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1

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

2

Climate monitoring with Earth radiation budget measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) and its geographical distribution is intimately linked with the earth’s climate and with the general circulation. We analyze 10 years of global Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) measurements from 2000 to 2010 and 8 years of diurnally resolved Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) from 2004 to 2011 to illustrate this link and to verify if we can detect climate variability or systematic change. In response to the diurnal wave of solar heating three tropical convection maxima exist over South America Africa and around Indonesia. The Indonesian convection maximum is unstable due to a lack of a stabilizing land mass; this is the root cause of the El Ni?o/La Ni?a inter-annual variation with a global pattern of teleconnected variations through the general Walker circulation. Since 2000 a change in global dynamics seems to have occurred. There was a general strengthening of La Ni?a coinciding with a ‘break in global temperature rise’ and with an ‘eastern dimming’ i.e. an increase of aerosols over Asia. There is a resemblance to the period of ‘western dimming’ from 1945 to 1980 and a contrast with the period of global temperature rise and El Ni?o strengthening from 1980 to 2000. It is of paramount importance that the suspected link between the eastern dimming the strengthening of La Ni?a and the break in global temperature rise is thoroughly investigated. This can best be done by a move of a satellite of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) series over the Indian Ocean. MSG provides diurnally resolved measurements of the key variables of the ERB clouds and aerosols and of the auxiliary variables of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and static stability.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

4

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

6

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

7

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

8

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

9

DOE/SC-ARM-13-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the...

10

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility - annual report 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-ARM-0403 ER-ARM-0403 3 Table of Contents Program Overview ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 The Role of Clouds in Climate .................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Science Goals ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Climate Research Facility: Successful Science Program Leads to User Facility Designation ................................ 5 Sites Around the World Enable Real Observations .......................................................................................................

11

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

LR Roeder

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

15

DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

16

DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

17

Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)  

SciTech Connect

The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program North Slope, Alaska Bringing Climate Change Into The Classroom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the concentrations of these gases since the start of the industrial revolution, around 1850. #12;Causes of Climate Change Since the start of the industrial revolution, human activities have caused a steady increase fuels (e.g., oil, gas and coal) from industrial activities, landfills, agricultural practices, and many

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

19

2007 Radiation & Climate GRC ( July 29-August 3, 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The theme of the fifth Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate is 'Integrating multiscale measurements and models for key climate questions'. The meeting will feature lectures, posters, and discussion regarding these issues. The meeting will focus on insights from new types of satellite and in situ data and from new approaches to modeling processes in the climate system. The program on measurements will highlight syntheses of new satellite data on cloud, aerosols, and chemistry and syntheses of satellite and sub-orbital observations from field programs. The program on modeling will address both the evaluation of cloud-resolving and regional aerosol models using new types of measurements and the evidence for processes and physics missing from global models. The Conference will focus on two key climate questions. First, what factors govern the radiative interactions of clouds and aerosols with regional and global climate? Second, how well do we understand the interaction of radiation with land surfaces and with the cryosphere?

William Collins

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

22

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

23

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Radiative heating rate The heating rate due to the divergence of long and shortwave radiative flux. Categories Radiometric, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 : Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS

24

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

25

Evaluating the present-day simulation of clouds, precipitation, and radiation in climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] This paper describes a set of metrics for evaluating the simulation of clouds, radiation, and precipitation in the present-day climate. As with the skill scores used to measure the accuracy of short-term weather forecasts, these metrics are low-order statistical measures of agreement with relevant, well-observed physical quantities

Robert, Pincus

26

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

27

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

28

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation emitted by the earth. This instrument is onboard a European Union geostationary weather satellite launched in December 2005; it is collecting data over Niamey and the...

29

Measurement of radiation impedance of stepped piston radiator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was noted in a paper given in 1972 [A. H. Lubell J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 52 1310 (1972)] that the radiation mass of a stepped piston underwater loudspeaker was approximately half of the value expected from simple piston theory. Recently the integral equation approach was used to compute the radiation impedance for the Lubell Laboratories model 98 underwater loudspeaker and new measurements were made. This paper reviews the measurement and data reduction procedures and compares measured and theoretical radiation impedances. The original observation of reduced radiation mass is supported. A companion paper covers the integral equation computation. [This work was supported by Lubell Laboratories Inc.

Alan H. Lubell

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Climate Collections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional/Global > Climate Collections Regional/Global > Climate Collections Climate Collections Overview Climate encompasses the statistics of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, rainfall, atmospheric particle count, and numerous other meteorological elements in a given region over long periods of time. Climate can be contrasted to weather, which is the present condition of these same elements over periods up to two weeks. The climate collections project includes data sets containing measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and cloud cover and include station measurements as well as gridded mean values. The ORNL DAAC Climate Collections Data archive includes 10 data products from the following categories:

31

Growing More Effective Ways to Measure Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Growing More Effective Ways to Measure Climate Change For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research Highlight...

32

''Measuring the Costs of Climate Change Policies''  

SciTech Connect

Studies of the costs of climate change policies have utilized a variety of measures or metrics for summarizing costs. The leading economic models have utilized GNP, GDP, the ''area under a marginal cost curve,'' the discounted present value of consumption, and a welfare measure taken directly from the utility function of the model's representative agent (the ''Equivalent Variation''). Even when calculated using a single model, these metrics do not necessarily give similar magnitudes of costs or even rank policies consistently. This paper discusses in non-technical terms the economic concepts lying behind each concept, the theoretical basis for expecting each measure to provide a consistent ranking of policies, and the reasons why different measures provide different rankings. It identifies a method of calculating the ''Equivalent Variation'' as theoretically superior to the other cost metrics in ranking policies. When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes empirically these two properties of different costs measures as they pertain to assessing the costs of the carbon abatement policies, especially the Kyoto Protocol, under alternative assumptions about implementation.

Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P.M.

2003-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

33

DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Forward In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change Research Program coordinated by the Committee on Earth Sciences (CES) of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The recent heightened concern about global warming from an enhanced greenhouse effect has prompted the Department to accelerate the research to improve predictions of climate change. The emphasis is on

34

Measurement of solar radiation exergy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods of estimating the energy of solar radiation during it conversion into other forms of energy-thermal, photoelectric, and chemical-during photosynthesis of plants are examined. Analytical expressions are gi...

I. I. Sventitskii; A. P. Grishin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, January 2000  

SciTech Connect

The subject of this newsletter is the ARM unmanned aerospace vehicle program. The ARM Program's focus is on climate research, specifically research related to solar radiation and its interaction with clouds. The SGP CART site contains highly sophisticated surface instrumentation, but even these instruments cannot gather some crucial climate data from high in the atmosphere. The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense joined together to use a high-tech, high-altitude, long-endurance class of unmanned aircraft known as the unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV). A UAV is a small, lightweight airplane that is controlled remotely from the ground. A pilot sits in a ground-based cockpit and flies the aircraft as if he were actually on board. The UAV can also fly completely on its own through the use of preprogrammed computer flight routines. The ARM UAV is fitted with payload instruments developed to make highly accurate measurements of atmospheric flux, radiance, and clouds. Using a UAV is beneficial to climate research in many ways. The UAV puts the instrumentation within the environment being studied and gives scientists direct measurements, in contrast to indirect measurements from satellites orbiting high above Earth. The data collected by UAVs can be used to verify and calibrate measurements and calculated values from satellites, therefore making satellite data more useful and valuable to researchers.

Sisterson, D.L.

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Trends of measured climate forcing agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reflective aerosols and soil dust (?1.4 ± 0...possible additional downward pressure caused by climate concerns...escaping from landfills, coal mining, oil and gas...product of incomplete combustion, whereas O 3 is produced...CH 4 (30). Improved combustion technologies can reduce...

James E. Hansen; Makiko Sato

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Radiative forcing in the ACCMIP historical and future climate simulations  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) examined the short-lived drivers of climate change in current climate models. Here we evaluate the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of which also participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The models reproduce present-day total aerosol optical depth (AOD) relatively well, though many are biased low. Contributions from individual aerosol components are quite different, however, and most models underestimate east Asian AOD. The models capture most 1980-2000 AOD trends well, but underpredict increases over the Yellow/Eastern Sea. They strongly underestimate absorbing AOD in many regions. We examine both the direct radiative forcing (RF) and the forcing including rapid adjustments (effective radiative forcing; ERF, including direct and indirect effects). The models’ all-sky 1850 to 2000 global mean annual average total aerosol RF is (mean; range) ?0.26Wm?2; ?0.06 to ?0.49Wm?2. Screening based on model skill in capturing observed AOD yields a best estimate of ?0.42Wm?2; ?0.33 to ?0.50Wm?2, including adjustment for missing aerosol components in some models. Many ACCMIP and CMIP5 models appear to produce substantially smaller aerosol RF than this best estimate. Climate feedbacks contribute substantially (35 to ?58 %) to modeled historical aerosol RF. The 1850 to 2000 aerosol ERF is ?1.17Wm?2; ?0.71 to ?1.44Wm?2. Thus adjustments, including clouds, typically cause greater forcing than direct RF. Despite this, the multi-model spread relative to the mean is typically the same for ERF as it is for RF, or even smaller, over areas with substantial forcing. The largest 1850 to 2000 negative aerosol RF and ERF values are over and near Europe, south and east Asia and North America. ERF, however, is positive over the Sahara, the Karakoram, high Southern latitudes and especially the Arctic. Global aerosol RF peaks in most models around 1980, declining thereafter with only weak sensitivity to the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP). One model, however, projects approximately stable RF levels, while two show increasingly negative RF due to nitrate (not included in most models). Aerosol ERF, in contrast, becomes more negative during 1980 to 2000. During this period, increased Asian emissions appear to have a larger impact on aerosol ERF than European and North American decreases due to their being upwind of the large, relatively pristine Pacific Ocean. There is no clear relationship between historical aerosol ERF and climate sensitivity in the CMIP5 subset of ACCMIP models. In the ACCMIP/CMIP5 models, historical aerosol ERF of about ?0.8 to ?1.5Wm?2 is most consistent with observed historical warming. Aerosol ERF masks a large portion of greenhouse forcing during the late 20th and early 21st century at the global scale. Regionally, aerosol ERF is so large that net forcing is negative over most industrialized and biomass burning regions through 1980, but remains strongly negative only over east and southeast Asia by 2000. Net forcing is strongly positive by 1980 over most deserts, the Arctic, Australia, and most tropical oceans. Both the magnitude of and area covered by positive forcing expand steadily thereafter.

Shindell, Drew; Lamarque, J.-F.; Schulz, M.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Chin, Mian; Young, P. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Rotstayn, Leon; Mahowald, N. M.; Milly, G.; Faluvegi, G.; Balkanski, Y.; Collins, W. J.; Conley, Andrew; Dalsoren, S.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Liu, Xiaohong; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Takemura, T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Lo, Fiona

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, June 2002.  

