human respiratory health, and wider spread of tropical disease such as malaria. The world's hydrologic cycle might be affected by an increase in evaporation and, thus, in precipitation. An increase in evaporation will increase atmospheric water vapor, a significant natural greenhouse gas. The increase in water vapor might further enhance the global warming caused by the greenhouse effect. This is known as a positive feedback. The increase in water vapor could also change the amount of clouds present in the atmosphere, which could reduce temperatures in a negative feedback. Many interrelated factors affect the global climate and are responsible for climate change. Predicting the outcome of the interactions among the many factors is not easy, but it must be addressed. The ARM Program is taking a lead in this effort by collecting vast amounts of data whose analysis will improve our forecasting models for both daily weather and long-term climate. For more information on the ARM Program, please visit our web site at www.arm.gov.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Methods of in vivo radiation measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of and apparatus for in vivo radiation measurements relay on a MOSFET dosimeter of high radiation sensitivity with operates in both the passive mode to provide an integrated dose detector and active mode to provide an irradiation rate detector. A compensating circuit with a matched unirradiated MOSFET is provided to operate at a current designed to eliminate temperature dependence of the device. Preferably, the MOSFET is rigidly mounted in the end of a miniature catheter and the catheter is implanted in the patient proximate the radiation source.

Huffman, Dennis D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Kelsey, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM); Lane, Richard (Galveston, TX); Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM); Snelling, Jay B. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Radiative Forcing of Climate By Ice-Age Atmospheric Dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During glacial periods, dust deposition rates and inferred atmospheric concentrations were globally much higher than present. According to recent model results, the large enhancement of atmospheric dust content at the last glacial maximum (LGM) can be explained only if increases in the potential dust source areas are taken into account. Such increases are to be expected, due to e#ects of low precipitation and low atmospheric (CO 2 ) on plant growth. Here the modelled three-dimensional dust fields from Mahowald et al. and modelled seasonally varying surface-albedo fields derived in a parallel manner, are used to quantify the mean radiative forcing due to modern (non-anthropogenic) and LGM dust. The e#ect of mineralogical provenance on the radiative properties of the dust is taken into account, as is the range of optical properties associated with uncertainties about the mixing state of the dust particles. The high-latitude (poleward of 45#) mean change in forcing (LGM minus modern) is estimated to be small (--0.9 to +0.2 W m ), especially when compared to nearly --20 W m due to reflection from the extended ice sheets. Although the net e#ect of dust over ice sheets is a positive forcing (warming), much of the simulated high-latitude dust was not over the ice sheets, but over unglaciated regions close to the expanded dust source region in central Asia. In the tropics the change in forcing is estimated to be overall negative, and of similarly large magnitude (--2.2 to --3.2 W m ) to the radiative cooling e#ect of low atmospheric (CO 2 ). Thus, the largest long-term climatic e#ect of the LGM dust is likely to have been a cooling of the tropics. Low tropical sea-surface temperatures, low atmospheric (CO 2 ) and high atmospheric dust loading may be mutually reinforcin...

T. Claquin; C. Roelandt; K.E. Kohfeld; S.P. Harrison; I. Tegen; I.C. Prentice; Y. Balkanski; Prentice Æ Y. Balkanski; G. Bergametti; Æ N. Mahowald; Æ M. Schulz; M. Schulz; Æ K. E. Kohfeld; Æ K. E. Kohfeld; C. Roelandt; C. Roelandt; Æ S. P. Harrison; Æ S. P. Harrison; Æ S. P. Harrison; G. Bergametti; H. Rodhe; Æ H. Rodhe; M. Hansson; M. Hansson; N. Mahowald; N. Mahowald

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

90

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TR-081.2 iii Abstract This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval...

91

Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger  

SciTech Connect

This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated dust parameterizations.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

92

Measurements and Standards for the Climate Change ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... critically on developing absolute measurements of the sun's energy that can be ... with better information about the impact of various policy options.

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Role of aerosols in radiative forcing of climate change: Global mean and uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenically induced climate change is of great current interest because of increases in atmospheric loading of infrared active (greenhouse) gases over the past 150 years and the inferred resultant increase in infrared radiation flux in the troposphere. However, the climate change ascribed to such increases, not to mention predictions of future climate change in response to prospective changes in the earth`s radiation budget, is based virtually entirely on climate model simulations of how the earth`s climate would respond to changes in radiation rather than on empirically established relationships between changes in the earth`s radiation budget and climate change. There is thus an urgent need to evaluate the performance of climate models to ascertain the accuracy with which they represent the changes in temperature and other indicia of climate that have been observed over the industrial period. Such an evaluation, however, requires an accurate assessment of the totality of changes in the earth`s radiation budget in both the longwave (thermal infrared) and shortwave (solar) spectral regions, not just of changes in the longwave due to increased concentrations of long-lived greenhouse gases.

Schwartz, S.E.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evaluation of Energy Efficiency Measures in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot and humid climates present some of the most complex challenges for sustainable building designs. High temperatures coupled with high humidity create extreme comfort problems and exacerbate the potential for condensation, mold and mildew. These are usually remedied with conventional mechanical air conditioning systems, but the move toward sustainability urges designers to find less energy intensive solutions. An integrated design process coupled with energy modeling and lifecycle analysis can unite design teams around desired outcomes to provide an optimized design solution for projects in these climates. Such an approach involves first minimizing building loads and then reducing residual energy consumed by the HVAC systems. This paper presents an integrated design approach to evaluating the most efficient energy measures in hot and humid climates and summarizes the findings of a series of cases using this approach, including international examples of office, education, and small retail buildings in ASHRAE Climate Zones 1A and 2A.

Zhao, Y.; Erwine, B.; Leonard, P.; Pease, B.; Dole, A.; Lee, A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures Agency/Company /Organization: GIZ Focus Area: Governance - Planning - Decision-Making Structure Topics: Best Practices Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: transferproject.org/index.php/hb During the 3-year project, project partners will develop the online handbook 'Navigating Transport NAMAs' with practical advice on how to develop and implement a mitigation action in the transport sector. The handbook will consist of a generic part with general information on transport NAMAs and a number of case studies which will be based on south-south networks of countries and practical implementation within the

96

Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Effects of Moist Convection and Water Vapor Radiative Processes on Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary interest of the present study is to examine the sensitivity of climate to radiative perturbations such as increases in CO2 and solar insolation for surface temperatures warmer than present day global averaged values (Ts> 290 K). The ...

M. Lal; V. Ramanathan

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Radiative Characteristics of the Canadian Climate Centre Second-Generation General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several observational datasets were used to assess the quality of the radiative characteristics of the Canadian Climate Centre (CCC) second-generation GCM. The GCM data were obtained from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) ...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li; Jean-Pierre Blanchet

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Reproducibility by Climate Models of Cloud Radiative Forcing Associated with Tropical Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, cloud radiative forcing (CRF) associated with convective activity over tropical oceans is analyzed for monthly mean data from twentieth-century simulations of 18 climate models participating in phase 3 of the Coupled Model ...

Hiroki Ichikawa; Hirohiko Masunaga; Yoko Tsushima; Hiroshi Kanzawa

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Character of Solar and Circumsolar Radiation. Proceedings ~all of the direct solar radiation (that originating from thethat attenuate the solar radiation available to terres-

Grether, Donald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Climate Sensitivity and Its Components Diagnosed from Earth Radiation Budget Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major uncertainties in the ability to predict future climate change, and hence its impacts, is the lack of knowledge of the earth’s climate sensitivity. Here, data are combined from the 1985–96 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) ...

Piers Mde F. Forster; Jonathan M. Gregory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Gordon Research Conference on Radiation & Climate in 2009, July 5 -10  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate will present cutting-edge research on the outstanding issues in global climate change with focus on the radiative forcing and sensitivity of the climate system and associated physical processes. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, including grand challenges in radiation and climate, radiative forcing, climate feedbacks, cloud processes in climate system, hydrological cycle in changing climate, absorbing aerosols and Asian monsoon, recent climate changes, and geo-engineering. The invited speakers will present the recent most important advances and future challenges in these areas. The Conference will bring together a collection of leading investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for scientists especially junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented.

Quiang Fu

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the FC doing? ­ Woodland carbon code and assessment protocols (3 slides) · Conclusions (2 slides). #12 2010 Climate change mitigation and forestry measures Global carbon balance c. 2000 Burning fossil fuels 23.1 GtCO2 yr-1 Land-use change (including deforestation) 5.9 GtCO2 yr -1 Vegetation growth 11.0 Gt

105

THE EFFECT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION ON THE ACCURACY OF PYRHELIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse, and Total Solar Radiation," Solar Energy, vol. 4,r Presented at the Solar Radiation workshop of Solar Rising,MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION D. Grether, D.

Grether, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Estimation and Model Validation of Surface Solar Radiation and Cloud Radiative Forcing Using TOGA COARE Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) radiation measurements in the western Pacific warm pool are used to estimate surface solar radiation budgets and to validate radiation model ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Wenzhong Zhao

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Simultaneously Constraining Climate Sensitivity and Aerosol Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy balance climate model with latitudinal, surface–air, and land–sea resolution is coupled to a two-dimensional (latitude–depth) ocean model and used to simulate changes in surface and surface air temperature since 1765. The climate model ...

L. D. Danny Harvey; Robert K. Kaufmann

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: Interactions and feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects, they could accelerate the rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase and subsequent climate change beyond current predictions. The effects of predicted changes in climate and solar UV radiation on carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are expected to vary significantly between regions. The balance of positive and negative effects on terrestrial carbon cycling remains uncertain, but the interactions between UV radiation and climate change are likely to contribute to decreasing sink strength in many oceanic regions. Interactions between climate and solar UV radiation will affect cycling of elements other than carbon, and so will influence the concentration of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. For example, increases in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean caused by climate change are projected to enhance the emissions of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gas. Future changes in UV-induced transformations of aquatic and terrestrial contaminants could have both beneficial and adverse effects. Taken in total, it is clear that the future changes in UV radiation coupled with human-caused global change will have large impacts on biogeochemical cycles at local, regional and global scales.

Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Technical Sessions A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Study of Longwave Radiation A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models R. G. Ellingson F. Baer Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 Introduction the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere. Nature of Longwave Problems Longwave radiation quantities-radiances, fluxes and heating rates-are usually calculated in GCM models as the cloud amount weighted average of the values for clear and homogeneous cloud conditions. For example, the downward flux at the surface, F, may be written as

110

Effect of Ice-Albedo Feedback on Global Sensitivity in a One-Dimensional Radiative-Convective Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feedback between ice albedo and temperature is included in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model. The effect of this feedback on global sensitivity to changes in solar constant is studied for the current climate conditions. ...

Wei-Chyung Wang; Peter H. Stone

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Climate Prediction and Radiative Heating Climate models are driven by forcing, and these forces are seen primarily by the thermal field in general circulation models (GCMs). The major forces that affect the thermal field are longwave radiative (LWR) heating, shortwave radiative (SWR) heating, and convection (cumulus, etc.). These forcing effects are cycled through the thermal field to the motion field by nonlinear transfer. The dependent variables-in particular, temperature (T), moisture (Q) and especially clouds-evolve in time in a model and determine the subsequent forcing. If the dependent variables are not accurately calculated in space and time, the forcing

112

Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties: Application to Climate Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties: Application to Climate Studies G. M. McFarquhar and T. Nousiainen Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois M. S. Timlin, S. F. Iacobellis, and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Cloud radiative feedback is the most important effect determining climate response to human activity. Ice clouds reflect solar radiation and absorb thermal emission from the ground and the lower atmosphere and emit infrared radiation to space. The representation of these processes in models affects future climate predictions and there is much uncertainty in the representation of these processes. The size and

113

Posters Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties Measured  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties Measured by Combined Lidar, Radar, and Infrared Radiometer W. L. Eberhard and J. M. Intrieri National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. P. Chan and G. Feingold Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Boulder, Colorado also an order of magnitude smaller. These features make simple approximations in scattering calculations adequate for some applications, e.g., Eberhard (1993a). They also provide some unique capabilities, especially the technique described below for measuring drop sizes. One of the four IDP tasks is to characterize cloud signatures obtained by CO 2 lidar. For instance, our earlier work discovered that depolarization from ice particles was almost

114

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 16 March 1991--15 March 1992  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM`s). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM`s under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM`s to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A U. S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program DOESC-ARM...

116

The Radiative Effects of Clouds and their Impact on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our knowledge of the direct role of clouds in long-term climate change is examined in an overview of key results published over the last 15 or 20 years, along with some relevant unpublished model studies. The focus is on 1) the impact of clouds ...

Albert Arking

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total direct solar (from the disk of the sun) radiation.by the direct solar (coming from the disk of the sun) plussolar radiation (that originating from the disk of the sun)

Grether, Donald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate simulation map Climate Global climate change processes and impacts research in EETD is aimed at understanding the factors-and the feedbacks among these factors-driving...

119

Development of the HIRS Outgoing Longwave Radiation Climate Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) product, which NOAA has been operationally generating since 1979, is a very long data record that has been used in many applications, yet past studies have ...

Hai-Tien Lee; Arnold Gruber; Robert G. Ellingson; Istvan Laszlo

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Gary Hodges; Tom Stoffel; Mark Kutchenreiter; Bev Kay; Aron Habte; Michael Ritsche; Victor Morris; Mary Anderberg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Temperature Measurements in Radiative Shock Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??At signifcantly large pressures, shock waves can be driven that are so energetic that radiation starts to play an important role in the dynamics of… (more)

Visco, Anthony John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOLS: THE WILD CARD IN RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forcings of climate change over the industrial period. Cooling forcings of tens of watts per square meter Understanding 2 1 0 1 2 3 Radiativeforcing(Wattspersquaremetre) CoolingWarming The global mean radiative forcing scattering -- Cooling influence Light absorption -- Warming influence, depending on surface Indirect Effects

Schwartz, Stephen E.

123

Synchrotron Radiation Measurements at the CERN LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CERN LHC is equipped with two systems (one for each beam) designed to image the synchrotron radiation emitted by protons and heavy ions. After their commissioning in 2009, the detectors were extensively used and studied during the 2010 run. This allowed preliminary limits in terms of sensitivity, accuracy and resolution to be established. The upgrade to an intensified video camera capable of gating down to 25ns permitted the acquisition of single bunch profiles even with an LHC proton pilot bunch (~5e9 protons) at 450 GeV or a single lead ion bunch (~1e8 ions) from about 2 TeV. Plans for the optimization and upgrade of the system will be discussed. For the last few months, part of the extracted light is deviated to the novel Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM), consisting of an avalanche photo-diode detector providing a resolution better that 100 ps. The LDM system description will be complemented with the promissing first measurement results.

Roncarolo, F; Boccardi, A; Bravin, E; Guerrero, A; Jeff, A; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Fisher, AS

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar and circumsolar radiation vs angular distance from the center of the sun)solar radiation (that originating from the disk of the sun)solar constant of 1367 W/m and then corrected for the actual earth-sun

Grether, D.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Global climate change: Implications, challenges and mitigation measures  

SciTech Connect

The present volume discusses topics in the fields of natural climatic fluctuations, the greenhouse effect, climate modeling, the biophysical and socioeconomic impacts of climate change, climate-change effect mitigation and adaptation strategies, and domestic (US) and international perspectives on regulation of climate-affecting activities. Attention is given to past climates as a guide to the future, the certainty of contemporary global warming, the physics of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle, general circulation model studies of global warming, the implications of sea-level rise, forests' role in global climate change, the ecological effects of rapid climate change, predicted effects of climate change on agriculture, the impact of global warming on human health, energy supply technologies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the U.N.'s 1992 Earth Summit Conference.

Majumdar, S.K.; Kalkstein, L.S.; Yarnal, B.M.; Miller, E.W.; Rosenfeld, L.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/climate_change_mitigation_land_use.pdf References: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors[1] Overview "This paper reviews the status of the post-2012 negotiations on climate change mitigation through land-use measures in the agriculture and forestry

127

Method for increased sensitivity of radiation detection and measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength. Reduced background is accomplished by more thorough annealing and enhanced radiation induced luminescence is obtained by treating the crystalline material to coalesce primary damage centers into secondary damage centers.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A CCD Spectroradiometer for Ultraviolet Actinic Radiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new spectroradiometer for spectral measurements of ultraviolet (UV) atmospheric radiation (290–400 nm) using a charge coupled device (CCD) as a detector is introduced. The instrument development is motivated by the need for measurements with (a)...

Evelyn Jäkel; Manfred Wendisch; Mario Blumthaler; Rainer Schmitt; Ann R. Webb

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Calibration of solar radiation measuring instruments. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of solar radiation measurement of instruments and some types of errors is given; and procedures for calibrating solar radiation measuring instruments are detailed. An appendix contains a description of various agencies who perform calibration of solar instruments and a description of the methods they used at the time this report was prepared. (WHK)

Bahm, R J; Nakos, J C

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Mission to planet Earth: Role of clouds and radiation in climate  

SciTech Connect

The role of clouds in modifying the earth`s radiation balance is well recognized as a key uncertainty in predicting any potential future climate change. This statement is true whether the climate change of interest is caused by changing emissions of greenhouse gases and sulfates, deforestation, ozone depletion, volcanic eruptions, or changes in the solar constant. This paper presents and overview of the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Earth Observing System (EOR) satellite data in understanding the role of clouds in the global climate system. The paper gives a brief summary of the cloud/radiation problem, and discusses the critical observations needed to support further investigation. The planned EOS data products are summarized, including the critical advances over current satellite cloud and radiation budget data. Key advances include simultaneous observation on cloud particle size and phase, improved detection of thin clouds and multilayer cloud systems, greatly reduced ambiguity in partially cloud-filled satellite fields of view, improved calibration and stability of satellite-observed radiances, and improved estimates of radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and at levels within the atmosphere. outstanding sampling and remote sensing issues that effect data quality are also discussed. Finally, the EOS data are placed in the context of other satellite observations as well as the critical surface, field experiment and laboratory data needed to address the role in clouds on the climate system. I is concluded that the EOS data are a necessary but insufficient condition for solution of the scientific cloud/radiation issues. A balanced approach of satellite, field, and laboratory data will be required. These combined data can span the necessary spatial scales of global, regional, cloud cell and cloud particle physics. 137 refs., 12 fig., 4 tab.

Wielicki, B.A.; Harrison, E.F. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Effect of Directional Radiation Models on the Interpretation of Earth Radiation Budget Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameter estimation technique is presented to estimate the radiative flux density distribution over the earn from a set of radiometer measurements at satellite altitude. The technique analyzes measurements from a wide field of view, horizon to ...

Richard N. Green

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

How Well Do Regional Climate Models Reproduce Radiation and Clouds in the Arctic? An Evaluation of ARCMIP Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downwelling radiation in six regional models from the Arctic Regional Climate Model Intercomparison (ARCMIP) project is systematically biased negative in comparison with observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ...

Michael Tjernström; Joseph Sedlar; Matthew D. Shupe

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Sensitivity of the Radiation Budget in a Climate Simulation to Neglecting the Effect of Small Ice Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the atmospheric radiation budget to ignoring small ice particles (D ? 100 ?m) in parameterization of the mean effective size of ice particles was investigated by using the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (...

Faisal S. Boudala; George A. Isaac; N. A. McFarlane; J. Li

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Short-Term Climate Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections from Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation. Part I: Simultaneous Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-inferred short-term climate variability and atmospheric teleconnections are studied using seven years (1974–81) of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) data from NOAA polar orbiters. This study utilizes composite, partition-of-variance and ...

Ka-Ming Lau; Paul H. Chan

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Response of the NCAR Community Climate Model to the Radiative Forcing by the Naturally Occurring Tropospheric Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We insert the effect of naturally occurring tropospheric aerosols on solar radiation into the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The effect of the aerosol depends on concentration and type (continental, maritime), surface albedo, solar zenith ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Robert D. Cess

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Evaluation of Cirrus Parameterizations for Radiative Flux Computations in Climate Models Using TOVS–ScaRaB Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined simultaneous satellite observations are used to evaluate the performance of parameterizations of the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds used for radiative flux computations in climate models. Atmospheric and cirrus ...

C. J. Stubenrauch; F. Eddounia; J. M. Edwards; A. Macke

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Measure and Evaluate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) and the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) have put together a reporting system for colleges and...

139

Radiative Measurements of Pressure Modulator Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pressure modulator is extensively used in atmospheric measurements but is not well characterized in terms of its spectroscopic operation. A series of measurements on a carbon monoxide radiometer is described and comparisons are made with ...

J. R. Drummond; A. Ashton

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The whitehouse effect: shortwave radiative forcing of climate by anthropogenic aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Increases in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other infrared active gases over the industrial period are thought to have increased the average flux of longwave (thermal infrared) radiation between the surface of the earth and the lower atmosphere, leading to an increase in global mean temperature. Over the same period it is though that concentrations of aerosol particles in the troposphere have similarly increased as a consequence of industrial emissions and that these increased concentrations of particles have increased the earth`s reflectivity of shortwave (solar) radiation incident on the planet both directly, by scattering radiation, and indirectly, by increasing the reflectivity of clouds. The term ``whitehouse effect`` is introduced to refer to this increased scattering of shortwave radiation by analogy to the term ``greenhouse effect,`` which refers to the enhanced trapping of longwave radiation resulting from increased concentrations of infrared active gases. Each of these phenomena is referred to as a ``forcing`` of the earth`s climate, that is a secular change imposed on the system; such a forcing is to be distinguished from a ``response`` of the system, such as a change in global mean temperature or other index of global climate. The forcing due to the direct and indirect effects induced by anthropogenic aerosols has been estimated to be comparable in global- average magnitude to that due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, but it is of opposite direction, that is exerting a cooling influence. The shortwave radiative influence of anthropogenic aerosols may thus be considered to be offsetting some, perhaps a great fraction, of the longwave radiative influence of anthropogenic greenhouse gases.