SciTech Connect

ARM Intensive Operational Period Scheduled to Validate New NASA Satellite--Beginning in July, all three ARM sites (Southern Great Plains [SGP], North Slope of Alaska, and Tropical Western Pacific; Figure 1) will participate in the AIRS Validation IOP. This three-month intensive operational period (IOP) will validate data collected by the satellite-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) recently launched into space. On May 4, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched Aqua, the second spacecraft in the Earth Observing System (EOS) series. The EOS satellites monitor Earth systems including land surfaces, oceans, the atmosphere, and ice cover. The first EOS satellite, named Terra, was launched in December 1999. The second EOS satellite is named Aqua because its primary focus is understanding Earth's water cycle through observation of atmospheric moisture, clouds, temperature, ocean surface, precipitation, and soil moisture. One of the instruments aboard Aqua is the AIRS, built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA agency. The AIRS Validation IOP complements the ARM mission to improve understanding of the interactions of clouds and atmospheric moisture with solar radiation and their influence on weather and climate. In support of satellite validation IOP, ARM will launch dedicated radiosondes at all three ARM sites while the Aqua satellite with the AIRS instrument is orbiting overhead. These radiosonde launches will occur 45 minutes and 5 minutes before selected satellite overpasses. In addition, visiting scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will launch special radiosondes to measure ozone and humidity over the SGP site. All launches will generate ground-truth data to validate satellite data collected simultaneously. Data gathered daily by ARM meteorological and solar radiation instruments will complete the validation data sets. Data from Aqua-based instruments, including AIRS, will aid in weather forecasting, climate modeling, and greenhouse gas studies. These instruments will provide more accurate, detailed global observations of weather and atmospheric parameters that will, in turn, improve the accuracy and quality of weather forecasts. A satellite-based instrument is cost-effective because it can provide continuous global measurements, eliminating isolated yet costly weather balloon releases. Aqua, launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California (Figure 2), carries six state-of-the-art instruments that measure various water vapor parameters: (1) AIRS, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity, land and sea surface temperatures, cloud properties, and radiative energy flux; (2) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity during both cloudy and cloud-free periods; (3) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, precipitation rates, land surface wetness, sea ice, snow cover, sea surface temperature, and wind fields; (4) Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System, which measures radiative energy flux; (5) Humidity Sounder for Brazil, which measures atmospheric humidity by using a passive scanning microwave radiometer; and (6) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, aerosol properties, land cover and land use change, vegetation dynamics, land surface temperature, fire occurrence, volcanic effects, sea surface temperature, ocean color, snow cover, atmospheric temperature and humidity, and sea ice. The data-gathering capabilities of the Aqua instruments will provide an unprecedented view of atmosphere-land interactions (Figure 3). The availability of more frequent, more accurate global measurements of important atmospheric parameters will both improve our capabilities for short-term weather forecasting and lead to a better understanding of climate variability and climate change. Simultaneous measurements of many parameters will allow scientists to study complicated forcings and feedbacks of the atmosphere, which can be

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

39

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.

Robert G. Ellingson

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol radiative forcing Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No. DE- Summary: : WHY MEASUREMENTS ALONE CANNOT QUANTIFY AEROSOL RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE Stephen E. Schwartz... of radiative forcing of climate change by aerosols,...

43

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial Facility  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM data is collected both through permanent monitoring stations and field campaigns around the world. Airborne measurements required to answer science questions from researchers or to validate ground data are also collected. To find data from all categories of aerial operations, follow the links from the AAF information page at http://www.arm.gov/sites/aaf. Tables of information will provide start dates, duration, lead scientist, and the research site for each of the named campaigns. The title of a campaign leads, in turn, to a project description, contact information, and links to the data. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

44

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

45

Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties of GHG balances in forestry systems (1 slide) · The current GHG balance and potentials at different scales (5 slides) · Modelling forest GHG balances and impacts of measures (2 slides;18 May 2010 Climate change mitigation and forestry measures GHG dynamics in forest systems · Emissions

46

TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures Agency/Company /Organization: GIZ Focus Area: Governance - Planning - Decision-Making Structure Topics: Best Practices Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: transferproject.org/index.php/hb During the 3-year project, project partners will develop the online handbook 'Navigating Transport NAMAs' with practical advice on how to develop and implement a mitigation action in the transport sector. The handbook will consist of a generic part with general information on transport NAMAs and a number of case studies which will be based on south-south networks of countries and practical implementation within the

47

Gordon Research Conference on Radiation & Climate in 2009, July 5 -10  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate will present cutting-edge research on the outstanding issues in global climate change with focus on the radiative forcing and sensitivity of the climate system and associated physical processes. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, including grand challenges in radiation and climate, radiative forcing, climate feedbacks, cloud processes in climate system, hydrological cycle in changing climate, absorbing aerosols and Asian monsoon, recent climate changes, and geo-engineering. The invited speakers will present the recent most important advances and future challenges in these areas. The Conference will bring together a collection of leading investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for scientists especially junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented.

Quiang Fu

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

48

Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Diabat L., Blanc Ph., Wald L., Solar radiation climate in Africa. Solar Energy, 76, 733-744, 2004. SOLAR RADIATION CLIMATE IN AFRICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diabaté L., Blanc Ph., Wald L., Solar radiation climate in Africa. Solar Energy, 76, 733-744, 2004 is very useful for preliminary assessment and modeling of solar energy systems. Following the approach: clearness index, atmosphere optics, clustering, interpolation, map, solar energy systems Nomenclature: (KTd

Boyer, Edmond

50

Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site  

SciTech Connect

Although shallow cumuli are common over large areas of the globe, their impact on the surface radiative forcing has not been carefully evaluated. This study addresses this shortcoming by analyzing data from days with shallow cumuli collected over eight summers (2000-2007) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (collectively ACRF) Southern Great Plains site. During periods with clouds, the average shortwave and longwave radiative forcings are 45.5 W m-2 and +11.6 W m-2, respectively. The forcing has been defined so that a negative (positive) forcing indicates a surface cooling (warming). On average, the shortwave forcing is negative, however, instances with positive shortwave forcing are observed approximately 20% of the time. These positive values of shortwave forcing are associated with three-dimensional radiative effects of the clouds. The three-dimensional effects are shown to be largest for intermediate cloud amounts. The magnitude of the three-dimensional effects decreased with averaging time, but it is not negligibly small even for large averaging times as long as four hours.

Berg, Larry K.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Mills Jr., David L.

2011-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

51

Technical Sessions A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Study of Longwave Radiation A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models R. G. Ellingson F. Baer Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 Introduction the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere. Nature of Longwave Problems Longwave radiation quantities-radiances, fluxes and heating rates-are usually calculated in GCM models as the cloud amount weighted average of the values for clear and homogeneous cloud conditions. For example, the downward flux at the surface, F, may be written as

52

Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Climate Prediction and Radiative Heating Climate models are driven by forcing, and these forces are seen primarily by the thermal field in general circulation models (GCMs). The major forces that affect the thermal field are longwave radiative (LWR) heating, shortwave radiative (SWR) heating, and convection (cumulus, etc.). These forcing effects are cycled through the thermal field to the motion field by nonlinear transfer. The dependent variables-in particular, temperature (T), moisture (Q) and especially clouds-evolve in time in a model and determine the subsequent forcing. If the dependent variables are not accurately calculated in space and time, the forcing

53

Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties: Application to Climate Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Use of In Situ Observations to Characterize Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties: Application to Climate Studies G. M. McFarquhar and T. Nousiainen Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois M. S. Timlin, S. F. Iacobellis, and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Cloud radiative feedback is the most important effect determining climate response to human activity. Ice clouds reflect solar radiation and absorb thermal emission from the ground and the lower atmosphere and emit infrared radiation to space. The representation of these processes in models affects future climate predictions and there is much uncertainty in the representation of these processes. The size and

54

Measurements of Relative K Radiative Decay Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relative radiative decay rates were measured for K-shell vacancies for elements between Z=62 and 92 with a high-resolution Ge(Li) spectrometer. The ratios ?2?1, ?1??1, and ?2??1 (Siegbahn notation) were determined, with ?2?1 significantly higher (4-14%) than those reported by Beckman but in excellent agreement with recent Hartree-Slater calculations of Scofield. The ratios ?1??1 and ?2??1 do not agree with either Beckman's experiment or Scofield's calculations.

P. J. Ebert and V. W. Slivinsky

1969-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Collaborative Research: The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to an accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR climate model. To better understand and eventually better represent these processes, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, intra-seasonal oscillations and the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. The effect of the MIT and AER physics also has been tested in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 (hereinafter STD) and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics (hereinafter MOD) are still unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of the intra-seasonal oscillations (ISOs). The new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor relative to satellite measurements.

Dr. Kerry Emanuel; Michael J. Iacono

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Posters Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties Measured  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties Measured by Combined Lidar, Radar, and Infrared Radiometer W. L. Eberhard and J. M. Intrieri National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. P. Chan and G. Feingold Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Boulder, Colorado also an order of magnitude smaller. These features make simple approximations in scattering calculations adequate for some applications, e.g., Eberhard (1993a). They also provide some unique capabilities, especially the technique described below for measuring drop sizes. One of the four IDP tasks is to characterize cloud signatures obtained by CO 2 lidar. For instance, our earlier work discovered that depolarization from ice particles was almost

57

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Niamey, Niger for the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) operates at non-permanent sites selected by the ARM Program. Sometimes these sites can become permanent ARM sites, as was the case with Graciosa Island in the Azores. It is now known as the Eastern North Atlantic permanent site. In January 2006 the AMF deployed to Niamey, Niger, West Africa, at the Niger Meteorological Office at Niamey International Airport. This deployment was timed to coincide with the field phases and Special Observing Periods of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). The ARM Program participated in this international effort as a field campaign called "Radiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST).The primary purpose of the Niger deployment was to combine an extended series of measurements from the AMF with those from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) Instrument on the Meteosat operational geostationary satellite in order to provide the first well-sampled, direct estimates of the divergence of solar and thermal radiation across the atmosphere. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Niamey are available via a link from ARM's Niamey, Niger site information page. Other data can be found at the related websites mentioned above and in the ARM Archive. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

58

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.  