Schwartz, S.E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Radars: Operational Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, has supported the development of several millimeter-wavelength radars for the study of clouds. This effort has culminated in ...

Eugene E. Clothiaux; Kenneth P. Moran; Brooks E. Martner; Thomas P. Ackerman; Gerald G. Mace; Taneil Uttal; James H. Mather; Kevin B. Widener; Mark A. Miller; Daniel J. Rodriguez

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are compared with calculations made with a state-of-the art radiative transfer model (Modtran). The model is driven by measurements that give an as accurate as possible...

143

Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

144

Measurements of sky luminance, sky illuminance, and horizontal solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents initial findings of a sky measurement program currently in progress at the National Bureau of Standards. Measurements are reported on sky luminance and illuminance and how they relate to horizontal solar radiation and sun position. Correlations are presented relating horizontal illuminance to horizontal solar radiation, and zenith luminance to solar altitude. These empirical models are particularly suitable for use in daylighting energy studies since they are based on existing solar data currently available on standard weather tapes.

Treado, S.; Gillette, G.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

146

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

147

NIST Greenhouse gas and climate measurement in SSD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Synchrotron Radiation-Based Calibrations for Space Weather Prediction. ... the development of calibration reference standards, tools, and facilities ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

On the Use of Earth Radiation Budget Statistics for Studies of Clouds and Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily observations of albedo and outgoing terrestrial radiation derived from NOAA Scanning Radiometer measurements are used to relate cloudiness variations to regional features of the general circulation and to estimate the relative importance of ...

Dennis L. Hartmann; David A. Short

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Biological trace element measurements using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of performing x-ray fluorescence trace element determinations at concentrations substantially below the ppM level for biological materials is demonstrated. Conditions for achieving optimum sensitivity were ascertained. Results achieved for five standard reference materials were, in most cases, in excellent agreement with listed values. Minimum detectable limits of 20 ppM were measured for most elements.

Giauque, R.D.; Jaklevic, J.M.; Thompson, A.C.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Radiation Budget of the West African Sahel and Its Controls: A Perspective from Observations and Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous measurements of the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net cross-atmosphere radiation flux divergence over the West African Sahel were made during the year 2006 using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and ...

Mark A. Miller; Virendra P. Ghate; Robert K. Zahn

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Measurement and analysis of near ultraviolet solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The photocatalytic detoxification of organic contaminants is currently being investigated by a number of laboratories, universities, and institutions throughout the world. The photocatalytic oxidation process requires that contaminants come in contact with a photocatalyst such as titanium dioxide, under illumination of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in order for the decomposition reaction to take place. Researches from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories are currently investigating the use of solar energy as a means of driving this photocatalytic process. Measurements of direct-normal and global-horizontal ultraviolet (280--385 nm) and full-spectrum (280--4000 nm) solar radiation taken in Golden, Colorado over a one-year period are analyzed, and comparisons are made with data generated from a clear-sky solar radiation model (BRITE) currently in use for predicting the performance of solar detoxification processes. Analysis of the data indicates a ratio of global-horizontal ultraviolet to full-spectrum radiation of 4%--6% that is weakly dependent on air mass. Conversely, data for direct-normal ultraviolet radiation indicate a much large dependence on air mass, with a ratio of approximately 5% at low air mass to 1% at higher at masses. Results show excellent agreement between the measured data and clear-sky predictions for both the ultraviolet and the full-spectrum global-horizontal radiation. For the direct-normal components, however, the tendency is for the clear-sky model to underpredict the measured that. Averaged monthly ultraviolet radiation available for the detoxification process indicates that the global-horizontal component of the radiation exceeds the direct-normal component throughout the year. 9 refs., 7 figs.

Mehos, M.S.; Pacheco, K.A.; Link, H.F.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Current Issues in Terrestrial Solar Radiation Instrumentation for Energy, Climate and Space Applications Preprint prepared for New RAD '99  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reductions of uncertainty in terrestrial solar radiation measurements are needed to validate the Earth's radiation balance derived from satellite data. Characterization of solar energy resources for renewable technologies requires greater time and spatial resolution for economical technology deployment. Solar radiation measurement research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses calibrations, operational characteristics, and corrections for terrestrial solar radiation measurements. We describe progress in measurements of broadband diffuse-sky radiation, and characterization of field instrument thermal offsets and spectral irradiance. The need and prospects for absolute references for diffuse and long-wave terrestrial solar radiation measurements are discussed. Reductions in uncertainty of broadband irradiance measurements from tens of watts per square meter to a few (one to two) watts per square meter are reported, which reduce time and labor to quantify and identify trends in artificial optical radiation sources, terrestrial solar radiation, and the Earth's radiation budget.

Stoffel, T. L.; Reda, I.; Myers, D. R.; Renne, D.; Wilcox, S. W.; Treadwell, J.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

The whitehouse effect: Shortwave radiative forcing of climate by anthropogenic aerosols, an overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstraet--Loadings of tropospheric aerosols have increased substantially over the past 150 yr as a consequence of industrial activities. These aerosols enhance reflection of solar radiation by the Earth-atmosphere system both directly, by scattering light in clear air and, indirectly, by increasing the reflectivity of clouds. The magnitude of the resultant decrease in absorption of solar radiation is estimated to be comparable on global average to the enhancement in infrared forcing at the tropopause due to increases in concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases over the same time period. Estimates of the aerosol shortwave forcing are quite uncertain, by more than a factor of two about the current best estimates. This article reviews the atmospheric chemistry and microphysical processes that govern the loading and light scattering properties of the aerosol particles responsible for the direct effect and delineates the basis for the present estimates of the magnitude and uncertainty in the resultant radiative forcing. The principal sources of uncertainty are in the loading of anthropogenic aerosols, which is highly variable spatially and temporally because of the relatively short residence time of these aerosols (ca. 1 week) and the episodic removal in precipitation, and in the dependence of light scattering on particle size, and in turn on relative humidity. Uncertainty in aerosol forcing is the greatest source of uncertainty in radiative forcing of climate

Stephen E. Schwartz

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Toward Estimating Climatic Trends in SST. Part I: Methods of Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess climatic changes in sea surface temperature (SST), changes in the measurement method with time and the effect of these changes on the mean SST must be quantified. Observations from the International Comprehensive Ocean–Atmosphere Data ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Climate Science Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Climate Science Overview. NIST Greenhouse Gas Measurements and Climate Research Program Overview. Earth's climate is ...

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis

Filippetto, D; Zolotorev, Max Samuil; Stupakov, G V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

North Slope of Alaska ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Emergency Response Plan June 2010 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility North Slope of AlaskaAdjacent Arctic Ocean Emergency Response Plan Purpose The...

158

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: • Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. • Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. • Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. • Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. • Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. • Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. • Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM’s Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

TP Ackerman; AD Del Genio; RG Ellingson; RA Ferrare; SA Klein; GM McFarquhar; PJ Lamb; CN Long; J Verlinde

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Measurement of the radiative transport properties of reticulated alumina foams  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method for determining radiative transport properties of reticulated materials. The method has both experimental and analytical components. A polar nephelometer is used to measure the scattering profile of a sample of the reticulated material. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment are then combined with the experimental results to give the scatter albedo and extinction coefficient. This paper presents the results of using this method to determine the radiative transport properties of four different porosities (10, 20, 30, 65 pores per inch) of cylindrical reticulated alumina samples ranging in thickness form 0.5 inches to 2. 5 inches.

Hale, M.J.; Bohn, M.S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques  

SciTech Connect

A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Significance of Cloud–Radiative Forcing to the General Circulation on Climate Time Scales—A Satellite Interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud–radiative forcing calculations based on Nimbus-7 radiation budget and cloudiness measurements reveal that cloud-induced longwave (LW) warming (cloud greenhouse influence) is dominant over the tropics, whereas cloud-induced shortwave (SW) ...

Byung-Ju Sohn; Eric A. Smith

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

RADIATIVE PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF OXY-FUEL FLAMES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the DOE Existing Plants, Emissions and Capture (EPEC) program, oxy-combustion is being investigated as a method to simplify carbon capture and reduce the parasitic energy penalties associated with separating CO2 from a dilute flue gas. Gas-phase radiation heat transfer in boilers becomes significant when shifting from air-firing to oxycombustion, and must be accurately represented in models. Currently, radiative property data are not widely available in the literature for conditions appropriate to this environment. In order to facilitate the development and validation of accurate oxy-combustion models, NETL conducted a series of studies to measure radiation properties of oxy-fuel flames at adiabatic flame temperatures of 1750 - 1950K, and product molar concentrations ranging from 95% CO2 to 100% steam, determined by equilibrium calculations. Transmission coefficients were measured as a function of wavelength using a mid-IR imaging spectrometer and a blackbody radiation source. Additionally, flame temperatures were calculated using data collected within CO2 and H2O absorption bands. Experimental results were compared to two statistical narrowband models and experimental data from literature sources. These comparisons showed good overall agreement, although differences between the models and experimental results were noted, particularly for the R branch of the 2.7 ?m H2O band.

Clinton R. Bedick; Stephen K. Beer; Kent H. Casleton; Benjamin T. Chorpening; David W. Shaw; M. Joseph Yip

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Changing the Climate Sensitivity of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model through Cloud Radiative Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conducting probabilistic climate projections with a particular climate model requires the ability to vary the model’s characteristics, such as its climate sensitivity. In this study, the authors implement and validate a method to change the ...

Andrei P. Sokolov; Erwan Monier

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Physical basis for climate change models  

SciTech Connect

The objectives for this research were two-fold: To identify means of using measurements of the outgoing radiation stream from earth to identify mechanisms of climate change; and to develop a flexible radiation code based upon the correlated-k method to enable rapid and accurate calculations of the outgoing radiation. The intended products are three papers and a radiation code. The three papers are to be on Entropy fluxes and the dissipation of the climate system, Radiation fingerprints of climate change, and A rapid correlated-k code.

Goody, R.; Gerstell, M.

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

165

Plasma ion temperature measurements via charge-exchange recombination radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spatially and temporally resolved plasma ion temperatures can be determined by measuring the Doppler-broadened line profiles of transitions excited by charge-exchange recombination reactions between fast hydrogen atoms and fully ionized low-Z ions. Plasma rotation velocity profiles can also be obtained. A sample result from the PDX tokamak using He/sup +/ radiation is presented, and expected line intensities for model cases for PDX and TFTR are calculated.

Fonck, R.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Kaita, R.; Post, D.E.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Plasma ion temperature measurements via charge exchange recombination radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spatially and temporally resolved plasma ion temperatures can be determined by measuring the Doppler-broadened line profiles of transitions excited by charge-exchange recombination reactions between fast hydrogen atoms and fully ionized low-Z ions. Plasma rotation velocity profiles can also be obtained. A sample result from the PDX tokamak using He/sup +/ radiation is presented, and expected line intensities for model cases for PDX and TFTR are calculated.

Fonck, R.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Kaita, R.; Post, D.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements by Incoherent Radiation Fluctuation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations of the radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of the spectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatial distribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and successfully tested a simple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolute measurement of the rms bunch length. A description of the method and the experimental results are presented.

Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC; Zolotorev, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Filippetto, D.; /INFN, Rome; Jagerhofer, L.; /Vienna, Tech. U.

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

A research program on radiative, chemical, and dynamical feedback progresses influencing the carbon dioxide and trace gases climate effects: Annual progress report, September 1, 1986--July 15, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the up-to-date progress. The program includes two tasks: atmospheric radiation and climatic effects and their objective is to link quantitatively the radiation forcing changes and the climate responses caused by increasing greenhouse gases. Here, the objective and approach are described. We investigate the combined atmospheric radiation characteristics of the greenhouse gases (H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, N/sub 2/O, CFCs, and O/sub 3/), aerosols and clouds. Since the climatic effect of increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases is initiated by perturabtion to the longwave thermal radiation, it is critical to understand better the radiation characteristics of the greenhouse gases and their relationship to radiatively-important aerosols and clouds; the latter reflect solar radiation (a cooling of the surface) and provide a greenhouse effect (a warming to the surface). Therefore, aerosol and cloud particles are an integral part of the radiation field in the atmosphere. 9 refs.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Satellite Measures Sun's True Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), a satellite mission of ... and accurate daily measurements of the sun's radiant power (or light ...

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).  

SciTech Connect

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E. [ITT Exelis Mission Systems, Colorado Springs, CO

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.  

SciTech Connect

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

Preston, Eric F. (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO); Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Climatic Comparisons of Estimated and Measured Winds from Ships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speed records from twelve Ocean Weather Stations (OWS's) are compared to estimates from transient ships in the general vicinity of the on-station OWS position. Measured and estimated winds from transient ships within specified areas are also ...

Robert G. Quayle

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

International Governance of Climate Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Radiation Management Governance Initiative conference); Daniel Bodansky, Governing Climate Engineering: Scenarios for Analysis (Harvard Project on Climate Agreements,

Parson, Edward; Ernst, Lia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Modeling and experimental measurements of residual stress using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

This work was an extension of recent LLNL-related efforts to determine the most effective method for determining residual stress in metal components by non-destructive techniques. These activities have included neutron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and ultrasonics. In 1988, we recognized that the newly installed UC/LLNL beam line at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) could be applied to determining lattice strains in a fashion helpful to our overall research goals. Pioneering work using synchrotron radiation for stress measurements had been reported in Japan. Benefits of a synchrotron source to our studies include a highly intense and monochromatic beam, with variable energies (allowing significant sample penetration) and very low beam divergence. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Shackelford, J.F.

1989-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Graciosa Island, Azores  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

From May 2009 through December 2010, the ARM Mobile Facility is obtaining data from a location near the airport on Graciosa Island to support the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field campaign. Led by principal investigator Robert Wood, scientists involved in the campaign will use data from the AMF to study processes controlling the radiative properties and microphysics of marine boundary layer clouds, a high priority science question. Marine boundary layer clouds are particularly important in the global climate system, not only as passive modulators of solar energy, but as interactive systems that influence and modulate sea surface temperature and the strength of the trade winds on seasonal-interannual timescales. Their microphysical properties are important, strongly sensitive to manmade aerosol, and poorly understood, especially over remote oceans. Data from the prolonged AMF deployment will result in the first climatology of detailed vertical structure of cloud and precipitation properties of low clouds at a remote subtropical marine site.[Copied and edited from http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/grw/

Wood, Robert (PI)

177

Field Comparisons of Direct and Component Measurements of Net Radiation under Clear Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate measurements of net radiation are basic to all studies of the surface energy budget. In preparation for an energy budget experiment significant differences were found between direct and component measurement of net radiation, which ...

Claude E. Duchon; Gregory E. Wilk

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD  

SciTech Connect

Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

Kurzeja, R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Programmatic Background and Design of the Cloud and Radiation Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, is a major new program of atmospheric measurement and modeling. The program is intended to improve the understanding of processes that affect ...

Gerald M. Stokes; Stephen E. Schwartz

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Satellite Instrument Calibration for Measuring Global Climate Change: Report of a Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measuring the small changes associated with long-term global climate change from space is a daunting task. The satellite instruments must be capable of observing atmospheric and surface temperature trends as small as 0.1°C decade?1, ozone changes ...

George Ohring; Bruce Wielicki; Roy Spencer; Bill Emery; Raju Datla

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Using the Radiative Kernel Technique to Calculate Climate Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate models differ in their responses to imposed forcings, such as increased greenhouse gas concentrations, due to different climate feedback strengths. Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) are separated into two components: ...

Karen M. Shell; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Christine A. Shields

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Tonehole radiation directivity: A comparison of theory to measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements have been conducted in an anechoic chamber for comparison to current linear acoustic theory for radiation directivity from a cylindrical pipe with toneholes. Time-delay spectrometry using an exponentially swept sine signal was employed to determine impulse responses at points external to the experimental air column. This technique is effective in clearly isolating nonlinear artifacts from the desired linear system response along the time axis, allowing the use of a strong driving signal without fear of nonlinear distortion. The experimental air column was positioned through a wall conduit into the anechoic chamber such that the driver and pipe input were located outside the chamber while the open pipe end and toneholes were inside the chamber, effectively isolating the source from the pickup. Measured results are compared to both frequency-domain, transmissionnetwork simulations, as well as time-domain, digital waveguide calculations. 1

Gary P. Scavone; Matti Karjalainen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE/SC-ARM-11-024 ARM Climate Research Facility ANNUAL REPORT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Recovery Act HIGHLIGHTS October 2010 * Doppler lidars tested at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. *...

184

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Measuring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Solar Irradiance from Space: The SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment Harder, Jerry LASP University of Colorado Fontenla, Juan LASP University of Colorado Kopp, Greg...

185

The Arm Climate Research Facility: A Review of Structure and Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (www.arm.gov) provides atmospheric observations from diverse climatic regimes around the world. Because it is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) user facility, ARM data are freely ...

James H. Mather; Jimmy W. Voyles

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Contemporaneous Relationships between Global Radiation and Heating Degree Days during Severe Winters in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global radiation climate associated with anomalously cold winter months and cold winters is analyzed for the contiguous United States. The radiation data consist of rehabilitated measured and modeled monthly values of global radiation on both ...

Thomas R. Karl; Frank T. Quinlan

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diffusion approximation to the equation of transfer (Boltzmann transport equation) is usually applied to media where scattering dominates the interactions. Diffusion approximation helps in significant savings in terms of code complexity and computational time. However, this approximation often has significant error. Error due to the inherent nature of a physics model is called model error. Information about the model error associated with the diffusion approximation is clearly desirable. An indirect measure of model error is a quantity that is related in some way to the error but not equal to the error. In general, indirect measures of error are expected to be less costly than direct measures. Perhaps the most well-known indirect measure of the diffusion model error is the variable-Eddington tensor. This tensor provides a great deal of information about the angular dependence of the angular intensity solution, but it is not always simple to interpret. We define a new indirect measure of the diffusion model error called the diffusion model error source (DME source). When this DME source is added to the diffusion equation, the transport solution for the angular-integrated intensity is obtained. In contrast to the variable-Eddington tensor, our DME source is a scalar that is conceptually easy to interpret. In addition to defining the DME source analytically, we show how to generate this source numerically relative to the Sn radiative transfer equations with linear-discontinuous spatial discretization. This numerical source is computationally tested and shown to reproduce the Sn solution for a number of problems. Our radiative transfer model solves a coupled, time dependent, multi-frequency, 1-D slab equation and material heat transfer equation. We then use diffusion approximation to solve the same problem. The difference due to this approximation can be modelled by a “diffusion source”. The diffusion source is defined as an amount of inhomogeneous source that, when added to a diffusion calculation, gives a solution for the angle-integrated intensity that is equal to the transport solution.

Kumar, Akansha

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Radiation Parameterization for Three-Dimensional Inhomogeneous Cirrus Clouds Applied to ARM Data and Climate Models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 (a) We developed a 3D radiative transfer model to simulate the transfer of solar and thermal infrared radiation in inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The model utilized a diffusion approximation approach (four-term expansion in the intensity) employing Cartesian coordinates. The required single-scattering parameters, including the extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor, for input to the model, were parameterized in terms of the ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size. The incorporation of gaseous absorption in multiple scattering atmospheres was accomplished by means of the correlated k-distribution approach. In addition, the strong forward diffraction nature in the phase function was accounted for in each predivided spatial grid based on a delta-function adjustment. The radiation parameterization developed herein is applied to potential cloud configurations generated from GCMs to investigate broken clouds and cloud-overlapping effects on the domain-averaged heating rate. Cloud inhomogeneity plays an important role in the determination of flux and heating rate distributions. Clouds with maximum overlap tend to produce less heating than those with random overlap. Broken clouds show more solar heating as well as more IR cooling as compared to a continuous cloud field (Gu and Liou, 2001). (b) We incorporated a contemporary radiation parameterization scheme in the UCLA atmospheric GCM in collaboration with the UCLA GCM group. In conjunction with the cloud/radiation process studies, we developed a physically-based cloud cover formation scheme in association with radiation calculations. The model clouds were first vertically grouped in terms of low, middle, and high types. Maximum overlap was then used for each cloud type, followed by random overlap among the three cloud types. Fu and Liou's 1D radiation code with modification was subsequently employed for pixel-by-pixel radiation calculations in the UCLA GCM. We showed that the simulated cloud cover and OLR fields without special tuning are comparable to those of ISCCP dataset and the results derived from radiation budget experiments. Use of the new radiation and cloud schemes enhances the radiative warming in the middle to upper tropical troposphere and alleviates the cold bias in the UCLA atmospheric GCM. We also illustrated that ice crystal size and cloud inhomogeneous are significant factors affecting the radiation budgets at the top of the atmosphere and the surface (Gu et al. 2003). (c) An innovative approach has been developed to construct a 3D field of inhomogeneous clouds in general and cirrus in particular in terms of liquid/ice water content and particle size on the basis of a unification of satellite and ground-based cloud radar data. Satellite remote sensing employing the current narrow-band spectro-radiometers has limitation and only the vertically integrated cloud parameters (optical depth and mean particle size) can be determined. However, by combining the horizontal cloud mapping inferred from satellites with the vertical structure derived from the profiling Doppler cloud radar, a 3D cloud field can be constructed. This represents a new conceptual approach to 3D remote sensing and imaging and offers a new perspective in observing the cloud structure. We applied this novel technique to AVHRR/NOAA satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data obtained from the ARM achieve and assessed the 3D cirrus cloud field with the ice crystal size distributions independently derived from optical probe measurements aboard the University of North Dakota Citation. The retrieved 3D ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size involving an impressive cirrus cloud occurring on April 18, 1997, are shown to be comparable to those derived from the analysis of collocated and coincident in situ aircraft measurements (Liou et al. 2002). (d) Detection of thin cirrus with optical depths less than 0.5, particularly those occurring i n the tropics remains a fundamental problem in remote sensing. We developed a new detection scheme for the

Kuo-Nan Liou

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes insitu polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

190

Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

Britton, Jr.; Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

Seasonal Variation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Optical Properties Estimated from Ground-Based Solar Radiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface direct radiative forcing and optical properties of aerosols have been analyzed from a ground-based solar radiation measurement, which was made under clear-sky conditions in Tsukuba, Japan, over two years from April 1997 to March 1999. ...

Tomoaki Nishizawa; Shoji Asano; Akihiro Uchiyama; Akihiro Yamazaki

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high-quality reference measurements. This paper discusses an experimental ...

R. Philipona; A. Kräuchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high quality reference measurements. Here we show an experimental approach ...

R. Philipona; A. Kräuchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

194

A Comprehensive Radiation Scheme for Numerical Weather Prediction Models with Potential Applications in Climate Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive scheme for the parameterization of radiative transfer in numerical weather Prediction (NWP) models has been developed. The scheme is based on the solution of the ?-two-stream version of the radiative transfer equation ...

Bodo Ritter; Jean-Francois Geleyn

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Diurnal Cycle of Outgoing Longwave Radiation from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal cycle of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the earth is analyzed by decomposing satellite observations into a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). The observations are from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) ...

G. Louis Smith; David A. Rutan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

In situ measurement of lattice strain using synchrotron radiation and a conical slit system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An experiment utilizing synchrotron radiation to measure lattice strain components from an aluminum-lithium sample during tensile loading is presented in detail. The conical slit system… (more)

Obstalecki, Mark

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

World Wide Web Access to Radiation Datasets for Environmental and Climate Change Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five years of scanner data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), eight years of surface radiation budget (SRB) data, and one year of scanner radiation budget data from the French–Russian–German experiment, ScaRaB, will be available ...

T. Dale Bess; Ann B. Carlson; Calvin Mackey; Fredrick M. Denn; Anne Wilber; Nancy Ritchey

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

On Correction of Diffuse Radiation Measured by MFRSR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an angular correction is needed. Such a correction of MFRSR data is performed for direct solar radiation, whereas uncertainty exists concerning the diffuse irradiance, whose...

199

The Sensitivity of the Tropical-Mean Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key disagreement exists between global climate model (GCM) simulations and satellite observations of the decadal variability in the tropical-mean radiation budget. Measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) over the period ...

Amy C. Clement; Brian Soden

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Asymmetry of Global Solar Radiation Around Solar Noon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using approximately 25 years of rehabilitated global solar radiation measurements, an analysis of the asymmetry of global solar radiation around solar noon was performed for three climatic regions of the United states represented by Miami, ...

R. T. Pinker; L. M. Militana

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The need of coupled differential and integral spectral radiation measurements  

SciTech Connect

The criticality safety community has historically directed a significant amount of effort toward attempting to quantify the integral behavior of fissioning systems via critical and subcritical experimental measurements. Some typical integral characteristics include critical masses, geometries, or concentrations for particular fissile isotopes in different chemical forms. While information such as this can be invaluable for determining criticality safety operating limits and for benchmarking computational methods, it is only a part of what is necessary for analyzing criticality accident alarm detectors. These analyses also require determination of the differential behavior of the leakage radiation (neutron and/or photon) emanating from the source, and an integral estimate of the corresponding detector dose response. This paper addresses part of the work done at the Savannah River Technology Center to validate version 4.2 of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP for application to criticality detector response analysis. Additionally, the paper discusses some observations about existing experimental data which can be used for code validation, as well as the need for further experiments.

Zino, J.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Climate Model–Simulated Diurnal Cycles in HIRS Clear-Sky Brightness Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear-sky brightness temperature measurements from the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) are simulated with two climate models via a radiative transfer code. The models are sampled along the HIRS orbit paths to derive diurnal ...

Ian A. MacKenzie; Simon F. B. Tett; Anders V. Lindfors

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Aerosol Properties and Processes: A Path from Field and Laboratory Measurements to Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol particles in the lower atmosphere exert a substantial influence on climate and climate change through a variety of complex mechanisms. Consequently, there is a need to represent these influences in global climate models, and models have ...

Steven J. Ghan; Stephen E. Schwartz

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Proceedings of the sixth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1996 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held at San Antonio, Texas. The history and status of the ARM program at the time of the meeting helps to put these papers in context. The basic themes have not changed. First, from its beginning, the Program has attempted to respond to the most critical scientific issues facing the US Global Change Research Program. Second, the Program has been strongly coupled to other agency and international programs. More specifically, the Program reflects an unprecedented collaboration among agencies of the federal research community, among the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) national laboratories, and between DOE`s research program and related international programs, such as Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) and the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program. Next, ARM has always attempted to make the most judicious use of its resources by collaborating and leveraging existing assets and has managed to maintain an aggressive schedule despite budgets that have been much smaller than planned. Finally, the Program has attracted some of the very best scientific talent in the climate research community and has, as a result, been productive scientifically.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Determination of the Scaled Optical Thickness of Clouds from Reflected Solar Radiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for determining the scaled optical thickness of clouds from reflected solar radiation measurements. The procedure compares measurements of the reflection function with asymptotic expressions for the reflection function of ...

Michael D. King

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Multiwavelength Scanning Radiometer for Airborne Measurements of Scattered Radiation within Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-wavelength scanning radiometer has been developed for measuring the angular distribution of scattered radiation deep within a cloud layer. The purpose of the instrument is to provide measurements from which the single scattering albedo of ...

Michael D. King; Maxwell G. Strange; Peter Leone; Lamdin R. Blaine

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Accuracy of Humidity Measurement on Ships: Consideration of Solar Radiation Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of heating due to solar radiation on measurements of humidity obtained from ships is examined. Variations in wet- and dry-bulb temperature measured on each side of a research ship are shown to correlate with solar radiation. However, ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Radiation Measurements 42 (2007) 10291032 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for internalized DU exposure. The purpose of the current study was to measure the induction of mutagenic damageRadiation Measurements 42 (2007) 1029­1032 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas Observation of radiation demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalized human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically

209

Saharan Dust Aerosol Radiative Forcing Measured from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses data collected from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments to determine Saharan dust broadband shortwave aerosol radiative forcing over ...

F. Li; A. M. Vogelmann; V. Ramanathan

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Data Quality Assessment and the Long-Term Trend of Ground Solar Radiation in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation is one of the most important factors affecting climate and the environment. Routine measurements of irradiance are valuable for climate change research because of long time series and areal coverage. In this study, a set of ...

Guang-Yu Shi; Tadahiro Hayasaka; Atsumu Ohmura; Zhi-Hua Chen; Biao Wang; Jian-Qi Zhao; Hui-Zheng Che; Li Xu

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

On the Accuracy of Deriving Climate Feedback Parameters from Correlations between Surface Temperature and Outgoing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in outgoing radiation are both a consequence and a cause of changes in the earth’s temperature. Spencer and Braswell recently showed that in a simple box model for the earth the regression of outgoing radiation against surface temperature ...

D. M. Murphy; P. M. Forster

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Surface Solar Radiation Flux and Cloud Radiative Forcing for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP): A Satellite, Surface Observations, and Radiative Transfer Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents surface solar radiation flux and cloud radiative forcing results obtained by using a combination of satellite and surface observations interpreted by means of a simple plane-parallel radiative transfer model called 2001. This ...

Catherine Gautier; Martin Landsfeld

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Dosimeter for measuring skin dose and more deeply penetrating radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with netruon-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

Jones, Donald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parker, DeRay (Idaho Falls, ID); Boren, Paul R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Parametric Channeling Radiation and its Application to the Measurement of Electron Beam Energy  

SciTech Connect

We have proposed a method for observing parametric channeling radiation (PCR) and of applying it to the measurement of electron beam energy. The PCR process occurs if the energy of the channeling radiation coincides with the energy of the parametric X-ray radiation (PXR). The PCR process can be regarded as the diffraction of 'virtual channeling radiation'. We developed a scheme for beam energy measurement and designed an experimental setup. We also estimated the beam parameters, and calculated the angular distributions of PXR and PCR. These considerations indicate that the observation of PCR is promising.

Takabayashi, Y. [SAGA Light Source, 8-7 Yayoigaoka, Tosu, Saga 841-0005 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

Climate Change and Runoff Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Adaptation strategies #12;What is climate? "Climate is properly the long average of weather in a single place UV radiation Solar radiation Reflected by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat climate concerns us? Humans experience climate as weather #12;High water impacts June 1-15, 2008 38 River

Sheridan, Jennifer

216

A 3-D Canopy Radiative Transfer Model for Global Climate Modeling: Description, Validation and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of solar radiative transfer at the land surface is important to energy, water and carbon balance, especially for vegetated areas. Currently the most commonly used two-stream model considers the Plant Functional Types (PFTs) within a ...

Hua Yuan; Robert E. Dickinson; Yongjiu Dai; Muhammad J. Shaikh; Liming Zhou; Wei Shangguan; Duoying Ji

217

Decadal Climate Simulations Using Accurate and Fast Neural Network Emulation of Full, Longwave and Shortwave, Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach to calculating model physics using neural network emulations, previously proposed and developed by the authors, has been implemented in this study for both longwave and shortwave radiation parameterizations, or to the full model ...

Vladimir M. Krasnopolsky; Michael S. Fox-Rabinovitz; Alexei A. Belochitski

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Gray-Radiation Aquaplanet Moist GCM. Part II: Energy Transports in Altered Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified moist general circulation model is used to study changes in the meridional transport of moist static energy by the atmosphere as the water vapor content is increased. The key assumptions of the model are gray radiation, with water ...

Dargan M. W. Frierson; Isaac M. Held; Pablo Zurita-Gotor

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An Accurate Parameterization of the Solar Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds for Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate parameterization of the solar radiative properties of cirrus clouds is developed based on improved light scattering calculations. Here 28 ice crystal size distributions from in situ aircraft observations in both tropical and ...

Qiang Fu

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Photos from the ARM Program on Flickr  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM Climate Research Facility is now making its image gallery available on Flickr. The seven collections are comprised of 62 sets of images. Posters about field campaigns, about facilities, and prepared for conferences or educational purposes make up an interesting collection, while the largest collection (33 sets of images) captures images from the field campaigns themselves. For a quick way to find select images, click on Tags, then click on a term in which you are interested. That will retrieve all images tagged with that term, regardless of the collection in which they have been grouped.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Appropriate Conservation Measures for Single-Family Buildings in Hot, Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effectiveness of a number of energy conservation measures for homes located in hot, humid climates was analyzed using the DOE-2.1B building simulation model. Measures having the greatest benefits to the homeowner are predicted to be the addition of ceiling insulation only if the house is not already insulated, weatherization, and reduction of the wall outer surface solar absorptance. The weatherization and solar absorptance reduction measures should be do-it-yourself installations to be cost-effective Replacement of an air-conditioning unit with a new high-efficiency unit was very effective in reducing peak demand and annual cooling energy. Unless the energy efficiency ratio of the existing unit is low (< 6), replacement is generally not cost-effective. The measures were predicted to result in slightly increased indoor humidities, but their effect on human comfort was predicted to be small. However, this conclusion should be considered preliminary since the simulation models used for these predictions have limitations. The amount of energy that can be saved by these measures is very dependent on the occupant's lifestyle, such as the degree to which the occupants will alter clothing to achieve comfort.

McLain, H. A.; MacDonald, J. M.; Goldenberg, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV

Blackmore, V; Doucas, G; Kimmitt, M F; Molloy, S; Ottewell, B; Perry, C; Woods, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Retrieval of Cirrus Cloud Radiative and Backscattering Properties Using Combined Lidar and Infrared Radiometer (LIRAD) Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for retrieval of cirrus macrophysical and radiative properties using combined ruby lidar and infrared radiometer measurements is explained in detail. The retrieval algorithm includes estimation of a variable backscatter-to-extinction ...

Jennifer M. Comstock; Kenneth Sassen

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Field Experiment for Measurement of the Radiative Characteristics of a Hazy Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two-and three-dimensional solutions to the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. A field experiment was conducted to test this theory. in the experiment the upward radiance was measured above ...

Y. J. Kaufman; T. W. Brakke; E. Eloranta

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A New Shadow-Ring Device for Measuring Diffuse Solar Radiation at the Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new shadow-ring device for measuring diffuse solar radiation at the surface is presented. In this device the seasonal variation of shadow is followed by moving the detector horizontally. This unique characteristic facilitates its application ...

Amauri P. de Oliveira; Antonio J. Machado; João F. Escobedo

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Signal Postprocessing and Reflectivity Calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915-MHz Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has recently initiated a new research avenue toward a better characterization of the transition from cloud to precipitation. Dual-wavelength techniques applied to millimeter-...

Frédéric Tridon; Alessandro Battaglia; Pavlos Kollias; Edward Luke; Christopher R. Williams

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: An Evaluation of Signal Processing and Sampling Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several specific locations within different climatological regimes. These vertically pointing cloud ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce A. Albrecht; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Mark A. Miller; Karen L. Johnson; Kenneth P. Moran

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Global, Seasonal Cloud Variations from Satellite Radiance Measurements. Part II. Cloud Properties and Radiative Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global, daily, visible and infrared radiance measurements from the NOAA-5 Scanning Radiometer (SR) are analyzed for the months of January, April, July and October 1977 to infer cloud and surface radiative properties and their effects on the Earth ...

William B. Rossow; Andrew A. Lacis

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux by Actinometer and of Maximal Polarization of Sky Brightness in the Solar Almucantar A. Kh. Shukurov, K. A....

232

Error in Measurements of Incoming Shortwave Radiation Made from Ships and Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors in shortwave solar radiation measurements resulting from mean tils and rocking motions, as well as from the response time of the sensors, are determined experimentally. The magnitude of the mean tilt error can be large and lead to errors ...

M. A. MacWhorter; R. A. Weller

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Parameterization of Radiation for Numerical Weather Prediction and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a review of the various methods used to compute both the fluxes and the rate of heating and/or cooling due to atmospheric radiation for use in numerical models of atmospheric circulation. The paper does not follow, step by ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global Warming and Methane--Global warming, an increase in Earth's near-surface temperature, is believed to result from the buildup of what scientists refer to as ''greenhouse gases.'' These gases include water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluoro-carbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. Greenhouse gases can absorb outgoing infrared (heat) radiation and re-emit it back to Earth, warming the surface. Thus, these gases act like the glass of a greenhouse enclosure, trapping infrared radiation inside and warming the space. One of the more important greenhouse gases is the naturally occurring hydrocarbon methane. Methane, a primary component of natural gas, is the second most important contributor to the greenhouse effect (after carbon dioxide). Natural sources of methane include wetlands, fossil sources, termites, oceans, fresh-waters, and non-wetland soils. Methane is also produced by human-related (or anthropogenic) activities such as fossil fuel production, coal mining, rice cultivation, biomass burning, water treatment facilities, waste management operations and landfills, and domesticated livestock operations (Figure 1). These anthropogenic activities account for approximately 70% of the methane emissions to the atmosphere. Methane is removed naturally from the atmosphere in three ways. These methods, commonly referred to as sinks, are oxidation by chemical reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl ion, oxidation within the stratosphere, and microbial uptake by soils. In spite of their important role in removing excess methane from the atmosphere, the sinks cannot keep up with global methane production. Methane concentrations in the atmosphere have increased by 145% since 1800. Increases in atmospheric methane roughly parallel world population growth, pointing to anthropogenic sources as the cause (Figure 2). Increases in the methane concentration reduce Earth's natural cooling efficiency by trapping more of the outgoing terrestrial infrared radiation, increasing the near-surface temperature.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

235

Radiation Measurements 40 (2005) 560568 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Measurements 40 (2005) 560­568 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas Long-term measurements of radon progeny concentrations with solid-state nuclear track detectors K.N.Yua, , D. Nikezica,1 , F-term measurements of radon decay products with solid-state nuclear track detectors. We then propose a method

Yu, K.N.

236

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Final report, September 15, 1990--October 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

DOE has launched a major initiative -- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCMs under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. In 1990, the authors proposed to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems connected with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem -- longwave radiation. In particular, their long-term research goals are to: develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations, assess the impact of the longwave radiative forcing in a GCM, determine the sensitivity of a GCM to the radiative model used in it, and determine how the longwave radiative forcing contributes relatively when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and expansion.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Posters Single-Column Model for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Sites: Model Development and Sensitivity Test Q. Xu and M. Dong Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman,...

238

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface downward far-infrared (far-IR) spectra were collected from NASA’s Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument from August to October 2009 at an altitude of 5.4 km near the summit of Cerro Toco, Chile. This region is known for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST observes the very fine spectral structure in the far-IR with differences as small as +/- 0.7% for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky simulations. Clear sky model analysis demonstrated the greatest sensitivity to atmospheric conditions is between 300 and 500 cm-1. The cloudy-sky simulations demonstrated that the far-IR radiation has minimal sensitivity to cloud particle effective radius, yet is very sensitive to cloud optical thickness at wavenumbers between 400 - 600 cm-1. In fact, cirrus optical thickness found to be inferred from the brightness temperature differences at 250 and 559.5 cm-1. Aerosols proved to reduce downwelling radiance by half that a clear-sky would emit, but had little effect on the total far-IR radiative forcing. Furthermore, these far-IR measurements open a new window to understanding the radiative impacts of various atmospheric constituents such as water vapor and clouds, and to understanding and modeling the Earth’s climate and energy budget.

Baugher, Elizabeth

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds Derived from Surface Interferometric Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam transmittance, emittance, reflectance, and outgoing radiance are inferred from interferometric measurements in the infrared window region for 14 temperate continental and 12 subtropical cirrus cloud cash observed during FIRE II at Parsons, ...

Gordon H. Beck; John M. Davis; S. K. Cox

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Air Temperature Measurement Errors in Naturally Ventilated Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sources of systematic errors are considered for estimating air temperature. The first source is ambiguity of the definition of the standardized measurement height over vegetated surfaces of varying heights. Without such a standardization, ...

Reina Nakamura; L. Mahrt

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program’s first water vapor intensive observation period (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This ...

D. D. Turner; J. E. M. Goldsmith

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Lidar-Measured Winds from Space: A Key Component for Weather and Climate Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deployment of a space-based Doppler lidar would provide information that is fundamental to advancing the understanding and prediction of weather and climate.

Wayman E. Baker; George D. Emmitt; Franklin Robertson; Robert M. Atlas; John E. Molinari; David A. Bowdle; Jan Paegle; R. Michael Hardesty; Madison J. Post; Robert T. Menzies; T. N. Krishnamurti; Robert A. Brown; John R. Anderson; Andrew C. Lorenc; James McElroy

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Downscaling Aerosols and the Impact of Neglected Subgrid Processes on Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing for a Representative Global Climate Model Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to many global climate models include detailed, prognostic aerosol calculations intended to better reproduce the observed climate. However, the trace gas and aerosol fields are treated at the grid-cell scale with no attempt to account for sub-grid impacts on the aerosol fields. This paper begins to quantify the error introduced by the neglected sub-grid variability for the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a representative climate model grid spacing of 75 km. An analysis of the value added in downscaling aerosol fields is also presented to give context to the WRF-Chem simulations used for the sub-grid analysis. We found that 1) the impact of neglected sub-grid variability on the aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in regions of complex topography and complicated flow patterns, and 2) scale-induced differences in emissions contribute strongly to the impact of neglected sub-grid processes on the aerosol radiative forcing. The two of these effects together, when simulated at 75 km vs. 3 km in WRF-Chem, result in an average daytime mean bias of over 30% error in top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a large percentage of central Mexico during the MILAGRO field campaign.

Gustafson, William I.; Qian, Yun; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

244

Climate Feedbacks in CCSM3 under Changing CO2 Forcing. Part II: Variation of Climate Feedbacks and Sensitivity with Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Are equilibrium climate sensitivity and the associated radiative feedbacks a constant property of the climate system, or do they change with forcing magnitude and base climate? Using the radiative kernel technique, feedbacks and climate ...

Alexandra K. Jonko; Karen M. Shell; Benjamin M. Sanderson; Gokhan Danabasoglu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an improved multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over previously published MPA studies due to the incorporation of an artificial horizon that prevents reflected ground radiation from striking the tilted sensors. In this paper a description of the NIST-traceable calibration facility is provided and preliminary results are presented that compare the MPA predicted beam to beam measurements from a precision normal incidence pyrheliometer and diffuse measurements from a precision shadow-band pyranometer respectively.

Munger, B.; Haberl, J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Radiation Measurements 36 (2003) 161164  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Radiation Measurements 36 (2003) 161­164 www 2003 Abstract Solid state nuclear track detectors are commonly used for measurements of concentrations been established a long time ago that the absorbed radon (222 Rn) dose in the human lung

Yu, K.N.

247

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

248

Accurate and Fast Neural Network Emulations of Model Radiation for the NCEP Coupled Climate Forecast System: Climate Simulations and Seasonal Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The approach to accurate and fast-calculating model physics using neural network emulations was previously developed by the authors for both longwave and shortwave radiation parameterizations or the full model radiation, which is the most time-...