SciTech Connect

Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

59

3 Canopy microclimate measurement This chapter presents methods general to the measurement of climate variables at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to maximize data capture and improve signal quality assessment. Duplicate measurements were usually recorded.1. For measurements that did not vary spatially (e.g. incoming solar radiation on a clear day), a single measurement-2 s-1 72 24 Air temperature 0.243 1.5 °C 2 3 Net Radiation 5.174 12 W m-2 14 3 Global short-wave 1

60

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Specific Measurement Categories  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM Program gathers a wide variety of measurements from many different sources. Each day, the Data Archive stores and distributes large quantities of data collected from these sources. Scientists then use these data to research atmospheric radiation balance and cloud feedback processes, which are critical elements of global climate change. The huge archive of ARM data can be organized by measurement categories into six "collections:" Aerosols, Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties, Radiometric, and Surface Properties. Clicking on one of the measurement categories leads to a page that breaks that category down into sub-categories. For example, "Aerosols" is broken down into Microphysical and Chemical Properties (with 9 subsets) and Optical and Radiative Properties (with 7 subsets). Each of the subset links, in turn, leads to detailed information pages and links to specific data streams. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

62

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/climate_change_mitigation_land_use.pdf References: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors[1] Overview "This paper reviews the status of the post-2012 negotiations on climate change mitigation through land-use measures in the agriculture and forestry

63

Radiation measurements with heat-proof polyethylene terephthalate bottles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1009 145 1006 55 Radiation measurements with...Chiba-263-8555, Japan 2 Hiroshima University...Photonics K.K., Japan) connected with...evaluation of a radiation detector because...be used to detect radiation in place of the...Chemicals Inc., Japan). Since the PET...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive ComponentEmissionsEmissionsEmissions Todd Hubing Mi h li P f f V hi l El t iMichelin Professor of Vehicular Electronics Clemson University

Stuart, Steven J.

65

Motivation Measurements EVA Results Issues/Future Work Weather and Climate Extremes: cape times shear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivation Measurements EVA Results Issues/Future Work Weather and Climate Extremes: cape times Weather/Climate Extremes 1 / 19 c University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. All rights reserved scales. E Gilleland Weather/Climate Extremes 2 / 19 c University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Gilleland, Eric

66

Current issues in terrestrial solar radiation instrumentation for energy, climate, and space applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uncertainty in terrestrial solar radiation measurements of a few watts per square metre (1 W/m2 to 2 W/m2) is needed to validate estimates of the Earth's radiation balance derived from satellite data. The characterization of solar energy resources for renewable energy technologies requires similar accuracy for economical technology deployment. Solar radiation measurement research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses calibrations, operational characteristics, and corrections for terrestrial solar radiation measurements. The characterization of field instrument geometric and thermal responses contributing to radiometric errors is described, together with correction schemes reducing the uncertainty of broadband irradiance measurements from tens of watts per square metre to a few (±2 W/m2 to ±5 W/m2). Such improvements in accuracy reduce the time and labour required for detecting and quantifying trends in terrestrial solar radiation and possible changes in the Earth's radiation budget.

T L Stoffel; I Reda; D R Myers; D Renne; S Wilcox; J Treadwell

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. Scientists are using the information obtained from the permanent SGP site to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the SGP site. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions over the typical distribution of land uses within the site. The continuous observations at the SGP site are supplemented by intensive observation periods, when the frequency of measurements is increased and special measurements are added to address specific research questions. During such periods, 2 gigabytes or more of data (two billion bytes) are generated daily. SGP data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/ http. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

68

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry...

69

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Response of the NCAR Community Climate Model to the Radiative Forcing by the Naturally Occurring Tropospheric Aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We insert the effect of naturally occurring tropospheric aerosols on solar radiation into the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The effect of the aerosol depends on concentration and type (continental, maritime), surface albedo, solar zenith ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Robert D. Cess

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

72

Extreme measures : mechanisms driving changes in climate extremes in Australia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Changes in the frequency and/or severity of extreme climate events have the potential to have profound societal and ecological impacts and observations suggest that in… (more)

Alexander, Lisa Victoria

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Measurements - Ion Beams - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Beams Available Beams Beam Change Times Measurements Useful Graphs Measurements The beam uniformity and flux are determined using an array of five detectors. Each...

74

What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and extreme values determine climate for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate zones? The sun is the ultimate power source for the climate "machine". The uneven distribution conditions. Typical variables to consider are temperature (maximum, miniumum), precipitation (includes rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc), sunlight/cloudiness, wind, humidity, ice cover, sea temperature, etc... Many

Allan, Richard P.

75

Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation  

SciTech Connect

Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

Smith, D. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sound radiation measurement with nearfield holography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With holography an entire 3D wave field can be reconstructed from data obtained on a single 2D surface. Such high information content has made holography a powerful research tool and useful extensions from its original optical domain to other wave fields such as sound have naturally been pursued. However it has usually been assumed that the resolution of a holographicreconstruction is limited by the wavelength of the radiation; this limitation severely diminishes the usefulness of holography for sound fields when the wavelengths are many times larger than the objects to be imaged. We have developed a new technique called nearfield holography which eliminates the wavelength resolution limit and in addition permits a determination of: (1) the complete sound pressure and particle velocity fields produced by the source; (2) the mode of vibration of the surfaces of the source; (3) the vector intensity field (showing flow of acoustic energy) around the source; (4) the farfield directivity pattern; (5) the total power radiated into a half?space. A particularly interesting application of nearfield holography occurs in the study of sound radiation from musical instruments. [Work supported by ONR.

J. D. Maynard; E. G. Williams

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

78

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

79

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

80

Techniques for radiation measurements: microdosimetry and dosimetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......neutron capture therapy(25) using a pair of matched miniature TEPCs where the wall of one of the counters is loaded with Boron-10. Subtraction of the two measured microdosimetric spectra reveals the enhanced dose achieved by boron capture. In this......

A. J. Waker

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cosmic Radiation Measurements in Airline Service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of 38.9 µSv whereas the CARI 3Q programme gives a route dose of 32.5 µSv. Measurements have also been performed on the Boeing 747-400 aircraft on the high latitude ultralonghaul direct London-Tokyo flight and these give values in the region of 6......

M. Bagshaw

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Measurement of radiation dose in dental radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......product to effective dose and energy imparted to the patient. Phys...C. A. and Persliden, J. Energy imparted to the patient in diagnostic...factors for determining the energy imparted from measurements of...dental radiology. | Patient dose audit is an important tool for quality......

Ebba Helmrot; Gudrun Alm Carlsson

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Method and apparatus for measuring spatial uniformity of radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for measuring the spatial uniformity of the intensity of a radiation beam from a radiation source based on a single sampling time and/or a single pulse of radiation. The measuring apparatus includes a plurality of radiation detectors positioned on planar mounting plate to form a radiation receiving area that has a shape and size approximating the size and shape of the cross section of the radiation beam. The detectors concurrently receive portions of the radiation beam and transmit electrical signals representative of the intensity of impinging radiation to a signal processor circuit connected to each of the detectors and adapted to concurrently receive the electrical signals from the detectors and process with a central processing unit (CPU) the signals to determine intensities of the radiation impinging at each detector location. The CPU displays the determined intensities and relative intensity values corresponding to each detector location to an operator of the measuring apparatus on an included data display device. Concurrent sampling of each detector is achieved by connecting to each detector a sample and hold circuit that is configured to track the signal and store it upon receipt of a "capture" signal. A switching device then selectively retrieves the signals and transmits the signals to the CPU through a single analog to digital (A/D) converter. The "capture" signal. is then removed from the sample-and-hold circuits. Alternatively, concurrent sampling is achieved by providing an A/D converter for each detector, each of which transmits a corresponding digital signal to the CPU. The sampling or reading of the detector signals can be controlled by the CPU or level-detection and timing circuit.

Field, Halden (Boulder, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments  

SciTech Connect

Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

Fu, Tairan, E-mail: trfu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Evaluation of the Multi-scale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is to provide long-term observations for evaluating and improving cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, the traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties for gridcells that are tens to hundreds kilometers across from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with time series of ground based observations at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the scale gap. The MMF consists of a two-dimensional or small three-dimensional cloud resolving model (CRM) embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. We present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru Island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both the CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with the MMF as well as the CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from the MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from the CAM run. This change is attributed to the improved representation of convective clouds in the MMF compared to the conventional climate model. For the SGP, the MMF shows little to no improvement in predicting the same quantities. Possible causes of this lack of improvement are discussed.

Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Measurement of parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the measurement of optics parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source, which include betatron tune, beta function, dispersion function, natural chromaticity, corrected chromaticity, central RF frequency, momentum compaction factor, and linear betatron coupling. Two methods were used for beta function measurement; a conventional quadrupole scan method and a method using the fitting of the orbit response matrix. A robust Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used for nonlinear least square fitting of the orbit response matrix. In this paper, detailed methods for the parameter measurements are described. The measured results are discussed and compared with the theoretical values obtained using accelerator simulation code Accelerator Toolbox in MATLAB.

Ghodke, A. D.; Husain, Riyasat; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Surendra; Puntambekar, T. A. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, 452013, Indore (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Lens transmission measurement for an absolute radiation thermometer  

SciTech Connect

The lens transmission for the National Institute of Metrology of China absolute radiation thermometer is measured by a hybrid method. The results of the lens transmission measurements are 99.002% and 86.792% for filter radiometers with center wavelengths 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively. These results, after correcting for diffraction factors and the size-of-source effect when the lens is incorporated within the radiometer, can be used for measurement of thermodynamic temperature. The expanded uncertainty of the lens transmission measurement system has been evaluated. It is 1.3×10{sup ?3} at 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively.

Hao, X.; Yuan, Z.; Lu, X. [Division of Thermometry and Materials Evaluation, National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)] [Division of Thermometry and Materials Evaluation, National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

88

Changing the Climate Sensitivity of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model through Cloud Radiative Adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting probabilistic climate projections with a particular climate model requires the ability to vary the model’s characteristics, such as its climate sensitivity. In this study, the authors implement and validate a ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

89

Implementation of a Cloud Radiative Adjustment Method to Change the Climate Sensitivity of CAM3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting probabilistic climate projections with a particular climate model requires the ability to vary the model’s characteristics, such as its climate sensitivity. In this study, we implement and validate a method to ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

90

Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates  

SciTech Connect

This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

Rudd, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Evaluation of Energy Efficiency Measures in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Prototype, Storefront Retail Building Prototype Stand-alone Retail Building Small Retail Location Hawaii West Africa Thailand various various various various Climate Zone(s) 1A 1A 1A 1A, 2A, 3B, 4A, 5A & 6A 1A, 2A, 3B, 4A, 5... External External Window-to- wall area ratio >40% 23% 31% 40%, window evenly distributed on exterior walls 35%, most windows on south and west walls 35% Various Proposed HVAC System VRV and DOAS VAV with reheat, air- cooled chillers VAV...

Zhao, Y.; Erwine, B.; Leonard, P.; Pease, B.; Dole, A.; Lee, A.