V. M. Krasnopolsky; M. S. Fox-Rabinovitz; Y. T. Hou; S. J. Lord; A. A. Belochitski

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Comparison of Solar UVA and UVB Radiation Measured in Selangor, Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation data was measured at Physics Building, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (2 degree sign 55' N, 101 degree sign 46' E, 50m asl) by the Xplorer GLX Pasco that connected to UVA Light sensor. The measured solar UVA data were compared with the total daily solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation data recorded by the Malaysian Metrological Department at Petaling Jaya, Malaysia (3 degree sign 06' N, 101 degree sign 39' E, 50m asl) for 18 days in year 2007. The daily total average of UVA radiation received is (298{+-}105) kJm{sup -2} while the total daily maximum is (600{+-}56) kJm{sup -2}. From the analysis, it shows that the values of UVA radiation data were higher than UVB radiation data with the average ratio of 6.41% between 3-14%. A weak positive correlation was found (the correlation coefficient, r, is 0.22). The amount of UVA radiation that reached the earth surface is less dependence on UVB radiation and the factors were discussed.

Kamarudin, S. U.; Gopir, G.; Yatim, B. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Level 2, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sanusi, H. [Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Level 2, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Mahmud, P. S. Megat; Choo, P. Y. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

A New Measurement of the $?^0$ Radiative Decay Width  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

I. Larin; D. McNulty; E. Clinton; P. Ambrozewicz; D. Lawrence; I. Nakagawa; Y. Prok; A. Teymurazyan; A. Ahmidouch; A. Asratyan; K. Baker; L. Benton; A. M. Bernstein; V. Burkert; P. Cole; P. Collins; D. Dale; S. Danagoulian; G. Davidenko; R. Demirchyan; A. Deur; A. Dolgolenko; G. Dzyubenko; R. Ent; A. Evdokimov; J. Feng; M. Gabrielyan; L. Gan; A. Gasparian; S. Gevorkyan; A. Glamazdin; V. Goryachev; V. Gyurjyan; K. Hardy; J. He; M. Ito; L. Jiang; D. Kashy; M. Khandaker; P. Kingsberry; A. Kolarkar; M. Konchatnyi; A. Korchin; W. Korsch; S. Kowalski; M. Kubantsev; V. Kubarovsky; X. Li; P. Martel; V. Matveev; B. Mecking; B. Milbrath; R. Minehart; R. Miskimen; V. Mochalov; S. Mtingwa; S. Overby; E. Pasyuk; M. Payen; R. Pedroni; B. Ritchie; T. E. Rodrigues; C. Salgado; A. Shahinyan; A. Sitnikov; D. Sober; S. Stepanyan; W. Stephens; J. Underwood; A. Vasiliev; V. Vishnyakov; M. Wood; S. Zhou

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

251

Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

Comparison of Historical Satellite Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowland Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-based solar radiation estimates have recently been incorporated into the 1990-2005 update to the 1961-1990 U.S. National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) also supplies satellite-based estimates of solar radiation. The usefulness of such data with respect to solar resources for site selection and designing solar energy conversion systems is often questioned. The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates. We compare the most recent shadowband radiometer MMDT with a complement of thermopile 'first class' solar radiometers at one site. Quantitative analysis shows that in most cases, the long-term average MMDT and measured data are comparable, within 10% of each other for global, and 20% for direct-radiation MMDT.

Myers, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter  

SciTech Connect

Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

Chuyu Liu

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Measurement Requirements for Climate Monitoring of Upper-Air Temperature Derived from Reanalysis Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a reanalysis of the climate of the past half century as a model of temperature variations over the next half century, tests of various data collection protocols are made to develop recommendations for observing system requirements for ...

Dian J. Seidel; Melissa Free

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

An improved multipyranometer array for the measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development of an improved multipyranometer array (NDA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diff-use solar radiation. The NWA described in this thesis is an improvement over previously published MPA studies due to the incorporation of an artificial horizon that prevents reflected ground radiation from striking the tilted sensors, the development of an improved solution scheme for the calculation of the beam and diff-use solar radiation components, and the development of an empirical spectral correction for the photovoltaic-type sensors used in the NWA. In this thesis a description of the NIST-traceable calibration facility is provided and results are presented that compare the NWA predicted beam to beam measurements from a precision normal incidence pyrheliometer.

Munger, Bryce Kirtley

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development of an improved multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this thesis is an improvement over previously published MPA studies due to the incorporation of an artificial horizon that prevents reflected ground radiation from striking the tilted sensors, the development of an improved solution scheme for the calculation of the beam and diffuse solar radiation components, and the development of an empirical spectral correction for the photovoltaic-type sensors used in the MPA. In this thesis a description of the NIST-traceable calibration facility is provided and results are presented that compare the MPA predicted beam to beam measurements from a precision normal incidence pyrheliometer.

Munger, Bryce Kirtley

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

DOE/SC-ARM-12-015 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all data are in final processing at the Archive. The AMF1 system is now deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to support the Two-Column Aerosol Campaign (TCAP). The TCAP campaign...

258

DOE/SC-ARM-13-013 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sites. The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) is in the teardown and packing phase at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, after having completed the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). The TCAP...

259

DOE/SC-ARM-13-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru, and Darwin sites. The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) is now deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to support the Two-Column Aerosol Campaign (TCAP). The TCAP campaign...

260

DOE/SC-ARM-13-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru, and Darwin sites. The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) is now deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to support the Two-Column Aerosol Campaign (TCAP). The TCAP campaign...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Study of the temporal and spatial variation of climate and solar radiation in th metropolitan Phoenix area. Final technical progress report, July 1, 1977-June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research performed was designed to identify spatial or temporal variation of any atmospheric parameters that might affect the operation of devices utilizing solar energy in the metropolitan Phoenix area. The first part of the research involved the analysis of all available solar and climatic data to determine their validity and comparability. For the standard climatic parameters, few difficulties were encountered, but the task of determining comparability of solar radiation data involved many pitfalls. It was concluded that most of the solar data acquired before January 1977 could not be used for purposes of identifying spatial variability. And, a year and a half of data does not represent a long enough period of time upon which to base sound conclusions about spatial and temporal variability of solar radiation in the metropolitan Phoenix region. The data currently available to us do not indicate any great variation of solar radiation in the metropolitan Phoenix area. However, any meaningful statements about spatial and temporal variability of solar radiation in the metropolitan Phoenix area must await the acquisition of additional data from well-calibrated equipment.

Durrenberger, R.W.

1978-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

banner banner Home | People | Site Index Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility US Department of Energy About Science Campaigns Sites Instruments Measurements Data News Publications Education Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQ Outreach Displays History Organization Participants Facility Statistics Forms Contacts Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings Propose a Campaign Submitting Proposals: Guidelines Featured Campaigns Campaign Data List of Campaigns Aerial Facility Eastern North Atlantic Mobile Facilities North Slope of Alaska Southern Great Plains Tropical Western Pacific Location Table Contacts Instrument Datastreams Value-Added Products PI Data Products Field Campaign Data Related Data

263

A New Natural Gamma Radiation Measurement System for Marine Sediment and Rock Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to background ratio is maximized with passive lead shielding, including both ordinary and low-activity lead. Large-area plastic scintillator active shielding filters background associated with the high-energy part of cosmic radiation. The new system has at least an order of magnitude higher statistical reliability and significantly enhances data quality compared to other offshore natural gamma radiation (NGR) systems designed to measure geological core samples. Reliable correlations and interpretations of cored intervals are ...

Vasiliev, M A; Chubarian, G; Olsen, R; Bennight, C; Cobine, T; Fackler, D; Hastedt, M; Houpt, D; Mateo, Z; Vasilieva, Y B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Quality control of solar radiation data within the RMIB solar measurements network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessment of the solar resource is based upon measured data, where available. However, with any measurement there exist errors. Consequently, solar radiation data do not exhibit necessarily the same reliability and it often happens that users face time series of measurements containing questionable values though preliminary technical control has been done before the data release. To overcome such a situation, a major effort has been undertaken at the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMIB) to develop procedures and software for performing post-measurement quality control of solar data from the radiometric stations of our in situ solar monitoring network. Moreover, because solar energy applications usually need continuous time series of solar radiation data, additional procedures have also been established to fill missing values (data initially lacking or removed via quality checks). (author)

Journee, Michel; Bertrand, Cedric [Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Two-phase fluid density measurement with a two-beam radiation densitometer  

SciTech Connect

A densitometer consisting of two beams of radiation passing through a pipe is very useful for measuring the average density and the density distribution of inhomogeneous two-phase fluids in the pipe. The general technique is illustrated by an example. (auth)

Lassahn, G.D.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A PORTABLE DOSE RATE INSTRUMENT FOR MEASUREMENT OF NATURAL BACK-GROUND RADIATION LEVELS  

SciTech Connect

An instrument of the ionization chamber type which is capable of measuring radiation dose rates down to and below those encountered in natural background was designed and constructed. It consists of a 40-liter ionization chamber coupled to a portable battery-powered electrometer. The chamber polarizing battery is a part of the chamber center electrode assembly and is located inside the chamber. (auth)

Rising, F.L.

1960-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

Low Frequency Measurement of the Spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

Smoot, G. F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S. D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

1983-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

269

Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a very hot summer equivalent to a Guangzhou summer, the reduction of heat coming into rooms is very important with respect to thermal comfort and energy efficiency. The objective of this study is to investigate the evaporation cooling effect on a rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results of the hot-climate wind tunnel experiment. The calculated equivalent thermal resistance and synthesis exterior surface heat transfer coefficient were in fairly good agreement with that in the design standard for energy efficiency of residential buildings in the hot summer and warm winter zone, while the average velocity in hot-climate wind tunnel equals the summer average outdoor velocity in Guangzhou.

Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Measurement of the surface wavelength distribution of narrow-band radiation by a colorimetric method  

SciTech Connect

A method is suggested for determining the wavelength of narrow-band light from a digital photograph of a radiating surface. The digital camera used should be appropriately calibrated. The accuracy of the wavelength measurement is better than 1 nm. The method was tested on the yellow doublet of mercury spectrum and on the adjacent continuum of the incandescent lamp radiation spectrum. By means of the method suggested the homogeneity of holographic sensor swelling was studied in stationary and transient cases. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Kraiskii, A V; Mironova, T V; Sultanov, T T [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

L- and M-shell absorption measurements of radiatively heated Fe plasma  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of iron-plasma absorption spectrum over 150-1200 eV photon energy range were reported at temperature T = (72 {+-} 4) eV. The electron temperature was diagnosed with the absorption spectrum of aluminum mixed with iron. The density was not diagnosed directly but obtained from a radiative hydrodynamic simulation with the Multi-1D code. The broad photon energy range enables simultaneous observation of the L-shell and M-shell transitions that dominate the radiation transport at this temperature. The spectrally resolved transmission data were compared to the detailed-configuration-accounting model calculations and reasonable agreement was found.

Zhang Jiyan; Li Hang; Zhao Yang; Xiong Gang; Yuan Zheng; Zhang Haiying; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiamin; Liu Shenye; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu Yan; Meng Xujun; Yan Jun [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development of a second-generation regional climate model (RegCM2). Part I: Boundary-layer and radiative transfer processes  

SciTech Connect

During the last few years the development of a second-generation regional climate modeling system (RegCM2) has been completed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Based upon the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Pennsylvania State University Mesoscale Model (MM4), RegCM2 includes improved formulations of boundary layer, radiative transfer, surface physics, cumulus convection, and time integration technique, which make it more physically comprehensive and more computationally efficient than the previous regional climate model version. This paper discusses a number of month-long simulations over the European region that were conducted to test the new RegCM2 boundary-layer parameterization (the scheme developed by Holtsag et al.) and radiative transfer formulation [the package developed for the NCAR Community Climate Model 2 (CCM2)]. Both schemes significantly affect the model precipitation, temperature, moisture, and cloudiness climatology, leading to overall more realistic results, while they do not substantially modify the model performance in simulating the aggregated characteristics of synoptic patterns. Description of the convective processes and procedures of boundary condition assimilation included in RegCM2 is presented in companion paper by Giorgi et al. 26 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

Giorgi, F.; Marinucci, M.R.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Dust Aerosol Impact on North Africa Climate: A GCM Investigation of Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Using A-Train Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol indirect effect based on cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in the climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD). When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced, since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing could exceed aerosol forcing. With the aerosol indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced for ice water path (IWP) larger than 20 g m-2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP. AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect result in less OLR and net solar flux at the top of the atmosphere over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. The increased precipitation seems to be associated with enhanced ice water contents in this region. The 200 mb radiative heating rate shows more cooling with the aerosol indirect effect since greater cooling is produced at the cloud top with smaller ice crystal size. The 500 mb omega indicates strong upward motion, which, together with the increased cooling effect, results in the increased ice water contents. Adding the aerosol direct effect into the model simulation reduces the precipitation in the normal rainfall band over North Africa, where precipitation is shifted to the south and the northeast produced by the absorption of sunlight and the subsequent heating of the air column by dust particles. As a result, rainfall is drawn further inland to the northeast. This study represents the first attempt to quantify the climate impact of aerosol indirect effect using a GCM in connection with A-train satellite data. The parameterization for the aerosol first indirect effect developed in this study can be readily incorporated for application to any other GCMs.

Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Jiang, Jonathan; Su, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates from Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland area shores. Addendum 1  

SciTech Connect

Environmental radiation exposure rate measurements are taken on and around the Hanford Site for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. In 1992, environmental radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from shoreline and island areas ranging from Vernita, along the Hanford Reach, down to the Richland Pumphouse. Measurements were taken primarily at locations known or expected to have elevated exposure rates as determined by examination of aerial photographs depicting radiation exposure measurements. Results from the 1992 survey indicated radiation exposure rates taken from the Hanford Reach area were elevated in comparison to the measurements taken from the Vernita area with ranges of 8 to 28 {mu}R/hr and 4 to 11 {mu}R/hr, respectively. In January 1994, additional shoreline radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from the Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland areas to determine the relationship of radiation exposure rates along the Richland area shores when compared to Vernita and Hanford Reach area exposure rates (measurements along the Richland area were not collected during the 1992 survey). This report discusses the 1994 results and is an addendum to the report that discussed the 1992 survey. An analysis of variance indicated a significant location interaction at a p-value of 0.0014. To determine differences between paried locations a post-hoc comparison of location means was performed on log transformed data using the Scheff{acute e}`s F-test. This test indicated a significant difference between Hanford Reach and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.075 /{mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.0014. No significant difference was found between Hanford Reach and Vernita area means: The mean difference was 0.031 {mu}R/hr and the p-value was 0.3138. No significant difference was found between Vernita and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.044 {mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.1155.

Cooper, A.T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Transmission of Solar Radiation by Clouds over Snow and Ice Surfaces. Part II: Cloud Optical Depth and Shortwave Radiative Forcing from Pyranometer Measurements in the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downward solar irradiance at the sea surface, measured on several voyages of an icebreaker in the Southern Ocean, is used to infer transmittance of solar radiation by clouds. Together with surface albedo estimated from coincident hourly sea ice ...

Melanie F. Fitzpatrick; Stephen G. Warren

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Spectral longwave emission in the tropics: FTIR measurements at the sea surface and comparison with fast radiation codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Longwave emission by the tropical western Pacific atmosphere has been measured at the ocean surface by a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroradiometer deployed aboard the research vessel John Vickers as part of the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment. The instrument operated throughout a Pacific Ocean crossing, beginning on 7 March 1993 in Honiara, Solomon Islands, and ending on 29 March 1993 in Los Angeles, and recorded longwave emission spectra under atmospheres associated with sea surface temperatures ranging from 291.0 to 302.8 K. Precipitable water vapor abundances ranged from 1.9 to 5.5 column centimeters. Measured emission spectra (downwelling zenith radiance) covered the middled infrared (5-20 {mu}m) with one inverse centimeter spectral resolution. FTIR measurements made under an entirely clear field of view are compared with spectra generated by LOWTRAN 7 and MODTRAN 2, as well as downwelling flux calculated by the NCAR COmmunity Climate Model (CCM-2) radiation code, using radiosonde profiles as input data for these calculations. In the spectral interval 800-1000 cm{sup -1}, these comparisons show a discrepance between FTIR data and MODTRAN 2 having an overall variability of 6-7 mW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} cm and a concave shape that may be related to the representation of water vapor continuum emission in MODTRAN 2. Another discrepancy appears in the spectral interval 1200-1300 cm{sup -1}, whether MODTRAN 2 appears to overestimate zenith radiance by 5 mW m{sup -2} sr-1 cm. These discrepancies appear consistently; however, they become only slightly larger at the highest water vapor abundances. Because these radiance discrepancies correspond to broadband (500-2000 cm{sup -1}) flux uncertainties of around 3 W m{sup -2}, there appear to be no serious inadequacies with the performance of MODTRAN 2 or LOWTRAN 7 at high atmospheric temperatures and water vapor abundances. 23 refs., 10 figs.

Lubin, D.; Cutchin, D.; Conant, W. [Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA (United States); Grassl, H. [Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)] [Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Schmid, U.; Biselli, W. [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)] [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Satellite-based reconstruction of the tropical oceanic clear sky outgoing longwave radiation and comparison with climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) in clear-sky conditions have been calculated using High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) observations from 1979 to 2004. After applying corrections for satellite orbital drift and ...

Guillaume Gastineau; Brian J. Soden; Darren L. Jackson; Chris W. O’Dell

280

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic ...

S. J. Ghan; X. Liu; R. C. Easter; R. Zaveri; P. J. Rasch; J.-H. Yoon; B. Eaton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

Voyles, JW

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time M. Splitt University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Recent work in this area by Charles Wade (1987) lays out the groundwork for monitoring data quality for projects with large networks of instruments such as the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Wade generated objectively analyzed fields of meteorological variables (temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind) and then compared the objectively analyzed value at the sensor location with the value produced by the sensor. Wade used a Barne's objective analysis scheme to produce objective data values for a given meteorological variable (q) in two- dimensional space. The objectively analyzed value should

283

Passive and Active Radiation Measurements Capability at the INL Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility is a Department of Energy facility located in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex. It contains various nuclear and non-nuclear materials that are available to support many radiation measurement assessments. User-selected, single material, nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be readily utilized with ZPPR clamshell containers with almost no criticality concerns. If custom, multi-material configurations are desired, the ZPPR clamshell or an approved aluminum Inspection Object (IO) Box container may be utilized, yet each specific material configuration will require a criticality assessment. As an example of the specialized material configurations possible, the National Nuclear Security Agency’s Office of Nuclear Verification (NNSA/NA 243) has sponsored the assembly of six material configurations. These are shown in the Appendixes and have been designated for semi-permanent storage that can be available to support various radiation measurement applications.

Robert Neibert; John Zabriskie; Collin Knight; James L. Jones

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Radiative Effects of Aerosols on Photochemical Smog: Measurements and Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. High concentrations of both ozone and aerosols are observed in the eastern United States during stagnant weather conditions associated with transport from the W or NW; they show similar spatial and temporal patterns. We discuss a causal mechanism that may contribute to this correlation - the radiative effects of aerosols on photolysis rates. We measured j(NO 2 ), the rate coefficient for nitrogen dioxide photolysis, and column aerosol optical depths at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD (39.01 ffi N and 76.87 ffi W) during the smog seasons of 1995 and 1997. Direct measurements and radiative transfer model calculations show that particles can reduce surface j(NO 2 ) by 5 - 60%, depending on solar zenith angle and aerosol loading. Although particle scattering by dense aerosol loading on smoggy days decreases near-surface photolysis rates, it increases the integrated boundary layer photolysis rates by up to 20% and leads to accelerated photochemical smog formation in ...

Kondragunta Dickerson Stenchikov; S. Kondragunta; R. R. Dickerson; G. Stenchikov; W. F. Ryan; B. Holben; R. W. Stewart

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations of the radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of the spectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatial distribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and tested a simple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolute measurement of the bunch length. A description of the method and the experimental results are presented.

Filippetto, D.; /Frascati; Sannibale, F.; Zolotorev, Max Samuil; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

286

Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation  

SciTech Connect

A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE UK SOLAR ENERGY RESOURCE Dougal Burnett*1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model were performed by identifying UK Met Office weather stations measuring both solar radiation and comparing it to the actual measured solar radiation. Eighteen weather stations were found to meetCLIMATE CHANGE AND THE UK SOLAR ENERGY RESOURCE Dougal Burnett*1 and Gareth P. Harrison1 1 School

Harrison, Gareth

288

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1.4 mSv was measured, respectively. Using kilovoltage or megavoltage radiation to obtain cone beam computed tomography scans led to an additional dose of 8-46 mSv. For treatment verification images performed once per week using double exposure technique, an additional effective dose of up to 18 mSv was measured. Conclusions: Daily setup imaging using kilovoltage planar images or TomoTherapy megavoltage fan beam CT imaging can be used as a standard procedure in clinical routine. Daily kilovoltage and megavoltage cone beam computed tomography setup imaging should be applied on an individual or indication based protocol. Depending on the imaging scheme applied, image-guided radiation therapy can be administered without increasing the dose outside of the treated volume compared to therapies without image guidance.

Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057 (Switzerland) and Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

NIST Testimony on Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Testimony on Climate Change. 2009. Monitoring, Measurement and Verification of Greenhouse Gas Emissions II: The ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

Contrails, Cirrus Trends, and Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising global air traffic and its associated contrails have the potential for affecting climate via radiative forcing. Current estimates of contrail climate effects are based on coverage by linear contrails that do not account for spreading and, ...

Patrick Minnis; J. Kirk Ayers; Rabindra Palikonda; Dung Phan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Improving the reliability and accuracy of a multipyranometer array measuring solar radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measurement of solar radiation is crucial for the use of solar energy in fields including power generation, agriculture and meteorology. In the building sciences, It is essential for daylighting studies, energy use calculations, and thermal simulation. These uses require knowing the amount of solar radiation irradiating variously oriented walls and tilted roofs, which can be calculated from beam and diffuse radiation measured on a horizontal surface. It is possible to obtain such data using a multipyranometer array (MPA). However, the MPA is not as accurate as some other sensors and suffers from poor data reliability. This work improves the accuracy of the MPA and solves the problem of invalid data. Several schemes the removal of invalid data are tested. The location of the test equipment is changed to one with fewer obstructions. A Class A sensor is substituted for one of the photovoltaic sensors. Corrections are applied to the photovoltaic sensors. The need for changing sensor alignment is tested. As a result, accuracy has been significantly improved over previous work.

Klima, Peter Miloslaw

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

An Absolute Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Temperature at 10.7 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A balloon-borne experiment has measured the absolute temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 10.7 GHz to be Tcmbr = 2.730 +- .014 K. The error is the quadratic sum of several systematic errors, with statistical error of less than 0.1 mK. The instrument comprises a cooled corrugated horn antenna coupled to a total-power radiometer. A cryogenic mechanical waveguide switch alternately connects the radiometer to the horn and to an internal reference load. The small measured temperature difference (load in conjunction with the use of a cold front end keeps systematic instrumental corrections small. Atmospheric and window emission are minimized by flying the instrument at 24 km altitude. A large outer ground screen and smaller inner screen shield the instrument from stray radiation from the ground and the balloon. In-flight tests constrain the magnitude of ground radiation contamination, and low level interference is monitored through observations in several narrow frequency bands.

S. T. Staggs; N. C. Jarosik; S. S. Meyer; D. T. Wilkinson

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

Creation of a homogeneous plasma column by means of hohlraum radiation for ion-stopping measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we present the results of two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of a hohlraum target whose outgoing radiation is used to produce a homogeneously ionized carbon plasma for ion-beam stopping measurements. The cylindrical hohlraum with gold walls is heated by a frequency-doubled (\\lambda_l = 526.5 \\mu m) 1.4 ns long laser pulse with the total energy of E_l = 180 J. At the laser spot, the peak matter and radiation temperatures of, respectively, T ~ 380 eV and T_r ~ 120 eV are observed. X-rays from the hohlraum heat the attached carbon foam with a mean density of \\rho_C = 2 mg/cm^3 to a temperature of T ~ 25 eV. The simulation shows that the carbon ionization degree (Z ~ 3.75) and its column density stay relatively stable (within variations of about +-7%) long enough to conduct the ion-stopping measurements. Also, it is found that a special attention should be paid to the shock wave, emerging from the x-ray heated copper support plate, which at later times may significantly distort the ...

Faik, Steffen; Basko, Mikhail M; Maruhn, Joachim A; Rosmej, Olga; Rienecker, Tim; Novikov, Vladimir G; Grushin, Alexander S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Relation between measurable and principal characteristics of radiation-induced shape-change of graphite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of studies of radiation-induced shape-change of reactor graphite GR-280, through the series of measurements of samples with different orientation of cutting with respect to the direction of extrusion, a conclusion is made about the existence of polycrystal substructural elements - domains. Domains, like graphite as a whole, possess the property of transverse isotropy, but have different amplitudes of shape-change and random orientations of the axes of axial symmetry. The model of graphite, constructed on the basis of the concept of domains allowed to explain from a unified point of view most of existing experimental data. It is shown that the presence of the disoriented domain structure leads to the development of radiation-induced stresses and to the dependence of the shape-change on the size of graphite samples. We derive the relation between the shape-change of finite size samples and the actual shape-change of macro-graphite.

M. V. Arjakov; A. V. Subbotin; S. V. Panyukov; O. V. Ivanov; A. S. Pokrovskii; D. V. Kharkov

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

Climate Forcings and Climate Sensitivities Diagnosed from Coupled Climate Model Integrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple technique is proposed for calculating global mean climate forcing from transient integrations of coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). This “climate forcing” differs from the conventionally defined radiative ...

Piers Mde F. Forster; Karl E. Taylor

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Data Quality Assessment and Control for the ARM Climate Research Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is to provide observations of the earth climate system to the climate research community for the purpose of improving the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their coupling with the Earth's surface. In order for ARM measurements to be useful toward this goal, it is important that the measurements are of a known and reasonable quality. The ARM data quality program includes several components designed to identify quality issues in near-real-time, track problems to solutions, assess more subtle long-term issues, and communicate problems to the user community.

Peppler, R

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

299

A MEASUREMENT OF ANISOTROPY IN THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION ON A LARGE ANGULAR SCALE AT 33 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relative to the 3°K Radiation D.l Pilot's Flight Operationsradiation in the «, direction. «i is the direction of Ihc antenna on ihc pilot'spilot's left, checking the sign conventions. Table IV.1 - Measurements of Anisotropy of 3°K Radiation,

Gorenstein, M.V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

302

Annual Forcing of the Surface Radiation Balance Diurnal Cycle Measured from a High Tower near Boulder, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation balance consisting of upward and downward components of solar and thermal infrared broadband irradiances is continuously measured from the top of a 300-m tower situated on the Colorado high plains. The data are representative of a ...

Ellsworth G. Dutton

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Estimations of Cloud Optical Thickness from Ground-Based Measurements of Incoming Solar Radiation in the Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for evaluation of cloud optical thickness (plant-parallel, homogeneous layer) from ground-based measurements of incoming solar irradiance using a simple radiation model is introduced. The sensitivities of downward and upward fluxes of ...

E. Leontyeva; K. Stamnes

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: Second-Generation Sampling Strategies, Processing, and Cloud Data Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars in several climatologically distinct regions. The digital signal processors for these radars were recently upgraded and ...

Pavlos Kollias; Mark A. Miller; Edward P. Luke; Karen L. Johnson; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Kenneth P. Moran; Kevin B. Widener; Bruce A. Albrecht

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Narrow- and Broad-Band Satellite Measurements of Shortwave Radiation: Conversion Simulations with a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oregon State University/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory general circulation model has been employed as a vehicle for suggesting and exploring various means of converting narrow-band measurements of reflected solar radiation from the ...

Robert D. Cess; Gerald L. Potter

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A Theory for the Retrievals of Virtual Temperature from Remote Measurements of Horizontal Winds and Thermal Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops a theory for the estimation of virtual temperature from remote measurements of (i) emitted thermal radiation by microwave and infrared radiometers and (ii) horizontal winds by Doppler radars (or lidars). The problem of ...

Tzvi Gal-Chen

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Precise Measurement of the e(+)e(-)->pi(+)pi(-)(gamma) Cross Section with the Initial State Radiation Method at BABAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e[superscript +]e[superscript -]??[superscript +]?[superscript -](?) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

308

Determination of the Optical Thickness and Effective Particle Radius of Clouds from Reflected Solar Radiation Measurements. Part I: Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for determining the optical thickness and effective particle radius of stratiform cloud layers from reflected solar radiation measurements. A detailed study is presented which shows that the cloud optical thickness (?c) and ...

Teruyuki Nakajima; Michael D. King

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

310

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

311

Measuring the Effects of Disturbance & Climate on the CO2 & Energy Exchange of Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal is to quantify and understand the influence of climate and disturbance on ecosystem processes and thus net carbon uptake by forests. The objective is to combine tower and ground-based observations to quantify the effects of disturbance on processes controlling carbon storage and CO{sub 2} and energy exchange in varying climatic conditions. Specific objectives are: (1) Investigate the effects of logging and fire on carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in chronosequences of ponderosa pine, using consistent methodology; (2) Determine key environmental factors controlling carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in these forests through a combination of measurements and process modeling; and (3) Assess spatial variation of the concentrations and transport in complex terrain. The eddy covariance method is used for measurements of CO2, water vapor, and energy exchanges in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests (burned in 2002 wildfire, 10 year-old stand, 90 year-old mature stand). The mature stand has been an AmeriFlux site since 2000 (following previous flux sites in young and old stands initiated in 1996). In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, a large suite of biological processes and ecosystem properties are determined for the purpose of developing independent forest carbon budgets and NEP estimates; these include photosynthesis, stand respiration, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes, annual litterfall, foliar chemistry, and bole increment, and soil organic matter among other parameters. The measurements are being integrated and evaluated with two ecosystem models (BIOME-BGC and SPA). Such analyses are needed to assess regional terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets. The results will contribute scientific understanding of carbon processes, and will provide comprehensive data sets for forest managers and those preparing national carbon inventories to use in assessments of carbon sequestration in relation to interannual climate variation and disturbance. Frameworks and methodologies developed by the PI will contribute to AmeriFlux Network facility functions for data acquisition, exchange and modeling of results in a broad spectrum of carbon cycle research.

Beverly E. Law; Larry Mahrt

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates  

SciTech Connect

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 15 September 1990--25 April 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of our group to meet our stated objectives. The report is divided into sections entitled: Radiation Model Testing Activities, General Circulation Model Testing Activities, Science Team Activities, and Publications, Presentations and Meetings. The section on Science Team Activities summarizes our participation with the science team to further advance the observation and modeling programs. Appendix A lists graduate students supported, and post-doctoral appointments during the project. Reports on the activities during each of the first two years are included as Appendix B. Significant progress has been made in: determining the ability of line-by-line radiation models to calculate the downward longwave flux at the surface; determining the uncertainties in calculated the downwelling radiance and flux at the surface associated with the use of different proposed profiling techniques; intercomparing clear-sky radiance and flux observations with calculations from radiation codes from different climate models; determining the uncertainties associated with estimating N* from surface longwave flux observations; and determining the sensitivity of model calculations to different formulations of the effects of finite sized clouds.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (ozone · Result: a statistical range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW

Sheridan, Jennifer

315

Parameterization of Ice Cloud Radiative Properties and Its Application to the Potential Climatic Importance of Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is often assumed, in modeling and radiation budget simulation, that clouds below the cirrus level are entirely in the liquid phase. There is substantive evidence from observations that low and middle clouds are often of mixed phase. Using a ...

Zhian Sun; Keith P. Shine

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Short-Term Climate Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections from Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation. Part II: Lagged Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a sequel to Part I of this study, lagged relationships in atmospheric teleconnections associated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are investigated using Lagged Cross Correlations (LCC). The feasibility of extratropical seasonal-to-...

Ka-Ming Lau; Paul H. Chan

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Climatic effects of 1950–2050 changes in US anthropogenic aerosols – Part 1: Aerosol trends and radiative forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model combined with the GISS general circulation model to calculate the aerosol direct and indirect (warm cloud) radiative forcings from US anthropogenic sources over the 1950–2050 ...

Leibensperger, Eric Michael

318

ARM - ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Support International Polar Year Begins at ACRF with 3-week Campaign in Barrow Aerosol Affects on Clouds To Be Studied Yearlong Study to Improve Polar Measurements of Radiative Energy Education Efforts Educational Kiosk CD Available at No Cost-Request Yours Today! POLAR-PALOOZA: Climate science goes on tour! Partnership Extends Support for National Science Teacher Conference Teacher's Domain Combines Culture and Climate Other Links ACRF IPY Home U.S. IPY Home ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) The Department of Energy's International Polar Year (IPY) contributions will be conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) located in the North Slope of Alaska. This DOE user facility

319

Vertical Profiles of Aerosol and Radiation and the Influence of a Temperature Inversion: Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an airborne experiment performed near Mönchengladbach (Germany) in November 1993 are reported. Besides meteorological data, vertical profiles of aerosol properties (number concentration, size distribution) and radiation (...

M. Wendisch; S. Mertes; A. Ruggaber; T. Nakajima

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

322

Optimal Measurement of Surface Shortwave Irradiance Using Current Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although most measurements of total downwelling shortwave irradiance are made with pyranometers, the World Climate Research Program’s Baseline Surface Radiation Network has recommended the use of the summation of shortwave components in which the ...

J. Michalsky; E. Dutton; M. Rubes; D. Nelson; T. Stoffel; M. Wesley; M. Splitt; J. DeLuisi

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

325

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cloud Radiative Forcing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Vertical Redistribution of Radiant Energy by Clouds. Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Kato, Seiji Hampton University/NASA Langley Research Center Documentation with data of the effects of clouds on the radiant energy balance of the surface and atmosphere represent a critical shortcoming in the set of observations that are needed to ascertain the validity of model simulations of the earth's climate. While clouds are known to cool the climate system from TOA radiation budget studies, the redistribution of energy between the surface and atmosphere and within the atmosphere by clouds has not been examined in detail. Using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP)

326

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosol on solar and infrared radiation through droplet and crystal nucleation on aerosol, and semidirect effects through the influence of solar absorption on the distribution of clouds. A three-mode representation of the aerosol in version 5.1 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.1) yields global annual mean radiative forcing estimates for each of these forcing mechanisms that are within 0.1 W m–2 of estimates using a more complex seven-mode representation that distinguishes between fresh and aged black carbon and primary organic matter. Simulating fresh black carbon particles separately from internally mixed accumulation mode particles is found to be important only near fossil fuel sources. In addition to the usual large indirect effect on solar radiation, this study finds an unexpectedly large positive longwave indirect effect (because of enhanced cirrus produced by homogenous nucleation of ice crystals on anthropogenic sulfate), small shortwave and longwave semidirect effects, and a small direct effect (because of cancelation and interactions of direct effects of black carbon and sulfate). Differences between the threemode and seven-mode versions are significantly larger (up to 0.2 W m–2) when the hygroscopicity of primary organic matter is decreased from 0.1 to 0 and transfer of the primary carbonaceous aerosol to the accumulation mode in the seven-mode version requires more hygroscopic material coating the primary particles. Radiative forcing by cloudborne anthropogenic black carbon is only 20.07 W m–2.

Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Eaton, Brian

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Comparison of Short-Term and Long-Term Radiative Feedbacks and Variability in Twentieth-Century Global Climate Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate sensitivity uncertainty of global climate models (GCMs) is partly due to the spread of individual feedbacks. One approach to constrain long-term climate sensitivity is to use the relatively short observational record, assuming there ...

Meghan M. Dalton; Karen M. Shell

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument Calibrations Weather Observations Measurement Research Support Measurements & Instrumentation Team Center for Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems http://www.nrel.gov/srrl NREL * * * * 1617 Cole Boulevard * * * * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 * * * * (303) 275-3000 Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Mission Provide a unique outdoor research facility for supporting renewable energy conversion technologies and climate change studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE). Objectives * Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations * Develop a Solar Resource Climate Database for Golden, Colorado

329

Data systems for science integration within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was developed by the US Department of Energy to support the goals and mission of the US Global Change Research Program. The purpose of the ARM program is to improve the predictive capabilities of General Circulation Models (GCMs) in their treatment of clouds and radiative transfer effects. Three experimental testbeds were designed for the deployment of instruments to collect atmospheric data used to drive the GCMs. Each site, known as a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART), consists of a highly available, redundant data system for the collection of data from a variety of instrumentation. The first CART site was deployed in April 1992 in the Southern Great Plains (SGP), Lamont, Oklahoma, with the other two sites to follow in early 1996 in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and in 1997 on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA). Approximately 1.5 GB of data are transferred per day via the Internet from the CART sites, and external data sources to the ARM Experiment Center (EC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington. The Experimental Center is central to the ARM data path and provides for the collection, processing, analysis and delivery of ARM data. Data from the CART sites from a variety of instrumentation, observational systems and from external data sources are transferred to the Experiment Center. The EC processes these data streams on a continuous basis to provide derived data products to the ARM Science Team in near real-time while maintaining a three-month running archive of data.

Gracio, D.K.; Hatfield, L.D.; Yates, K.R.; Voyles, J.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Tichler, J.L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cederwall, R.T.; Laufersweiler, M.J.; Leach, M.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Singley, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Modified Fowler-Milne method for the spectroscopic determination of thermal plasma temperature without the measurement of continuum radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique based on the Fowler-Milne method for the spectroscopic determination of thermal plasma temperatures without measuring continuum radiation is presented. This technique avoids the influence of continuum radiation with the combined line and continuum emission coefficients to derive the plasma temperatures. The amount of continuum emission coefficient is estimated by using an expression related to the Biberman factors. Parameters that affect the accuracy of the proposed technique and errors in the measured plasma temperatures are analyzed. It is shown that, by using the Ar I 696.5 nm line with a bandwidth of 3.27 nm without taking into account the continuum radiation, the plasma temperature measured will be lower on the order of up to 1000-3000 K for temperatures from 20 000 to 24 000 K. The theoretically predicted temperature errors are in good agreement with the experimental results, indicating that the proposed technique is reliable for plasma temperature measurement.

Ma Shuiliang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Plasma Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Gao Hongming; Wu Lin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Parameterizations for the Absorption of Solar Radiation by O2 and CO2 with Application to Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple and accurate parameterizations have been developed for computing the absorption of solar radiation due to O2 and CO2. The parameterizations are based on the findings that temperature has a minimal effect on the absorption and that the one-...

Ming-Dah Chou

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Parameterization of ice cloud radiative properties and its application to the potential climatic importance of mixed-phase clouds  

SciTech Connect

It is often assumed, in modeling and radiation budget simulation, that clouds below the cirrus level are entirely in the liquid phase. There is substantive evidence from observations that low and middle clouds are often of mixed phase. Using a light-scattering program for hexagonal crystals, the authors update a parameterization of the radiative properties of ice clouds from an earlier study and use the new parameterization to investigate the role of mixed-phase clouds in three areas: (i) the interpretation of ISCCP optical depth, (ii) the simulation of the earth radiation budget, and (iii) the sensitivity of a simple radiative-convective model to an increase in CO{sub 2}. In all cases, mixed-phase clouds are shown to have the potential to significantly modify the results obtained using liquid phase clouds. A precise quantification is not yet possible as the dependence of the fraction of ice and liquid water is mixed-phase clouds on atmospheric properties, and the way in which the ice and liquid water are mixed, are not known with sufficient detail. 43 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

Sun, Z.; Shine, K.P. [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

First Measurement of the Inclusive Rate for the Radiative Penguin Decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the branching ratio for the inclusive radiative penguin process b ! sfl. We find BR(b ! sfl) = (2:32 \\Sigma 0:51 \\Sigma 0:29 \\Sigma 0:32) \\Theta 10 \\Gamma4 ; where the first error is statistical, the second error is the additive systematic error from uncertainty in yield, and the third error is the multiplicative systematic error from uncertainty in efficiency, which includes model dependence. Permanent address: University of Hawaii at Manoa 2 I. INTRODUCTION Last year CLEO observed [1] the decay B ! K (892)fl, thereby establishing the existence of the radiative penguin process b ! sfl. However, the fraction of the inclusive b ! sfl rate which hadronizes into B ! K (892)fl exhibits large model variation. The inclusive b ! sfl branching ratio is more reliably predicted [2], at (2.75 \\Sigma 0.80) \\Theta 10 \\Gamma4 for a top quark mass of 175 GeV. The branching ratio is sensitive to the existence of a charged Higgs [3], to anomalous WW fl couplings [4],...

Barish Chadha Chan; S. Chan; G. Eigen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Videos from the ARM Channel on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM Climate Research Facility now has its own channel on YouTube, having joined in late June of 2010. Twenty-six video clips are now available to provide quick views of the work of this DOE scientific user facility for the study of global climate change.

335

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Program: An Overview P. A. Crowley Environmental Sciences Division U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. J. Vitko, Jr. Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA 94550 Introduction for leased UA V operation over the next year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the existing Gnat 750-45, with its 7-8 km ceiling, as well as the planned FY93 demonstration of two 20 km capable UA Vs-the Perseus- B and the Raptor. Thus the funding of some initial flights and the availability of leased UAVs will enable us to start up the ARM-UAV program. Additional funding will be required to continue this program. Interim Science Team This paper and the one that follows describe the start-up

336

Method and apparatus for the measurement of signals from radiation sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The preferred embodiments of the present invention include a device for measuring an ionizing event in a radiation sensor. The device can include a charge amplifier and a timing shaper. The charge amplifier receives a cathode signal and is configured to output an amplified cathode signal. The timing shaper is operatively connected to the charge amplifier to receive the amplified cathode signal. The timing shaper is configured to generate a first pulse in response to a beginning of the ionizing event and a second pulse in response to an end of the ionizing event. The first and second pulses are associated with a depth of interaction of the ionizing event and are generated in response to a slope of the amplified cathode signal changing.

De Geronimo, Gianluigi

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

337

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Oritz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Marlow, William H. (College Station, TX)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The "Z" Pulsed Radiation Source: Recent Developments in Equation of State Measurement Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia Z machine is a source of intense radiation which can be used to drive ablative shocks for equation of state studies. In developing the capability to diagnose these types of studies on Z, techniques commonly used in conventional impact generated experiments were leveraged. The primary diagnostic transferred was velocity interferome~, VLSAR, [1] which not only provides Hugoniot particle velocity measurements, but also indications of shock stability and wave attenuation. In addition to a VISAR capability on the Z machine, methods for measuring shock velocity have been developed. When these measured parameters are used in conjunction with the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions, [2] material response at high temperatures and pressures can be inferred. With sample sizes used on Z being much smaller than those fielded in typical impact experiments, temporal resolution and methods of interfacing the diagnostics with the targets had to be improved. In this paper, a "standard" equation of state experiment, associated diagnostics, and some recent results in aluminum and beryllium will be discussed.

Asay, J.R.; Chandler, G.; Clark, B.; Fleming, K.; Hall, C.A.; Holland, K.; Trott, W.M.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Angular Distribution of UV-B Sky Radiance under Cloudy Conditions: A Comparison of Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations Using a Fractal Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, global warming concerns have focused attention on cloud radiative forcing and its accurate encapsulation in radiative transfer measurement and modeling programs. At present, this process is constrained by the dynamic movement and ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Kurt Fienberg; Manuel Nunez

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Validation of the Surface Energy Balance over the Antarctic Ice Sheets in the U.K. Meteorological Office Unified Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface radiation measurements and other climatological data were used to validate the representation of the surface energy balance over the East Antarctic Ice Sheet in the U.K. Meteorological Office Unified Climate Model. Model calculations of ...