92

Atmospheric radiation measurement unmanned aerospace vehicle (ARM-UAV) program  

SciTech Connect

ARM-UAV is part of the multi-agency U.S. Global Change Research Program and is addressing the largest source of uncertainty in predicting climatic response: the interaction of clouds and the sun`s energy in the Earth`s atmosphere. An important aspect of the program is the use of unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) as the primary airborne platform. The ARM-UAV Program has completed two major flight series: The first series conducted in April, 1994, using an existing UAV (the General Atomics Gnat 750) consisted of eight highly successful flights at the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. The second series conducted in September/October, 1995, using two piloted aircraft (Egrett and Twin Otter), featured simultaneous measurements above and below clouds and in clear sky. Additional flight series are planned to continue study of the cloudy and clear sky energy budget in the Spring and Fall of 1996 over the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Bolton, W.R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques  

SciTech Connect

A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements  

SciTech Connect

The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Statistical correlation between hourly and daily values of solar radiation on horizontal surface at sea level in the Italian climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

219- Statistical correlation between hourly and daily values of solar radiation on horizontal- nalières du rayonnement solaire. Abstract. 2014 The knowledge of hourly data of solar radiation is required data measured in Italian stations and propose a method to estimate hourly solar radiation

Boyer, Edmond

96

Borehole logging for uranium by measurement of natural ?-radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-Ray measurements have been made in boreholes since 1939, for the purpose of detecting the radiation from naturally occuring radioelements in rocks. Logs of the ?-radiation in boreholes have evolved to their present acceptance as a quantitative measurement of uranium concentration for uranium exploration and mining development projects. Many factors influence these ?-ray measurements and consequently new methods of overcoming previous problems have had to be developed. Calibration facilities with model holes have been established in several countries to support quantitative borehole measurements. New high density detector materials have been evaluated and have shown to yield considerable improvements for operation in the restricted environment of the borehole. ?-Ray spectral logging has become available partially as a result of spin-off from parallel developments in surface and airborne ?-ray spectrometric survey equipment. The use of the high resolution solid state detector has proceeded through a series of developments to its present availability as a commercial borehole logging service in spite of the inherent detector cooling problems. Digital measurements are replacing the earlier analog measurements, and minicomputer- or micro processor-based logging systems have enabled new data processing techniques such as inverse filtering, to be implemented in real time at the site of the borehole.

P.G. Killeen

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.  

SciTech Connect

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

Preston, Eric F. (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO); Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Evaluation of the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was to provide long-term observations for evaluation of cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with observed time series at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called the multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the gap. MMF consists of a two-dimensional cloud system resolving model (CSRM) embedded into each CAM grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. Because the approach is computationally expensive only limited simulations have been carried out. In this presentation, we will present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with MMF as well as CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from CAM run. For the SGP, the improvements are marginal.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to the accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). To better understand and eventually better represent these processes in this major national climate model, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global climate models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, on intra-seasonal oscillations and on the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. In addition, the MIT and AER physics packages have been incorporated and tested in combination within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model for the purpose of evaluating and improving convective and radiative processes on time scales appropriate to weather simulations. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics are unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of dynamical intra-seasonal oscillations such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation. In addition, it has been shown that the new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor in CAM as established through the comparison of modeled and observed satellite radiances. This suggests that continuing regional discrepancies in water vapor amounts in the climate model may not be solely related to convective or radiative processes. The major results of this project have been described in more detail in a journal article titled â??The Impacts of AER Radiation and MIT Convection on the Water Cycle Simulated by CAM3.5â?ť that will be submitted for publication during Fall 2010.

Emanuel, Kerry; Iacono, Michael J.

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD  

SciTech Connect

Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

Kurzeja, R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

102

Space station: Infrastructure for radiation measurements in low Earth orbit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has recently begun the design and development phase of the Space Station Program. International negotiations with the Europeans Japanese and Canadians are progressing and they will soon join the United States in the development to complete plans for a cooperative international space endeavor. The Space Station will prove a permanently manned facility in low earth orbit to support scientific research technology development and commercial activities. In addition free?flying platforms will be developed to carry a variety of user payloads in polar orbit in co?orbit with the station and eventually into geosynchronous orbit. The Station and platforms represent an infrastructure of research facilities in space which could be utilized for measurements of naturally occurring radiation and secondary emissions over extended periods of time. High energy radiation experiments at the Station/platforms might vary in objective from scientific purpose of characterizing the radiation evironment for improved model accuracy. This paper describes the Space Station Program content schedule and approach for inputting user requirements into the design process. Conference participants can then assess to what extent this future capability in space matches their future research initiatives.

B. D. Meredith

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Clear Skies A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the...

104

Measurement of the radiation field surrounding the Collider Detector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

We present here the first direct and detailed measurements of the spatial distribution of the ionizing radiation surrounding a hadron collider experiment. Using data from two different exposures we measure the effect of additional shielding on the radiation field around the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Employing a simple model we parameterize the ionizing radiation field surrounding the detector.

K. Kordas et al.

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Investigation of the Dynamical, Macrophysical and Radiative Properties of High Clouds Combining Satellite Observations and Climate Model Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the physical mechanism governing the fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis and test of FAT hypothesis with CTT measurements; and 3) the intercomparison of cloud fraction and radiative effects between satellite-based observations and reanalysis product...

Li, Yue

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Appropriate Conservation Measures for Single-Family Buildings in Hot, Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and skin wetness, and they should be investigated. REFERENCES 1. "Residential Conservation Service Model Audit Manual," Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL/CON-103, October 1983. 2. "WE-2 Reference Manual, Version 2. LA," LBL-8706, Rev. 2, May 1981..., Thermal Comfort, Krieger Publishing Co., Malabar, Florida, 1982. 9. H. A. McLain, J. M. MacDonald, D. Goldenberg, "Appropriate Conservation Measures for Single-Family Buildings in Hot Humid Climates,'' ORNL/CON report, to be issued. 10. R. Messenger...

McLain, H. A.; MacDonald, J. M.; Goldenberg, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Radiation Hard Hybrid Pixel Detectors, and a bbbar Cross Section Measurement at the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is placed on the effects of the high radiation environment on the detector operation. Measurements of the charge collection efficiency, interpixel capacitance, and other properties of the pixel sensors as a function of the radiation damage are presented...

Sibille, Jennifer Ann

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

On the Contribution of Longwave Radiation to Global Climate Model Biases in Arctic Lower Tropospheric Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous research has found that global climate models (GCMs) usually simulate greater lower tropospheric stabilities compared to reanalysis data. To understand the origins of this bias, the authors examine hindcast simulations initialized with ...

Neil P. Barton; Stephen A. Klein; James S. Boyle

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Throughput Measurement of a Multilayer-Coated Schwarzschild Objective Using Synchrotron Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The throughput of a Schwarzschild objective using undulator synchrotron radiation was measured. ... estimated from the squared reflectivity of one multilayer mirror and from the obstruction ratio. However,...

Takanori Kiyokura; Fumihiko MAEDA; Yoshio Watanabe; Yoshinori Iketaki…

110

MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH GAMMA RADIATION DOSE USING THE MEMS BASED DOSIMETER AND RADIOLISYS EFFECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation dose. If we consider, that the average time of exploitation is estimated to be 40 years and veryMEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH GAMMA RADIATION DOSE USING THE MEMS BASED DOSIMETER AND RADIOLISYS EFFECT M of high and very high doses of ionizing radiation is crucial for the monitoring of the existing Nuclear

Boyer, Edmond

111

76Radiation Dose and Dose Rate Radiation is measured in two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seiverts per year. Hasty reports about the devastating Japan 2011 nuclear power plant radiation leakages have by Concorde, what are the total radiation doses for a passenger in each case? Problem 3 - The Japan 2011 earthquake damaged several nuclear reactors, causing radiation leakage across northern Japan. On March 22

112

Global Warming Potential and Global Warming Commitment Concepts in the Assessment of Climate Radiative Forcing Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Global Warming Potential (GWP) and Radiative Forcing (RF ... CS) and Individual (IS) schemes. The Global Warming Commitment (GWC) is calculated by the...

Igor L. Karol; Victor A. Frolkis…

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiative fluxes for the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research, the Netherlands Knap, Wouter Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI Los, Alexander KNMI...

114

Country level risk measures of climate-related natural disasters and implications for adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to climate change Nick Brooks and W. Neil Adger January 2003 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research for adaptation to climate change Nick Brooks and W. Neil Adger Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research are nearly all developing countries with many of them showing a high degree of consistency in their rankings

Watson, Andrew

115

Measurements of Dust Oscillations with Laser Heterodyne Receiver of Scattered Radiation  

SciTech Connect

We performed the experiments on measurement of vibration amplitudes for microparticles in gas and water with laser heterodyne receiver of scattered radiation. The measured vibration amplitude values are about 20 nm.

Serozhkin, Yuriy; Venger, Yevgen [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 41 Nauky Prospect, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Accuracy of Humidity Measurement on Ships: Consideration of Solar Radiation Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of heating due to solar radiation on measurements of humidity obtained from ships is examined. Variations in wet- and dry-bulb temperature measured on each side of a research ship are shown to correlate with solar radiation. However, ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Parametric Channeling Radiation and its Application to the Measurement of Electron Beam Energy  

SciTech Connect

We have proposed a method for observing parametric channeling radiation (PCR) and of applying it to the measurement of electron beam energy. The PCR process occurs if the energy of the channeling radiation coincides with the energy of the parametric X-ray radiation (PXR). The PCR process can be regarded as the diffraction of 'virtual channeling radiation'. We developed a scheme for beam energy measurement and designed an experimental setup. We also estimated the beam parameters, and calculated the angular distributions of PXR and PCR. These considerations indicate that the observation of PCR is promising.

Takabayashi, Y. [SAGA Light Source, 8-7 Yayoigaoka, Tosu, Saga 841-0005 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

118

Climate Change Worksheet Energy Budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more energy in the tropics per unit area than it does at the poles. In a similar way, at midday, when are all in W/m2 (Watts per square metre), a measure of energy flux. Of the incoming radiation, 47% (161Climate Change Worksheet Energy Budget For any balanced budget, what comes in must equal what goes

Allan, Richard P.

119

Ozonesonde measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Billings, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Ozonesonde instruments were prepared and released at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site located near Billings, Oklahoma. Ozone sensors, associated radiosondes, balloons, and other parts and pieces required for the ozone observations were provided by WFF on a reimbursable arrangement with ANL. Observations were scheduled daily at 1,700 UTC beginning on September 22, 1995. Attempts to maintain this schedule were frustrated by a few simultaneous operations involving different electronic devices in use resulting in considerable rf noise. Since radiosondes are necessarily low-cost instruments their reception is particularly susceptible to noisy rf fields. Overall, however, 36 ozonesonde flights were made with the last observation occurring on November 1, 1995. Ozone data were processed on-site through the ground-station software and preliminary data delivered to Mike Splitt at the ARM site.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Experimental Measurement of Radiation Heat Transfer from Complex Fenestration Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A well instrumented facility for the measurement of heat transfer from complex fenestration systems was built and validated. The facility provided very accurate measurements based… (more)

Wilson, Barry Allan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Point Reyes, California for the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, was the location of the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The ARM Program collaborated with the U.S. Office of Naval Research and DOE's Aerosol Science Program in the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) project. Their objectives were to collect data from cloud/aerosol interactions and to improve understanding of cloud organization that is often associated with patches of drizzle. Between March and September 2005, the AMF and at least two research aircraft were used to collect data.

122

Improving the reliability and accuracy of a multipyranometer array measuring solar radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measurement of solar radiation is crucial for the use of solar energy in fields including power generation, agriculture and meteorology. In the building sciences, It is essential for daylighting studies, energy use calculations, and thermal...

Klima, Peter Miloslaw

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Spacecraft Habitation Systems, Water Recovery and Waste Active Charged Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-PMWC) Orbital Technologies Corporation Technical Abstract Model calculations and risk assessment estimates Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement Technologies Technical Abstract The innovative High Efficiency the resultant plastic tiles. This system requires access to power, data, and cooling interfaces. The system

124

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux by Actinometer and of Maximal Polarization of Sky Brightness in the Solar Almucantar A. Kh. Shukurov, K. A....

125

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic energy are consistent with independent measurements, where available. We find no dependence in individual seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment, J. Geophys

Prieto, Germán A.

126

Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

Stoffel, T

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Toward Robust Climate Baselining: Objective Assessment of Climate Change Using Widely Distributed Miniaturized Sensors for Accurate World-Wide Geophysical Measurements  

SciTech Connect

A gap-free, world-wide, ocean-, atmosphere-, and land surface-spanning geophysical data-set of three decades time-duration containing the full set of geophysical parameters characterizing global weather is the scientific perquisite for defining the climate; the generally-accepted definition in the meteorological community is that climate is the 30-year running-average of weather. Until such a tridecadal climate base line exists, climate change discussions inevitably will have a semi-speculative, vs. a purely scientific, character, as the baseline against which changes are referenced will be at least somewhat uncertain. The contemporary technology base provides ways-and-means for commencing the development of such a meteorological measurement-intensive climate baseline, moreover with a program budget far less than the {approx}$2.5 B/year which the US. currently spends on ''global change'' studies. In particular, the recent advent of satellite-based global telephony enables real-time control of, and data-return from, instrument packages of very modest scale, and Silicon Revolution-based sensor, data-processing and -storage advances permit 'intelligent' data-gathering payloads to be created with 10 gram-scale mass budgets. A geophysical measurement system implemented in such modern technology is a populous constellation 03 long-lived, highly-miniaturized robotic weather stations deployed throughout the weather-generating portions of the Earths atmosphere, throughout its oceans and across its land surfaces. Leveraging the technological advances of the OS, the filly-developed atmospheric weather station of this system has a projected weight of the order of 1 ounce, and contains a satellite telephone, a GPS receiver, a full set of atmospheric sensing instruments and a control computer - and has an operational life of the order of 1 year and a mass-production cost of the order of $20. Such stations are effectively ''intra-atmospheric satellites'' but likely have serial-production unit costs only about twenty-billionths that of a contemporary NASA global change satellite, whose entirely-remote sensing capabilities they complement with entirely-local sensing. It's thus feasible to deploy millions of them, and thereby to intensively monitor all aspects of the Earths weather. Analogs of these atmospheric weather stations will be employed to provide comparable-quality reporting of oceanic and land-surface geophysical parameters affecting weather. This definitive climate baselining system could be in initial-prototype operation on a one-year time-scale, and in intermediate-scale, proof-of-principle operation within three years, at a total cost of {approx}$95M. Steady-state operating costs are estimated to be {approx} $75M/year, or {approx}3% of the current US. ''global change'' program-cost. Its data-return would be of great value very quickly as simply the best weather information, and within a few years as the definitive climatic variability-reporting system. It would become the generator of a definitive climate baseline at a total present-value cost of {approx}$0.9 B.

Teller, E; Leith, C; Canavan, G; Marion, J; Wood, L

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cm2 sh keV c Speed of light 2:99 102 cmsh D Di usion coe cient ( 13 t ) cm F Radiation ux jkcm2 sh k Time iteration t Di erence between consecutive time steps shakes(sh) hi Size of spatial cell, i cm ! Direction of photon propagation ster... backward Euler implicit di erencing in time and lumped LD in space to (5.5), we get 1 c t (k+ 12) i;L (k 12) i;L hi 2 + F (k+ 12) i F (k+ 12) i 12 + hi 2 a (k+ 12) i;L = QL hi 2 ; (8.2a) 1 c t (k+ 12) i;R (k...

Kumar, Akansha

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

129

On Correction of Diffuse Radiation Measured by MFRSR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measured by MFRSR T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS Tomsk, Russia M. A. Sviridenkov and P. P. Anikin A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS...

130

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

131

Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

132

Design Specifications for a Radiation Tolerant Beam Loss Measurement ASIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel radiation-hardened current digitizer ASIC is in planning stage, aimed at the acquisition of the current signals from the ionization chambers employed in the Beam Loss Monitoring system at CERN. The purpose is to match and exceed the performance of the existing discrete component design, currently in operation in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The specifications include: a dynamic range of nine decades, defaulting to the 1 pA-1mA range but adjustable by the user, ability to withstand a total integrated dose of 10 kGy at least in 20 years of operation and user selectable integrating windows, as low as 500 ns. Moreover, the integrated circuit should be able to digitize currents of both polarity with a minimum number of external components and without needing any configuration. The target technology is the IBM 130nm CMOS process. The specifications, the architecture choices and the reasons on which they are based upon are discussed in this paper.

Venturini, G G; Effinger, E; Zamantzas, C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

banner banner Home | People | Site Index Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility US Department of Energy About Science Campaigns Sites Instruments Measurements Data News Publications Education Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQ Outreach Displays History Organization Participants Facility Statistics Forms Contacts Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings Propose a Campaign Submitting Proposals: Guidelines Featured Campaigns Campaign Data List of Campaigns Aerial Facility Eastern North Atlantic Mobile Facilities North Slope of Alaska Southern Great Plains Tropical Western Pacific Location Table Contacts Instrument Datastreams Value-Added Products PI Data Products Field Campaign Data Related Data

134

An Assessment of Envelope Measures in Mild Climate Deep Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect

Energy end-uses and interior comfort conditions have been monitored in 11 Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs) in a mild marine climate. Two broad categories of DER envelope were identified: first, bringing homes up to current code levels of insulation and airtightness, and second, enhanced retrofits that go beyond these code requirements. The efficacy of envelope measures in DERs was difficult to determine, due to the intermingled effects of enclosure improvements, HVAC system upgrades and changes in interior comfort conditions. While energy reductions in these project homes could not be assigned to specific improvements, the combined effects of changes in enclosure, HVAC system and comfort led to average heating energy reductions of 76percent (12,937 kWh) in the five DERs with pre-retrofit data, or 80percent (5.9 kWh/ft2) when normalized by floor area. Overall, net-site energy reductions averaged 58percent (15,966 kWh; n=5), and DERs with code-style envelopes achieved average net-site energy reductions of 65percent (18,923 kWh; n=4). In some homes, the heating energy reductions were actually larger than the whole house reductions that were achieved, which suggests that substantial additional energy uses were added to the home during the retrofit that offset some heating savings. Heating system operation and energy use was shown to vary inconsistently with outdoor conditions, suggesting that most DERs were not thermostatically controlled and that occupants were engaged in managing the indoor environmental conditions. Indoor temperatures maintained in these DERs were highly variable, and no project home consistently provided conditions within the ASHRAE Standard 55-2010 heating season comfort zone. Thermal comfort and heating system operation had a large impact on performance and were found to depend upon the occupant activities, so DERs should be designed with the occupants needs and patterns of consumption in mind. Beyond-code building envelopes were not found to be strictly necessary for the achievement of deep energy savings in existing uninsulated homes in mild marine climates, provided that other energy end-uses were comprehensively reduced. We recommend that mild climate DERs pursue envelopes in compliance with the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and pair these with high efficiency, off-the-shelf HVAC equipment. Enhanced building envelopes should be considered in cases where very low heating energy use (<1,000 kWh/year or <0.5 kWh/ft2-year) and enhanced thermal comfort (ASHRAE 55-2010) are required, as well as in those situations where substantial energy uses are added to the home, such as decorative lighting, cooling or smart home A/V and communication equipment.

Walker, Iain; Less, Brennan

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program - unmanned aerospace vehicle: The follow-on phase  

SciTech Connect

Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) demonstration flights (UDF) are designed to provide an early demonstration of the scientific utility of UAVs by using an existing UAV and instruments to measure broadband radiative flux profiles under clear sky conditions. UDF is but the first of three phases of ARM-UAV. The second phase significantly extends both the UAV measurement techniques and the available instrumentation to allow both multi-UAV measurements in cloudy skies and extended duration measurements in the tropopause. These activities build naturally to the third and final phase, that of full operational capability, i.e., UAVs capable of autonomous operations at 20-km altitudes for multiple days with a full suite of instrumentation for measuring radiative flux, cloud properties, and water vapor profiles.

Vitko, J. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) Central Facility  

SciTech Connect

In this study, a data analysis is performed to determine the area-averaged, spectral albedo at ARM's SGP central facility site. The spectral albedo is then fed into radiation transfer models to show that the diffuse discrepancy is diminished when the spectral albedo is used (as opposed to using the broadband albedo).

Michalsky, Joseph J.; Min, Qilong; Barnard, James C.; Marchand, Roger T.; Pilewskie, Peter

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

DOE/SC-ARM-14-025 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the continental U.S. megasite. The Manus TWP facility has been decommissioned and all instrumentation from that site is in transit to the SGP site for reconfiguration. The...

138

Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

array (MPA). The earliest work on an MPA related device for measuring diffuse sky radiation was performed in Finland by M. H2milllien et al. (1985). Further development on the MPA was performed in several countries including the United States where...

Munger, B.; Haberl, J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Diurnal Variations of Albedo Retrieved from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five years of measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) have been analyzed to define the diurnal cycle of albedo from 55°N to 55°S. The ERBS precesses through all local times every 72 days so as to provide data regarding the ...

David A. Rutan; G. Louis Smith; Takmeng Wong

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ON THE SUITABILITY OF LONGITUDINAL PROFILE MEASUREMENTS USING COHERENT SMITH-PURCELL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kittelmann, C. Thomas, ESS, Lund, Sweden Abstract The use of Smith-Purcell radiation to measure electrons power, it is mandatory to understand the beam dynamics and to determine the beam size and profile with precision. In high power proton Linacs, such under- standing would allow a full characterization of the beam

Boyer, Edmond

142

Low Frequency Measurement of the Spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

Smoot, G. F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S. D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

1983-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

143

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: â?˘ Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. â?˘ Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. â?˘ Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) measured the daily  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation for astronauts orbiting Mars. The biggest uncertainty is in the SPE dose estimate. We had important than GCRs as a source of radiation? Explain why or why not in terms of estimation uncertainties5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE

145

Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results...

Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Measuring Hawking Radiation of a Kerr-Newman Black Hole in a Superconducting Transmission Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying a dimensional reduction technique and a coordinates transformation approach, we deduce the Kerr-Newman space-time into a Painlev\\'{e}-like form, and obtain its corresponding event horizon and the Hawking radiation temperature. We find that, the event horizon of a Kerr-Newman black hole can be simulated in a superconducting transmission line. Moreover, by running some numerical simulation, we confirm that the Hawking radiation of a Kerr-Newman Black Hole can be experimentally measured in a superconducting transmission line.