J. C. King; W. M. Connolley

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

U.S. and Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration U.S. and Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration March 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The United States signed an agreement with Portugal today to launch the installation of a portable climate observatory on Graciosa Island in the Azores. The mobile observatory will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties from the island's marine environment for 20 months, beginning in May. The measurements are expected to greatly enhance scientific understanding of the microscopic processes that occur in low-level marine clouds, and will be used to test and improve climate models. The portable observatory, or Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility, is part of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ARM Climate Research

342

Irradiators for measuring the biological effects of low dose-rate ionizing radiation fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological response to ionizing radiation differs with radiation field. Particle type, energy spectrum, and dose-rate all affect biological response per unit dose. This thesis describes methods of spectral analysis, ...

Davidson, Matthew Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Radiative Heating Errors in Naturally Ventilated Air Temperature Measurements Made from Buoys*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiative heating errors in buoy-mounted, naturally ventilated air temperature sensors are examined. Data from sensors with multiplate radiation shields and collocated, fan-aspirated air temperature sensors from three buoy deployments ...

Steven P. Anderson; Mark F. Baumgartner

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A new approach for simultaneously retrieving cloud albedo and cloud fraction from surface-based shortwave radiation measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 8 (2013) 044023 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/4/044023 A new approach for simultaneously retrieving cloud albedo and cloud fraction from surface-based shortwave radiation measurements Yu Xie and Yangang Liu Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA E-mail: yxie@bnl.gov Received 27 June 2013 Accepted for publication 8 October 2013 Published 30 October 2013 Online at stacks.iop.org/ERL/8/044023 Abstract Surface-based measurements of shortwave (SW) radiative fluxes contain valuable information on cloud properties, but have not been fully used to infer those properties. Here a new analytical approach is presented that simultaneously infers cloud albedo and cloud fraction from surface-based measurements of total and direct radiative fluxes. An inspection of the

345

Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

Myers, D. R.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Volcanoes and Climate Effects of Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTENTS 8.1 Importance of volcanoes, natural aerosols, and anthropogenic aerosols 341 8.2 Major scientific questions and hypotheses 342 8.2.1 Stratospheric volcanic aerosols and climate 342 8.2.1.1 Source gases for stratospheric aerosols 342 8.2.1.2 Explosiveness and plume history during individual eruptions 343 8.2.1.3 Frequency of eruptions, tectonic setting, rock/ash vs. SO 2 343 8.2.1.4 Gas-to-particle conversion and removal mechanisms 343 8.2.1.5 Radiative properties and climatic effects of stratospheric aerosols 345 8.2.1.6 Needed satellite and in situ measurements 347 8.2.1.6.1 Global observations of stratospheric aerosol optical properties 347 8.2.1.6.2 Lidar measurements of aerosols 347 8.2.2 Volcanic aerosols and stratospheric ozone depletion 349 8.2.3 Climatic effects of t

Hartmann And Mouginis-Mark; Volcanoes; D. L. Hartmann; P. Mouginis-mark; G. J. Bluth; J. A. Coakley; J. Crisp; R. E. Dickinson; P. W. Francis; J. E. Hansen; P. V. Hobbs; B. L. Isacks; Y. J. Kaufman; M. D. King; W. I. Rose; S. Self; L. D. Travis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

An optimized colony forming assay for low-dose-radiation cell survival measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to develop a simple and reliable method to quantify the cell survival of low-dose irradiations. Two crucial factors were considered, the same number of cells plated in each flask and an appropriate interval between cell plating and irradiation. For the former, we optimized cell harvest with trypsin, diluted cells in one container, and directly seeded cells on the bottom of flasks in a low density before irradiation. Reproducible plating efficiency was obtained. For the latter, we plated cells on the bottom of flasks and then monitored the processing of attachment, cell cycle variations, and the plating efficiency after exposure to 20 cGy of X-rays. The results showed that a period of 4.5 h to 7.5 h after plating was suitable for further treatment. In order to confirm the reliability and feasibility of our method, we also measured the survival curves of these M059K and M059J glioma cell lines by following the optimized protocol and obtained consistent results reported by others with cell sorting system. In conclusion, we successfully developed a reliable and simple way to measure the survival fractions of human cells exposed to low dose irradiation, which might be helpful for the studies on low-dose radiation biology.

Zhu J.; Sutherland B.; Hu W.; Ding N.; Ye C.; Usikalu M.; Li S.; Hu B.; Zhou G.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; D. F. Young; M. G. Mlynczak; K. J. Thome; S. Leroy; J. Corliss; J. G. Anderson; C.O. Ao; R. Bantges; F. Best; K. Bowman; H. Brindley; J. J. Butler; W. Collins; J. A. Dykema; D. R. Doelling; D. R. Feldman; N. Fox; X. Huang; R. Holz; Y. Huang; Z. Jin; D. Jennings; D. G. Johnson; K. Jucks; S. Kato; D. B. Kirk-Davidoff; R. Knuteson; G. Kopp; D. P. Kratz; X. Liu; C. Lukashin; A. J. Mannucci; N. Phojanamongkolkij; P. Pilewskie; V. Ramaswamy; H. Revercomb; J. Rice; Y. Roberts; C. M. Roithmayr; F. Rose; S. Sandford; E. L. Shirley; W.L. Smith; Sr.; B. Soden; P. W. Speth; W. Sun; P.C. Taylor; D. Tobin; X. Xiong

349

Planning for Climate Impacts Wisconsin's Coastal Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Adaptation strategies #12;What is climate? "Climate is properly the long average of weather in a single place in = Energy out Absorbed by ozone Absorbed by the earth Greenhouse effect UV radiation Solar radiation climate as weather... ...and weather can be expensive. #12;High water impacts June 1-15, 2008 38 River

Sheridan, Jennifer

350

Small satellite radiation budget instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major diagnostic in understanding the response of the Earth`s climate to natural or anthropogenic changes is the radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere. Two classes of measurements may be undertaken: (1) a monitoring of the radiation balance over decade-long long time-scales, and (2) measurements designed to provide a sufficiently complete data set to validate or improve models. This paper discusses some of the important ingredients in obtaining such data, and presents a description of some candidate instrumentation for use on a small satellite. 23 refs.

Weber, P.G.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Small satellite radiation budget instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major diagnostic in understanding the response of the Earth's climate to natural or anthropogenic changes is the radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere. Two classes of measurements may be undertaken: (1) a monitoring of the radiation balance over decade-long long time-scales, and (2) measurements designed to provide a sufficiently complete data set to validate or improve models. This paper discusses some of the important ingredients in obtaining such data, and presents a description of some candidate instrumentation for use on a small satellite. 23 refs.

Weber, P.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Evaluation of the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recently developed approach to climate modeling, called the multiscale modeling framework (MMF), a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) is embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), replacing traditional ...

Mikhail Ovtchinnikov; Thomas Ackerman; Roger Marchand; Marat Khairoutdinov

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Determination of Clear-Sky Radiative Flux Profiles, Heating Rates, and Optical Depths Using Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles as a Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors report results obtained using an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV) as an experimental platform for atmospheric radiative transfer research. These are the first ever climate measurements made from a UAV and represent a ...

Francisco P. J. Valero; Shelly K. Pope; Robert G. Ellingson; Anthony W. Strawa; John Vitko Jr.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Comparison Between Modeled and Measured Clear-Sky Radiative Shortwave Fluxes in Arctic Environments, with Special Emphasis on Diffuse Radiation  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the SBDART radiative transfer model to predict clear-sky diffuse and direct normal broadband shortwave irradiances is investigated. Model calculations of these quantities are compared with data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. The model tends to consistently underestimate the direct normal irradiances at both sites by about 1%. In regards to clear-sky diffuse irradiance, the model overestimates this quantity at the SGP site in a manner similar to what has been observed in other studies (Halthore and Schwartz, 2000). The difference between the diffuse SBDART calculations and Halthore and Schwartz’s MODTRAN calculations is very small, thus demonstrating that SBDART performs similarly to MODTRAN. SBDART is then applied to the NSA site, and here it is found that the discrepancy between the model calculations and corrected diffuse measurements (corrected for daytime offsets, Dutton et al., 2001) is 0.4 W/m2 when averaged over the 12 cases considered here. Two cases of diffuse measurements from a shaded “black and white” pyranometer are also compared with the calculations and the discrepancy is again minimal. Thus, it appears as if the “diffuse discrepancy” that exists at the SGP site does not exist at the NSA sites. We cannot yet explain why the model predicts diffuse radiation well at one site but not at the other.

Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Donna M.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa January 18, 2006 - 10:47am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is placing a new, portable atmospheric laboratory with sophisticated instruments and data systems in Niger, Africa, to gain a better understanding of the potential impacts of Saharan dust on global climate. Dust from Africa's Sahara desert-the largest source of dust on the planet-reaches halfway around the globe. Carried by winds and clouds, the dust travels through West African, Mediterranean, and European skies, and across the Atlantic into North America. Unfortunately, Africa is one of the most under-sampled climate regimes in the world, leaving scientists to

357

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Measure of precursor electron density profiles of laser launched radiative shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied the dynamics of strong radiative shocks generated with the high-energy subnanosecond iodine laser at Prague Asterix Laser System facility

Busquet, Michel; González, Matthias; Audit, Edouard; 10.1063/1.3330636

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Aerosol Optical Properties in the Iranian Region Obtained by Ground-Based Solar Radiation Measurements in the Summer Of 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation measurements were made using sun photometers and pyranometers during 31 May-7 June 1991 at several places in Iran and during 12 June-17 September 1991 at a fixed place, Bushehr, Iran. In the first period the aerosol optical ...

Teruyuki Nakajima; Tadahiro Hayasaka; Akiko Higurashi; Gen Hashida; Naser Moharram-Nejad; Yahya Najafi; Hamzeh Valavi

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Cirrus Cloud Microphysical Property Retrieval Using Lidar and Radar Measurements. Part II: Midlatitude Cirrus Microphysical and Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lidar–radar algorithm described in Part I of this set of papers is applied to 1000 h of Raman lidar and millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program Southern Great Plains Clouds and ...

Zhien Wang; Kenneth Sassen

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Determination of the Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation by Marine Stratocumulus Clouds from Airborne Measurements within Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiwavelength scanning radiometer has been used to measure the angular distribution of scattered radiation deep within a cloud layer at discrete wavelengths between 0.5 and 2.3 ?m. The relative angular distribution of the intensity field at ...

Michael D. King; Lawrence F. Radke; Peter V. Hobbs

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Time-Varying Climate Sensitivity from Regional Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of global climate with respect to forcing is generally described in terms of the global climate feedback—the global radiative response per degree of global annual mean surface temperature change. While the global climate feedback ...

Kyle C. Armour; Cecilia M. Bitz; Gerard H. Roe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Recovery Act Learn about ARM's efforts. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a U.S. Department of Energy scientific user facility, providing data from strategically located in situ and remote sensing observatories around the world. [ Live Data Displays ] Featured Data 09.19.2013 New ARM Best Estimate Land Product Contains Critical Soil Quantities for Describing Land Properties 09.12.2013 Value-Added Product Estimates Planetary Boundary Layer Height from Radiosondes 08.29.2013 New Data Available for Precipitation Value-Added Product Feature12.30.2013 Pole Position: New Field Campaigns Explore Arctic and Antarctic Atmosphere Pole Position: New Field Campaigns Explore Arctic and Antarctic Atmosphere For the first time, ARM ventures to Antarctica for one of several newly

364

Climate Parameters from Satellite Spectral Measurements. Part 1: Collocated AVHRR and HIRS/2 Observations of Spectral Greenhouse Parameter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated method of monitoring various climate parameters using collocated Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and High-Resolution Infrared Sounder-2 (HIRS/2) observations has been developed. The method, referred to as CHAPS (...

Richard A. Frey; S. A. Ackerman; Brian J. Soden

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Comparison of Tropical Precipitation Simulated by the Community Climate Model with That Measured by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the simulation of tropical precipitation by the Community Climate Model, version 3, (CCM3) developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Monthly mean precipitation rates from an ensemble of CCM3 simulations are ...

J. Craig Collier; Kenneth P. Bowman; Gerald R. North

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Deconvolution of Wide-Field-of-View Measurements of Reflected Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-field-of-view (WFOV) radiometers have been flown as part of the Earth Radiation Budget instrument on the Nimbus 6 and 7 spacecraft and as part of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments aboard the ERBE spacecraft and also ...

G. Louis Smith; David Rutan

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

How Well Do We Understand and Evaluate Climate Change Feedback Processes?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processes in the climate system that can either amplify or dampen the climate response to an external perturbation are referred to as climate feedbacks. Climate sensitivity estimates depend critically on radiative feedbacks associated with water ...

Sandrine Bony; Robert Colman; Vladimir M. Kattsov; Richard P. Allan; Christopher S. Bretherton; Jean-Louis Dufresne; Alex Hall; Stephane Hallegatte; Marika M. Holland; William Ingram; David A. Randall; Brian J. Soden; George Tselioudis; Mark J. Webb

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation has been demonstrated as a technique for measuring the longitudinal profile of charged particles bunches in the low to intermediate energy range. However, with the advent of the International Linear Collider, the need has arisen for a non-invasive method of measuring the bunch profile at extremely high energies. Smith-Purcell radiation has been used for the first time in the multi-GeV regime to measure the longitudinal profile of the 28GeV SLAC beam. The experiment has both successfully determined the bunch length, and has also demonstrated its sensitivity to bunch profile changes. The challenges associated with this technique, and its prospects as a diagnostic tool are reported here.

Blackmore, V.; Doucas, G.; Ottewell, B.; Perry, C.; /Oxford U.; Kimmitt, M.F.; /Essex U.; Arnold, R.; Molloy, S.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

Earthwatch: The climate from space  

SciTech Connect

This concise textbook shows how observations from satellites can be used to derive variables important to the monitoring of the climate system. The aim of this book is not to provide a rigorous treatment of climate or of remote sensing and instrumentation, but to attempt to integrate the different disciplines at a level appropriate for undergraduate students of meteorology. The general topics covered are as follows: components of the climate system, basic physical laws (radiations and radiative transfer), current climate issues (greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, Southern Oscillations), remote sensing techniques, and operational principles of sensors aboard space platforms.

Harries, J.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Neutral Research Campuses Home Determine Baseline Energy Consumption Analyze Technology Options Plan & Prioritize Implement the Climate Action Plan Measure & Evaluate...

371

Lab-Based Measurement of Remediation Techniques for Radiation Portal Monitors (Initial Report)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) deployed by the Second Line of Defense (SLD) are known to be sensitive to the natural environmental radioactive background. There are several techniques used to mitigate the effects of background on the monitors, but since the installation environments can vary significantly from one another the need for a standardized, systematic, study of remediation techniques was proposed and carried out. This study is not meant to serve as the absolute last word on the subject. The data collected are, however, intelligible and useful. Some compromises were made, each of which will be described in detail. The hope of this initial report is to familiarize the SLD science teams with ORNL's effort to model the effect of various remediation techniques on simple, static backgrounds. This study provides a good start toward benchmarking the model, and each additional increment of data will serve to make the model more robust. The scope of this initial study is limited to a few basic cases. Its purpose is to prove the utility of lab-based study of remediation techniques and serve as a standard data set for future use. This importance of this first step of standardization will become obvious when science teams are working in parallel on issues of remediation; having a common starting point will do away with one category of difference, thereby making easier the task of determining the sources of disagreement. Further measurements will augment this data set, allowing for further constraint of the universe of possible situations. As will be discussed in the 'Going Forward' section, more data will be included in the final report of this work. Of particular interest will be the data taken with the official TSA lead collimators, which will provide more direct results for comparison with installation data.

Livesay, Jake [ORNL; Guzzardo, Tyler [ORNL; Lousteau, Angela L [ORNL

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

INVESTIGATING THE RELIABILITY OF CORONAL EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION DIAGNOSTICS USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining the temperature distribution of coronal plasmas can provide stringent constraints on coronal heating. Current observations with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on board Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide diagnostics of the emission measure distribution (EMD) of the coronal plasma. Here we test the reliability of temperature diagnostics using three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations. We produce synthetic observables from the models and apply the Monte Carlo Markov chain EMD diagnostic. By comparing the derived EMDs with the 'true' distributions from the model, we assess the limitations of the diagnostics as a function of the plasma parameters and the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We find that EMDs derived from EIS synthetic data reproduce some general characteristics of the true distributions, but usually show differences from the true EMDs that are much larger than the estimated uncertainties suggest, especially when structures with significantly different density overlap along the line of sight. When using AIA synthetic data the derived EMDs reproduce the true EMDs much less accurately, especially for broad EMDs. The differences between the two instruments are due to the: (1) smaller number of constraints provided by AIA data and (2) broad temperature response function of the AIA channels which provide looser constraints to the temperature distribution. Our results suggest that EMDs derived from current observatories may often show significant discrepancies from the true EMDs, rendering their interpretation fraught with uncertainty. These inherent limitations to the method should be carefully considered when using these distributions to constrain coronal heating.

Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

Estimation of Mixed-Phase Cloud Optical Depth and Position Using In Situ Radiation and Cloud Microphysical Measurements Obtained from a Tethered-Balloon Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microphysical and radiative measurements in boundary layer mixed-phase clouds (MPCs), consisting of ice crystals and liquid droplets, have been analyzed. These cloud measurements were collected during a May–June 2008 tethered-balloon campaign in ...

M. Sikand; J. Koskulics; K. Stamnes; B. Hamre; J. J. Stamnes; R. P. Lawson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Observations of the Infrared Radiative Properties of the Ocean—Implications for the Measurement of Sea Surface Temperature via Satellite Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) was used to measure the infrared radiative properties and the temperature of the Gulf of Mexico during a 5-day oceanographic cruise in January 1995. The ocean skin temperature was measured ...

William L. Smith; R. O. Knuteson; H. E. Revercomb; W. Feltz; N. R. Nalli; H. B. Howell; W. P. Menzel; Otis Brown; James Brown; Peter Minnett; Walter McKeown

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Spectral Distribution of Solar Radiation on Clear Days: A Comparison Between Measurements and Model Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral distribution of the direct solar and scattered sky radiation are computed and presented as functions of solar height and as integrated daily values for selected days of the year. The monochromatic fluxes are integrated over the ...

V. Hansen

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

GCM Aerosol Radiative Effects Using Geographically Varying Aerosol Sizes Deduced from AERONET Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol optical properties, and hence the direct radiative effects, are largely determined by the assumed aerosol size distribution. In order to relax the fixed aerosol size constraint commonly used in general circulation models (GCMs), ...

Glen Lesins; Ulrike Lohmann

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Absorption of Solar Radiation by Stratocumulus Clouds: Aircraft Measurements and Theoretical Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft observations of shortwave radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds were carried out over the western North Pacific Ocean during January 1991. Two aircraft were equipped with a pair of pyranometers and near-infrared pyranometers. ...

Tadahiro Hayasaka; Nobuyuki Kikuchi; Masayuki Tanaka

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Measuring short electron bunch lengths using coherent smith-purcell radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for directly determining the length of sub-picosecond electron bunches. A metallic grating is formed with a groove spacing greater than a length expected for the electron bunches. The electron bunches are passed over the metallic grating to generate coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. The angular distribution of the coherent Smith-Purcell radiation is then mapped to directly deduce the length of the electron bunches.

Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Measuring short electron bunch lengths using coherent Smith-Purcell radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for directly determining the length of sub-picosecond electron bunches. A metallic grating is formed with a groove spacing greater than a length expected for the electron bunches. The electron bunches are passed over the metallic grating to generate coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. The angular distribution of the coherent Smith-Purcell radiation is then mapped to directly deduce the length of the electron bunches. 8 figs.

Nguyen, D.C.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Climate Consultant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate data in dozens of ways useful to architects, builders, contractors, and homeowners, including temperatures, humidity, wind velocity, sky cover, and solar radiation in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data By Brian Grabowski * September 13, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint While the idea of a cruise to Hawaii may sound like paradise, making that same journey 25 times back and forth in a year might start to lose its appeal. But for a climate data-gathering machine called AMF2, perched aboard the ship, every trip is a chance to gather more data that is critical to understanding the Pacific Ocean's role in the global climate. The machine is the Department of Energy's second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) mobile facility, operated and managed by Argonne scientists. It carries a suite of instruments to measure properties of clouds, the ocean, precipitation, aerosols, and radiation. Over the summer of 2013, the AMF2 traveled back and forth between Hawaii and Los Angeles,

382

Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of simplified procedures for a multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over previously published MPA studies due several new features, including: the incorporation of an artificial horizon that prevents reflected ground radiation from striking the tilted sensors, and a routine that corrects the spectral response of photovoltaic-type sensors used in the MPA. An optimal solution procedure has also been developed that eliminates invalid data which are inherent in the simultaneous solution of the solar equations from the four MPA sensors. In this paper a description of the NIST-traceable calibration facility is provided and results are presented that compare the improved MPA-predicted beam to side-by-side measurements from a precision Normal Incidence Pyrheliometer (NIP).

Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A MEASUREMENT OF ANISOTROPY IN THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION ON A LARGE ANGULAR SCALE AT 33 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component, the cosmic blackbody radiation is isotropic to 1variation of the cosmic blackbody radiation Itself. c c Thisin the Cosmic Blackbody Radiation Appendix B - Radiometer

Gorenstein, M.V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

EGS4 calculations for a Cd-Zn-Te detector to measure synchrotron radiation at PEP-II  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed with the EGS4 Code System for a CdZnTe semiconductor detector to be used in background studies of synchrotron radiation at PEP-II. The simulations take into account K-shell fluorescent-photon production in a CdZnTe mixture, electron-hole pair collection and electronic-noise broadening. The results are compared with measurements made with encapsulated {sup 241}Am, {sup 133}Ba and {sup 109}Cd sources.