X. G. Lan; D. Y. Chen; L. F. Wei

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic ...

S. J. Ghan; X. Liu; R. C. Easter; R. Zaveri; P. J. Rasch; J.-H. Yoon; B. Eaton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electron density and temperature measurement by continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The electron-atom neutral bremsstrahlung continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized plasmas is investigated for electron density and temperature diagnostics. The continuum spectrum in 450–1000?nm emitted from the argon atmospheric pressure plasma is found to be in excellent agreement with the neutral bremsstrahlung formula with the electron-atom momentum transfer cross-section given by Popovi?. In 280–450?nm, however, a large discrepancy between the measured and the neutral bremsstrahlung emissivities is observed. We find that without accounting for the radiative H{sub 2} dissociation continuum, the temperature, and density measurements would be largely wrong, so that it should be taken into account for accurate measurement.

Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Youn Moon, Se [High-enthalpy Plasma Research Center, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaeyoung [5771 La Jolla Corona Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Leakage Current-based Measurement of the Radiation Damage in the ATLAS Pixel Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module measurement of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

Gorelov, Igor V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Data Quality Assessment and Control for the ARM Climate Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is to provide observations of the earth climate system to the climate research community for the purpose of improving the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their coupling with the Earth's surface. In order for ARM measurements to be useful toward this goal, it is important that the measurements are of a known and reasonable quality. The ARM data quality program includes several components designed to identify quality issues in near-real-time, track problems to solutions, assess more subtle long-term issues, and communicate problems to the user community.

Peppler, R

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

Blast wave radiation source measurement experiments on the Z Z-pinch facility  

SciTech Connect

The Dynamic Hohlraum (DH) radiation on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories [R. B. Spielman, W. A. Stygar, J. F. Seamen et al., Proceeding of the 11th International Pulsed Power Conference, Baltimore, 1997, edited by G. Cooperstein and I. Vitkovitsky (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1997), Vol. 1, p. 709] is a bright source of radiant energy that has proven useful for high energy density physics experiments. But the radiation output from a DH on Z needs to be well known. In this paper, a new method is presented for measuring the radiation fluence deposited in an experiment, specifically, an experiment driven by a Z DH. This technique uses a blast wave produced in a SiO{sub 2} foam, which starts as supersonic but transitions to subsonic, producing a shock at the transition point that is observable via radiography. The position of this shock is a sensitive measure of the radiation drive energy from the Z DH. Computer simulations have been used to design and analyze a Z foam blast wave experiment.

Peterson, R.R.; Peterson, D.L.; Watt, R.G.; Idzorek, G.; Tierney, T.; Lopez, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time M. Splitt University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Recent work in this area by Charles Wade (1987) lays out the groundwork for monitoring data quality for projects with large networks of instruments such as the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Wade generated objectively analyzed fields of meteorological variables (temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind) and then compared the objectively analyzed value at the sensor location with the value produced by the sensor. Wade used a Barne's objective analysis scheme to produce objective data values for a given meteorological variable (q) in two- dimensional space. The objectively analyzed value should

155

Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and south sensors and one for the east and west sensors. The solution for the east and west sensors is expanded to two new solutions by mirroring their readings according to the solar noon; each real measurement and its mirrored values generate a solution..., which was originally developed approximately 30 years back, Hämäläinen et al. [1] developed an instrument, which included 25 solar radiation sensors mounted on a metal hemisphere. Since then, many other have further studied how to simplify...

Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Haberl, Jeff; Sun, Yifu

156

Lowering the Light Speed Isotropy Limit: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measurement of the Compton edge of the scattered electrons in GRAAL facility in European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole reveals up to 10 sigma variations larger than the statistical errors. We now show that the variations are not due to the frequency variations of the accelerator. The nature of Compton edge variations remains unclear, thus outlining the imperative of dedicated studies of light speed anisotropy.

V. G. Gurzadyan; J. -P. Bocquet; A. Kashin; A. Margarian; O. Bartalini; V. Bellini; M. Castoldi; A. D'Angelo; J. -P. Didelez; R. Di Salvo; A. Fantini; G. Gervino; F. Ghio; B. Girolami; A. Giusa; M. Guidal; E. Hourany; S. Knyazyan; V. Kouznetsov; R. Kunne; A. Lapik; P. Levi Sandri; A. Lleres; S. Mehrabyan; D. Moricciani; V. Nedorezov; C. Perrin; D. Rebreyend; G. Russo; N. Rudnev; C. Schaerf; M. -L. Sperduto; M. -C. Sutera; A. Turinge

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

157

Gamma spectroscopic measurements using the PID350 pixelated CdTe radiation detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopic measurements are presented using the PID350 pixelated gamma radiation detectors. A high-speed data acquisition system has been developed in order to reduce the data loss during the data reading in case of a high flux of photons. A data analysis framework has been developed in order to improve the resolution of the acquired energy spectra, using specific calibration parameters for each PID350's pixel. Three PID350 detectors have been used to construct a stacked prototype system and spectroscopic measurements have been performed in order to test the ability of the prototype to localize radioactive sources.

Karafasoulis, K; Seferlis, S; Papadakis, I; Loukas, D; Lambropoulos, C; Potiriadis, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Characteristic measurements of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas generated in a Planckian radiation environment  

SciTech Connect

The temporally and spatially resolved characteristics of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas were studied using x-ray spectroscopy. The plasma was generated in the near-Planckian radiation environment within gold hohlraum targets irradiated by laser pulses with a total energy of 2.4 kJ in 1 ns. The contributions of silicon ions at different charge states to the specific components of the measured absorption spectra were also investigated. It was found that each main feature in the absorption spectra of the measured silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas was contributed by two neighboring silicon ionic species.

Dong Quanli; Wang Shoujun; Li Yutong; Zhang Yi; Zhao Jing [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei Huigang; Shi Jianrong; Zhao Gang [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang Jiyan; Gu Yuqiu; Ding Yongkun; Wen Tianshu; Zhang Wenhai; Hu Xin; Liu Shenye; Zhang Lin; Tang Yongjian; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center for Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

ARM - ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Support International Polar Year Begins at ACRF with 3-week Campaign in Barrow Aerosol Affects on Clouds To Be Studied Yearlong Study to Improve Polar Measurements of Radiative Energy Education Efforts Educational Kiosk CD Available at No Cost-Request Yours Today! POLAR-PALOOZA: Climate science goes on tour! Partnership Extends Support for National Science Teacher Conference Teacher's Domain Combines Culture and Climate Other Links ACRF IPY Home U.S. IPY Home ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) The Department of Energy's International Polar Year (IPY) contributions will be conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) located in the North Slope of Alaska. This DOE user facility

160

Evaluation of Radiometric Measurements from the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR): Two- and Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Modeling of an Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Cloud Deck  

SciTech Connect

In December 1999, NASA launched the Terra satellite. This platform carries five instruments that measure important properties of the Earth climate system. One of these instruments is the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MISR. This instrument measures light reflected from the Earth at a spatial resolution of 275-1100 m, at four wavelengths (446, 558, 672, and 866 nm), and at nine different viewing angles that vary from +70 to -70 degrees along the direction of flight [Diner et al., 2002]. These multiangle data have the potential to provide information on aerosols, surface, and cloud characteristics that compliments traditional single-view-direction satellite measurements. Before this potential can be realized, the accuracy of the satellite radiance measurements must be carefully assessed, and the implications of the radiometric accuracy on remote-sensing algorithms must be evaluated. In this article, we compare MISR multiangle measurements against two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D radiative transfer calculations from an inhomogeneous cloud scene. Inputs to the radiative transfer code are based entirely on independently gathered data (ground-based radar, lidar, microwave radiometer, in situ aircraft data, etc.). The 2-D radiative transfer calculations compare favorably near nadir and in most of the forward scattering directions, but differ by as much as 10% in the backscattering directions. Using 3-D radiative transfer modeling, we show that this difference is due to the 3-D structure of the cloud deck, including variations in the cloud top height on scales less than 275 m, which are not resolved in the 2-D simulations. Comparison of the 2-D calculations to the MISR measurements, after accounting for the 3-D structure, show residual differences that are less than 4% at all angles at the MISR blue and green wavelengths. The comparison also reveals that the MISR measurements at the red and near-infrared wavelengths are too bright relative to measurements in the blue and green bands. On the basis of the results of this study, along with results from five other comparisons, the MISR calibration is being adjusted to reduce the red and nearinfrared Radiances.

Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (ozone · Result: a statistical range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW

Sheridan, Jennifer

162

SURFRAD—A National Surface Radiation Budget Network for Atmospheric Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A surface radiation budget observing network (SURFRAD) has been established for the United States to support satellite retrieval validation, modeling, and climate, hydrology, and weather research. The primary measurements are the downwelling ...

John A. Augustine; John J. DeLuisi; Charles N. Long

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

164

Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates  

SciTech Connect

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Radiation from a uniformly accelerated particle detector: Energy, particles, and the quantum measurement process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We comment on the controversy whether a uniformly accelerated particle detector radiates. We stress the particular importance of the built-up correlations and of the quantum measurement process in this connection. We give the question the following form: We assume that the initial state of the quantum field is the Minkowski vacuum and that there is a uniformly accelerated two-level system which is initially in its ground state. What will in this case be found in the different regions of asymptotic future null infinity for the mean value of the field energy density on one hand and of the Minkowski particle number on the other if in the out region (a) no measurement is made on the two-level system, (b) the measurement finds the two-level system in its upper state, or (c) in its lower state? To obtain localized statements, we base the calculations on wave packet states. The different cases show essential differences.

Jürgen Audretsch and Rainer Müller

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cloud Radiative Forcing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Vertical Redistribution of Radiant Energy by Clouds. Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Kato, Seiji Hampton University/NASA Langley Research Center Documentation with data of the effects of clouds on the radiant energy balance of the surface and atmosphere represent a critical shortcoming in the set of observations that are needed to ascertain the validity of model simulations of the earth's climate. While clouds are known to cool the climate system from TOA radiation budget studies, the redistribution of energy between the surface and atmosphere and within the atmosphere by clouds has not been examined in detail. Using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP)

167

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument Calibrations Weather Observations Measurement Research Support Measurements & Instrumentation Team Center for Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems http://www.nrel.gov/srrl NREL * * * * 1617 Cole Boulevard * * * * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 * * * * (303) 275-3000 Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Mission Provide a unique outdoor research facility for supporting renewable energy conversion technologies and climate change studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE). Objectives * Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations * Develop a Solar Resource Climate Database for Golden, Colorado

168

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

169

Measurement of radiative widths of $a_2(1320)$ and $?_2(1670)$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The COMPASS Collaboration at CERN has investigated the reaction $\\pi^- \\gamma \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ embedded in the Primakoff reaction of $190~\\textrm{GeV}$ pions scattering in the Coulomb field of a lead target, $\\pi^- \\text{Pb} \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+ \\text{Pb}$. Exchange of quasi-real photons is selected by isolating the sharp Coulomb peak observed at momentum transfer below $0.001~(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. Using a partial-wave analysis the amplitudes and relative phases of the $a_2(1320)$ and $\\pi_2(1670)$ mesons have been extracted, and the Coulomb and the diffractive contributions have been disentangled. Measuring absolute production cross sections we have determined the radiative width of the $a_2(1320)$ to be $\\Gamma_0(a_2(1320) \\rightarrow \\pi\\gamma) = (358 \\pm 6_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 42_{\\textrm{syst}})~\\textrm{keV}$. As the first measurement, $\\Gamma_0(\\pi_2(1670) \\rightarrow \\pi\\gamma) = (181 \\pm 11_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 27_{\\textrm{syst}})~\\textrm{keV} \\cdot (\\textrm{BR}^{\\textrm{PDG}}_{f_2 \\pi}/\\textrm{BR}_{f_2 \\pi})$ is obtained for the radiative width of the $\\pi_2(1670)$, where in this analysis the branching ratio $\\textrm{BR}^{\\textrm{PDG}}_{f_2 \\pi}=0.56$ has been used. We compare these values to previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

C. Adolph; R. Akhunzyanov; M. G. Alekseev; G. D. Alexeev; A. Amoroso; V. Andrieux; V. Anosov; A. Austregesilo; B. Badelek; F. Balestra; J. Barth; G. Baum; R. Beck; Y. Bedfer; A. Berlin; J. Bernhard; K. Bicker; J. Bieling; R. Birsa; J. Bisplinghoff; M. Bodlak; M. Boer; P. Bordalo; F. Bradamante; C. Braun; A. Bressan; M. Buechele; E. Burtin; L. Capozza; M. Chiosso; S. U. Chung; A. Cicuttin; M. L. Crespo; Q. Curiel; S. Dalla Torre; S. S. Dasgupta; S. Dasgupta; O. Yu. Denisov; S. V. Donskov; N. Doshita; V. Duic; W. Duennweber; M. Dziewiecki; A. Efremov; C. Elia; P. D. Eversheim; W. Eyrich; M. Faessler; A. Ferrero; A. Filin; M. Finger; M. Finger~jr.; H. Fischer; C. Franco; N. du~Fresne~von~Hohenesche; J. M. Friedrich; V. Frolov; F. Gautheron; O. P. Gavrichtchouk; S. Gerassimov; R. Geyer; I. Gnesi; B. Gobbo; S. Goertz; M. Gorzellik; S. Grabmueller; A. Grasso; B. Grube; A. Guskov; T. Guthoerl; F. Haas; D. von Harrach; D. Hahne; R. Hashimoto; F. H. Heinsius; F. Herrmann; F. Hinterberger; Ch. Hoeppner; N. Horikawa; N. d'Hose; S. Huber; S. Ishimoto; A. Ivanov; Yu. Ivanshin; T. Iwata; R. Jahn; V. Jary; P. Jasinski; P. Joerg; R. Joosten; E. Kabuss; B. Ketzer; G. V. Khaustov; Yu. A. Khokhlov; Yu. Kisselev; F. Klein; K. Klimaszewski; J. H. Koivuniemi; V. N. Kolosov; K. Kondo; K. Koenigsmann; I. Konorov; V. F. Konstantinov; A. M. Kotzinian; O. Kouznetsov; Z. Kral; M. Kraemer; Z. V. Kroumchtein; N. Kuchinski; F. Kunne; K. Kurek; R. P. Kurjata; A. A. Lednev; A. Lehmann; S. Levorato; J. Lichtenstadt; A. Maggiora; A. Magnon; N. Makke; G. K. Mallot; C. Marchand; A. Martin; J. Marzec; J. Matousek; H. Matsuda; T. Matsuda; G. Meshcheryakov; W. Meyer; T. Michigami; Yu. V. Mikhailov; Y. Miyachi; A. Nagaytsev; T. Nagel; F. Nerling; S. Neubert; D. Neyret; V. I. Nikolaenko; J. Novy; W. -D. Nowak; A. S. Nunes; I. Orlov; A. G. Olshevsky; M. Ostrick; R. Panknin; D. Panzieri; B. Parsamyan; S. Paul; M. Pesek; S. Platchkov; J. Pochodzalla; V. A. Polyakov; J. Pretz; M. Quaresma; C. Quintans; S. Ramos; G. Reicherz; E. Rocco; A. Rychter; N. S. Rossiyskaya; D. I. Ryabchikov; V. D. Samoylenko; A. Sandacz; S. Sarkar; I. A. Savin; G. Sbrizzai; P. Schiavon; C. Schill; T. Schlueter; A. Schmidt; K. Schmidt; H. Schmieden; K. Schoenning; S. Schopferer; M. Schott; O. Yu. Shevchenko; L. Silva; L. Sinha; S. Sirtl; M. Slunecka; S. Sosio; F. Sozzi; A. Srnka; L. Steiger; M. Stolarski; M. Sulc; R. Sulej; H. Suzuki; A. Szabelski; T. Szameitat; P. Sznajder; S. Takekawa; J. ter~Wolbeek; S. Tessaro; F. Tessarotto; F. Thibaud; S. Uhl; I. Uman; M. Vandenbroucke; M. Virius; J. Vondra; L. Wang; T. Weisrock; M. Wilfert; R. Windmolders; H. Wollny; K. Zaremba; M. Zavertyaev; E. Zemlyanichkina; M. Ziembicki.

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

170

Methodic design of a measurement and control system for climate control in horticulture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many papers describe applications of advanced controllers in greenhouses. As control literature focusses on control algorithms, the layout of the measurement and control system is usually underexposed. Unfortunately, commercially available greenhouse ... Keywords: Closed greenhouse, Measurement and control system, Methodic design, Watergy project

S. L. Speetjens; H. J. J. Janssen; G. van Straten; Th. H. Gieling; J. D. Stigter

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

U.S. and Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration U.S. and Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration March 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The United States signed an agreement with Portugal today to launch the installation of a portable climate observatory on Graciosa Island in the Azores. The mobile observatory will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties from the island's marine environment for 20 months, beginning in May. The measurements are expected to greatly enhance scientific understanding of the microscopic processes that occur in low-level marine clouds, and will be used to test and improve climate models. The portable observatory, or Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility, is part of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ARM Climate Research

172

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Climate Change and Runoff Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UV radiation Solar radiation Reflected by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (ozone layer) Greenhouse Effect-natural #12 range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW-Madison #12;Temperature

Sheridan, Jennifer

174

Analysis of the Energy Savings Potential in K-5 Schools in Hot and Humid Climates: Application of High Performance Measures and Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF THE ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIAL IN K-5 SCHOOLS IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES: APPLICATION OF HIGH PERFORMANCE MEASURES AND RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS1 Piljae Im1, and Jeff S. Haberl2 1Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 2Texas... the energy savings measures recommended as in the ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides for K-12 Schools. As an effort to investigate more energy savings potential for the school building, several other energy savings measures and renewable energy...

Im, P.; Haberl, J.

175

A Century of Solar Ca ii Measurements and Their Implication for Solar UV Driving of Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-9330-0 A Century of Solar Ca II Measurements and Theirstrong resonance line of Ca II (K line) provide the longestrecent reductions of the Ca II K spectroheliograms obtained

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Radiation Dose Metrics in CT: Assessing Dose Using the National Quality Forum CT Patient Safety Measure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The National Quality Forum (NQF) is a nonprofit consensus organization that recently endorsed a measure focused on CT radiation doses. To comply, facilities must summarize the doses from consecutive scans within age and anatomic area strata and report the data in the medical record. Our purpose was to assess the time needed to assemble the data and to demonstrate how review of such data permits a facility to understand doses. Methods and Materials To assemble the data we used for analysis, we used the dose monitoring software eXposure to automatically export dose metrics from consecutive scans in 2010 and 2012. For a subset of 50 exams, we also collected dose metrics manually, copying data directly from the PACS into an excel spreadsheet. Results Manual data collection for 50 scans required 2 hours and 15 minutes. eXposure compiled the data in under an hour. All dose metrics demonstrated a 30% to 50% reduction between 2010 and 2012. There was also a significant decline and a reduction in the variability of the doses over time. Conclusion The NQF measure facilitates an institution's capacity to assess the doses they are using for CT as part of routine practice. The necessary data can be collected within a reasonable amount of time either with automatic software or manually. The collection and review of these data will allow facilities to compare their radiation dose distributions with national distributions and allow assessment of temporal trends in the doses they are using.

Jillian Keegan; Diana L. Miglioretti; Robert Gould; Lane F. Donnelly; Nicole D. Wilson; Rebecca Smith-Bindman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979  

SciTech Connect

Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect

Like a rock that slowly wears away beneath the pressure of a waterfall, planet earth?s climate is almost imperceptibly changing. Glaciers are getting smaller, droughts are lasting longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods, and tornadoes are occurring with greater frequency. Why? Part of the answer is clouds and the amount of solar radiation they reflect or absorb. These two factors clouds and radiative transfer represent the greatest source of error and uncertainty in the current generation of general circulation models used for climate research and simulation. The U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 established an interagency program within the Executive Office of the President to coordinate U.S. agency-sponsored scientific research designed to monitor, understand, and predict changes in the global environment. To address the need for new research on clouds and radiation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. As part of the DOE?s overall Climate Change Science Program, a primary objective of the ARM Program is improved scientific understanding of the fundamental physics related to interactions between clouds and radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere.

Voyles, J.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii for the Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) Field Campaign (an AMF2 Deployment)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

From October 2012 through September 2013, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed on the container ship Spirit, operated by Horizon Lines, for the Marine ARM GPCI* Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign. During approximately 20 round trips between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, AMF2 obtained continuous on-board measurements of cloud and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; surface meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric profiles from weather balloons launched every six hours. During two two-week intensive observational periods in January and July 2013, additional instruments were deployed and balloon soundings were be increased to every three hours. These additional data provided a more detailed characterization of the state of the atmosphere and its daily cycle during two distinctly different seasons. The primary objective of MAGIC was to improve the representation of the stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition in climate models. AMF2 data documented the small-scale physical processes associated with turbulence, convection, and radiation in a variety of marine cloud types.

180

ENERGY FLOWS CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorption of solar radiation. #12;AEROSOLS AS SEEN FROM SPACE Fire plumes from southern Mexico transportedENERGY FLOWS FORCINGS CLIMATE CHANGE A REALLY TOUGH PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz, BNL, 7-20-11 www average temperature 15°C or 59°F #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Power per area Energy per time per area Unit

Schwartz, Stephen E.