Nelson, W.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (US). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Borak, T.; Malchow, R.; Toki, W. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (US); Kadyk, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US)

1997-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

EGS4 CALCULATIONS FOR A Cd-Zn-Te DETECTOR TO? y MEASURE SYNCHROTRON RADIATION AT PEP-II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculations have been performed with the EGS4 Code System for a CdZnTe semiconductor detector to be used in background studies of synchrotron radiation at PEP-II. The simulations take into account K-shell uorescent-photon production in a CdZnTe mixture, electron-hole pair collection and electronic-noise broadening. The results are compared with measurements made with encapsulated 241 Am, 133 Ba and 109 Cd sources.

W. R. Nelson; T. Borak; R. Malchow; W. Toki; J. Kadyk

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Climate Studies with a Multilayer Energy Balance Model. Part III: Climatic Impact of Stratospheric Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and climatic effects of stratospheric volcanic aerosols are studied with a multilayer energy balance model. The results show that the latitudinal distribution of aerosols has a significant effect on climate sensitivity. When ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Li Peng; Albert Arking

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The changing climate  

SciTech Connect

The earth owes its hospitable climate to the greenhouse effect, but now the effect threatens to intensify, rapidly warming the planet. Rising concentrations of carbon dioxide and other gases are the cause. The danger of warming is serious enough to warrant prompt action. The paper examines data on atmospheric warming and attempts to project effects into the future using atmospheric models. Three kinds of response to the threat are described: technical measures to counteract climatic change; adaptation to the changing climate; and prevention.

Schneider, S.H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change William Collins UC Berkeley alter the radiative energy budget of the climate. · We will focus on solar reflection, absorption.43 -0.84 CO2 0.31 0.04 -0.31 (CH4) 0.22 0.40 -0.53 Change in Shortwave Absorption (2000-1860) Solar CH4

389

On the Usage of Spectral and Broadband Satellite Instrument Measurements to Differentiate Climate Models with Different Cloud Feedback Strengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere radiometric signals associated with different high- and low-cloud–radiative feedbacks have been examined through the use of an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE). The OSSE simulates variations in the spectrally ...

Daniel R. Feldman; Daniel M. Coleman; William D. Collins

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

On the Usage of Spectral and Broadband Satellite Instrument Measurements to Differentiate Climate Models with Different Cloud Feedback Strengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere radiometric signals associated with different high- and low-cloud radiative feedbacks have been examined through the use of an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE). The OSSE simulates variations in the spectrally ...

Daniel R. Feldman; Daniel M. Coleman; William D. Collins

391

Climate and the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to determine the role of the ocean in establishing the mean tropical climate and its sensitivity to radiative perturbations. A simple two-box energy balance model is developed that includes ocean heat transports as an ...

Amy Clement; Richard Seager

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Systematic measurements of whole-body dose distributions for various treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Contemporary radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, could increase the radiation-induced malignancies because of the increased beam-on time, i.e., number of monitor units needed to deliver the same dose to the target and the larger volume irradiated with low doses. In this study, whole-body dose distributions from typical radiotherapy patient plans using different treatment techniques and therapy machines were measured using the same measurement setup and irradiation intention. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from 6 MV beams were compared in terms of treatment technique (3D-conformal, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, helical TomoTherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, hard wedges, and flattening filter-free radiotherapy) and therapy machine (Elekta, Siemens and Varian linear accelerators, Accuray CyberKnife and TomoTherapy). Results: Close to the target, the doses from intensity-modulated treatments (including flattening filter-free) were below the dose from a static treatment plan, whereas the CyberKnife showed a larger dose by a factor of two. Far away from the treatment field, the dose from intensity-modulated treatments showed an increase in dose from stray radiation of about 50% compared to the 3D-conformal treatment. For the flattening filter-free photon beams, the dose from stray radiation far away from the target was slightly lower than the dose from a static treatment. The CyberKnife irradiation and the treatment using hard wedges increased the dose from stray radiation by nearly a factor of three compared to the 3D-conformal treatment. Conclusions: This study showed that the dose outside of the treated volume is influenced by several sources. Therefore, when comparing different treatment techniques, the dose ratios vary with distance to the isocenter. The effective dose outside the treated volume of intensity-modulated treatments with or without flattening filter was 10%-30% larger when compared to 3D-conformal radiotherapy. This dose increase is much lower than the monitor unit scaled effective dose from a static treatment.

Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057 (Switzerland) and Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Measurements of cosmic radiation dose in subsonic commercial aircraft compared to the city-pair dose calculation  

SciTech Connect

The radiation dose received by passengers during flight on conventional jet aircraft was determined as a function of exposure to cosmic radiation, solar radiation, flight time, and flight path. The dosimetric measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) and with emulsions of three types sealed in plastic packets. These packets were sent by air mail back and forth from Berkeley, California to five cities and a dose sufficiently above background for a satisfactory measurement was accumulated by the TLD's on one round trip and by the emulsions on three round trips. It was concluded that both experiments and theory show that the total doses received at present day conventional jet aircraft altitudes are considerably higher than those encountered in supersonic flights at much higher altitudes, even though the dose rate is lower at these lower altitudes, when the longer time of exposure at the lower altitudes is taken into consideration. Computer programs used in the dose calculations are included. (CH)

Wallace, R.

1973-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

From Tissues to Landscapes: How Thermal Physiology, Water Use, and Climate Influence Patterns of Landscape Use in Elephants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of climate such as solar radiation and thus, we use the termthe effects of solar radiation which varies considerablytemperature and solar radiation (which are time-dependent);

Dunkin, Robin Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Seasonal Variations of Climate Feedbacks in the NCAR CCSM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the annual cycle of radiative contributions to global climate feedbacks. A partial radiative perturbation (PRP) technique is used to diagnose monthly radiative perturbations at the top of atmosphere (TOA) due to CO2 forcing;...

Patrick C. Taylor; Robert G. Ellingson; Ming Cai

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation  

SciTech Connect

Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.26±0.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

397

ABSOLUTE BUNCH LENGTH MEASUREMENTS AT THE ALS BY INCOHERENTSYNCHROTRON RADIATION FLUCTUATION ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analysing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations ofthe radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of thespectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatialdistribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of theLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and tested asimple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolutemeasurement of the bunch length. A description of the method and theexperimental results are presented.

Sannibale, Fernando; Zolotorev, Max S.; Filippetto, Daniele; Stupakov, Gennady V.

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Variable Sky-View Platform for the Measurement of Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the more difficult tasks confronting atmospheric researchers today is the acquisition of long-term radiometric measurements that encapsulate variability in the sky hemisphere as well as time. High quality spatial measurements would allow ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Manuel Nunez

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately accounting for radiative energy balance between the incoming solar and the outgoing infrared radiative fluxes is very important in modeling the Earth's climate. Water vapor absorption plays a critical role in the radiative heating rate ...

D. D. Turner; E. J. Mlawer

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.

Famiano, M.A.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Field Intercomparison Technique to Improve the Relative Accuracy of Longwave Radiation Measurements and an Evaluation of CASES-99 Pyrgeometer Data Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques for improving the relative accuracy of longwave radiation measurements by a set of pyrgeometers [the Eppley Laboratory Precision Infrared Radiometer (Model PIR)] are presented using 10 PIRs from the 1999 Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface ...

S. P. Burns; J. Sun; A. C. Delany; S. R. Semmer; S. P. Oncley; T. W. Horst

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Precise measurement of the e[superscript +]e[superscript -]??[superscript +]?[superscript -](?) cross section with the initial-state radiation method at BABAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e[superscript +]e[superscript -]??[superscript +]?[superscript -](?) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial-state radiation (ISR) method ...

Sciolla, Gabriella

404

Development of a Second-Generation Regional Climate Model (RegCM2). Part I: Boundary-Layer and Radiative Transfer Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last few years the development of a second-generation regional climate modeling system (RegCM2) has been completed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Based upon the National Center for Atmospheric Research-...

Filippo Giorgi; Maria Rosaria Marinucci; Gary T. Bates

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

National Solar Radiation Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Solar Radiation Database National Solar Radiation Database Jump to: navigation, search The National Solar Radiation Database, or NSRDB, describes the amount of solar energy which is available at any location in the United States. It is generated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, with the assistance of many collaborators.[1] Technical Overview Per its user's manual, "The NSRDB is a serially complete collection of hourly values of the three most common measurements of solar radiation (global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal) over a period of time adequate to establish means and extremes, and at a sufficient number of locations to represent regional solar radiation climates."[2] There have been two releases of the NSRDB, each covering different time

406

Spatially averaged heat flux and convergence measurements at the ARM regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

Cloud formation and its relation to climate change is the greatest weakness in current numerical climate models. Surface heat flux in some cases causes clouds to form and in other to dissipate and the differences between these cases are subtle enough to make parameterization difficult in a numerical model. One of the goals of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is to make long term measurements at representative sites to improve radiation and cloud formation parameterization. This paper compares spatially averaged optical measurements of heat flux and convergence with a goal of determining how point measurements of heat fluxes scale up to the larger scale used for climate modeling. It was found that the various optical techniques used in this paper compared well with each other and with independent measurements. These results add confidence that spatially averaging optical techniques can be applied to transform point measurements to the larger scales needed for mesoscale and climate modeling. 10 refs., 6 figs. (MHB)

Porch, W.; Barnes, F.; Buchwald, M.; Clements, W.; Cooper, D.; Hoard, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Doran, C.; Hubbe, J.; Shaw, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Coulter, R.; Martin, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Kunkel, K. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Detecting Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The likelihood ratio of the data for a hypothesis of some change, relative to the hypothesis of no change, is a suitable statistical measure for the detection of climate change. Likelihood ratios calculated on the basis of Angell and Korshover's (...

Edward S. Epstein

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

ABSOLUTE BUNCH LENGTH MEASUREMENTS AT THE ALS BY INCOHERENT SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FLUCTUATION ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LENGTH MEASUREMENTS AT THE ALS BY INCOHERENT SYNCHROTRONAt the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeleythe technique at the ALS and the results were compared with

Sannibale, Fernando; Zolotorev, Max S.; Filippetto, Daniele; Stupakov, Gennady V.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Mobile Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Records Annual Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa Because dust can block incoming solar energy, and because solar energy drives weather and climate, scientists around the world are looking for ways to better understand these natural phenomena. In 2006, scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility conducted a year-long field campaign in Niamey, Niger, to provide key information for the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses, or AMMA, project. During the 12-month experiment at the airport in Niamey, researchers used a portable atmospheric laboratory, airplanes, and satellites to collect information about clouds, aerosols, and solar and terrestrial energy in the skies above the site. Measurements obtained

410

Solar Radiation Changes in the United States during the Twentieth Century: Evidence from Sunshine Duration Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in sunshine duration (SS) measured in the conterminous United States during the past century were used as a proxy to explore changes in shortwave forcing at the earth’s surface when and where accurate measurements of global irradiance (Eg)...

Gerald Stanhill; Shabtai Cohen

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Instrument Report Fourth Quarter: October 1–December 30, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

412

Climate Change Science and Impacts in Northeast Wisconsin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Adaptation strategies #12;What is climate? "Climate is properly the long average of weather in a single place in = Energy out Absorbed by ozone Absorbed by the earth Greenhouse effect UV radiation Solar radiation us? Humans experience climate as weather... ...and weather can be expensive. #12;High water impacts

Sheridan, Jennifer

413

Relationship of five anthropometric measurements at age 18 to radiation dose among atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero  

SciTech Connect

Five body measurements-standing height, body weight, sitting height, chest circumference and intercristal diameter-of 18-year-old atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were analyzed in relation to DS86 uterine dose. Age in utero was divided into four periods: 0-7, 8-15, 16-25 and [>=]26 weeks. This categorization is based upon the study of radiation-induced brain damage. The linear regression analyses for these five variables showed significant decreases with increasing dose. The regression coefficients were -2.65 cm/Gy for standing height, -2.46 kg/Gy for body weight, -0.92 cm/Gy for sitting height, -1.37 cm/Gy for chest circumference and -0.32 cm/Gy for intercristal diameter. The multivariate test statistic for the overall dose effect on five body measurements was significant, but the interaction between dose and gestational period was not significant. Principal-component analysis was applied to the five variables. For the first-component scores, the dose effect was significant, but the interaction between dose and gestational period was not significant. For the second-component scores, the dose effect was significant specifically at 0.7 weeks. The radiation dose effect on the second principal component found at 0-7 weeks of gestation suggests that malformation occur in this period. 17 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Nakashima, Eiji (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Minami-ku (Japan))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Design of a New Recoil Separator for Measurements of Radiative Capture Reactions in Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rates of proton- and alpha-capture reactions on unstable proton-rich nuclei are needed to understand the energy generation and element synthesis occurring in novae, X-ray bursts, and other explosions. Direct measurements of the cross sections of some of these reactions are now possible with radioactive beams and a recoil separator. A new device for such measurements, the Separator for CApture Reactions [SECAR], is being designed for use at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The specifications and preliminary conceptual design will be discussed along with plans for the first set of measurements.

Berg, Georg P. A.; Couder, Manoel; Wiescher, Michael [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, 46556-5670 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Blackmon, Jeff C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70803-4001 (United States); Greife, U. [Dept. of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Montes, F.; Schatz, Hendrik [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Rehm, K. Ernst [Physics Division, Argonne National Lab, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Smith, Michael S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Zeller, Al [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States)

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report August 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report September 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information December 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ionizing Radiation Division of the Physics Laboratory supports the ... meaningful, and compatible measurements of ionizing radiations (x rays ...

419

Accounting for the Solar Radiation Influence on Downward Longwave Irradiance Measurements by Pyrgeometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of broadband downward longwave (LW) irradiance are carried out at Lampedusa, Italy, in the Mediterranean, jointly with solar irradiance, since 2004 using shaded and unshaded Eppley Precision Infrared Radiometers (PIRs) and Kipp & ...

Daniela Meloni; Claudia Di Biagio; Alcide di Sarra; Francesco Monteleone; Giandomenico Pace; Damiano Massimiliano Sferlazzo

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Comparison of Spin-lattice Relaxation Measurements Made in the Presence of Strong Radiation Damping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of 1 H Spin-lattice Relaxation Times from VariousField Strength H Spin-lattice Relaxation Times, in seconds,Comparison of Spin-lattice Relaxation Measurements Made in

Taylor, Robert E; Peterson, Robert D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Equations for Estimating the Similarity Parameter from Radiation Measurements within Weakly Absorbing Optically Thick Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Series expansions are derived for estimating the similarity parameter, which is a combination of the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor, from radiance measurement deep in the interior of a weary absorbing cloud. One expansion requires ...

T. Duracz; N. J. McCormick

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A New Narrowband Radiation Model for Water Vapor Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of radiation models is a critical issue in climate studies. However, calculations from different radiation models used in climate calculations disagree with one another, and with more detailed models, at levels significant to many ...

Juying X. Warner; Robert G. Ellingson

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Analysis of the Energy Savings Potential in K-5 Schools in Hot and Humid Climates: Application of High Performance Measures and Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the analysis of the energy savings potential in an existing K-5 school in hot and humid climates. Previous paper (Im and Haberl 2008b) presented a calibrated simulation procedure for an existing K-5 school in hot and humid area, and the first step of the energy savings potential analysis by applying the energy savings measures recommended as in the ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides for K-12 Schools. As an effort to investigate more energy savings potential for the school building, several other energy savings measures and renewable energy measures were applied to the target building. Those measures include: increased glazing U-value, VFD application for the HVAC system, cold deck reset, variable speed for pumps, high-efficiency boiler, skylights, and the application of solar thermal and PV systems. The final simulation results show that the estimated Energy Use Index (EUI) of the school by applying all the measures but the solar thermal and PV systems would be 29.9 kBtu/sqft (i.e., 38.6 % energy savings against the baseline school). In addition, solar thermal and PV systems were designed to provide half of the electricity demand and all the SWH demand of the school building, respectively. The final EUI for the school with the solar thermal and PV systems was estimated to be 15 kBtu/sqft.

Im, P.; Haberl, J.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Climate VISION: News Archive  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

News Archive News Archive Collapse all | Expand all 2007 November 30, 2007 USTR Schwab to Announce New Climate Initiatives for WTO, Including a New Environmental Goods and Services Agreement November 28, 2007 U.S. Energy Information Administration Anounces U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Declined 1.5 Percent in 2006 November 20, 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for Research on Climate Change Awarded to U.S. Forest Service Scientists November 16, 2007 Our Changing Planet: The U.S. Climate Change Science Program for Fiscal Year 2008 Report Released October 18, 2007 U.S. DOE Issues Third U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report October 15, 2007 The Government of India Hosts the Second Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate Ministerial Meeting Fall 2007 EPA's 2nd measurement campaign to evaluate the performance of installed PFC

425

CANADIAN EXPERIENCE IN THE MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINES AND MILLS  

SciTech Connect

Apparatases developed for field sampling and measurement of radon are described. A battery-operated air sampler for the collection of radon daughters is described along with a battery-operated, alpha scintillation detector for the measurement of radon daughter products. A method is presented for estimating rate of exposure to U from the excretion rate of U in urine, and evaluation of personnel exposed to U in mine and mill. The principles of airborne hazards control in Canadian mines are outlined and discussed in terms of ventilation, control of radon-laden water, and dust control. (W.L.H.)

Simpson, S.D.; Stewart, C.G.; Yourt, G.R.; Bloy, H.

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Measurements of the flame emissivity and radiative properties of particulate medium in pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces by image processing of visible radiation  

SciTech Connect

Due to the complicated processes for coal particles burning in industrial furnaces, their radiative properties, such as the absorption and scattering coefficients, which are essential to make reliable calculation of radiative transfer in combustion computation, are hard to be given exactly by the existing methods. In this paper, multiple color image detectors were used to capture approximately red, green, and blue monochromatic radiative intensity images in the visible wavelength region, and the flame emissivity and the radiative properties of the particulate media in three pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces were got from the flame images. It was shown that as the load increased, the flame emissivity and the radiative properties increased too; these radiative parameters had the largest values near the burner zone, and decreased along the combustion process. Compared with the combustion medium with a low-volatile anthracite coal burning in a 670 t/h boiler, the emissivity and the absorption coefficient of the medium with a high-volatile bituminous coal burning in a 1025 t/h boiler were smaller near the outlet zone, but were larger near the burner zone of the furnace, due to the significant contribution of soot to the radiation. This work will be of practical importance in modeling and calculating the radiative heat transfer in combustion processes, and improving the technology for in situ, multi-dimensional visualization of large-scale combustion processes in coal-fired furnaces of power plants. 18 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Chun Lou; Huai-Chun Zhou; Peng-Feng Yu; Zhi-Wei Jiang [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Weight Measurements of High-Temperature Superconductors during Phase Transition in Stationary, Non-Stationary Condition and under ELF Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been a number of claims in the literature about gravity shielding effects of superconductors and more recently on the weight reduction of superconductors passing through their critical temperature. We report several experiments to test the weight of superconductors under various conditions. First, we report tests on the weight of YBCO and BSCCO high temperature superconductors passing through their critical temperature. No anomaly was found within the equipment accuracy ruling out claimed anomalies by Rounds and Reiss. Our experiments extend the accuracy of previous measurements by two orders of magnitude. In addition, for the first time, the weight of a rotating YBCO superconductor was measured. Also in this case, no weight anomaly could be seen within the accuracy of the equipment used. In addition, also weight measurements of a BSCCO superconductor subjected to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) radiation have been done to test a claim of weight reduction under these conditions by De Aquino, and again, no unusual behavior was found. These measurements put new important boundaries on any inertial effect connected with superconductivity - and consequently on possible space related applications.

M. Tajmar; K. Hense; K. Marhold; C. J. de Matos

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Spectral Measurements of Solar Ultraviolet-B Radiation in Southeast England  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral measurements of the ultraviolet region of the solar spectrum have been made at Reading, southeast England (51.5°N) since July 1989. The data presented here show the daily and annual variability of and within the ultraviolet-B wave band, ...

Ann R. Webb

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Dilepton radiation measured in PHENIX probing the strongly interacting matter created at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHENIX has measured $e^+e^-$ pairs from p+p and Au+Au collisions as function of mass and $p_T$. The data can be used to probe the properties of dense matter formed in Au+Au collision. The relation between electron pairs and virtual photons is discussed.

Y. Akiba; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

430

NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

431

Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

SciTech Connect

This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

Guss, P. P.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

432

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Measurements and General Instrumentation

Kenneth D. Jarman; Erin A. Miller; Richard S. Wittman; Christopher J. Gesh

433

Environment/Climate Programs/Projects in PML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environment/Climate Programs/Projects in PML. Aperture area measurements. Applied spectroradiometry and imaging metrology. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

Periodic Solutions in Low-Dimensional Climatic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classic climatic models use constitutive laws without any response time. A more realistic approach to the natural processes governing climate dynamics must introduce response time for heat and radiation fluxes. Extended irreversible ...

Toni Pujol; Josep Enric Llebot

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Nonlinear and Nonlocal Nature of Climate Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate feedback framework partitions the radiative response to climate forcing into contributions from individual atmospheric processes. The goal of this study is to understand the closure of the energy budget in as much detail and precision ...

Nicole Feldl; Gerard H. Roe

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Twenty-First-Century Arctic Climate Change in CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors summarize the twenty-first-century Arctic climate simulated by NCAR’s Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4). Under a strong radiative forcing scenario, the model simulates a much warmer, wetter, cloudier, and stormier ...

Stephen J. Vavrus; Marika M. Holland; Alexandra Jahn; David A. Bailey; Benjamin A. Blazey

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Issues and Uncertainties Affecting Metrics for Aviation Impacts on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metrics such as radiative forcing and global warming potential have proven to be useful tools in climate policy–related studies, including evaluation of the effects of aviation on climate, to relate different emissions to one another in order to ...

Don Wuebbles; Piers Forster; Helen Rogers; Redina Herman

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Global ice cloud observations: radiative properties and statistics from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice clouds occur quite frequently, yet so much about these clouds is unknown. In recent years, numerous investigations and field campaigns have been focused on the study of ice clouds, all with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding of microphysical and optical properties, as well as determining the radiative impact. Perhaps one of the most recognized instruments used for such research is the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), carried aboard the NASA EOS satellites Terra and Aqua. The present research aims to support ongoing efforts in the field of ice cloud research by use of observations obtained from Terra and Aqua MODIS. First, a technique is developed to infer ice cloud optical depth from the MODIS cirrus reflectance parameter. This technique is based on a previous method developed by Meyer et al. (2004). The applicability of the algorithm is demonstrated with retrievals from level-2 and -3 MODIS data. The technique is also evaluated with the operational MODIS cloud retrieval product and a method based on airborne ice cloud observations. From this technique, an archive of daily optical depth retrievals is constructed. Using simple statistics, the global spatial and temporal distributions of ice clouds are determined. Research has found that Aqua MODIS observes more frequent ice clouds and larger optical depths and ice water paths than does Terra MODIS. Finally, an analysis of the time series of daily optical depth values revealed that ice clouds at high latitudes, which are most likely associated with synoptic scale weather sytems, persist long enough to move with the upper level winds. Tropical ice clouds, however, dissipate more rapidly, and are in all likelihood associated with deep convective cells.

Meyer, Kerry Glynne

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Radiation environment simulations at the Tevatron, studies of the beam profile and measurement of the Bc meson mass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The description of a computer simulation of the CDF detector at Fermilab and the adjacent accelerator parts is detailed, with MARS calculations of the radiation background in various elements of the model due to the collision of beams and machine-related losses. Three components of beam halo formation are simulated for the determination of the principal source of radiation background in CDF due to beam losses. The effect of a collimator as a protection for the detector is studied. The simulation results are compared with data taken by a CDF group. Studies of a 150 GeV Tevatron proton beam are performed to investigate the transverse diffusion growth and distribution. A technique of collimator scan is used to scrape the beam under various experimental conditions, and computer programs are written for the beam reconstruction. An average beam halo growth speed is given and the potential of beam tail reconstruction using the collimator scan is evaluated. A particle physics analysis is conducted in order to detect the B{sub c} {yields} J/{psi}{pi} decay signal with the CDF Run II detector in 360 pb{sup -1} of data. The cut variables and an optimization method to determine their values are presented along with a criterion for the detection threshold of the signal. The mass of the B{sub c} meson is measured with an evaluation of the significance of the signal.

Nicolas, Ludovic Y.; /Glasgow U.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Deployment of a Tethered-Balloon System for Microphysics and Radiative Measurements in Mixed-Phase Clouds at Ny-Ålesund and South Pole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tethered-balloon system capable of making microphysical and radiative measurements in clouds is described and examples of measurements in boundary layer stratus clouds in the Arctic and at the South Pole are presented. A 43-m3 helium-filled ...

R. Paul Lawson; Knut Stamnes; Jakob Stamnes; Pat Zmarzly; Jeff Koskuliks; Chris Roden; Qixu Mo; Michael Carrithers; Geoffrey L. Bland

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Simultaneous imaging electron- and ion-feature Thomson scattering measurements of radiatively heated Xe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uniform density and temperature Xe plasmas have been produced over >4 mm scale-lengths using x-rays generated in a cylindrical Pb cavity. The cavity is 750 {mu}m in depth and diameter, and is heated by a 300 J, 2 ns square, 1054 nm laser pulse focused to a spot size of 200 {mu}m at the cavity entrance. The plasma is characterized by simultaneous imaging Thomson scattering measurements from both the electron and ion scattering features. The electron feature measurement determines the spatial electron density and temperature profile, and using these parameters as constraints in the ion feature analysis allows an accurate determination of the charge state of the Xe ions. The Thomson scattering probe beam is 40 J, 200 ps, and 527 nm, and is focused to a 100 {mu}m spot size at the entrance of the Pb cavity. Each system has a spatial resolution of 25 {mu}m, a temporal resolution of 200 ps (as determined by the probe duration), and a spectral resolution of 2 nm for the electron feature system and 0.025 nm for the ion feature system. The experiment is performed in a Xe filled target chamber at a neutral pressure of 3-10 Torr, and the x-rays produced in the Pb ionize and heat the Xe to a charge state of 20{+-}4 at up to 200 eV electron temperatures.

Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Meinecke, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of Oxford, Wellington Square, Oxford, OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Kuschel, S.; Ross, J. S.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Shaw, J. L. [University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Stoafer, C. [Columbia University, 116th Street and Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Tynan, G. R. [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

National Climate Assessment: Indicators System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indicators System Print E-mail Indicators System Print E-mail What are the goals for the NCA indicators? The vision for the National Climate Assessment (NCA) is to create a system of indicators that will help inform policy-makers and citizens understand key aspects of our changing climate. Scientific information about physical climate conditions, climate impacts, vulnerabilities, and preparedness will be tracked and compiled. These measures are called indicators. The goals of the Indicators System are to: Provide meaningful, authoritative climate-relevant measures about the status, rates, and trends of key physical, ecological, and societal variables and values Inform decisions on management, research, and education at regional to national scales Identify climate-related conditions and impacts to help develop effective mitigation and adaptation measures

443

DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) W. J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , Newand R. J. Berry, "Manual on Radiation Dosimetry" (New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (New

Perez-Mendez, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Deformation of Olivine at Subduction Zone Conditions Determined from In situ Measurements with Synchrotron Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report measurements of the deformation stress for San Carlos olivine at pressures of 3-5 GPa, temperatures of 25-1150 C, and strain rates of 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. We determine a deformation stress of approximately 2.5 GPa that is relatively temperature and strain rate independent in the temperature range of 400-900 C. The deformation experiments have been carried out on a deformation DIA (D-DIA) apparatus, Sam85, at X17B2, NSLS. Powder samples are used in these experiments. Enstatite (MgSiO{sub 3}) (3-5% total quality of sample) is used as the buffer to control the activity of silica. Ni foil is used in some experiments to buffer the oxygen fugacity. Water content is confirmed by IR spectra of the recovered samples. Samples are compressed at room temperature and are then annealed at 1200 C for at least 2 h before deformation. The total (plastic and elastic) strains (macroscopic) are derived from the direct measurements of the images taken by X-ray radiograph technique. The differential stresses are derived from the diffraction determined elastic strains. In the regime of 25-400 C, there is a small decrease of stress at steady state as temperature increases; in the regime of 400 C to the 'transition temperature', the differential stress at steady state ({approx}2.5 GPa) is relatively insensitive to the changes of temperature and strain rate; however, it drastically decreases to about 1 GPa and becomes temperature-dependent above the transition temperature and thereafter. The transition temperature is near 900 C. Above the transition temperature, the flow agrees with power law creep measurements of previous investigations. The anisotropy of differential stress in individual planes indicates that the deformation of olivine at low temperature is dominated by [0 0 1](1 0 0). Accounting to a slower strain rate in the natural system, the transition temperature for the olivine in the slab is most likely in the range of 570-660 C.

H Long; D Weidner; L Li; J Chen; L Wang

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Comparison of Radiation Budget at the TOA and Surface in the Antarctic from ERBE and Ground Surface Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and the surface were compared at two Antarctic stations, Syowa and the South Pole, using Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data and surface observations. Fluxes at both sites were plotted ...

Takashi Yamanouchi; Thomas P. Charlock

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The direct measurement of ablation pressure driven by 351-nm laser radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instantaneous scaling of ablation pressure to laser intensity is directly inferred for ramp compression of diamond targets irradiated by 351-nm light. Continuously increasing pressure profiles from 100 to 970 GPa are produced by direct-drive laser ablation at intensities up to 7 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The free-surface velocity on the rear of the target is used to directly infer the instantaneous ablation-pressure profile at the front of the target. The laser intensity on target is determined by laser power measurements and fully characterized laser spots. The ablation pressure is found to depend on the laser intensity as P(GPa)=42({+-}3)[I(TW/cm{sup 2})]{sup 0.71({+-}0.01)}.

Fratanduono, D. E. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Collisional and Radiative Effects in Transient sub-Doppler Hole Burning: Double Resonance Measurements in CN  

SciTech Connect

We report transient hole-burning and saturation recovery measurements in the CN radical with MHz frequency resolution and 20 ns time resolution. Narrow velocity groups of individual hyperfine levels of selected rotational states in CN (X{sup 2} {Sigma}{sup +}) are depleted and excited (A{sup 2}{pi}{sub i}) with a saturation laser and probed by a counterpropagating, frequency modulated probe beam. Recent work in our lab has used this method to measure and characterize the hyperfine splittings for a set of rotational, fine structure, and parity components of CN (A{sup 2}{pi}{sub i}, v=1). Extending this work, we report time and frequency dependence of the saturation signals following abrupt switching of the CW saturation beam on and off with an electro-optic amplitude modulator. Recovery of the unsaturated absorption following the turnoff of the saturation beam follows pressure-dependent kinetics, driven by collisions with the undissociated NCCN precursor with a rate coefficient of 2 x 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} molec{sup -1}. Similar recovery kinetics are observed for two-level saturation resonances, where the signal observed is a combination of X- and A-state kinetics, as well as for three-level crossover resonances, which can be chosen to probe selectively the holefilling in the X state or the decay of velocity-selected A state radicals. The observed recovery rates are 8-10 times faster than the estimated rotationally inelastic contribution. The observed recovery rates are likely dominated by velocity-changing collisions in both X and A states, occurring with similar rates, despite the large difference in the properties of these electronic states. Transient signal risetimes following the turning on of the saturation pulse are consistent with the expected Rabi frequency. At lower pressures ({approx}50 mTorr) and higher beam power ({approx}200 mW), we can observe multiple Rabi cycles before collisions disrupt the coherent excitation and the transient signal reaches a steady state.

Hause,M.L.; Hall,G.; Sears, T.J.

2009-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hiroshima and Nagasaki initial radiations: delayed neutron contributions and comparison of calculated and measured cobalt activations  

SciTech Connect

Calculated estimates of neutron doses received by atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki have not included contributions from delayed neutrons emitted by fission products in the debris cloud, although the possibility of a significant contribution from this source has been suggested. In the present work, an established model accounting for gamma-ray kermas from these fission products is adapted to provide the desired neutron kerma estimates. Adaptations include use of explicit time dependence of neutron emitters, properly folded with the time-dependent phenomenology of the explosion itself, and detailed air-over-ground neutron transport with a source having an energy spectrum characteristic of these delayed neutrons. Results show that delayed neutrons are indeed negligible contributors to atomic-bomb survivor dosimetry, as well as to neutron activations at Hiroshima. About half the activation at Nagasaki, however, is due to the delayed component. Calculated activation of cobalt, a revision of previous estimates, is compared to measured values at Hiroshima and at Nagasaki. The causes of the substantial discrepancies are discussed and compared to previously reported discrepancies for sulfur activation. Additional investigation is recommended.

Loewe, W.E.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The effect of land surface changes on Eemian climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

surface albedo, an increase of the amount of absorbed solar radiation and thereby ... more comprehensive representation of weather and climate than given by ...

450

Evaluating the Direct and Indirect Aerosol Effect on Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

one of the largest uncertainties in climate forcing studies is the effect of aerosols on the earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols affect the radiation budget under both clear...

451

Climate Indices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indices Indices Climate Indices Climate indices are diagnostic tools used to describe the state of the climate system and monitor climate. They are most often represented with a time series, where each point in time corresponds to one index value. An index can be constructed to describe almost any atmospheric event; as such, they are myriad. Therefore, CDIAC provides these links to other web sites to help guide users to the most widely used climate indices, which in many cases are updated monthly. Data Set Website/Name NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, Monitoring and Data Index Page NOAA's Earth Systems Research Laboratory, Monthly Atmospheric and Ocean Time Series Page (plot, analyze, and compare time series) The Monthly Teleconnection Indices Page from NOAA's National

452

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Implementing the Climate Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implementing the Climate Action Plan Implementing the Climate Action Plan When implementing climate action plans on research campuses, two important and related questions must be answered. How do we pay for climate actions? And, who will manage and oversee implementation of the plan? The answer to each question will be specific to your campus. Narrow climate action plans focus on incremental savings through low-cost and voluntary measures. This approach begs the question about what should be done after the short-term, incremental improvements are completed. In contrast, a portfolio approach can help achieve deep reductions in energy consumption and move toward campus-wide climate neutrality. Build a Portfolio After considering a wide array of individual measures, a single portfolio is created for implementation. This approach allows research campuses to

453

EOS Terra Aerosol and Radiative Flux Validation: An Overview of the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA developed an Earth Observing System (EOS) to study global change and reduce uncertainties associated with aerosols and other key parameters controlling climate. The first EOS satellite, Terra, was launched in December 1999. The Chesapeake ...

W. L. Smith Jr.; T. P. Charlock; R. Kahn; J. V. Martins; L. A. Remer; P. V. Hobbs; J. Redemann; C. K. Rutledge

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Measurement of the hydrogen recombination coefficient in the TEXT tokamak as a function of outgassing and power radiated during tokamak discharges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The global recombination rate coefficient k/sub r/ for hydrogen has been measured in the TEXT tokamak vacuum vessel for various surface conditions. An attempt was made to correlate the measured values of k/sub r/ with residual gas analyzer (RGA) data taken before each measurement of k/sub r/ and with the power radiated during tokamak discharges produced after each measurement of k/sub r/. The results show that k/sub r/ increases during a series of tokamak discharges, k/sub r/ is relatively insensitive to power radiated during tokamak discharges, and k/sub r/ increases with the RGA measurements of mass 28 and 40 but not with those of mass 18. In addition, it was found that the mass 18 (H/sub 2/O) signal decreases as glow discharge experiments with hydrogen were performed.

Langley, R.A.; Rowan, W.L.; Bravenec, R.V.; Nelin, K.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Measurement of the hydrogen recombination coefficient in the TEXT tokamak as a function of outgassing and power radiated during tokamak discharges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The global recombination rate coefficient k/sub r/ for hydrogen has been measured in the TEXT tokamak vacuum for various surface conditions. An attempt was made to correlate the measured values of k/sub r/ with RGA data taken prior to each k/sub r/ measurement and with the power radiated during tokamak discharges produced after each k/sub r/ measurement. The results show that: k/sub r/ increases during a series of tokamak discharges, k/sub r/ is relatively insensitive to power radiated during tokamak discharges, k/sub r/ increases with the RGA measurements of mass 28 and 40 but not with mass 18. In addition, it was found that the RGA mass 18 (H/sub 2/O) signal decreased as glow discharge experiments with hydrogen were performed.

Langley, R.A.; Rowan, W.L.; Bravinec, R.V.; Nelin, K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

ARM Climate Research Facility Radar Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect

Roles, responsibilities, and processes associated with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Radar Operations.

Voyles, JW

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

457

Impact of Aviation on Climate: Research Priorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though presently small in magnitude, aviation’s future impact on climate will likely increase with the absence of effective mitigation measures. With the exception of CO2 emissions, climate impacts of aviation emissions are quite uncertain, and ...

Guy P. Brasseur; Mohan Gupta

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Adapting to Climate Change in Wisconsin Strategies for Conservation Professionals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) gr

Sheridan, Jennifer

459

Measured Energy Savings from Retrofits Installed in Low-Income Housing in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is metering energy use in a Habitat for Humanity housing development. The objective is to understand the way in which energy is used in low income housing and how it can be effectively reduced. The ten homes come from a conventional housing project built by in 1993 Habitat for Humanity in Homestead, Florida. The instrumentation was installed in the homes in July of 1994 with over three years of 15-minute data collected on all sites. Data were obtained on seven electrical end-uses (air conditioning, heating, hot water, dryer, range, refrigerator, washer/freezer) as well as total. Weather conditions were also monitored as well as interior comfort conditions (temperature and humidity) and hot water consumption and window ventilation status. Baseline field data from a year of monitoring from the ten homes allowed unique insight into how energy is used in low income housing and suggested where consumption might be reduced. In April of 1997, a series of detailed retrofits were applied to eight of the ten Habitat homes. These included solar water heaters installed in seven homes. In eight homes we retrofit light features to compact fluorescent types, repaired and sealed duct air distribution systems, cleaned refrigerator coils and installed low-flow showerheads. Since each of he associated energy end-uses (including hot water consumption) is metered, we are able to assess the relative performance of each of the retrofits. We also measured of air conditioner performance and house tightness. These audits revealed numerous problems, but low-evaporator coil air flow was discovered in all homes. The paper describes the retrofit installation, audit data collected and the impact on measured energy consumption. Preliminary economics are explored.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.; Floyd, D. B.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Reproducibility of Seasonal Land Surface Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the sensitivity of the continental seasonal climate to initial conditions is estimated from an ensemble of decadal simulations of an atmospheric general circulation model with the same specifications of radiative forcings and ...

Thomas J. Phillips

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Interactive Cloud Formation and Climatic Temperature Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional climate model with an interactive cloud formation program is developed to investigate its effects on temperature perturbations due to various radiative forcings including doubling of CO2, a 2% increase of the solar constant and ...

Kuo-Nan Liou; S. C. S. Ou; P. J. Lu

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Climate Response to Soil Dust Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols upon climate is calculated. Two atmospheric GCM (AGCM) simulations are compared, one containing a prescribed seasonally varying concentration of dust aerosols, and the other omitting dust. ...

R. L. Miller; I. Tegen

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Clouds and radiation in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local heterogeneity Key, Erica University of Miami, RSMAS Minnett, Peter University of Miami Improving our comprehension of the influence of clouds in the polar regions is important as a prerequisite to refining our understanding of the earth's climate system. Polar clouds modulate the radiative heat loss to space in the regions that serve as the heat sink of the climate system. The local feedbacks between cloud formation and changing surface albedo that result from the ice melting and refreezing cycle, and the small space scales over which significant gradients occur, render this a very complex system to study. Difficulties in making appropriate measurements in the harsh Arctic environment lead to sparse, if not absent information on the

464

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U r r b b a a n n A A t t m m o o s s p p h h e e r r i i c c O O b b s s e e r r v v a a t t o o r r y y ( ( U U A A O O ) ) F F i i r r s s t t P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g W W o o r r k k s s h h o o p p - - A A t t t t e e n n d d e e e e s s 2 2 7 7 - - 2 2 8 8 J J a a n n u u a a r r y y , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 3 ****************************************************************** Sean Ahearn Hunter College North Bldg., 10 th Floor New York City, NY sca@everest.hunter.cuny.edu (W) 212-772-5327 Robert Bornstein San Jose State University Dept. of Meteorology San Jose, CA 951920-0104 pblmodel@hotmail.com (W) 408-924-5205 (F) 408-924-5191 David Brown Argonne National Lab 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 dbrown@anl.gov (W) 608-442-1249 Michael Brown LANL, Drop Point 19S, SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road Group D4-MS F604 Los Alamos, NM 87545 mbrown@lanl.gov (W) 505- 667-1788

465

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) Pilot Experiment at NYC" - Michael Reynolds, BNL 17:30 "EML Pilot Studies for the Urban Atmospheric Observatory" - Hsi-Na (Sam) Lee, EML 17:40 "A...

466

Cirrus Cloud Radiative and Microphysical Properties from Ground Observations and In Situ Measurements during FIRE 1991 and Their Application to Exhibit Problems in Cirrus Solar Radiative Transfer Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements from the FIRE 1991 cirrus cloud field experiment in the central United States are presented and analyzed.

S. Kinne; T. P. Ackerman; M. Shiobara; A. Uchiyama; A. J. Heymsfield; L. Miloshevich; J. Wendell; E. Eloranta; C. Purgold; R. W. Bergstrom

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Geographical Distribution of Climate Feedbacks in the NCAR CCSM3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study performs offline, partial radiative perturbation calculations to determine the geographical distributions of climate feedbacks contributing to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative energy budget. These radiative perturbations are ...

Patrick C. Taylor; Robert G. Ellingson; Ming Cai

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CLIMATE 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLIMATE 1 CLIMATE 1 CLIMATE 1 logo. Global climate data atlas consisting of a data base and a software for data access and visualization. The data base contains more than 1200 station data sets distributed all over the globe. Station data consist of 16 monthly mean data sets: Temperature: mean, min., max., extreme min. and max. rel. humidity, precipitation: mean, min., max., day maximum, days with precipitation, potential evaporation, global radiation, sunshine hours, wind speed and direction. Once a station is selected, its data are displayed graphically on the screen, and the data can be exported for other applications. A graphical user interface with topographic and climatic maps makes the tool easy to handle. Screen Shots Keywords climate data, climatic maps, sun chart

469

Habitable Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the standard liquid-water definition, the Earth is only partially habitable. We reconsider planetary habitability in the framework of energy-balance models, the simplest seasonal models in physical climatology, to assess the spatial and temporal habitability of Earth-like planets. We quantify the degree of climatic habitability of our models with several metrics of fractional habitability. Previous evaluations of habitable zones may have omitted important climatic conditions by focusing on close Solar System analogies. For example, we find that model pseudo-Earths with different rotation rates or different land-ocean fractions have fractional habitabilities that differ significantly from that of the Earth itself. Furthermore, the stability of a planet's climate against albedo-feedback snowball events strongly impacts its habitability. Therefore, issues of climate dynamics may be central in assessing the habitability of discovered terrestrial exoplanets, especially if astronomical forcing conditions are different from the moderate Solar System cases.

David S. Spiegel; Kristen Menou; Caleb A. Scharf

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z