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181

Measurement of the Betatron Radiation Spectrum Coming From a Laser Wakefield Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) is under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to produce electron bunches with GeV class energy and energy spreads of a few-percent. The ultimate goal is to provide a bright and compact photon source for high energy density physics. The interaction of a high power (200 TW), short pulse (50 fs) laser with neutral He gas can generate quasi-monoenergetic electron beams at energies up to 1 GeV. The laser pulse can be self-guided over a dephasing length of 1 cm (for a plasma density of 1.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) overcoming the limitation of vacuum diffraction. Betatron radiation is emitted while the accelerated electrons undergo oscillations in the wakefield electrostatic field. Here we present electron spectra measurements with a two screen spectrometer allowing to fix the ambiguities due to electron deflections at the plasma exit. They have measured monoenergetic electron beams above 300 MeV. Furthermore a forward directed x-ray beam is observed. The measured betatron spectrum agrees well with the calculated spectrum in the synchrotron asymptotic limit (SAL) using the measured electron beam parameters.

Leurent, V; Michel, P; Clayton, C E; Pollock, B; Doeppner, T; Wang, T L; Ralph, J; Pak, A; Marsh, K; Joshi, C; Tynan, G R; Divol, L; Palastro, J P; Glenzer, S H; Froula, D H

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

New portable hand-held radiation instruments for measurements and monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Hand-held radiation monitors are often used to search pedestrians and motor vehicles for special nuclear material (SNM) as part of a physical protection plan for nuclear materials. Recently, the Los Alamos Advanced Nuclear Technology group has commercialized an improved hand-held monitor that can be used for both physical-protection monitoring and verification measurements in nuclear material control and waste management. The new monitoring instruments are smaller and lighter; operate much longer on a battery charge; are available with NaI(Tl) or neutron and gamma-ray sensitive plastic scintillation detectors; and are less expensive than other comparable instruments. They also have a second operating mode for making precise measurements over counting times as long as 99 s. This mode permits making basic verification measurements that may be needed before transporting nuclear material or waste outside protected areas. Improved verification measurements can be made with a second new hand-held instrument that has a stabilized detector and three separate gamma-ray energy windows to obtain spectral information for SNM quantity, enrichment, or material-type verification.

Fehlau, P.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa January 18, 2006 - 10:47am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is placing a new, portable atmospheric laboratory with sophisticated instruments and data systems in Niger, Africa, to gain a better understanding of the potential impacts of Saharan dust on global climate. Dust from Africa's Sahara desert-the largest source of dust on the planet-reaches halfway around the globe. Carried by winds and clouds, the dust travels through West African, Mediterranean, and European skies, and across the Atlantic into North America. Unfortunately, Africa is one of the most under-sampled climate regimes in the world, leaving scientists to

184

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planet’s remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energy’s GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities’ pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

185

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Program: An Overview P. A. Crowley Environmental Sciences Division U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. J. Vitko, Jr. Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA 94550 Introduction for leased UA V operation over the next year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the existing Gnat 750-45, with its 7-8 km ceiling, as well as the planned FY93 demonstration of two 20 km capable UA Vs-the Perseus- B and the Raptor. Thus the funding of some initial flights and the availability of leased UAVs will enable us to start up the ARM-UAV program. Additional funding will be required to continue this program. Interim Science Team This paper and the one that follows describe the start-up

186

Indoor and Outdoor in Situ High-Resolution Gamma Radiation Measurements in Urban Areas of Cyprus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of Th-232 and U-238 series, and K-40 are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +- 0.5.

E. Svoukis; H. Tsertos

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2005  

SciTech Connect

Through the ARM Program, the DOE funded the development of several highly instrumented ground stations for studying cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer, and for measuring other parameters that determine the radiative properties of the atmosphere. This scientific infrastructure, and resultant data archive, is a valuable national and international asset for advancing scientific knowledge of Earth systems. In fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE designated ARM sites as a national scientific user facility: the ARM Climate Research (ACRF). The ACRF has enormous potential to contribute to a wide range interdisciplinary science in areas such as meteorology, atmospheric aerosols, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, and satellite validation, to name only a few.

J. Voyles

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

Myers, D. R.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Recovery Act Learn about ARM's efforts. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a U.S. Department of Energy scientific user facility, providing data from strategically located in situ and remote sensing observatories around the world. [ Live Data Displays ] Featured Data 09.19.2013 New ARM Best Estimate Land Product Contains Critical Soil Quantities for Describing Land Properties 09.12.2013 Value-Added Product Estimates Planetary Boundary Layer Height from Radiosondes 08.29.2013 New Data Available for Precipitation Value-Added Product Feature12.30.2013 Pole Position: New Field Campaigns Explore Arctic and Antarctic Atmosphere Pole Position: New Field Campaigns Explore Arctic and Antarctic Atmosphere For the first time, ARM ventures to Antarctica for one of several newly

191

A new approach for simultaneously retrieving cloud albedo and cloud fraction from surface-based shortwave radiation measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 8 (2013) 044023 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/4/044023 A new approach for simultaneously retrieving cloud albedo and cloud fraction from surface-based shortwave radiation measurements Yu Xie and Yangang Liu Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA E-mail: yxie@bnl.gov Received 27 June 2013 Accepted for publication 8 October 2013 Published 30 October 2013 Online at stacks.iop.org/ERL/8/044023 Abstract Surface-based measurements of shortwave (SW) radiative fluxes contain valuable information on cloud properties, but have not been fully used to infer those properties. Here a new analytical approach is presented that simultaneously infers cloud albedo and cloud fraction from surface-based measurements of total and direct radiative fluxes. An inspection of the

192

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring data was collected at four locations in China during 2008. The various sites are located in regions with different climate regimes and with high aerosol loadings of different optical, physical, and chemical properties. Measurements obtained at all the AMF sites during the 8-month deployment in China will help scientists to validate satellite-based findings, understand the mechanisms of the aerosol indirect effects in the region, and examine the roles of aerosols in affecting regional climate and atmospheric circulation, with a special focus on the impact of the East Asian monsoon system. As with other collections from the ARM Mobile Facility, the datasets are available from the ARM Archive. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

193

Tropical precipitation simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3): an evaluation based on TRMM satellite measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the TRMM Science Data and Information System; the Community Climate Model group at NCAR for developing and assistance with running CCM3; and the Program for Cli- mate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

Collier, Jonathan Craig

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data Hawaii-bound in search of global climate data By Brian Grabowski * September 13, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint While the idea of a cruise to Hawaii may sound like paradise, making that same journey 25 times back and forth in a year might start to lose its appeal. But for a climate data-gathering machine called AMF2, perched aboard the ship, every trip is a chance to gather more data that is critical to understanding the Pacific Ocean's role in the global climate. The machine is the Department of Energy's second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) mobile facility, operated and managed by Argonne scientists. It carries a suite of instruments to measure properties of clouds, the ocean, precipitation, aerosols, and radiation. Over the summer of 2013, the AMF2 traveled back and forth between Hawaii and Los Angeles,

195

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to other sites as determined. In 2007 the AMF operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. COPS was endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading.

196

Standard Test Method for Measuring Dose for Use in Linear Accelerator Pulsed Radiation Effects Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers a calorimetric measurement of the total dose delivered in a single pulse of electrons from an electron linear accelerator or a flash X-ray machine (FXR, e-beam mode) used as an ionizing source in radiation-effects testing. The test method is designed for use with pulses of electrons in the energy range from 10 to 50 MeV and is only valid for cases in which both the calorimeter and the test specimen to be irradiated are“thin” compared to the range of these electrons in the materials of which they are constructed. 1.2 The procedure described can be used in those cases in which (1) the dose delivered in a single pulse is 5 Gy (matl) (500 rd (matl)) or greater, or (2) multiple pulses of a lower dose can be delivered in a short time compared to the thermal time constant of the calorimeter. Matl refers to the material of the calorimeter. The minimum dose per pulse that can be acceptably monitored depends on the variables of the particular test, including pulse rate, pulse uniformity...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Determination of neutral beam energy fractions from collisional radiative measurements on DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

Neutral beams based on positive ion source technology are a key component of contemporary fusion research. An accurate assessment of the injected beam species mix is important for determining the actual plasma heating and momentum input as well as proper interpretation of beam-based diagnostics. On DIII-D, the main ion charge-exchange spectroscopy system is used to extract well-resolved intensity ratios of the Doppler-shifted D{sub {alpha}} emission from the full, half, and third energy beam components for a variety of beam operational parameters. In conjunction with accurate collisional-radiative modeling, these measurements indicate the assumed species mix and power fractions can vary significantly and should be regularly monitored and updated for the most accurate interpretation of plasma performance. In addition, if stable active control of the power fractions can be achieved through appropriate source tuning, the resulting control over the deposition profile can serve as an additional experimental knob for advanced tokamak studies, e.g., varying the off axis beam current drive without altering the beam trajectory.

Thomas, D. M.; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

High-resolution tangential absolute extreme ultraviolet arrays for radiated power density measurements on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect

The radiated-power-density diagnostic on the equatorial midplane for the NSTX-U tokamak will be upgraded to measure the radial structure of the photon emissivity profile with an improved radial resolution. This diagnostic will enhance the characterization and studies of power balance, impurity transport, and MHD. The layout and response expected of the new system is shown for different plasma conditions and impurity concentrations. The effect of toroidal rotation driving poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities is also addressed.

Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kozub, T. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Faust, I. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Tritz, K. [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21209 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Use of the Tetrazolium Assay in Measuring the Response of Human Tumor Cells to Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...irradiation dose rate was...demonstrated a range of absorbance...RESPONSE TO IONIZING RADIATION with 1 mg...with graded doses of irradiation...each with a range of seeded...MGHU1 0 5 10 DOSE (Gy) RT112...RESPONSE TO IONIZING RADIATION 150000 FF...

Patricia Price and Trevor J. McMillan

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Planning for Climate Impacts Wisconsin's Coastal Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reflected by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat relevant to climate impacts in Wisconsin GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW-Madison Result

Sheridan, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

INVESTIGATING THE RELIABILITY OF CORONAL EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION DIAGNOSTICS USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Determining the temperature distribution of coronal plasmas can provide stringent constraints on coronal heating. Current observations with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on board Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide diagnostics of the emission measure distribution (EMD) of the coronal plasma. Here we test the reliability of temperature diagnostics using three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations. We produce synthetic observables from the models and apply the Monte Carlo Markov chain EMD diagnostic. By comparing the derived EMDs with the 'true' distributions from the model, we assess the limitations of the diagnostics as a function of the plasma parameters and the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We find that EMDs derived from EIS synthetic data reproduce some general characteristics of the true distributions, but usually show differences from the true EMDs that are much larger than the estimated uncertainties suggest, especially when structures with significantly different density overlap along the line of sight. When using AIA synthetic data the derived EMDs reproduce the true EMDs much less accurately, especially for broad EMDs. The differences between the two instruments are due to the: (1) smaller number of constraints provided by AIA data and (2) broad temperature response function of the AIA channels which provide looser constraints to the temperature distribution. Our results suggest that EMDs derived from current observatories may often show significant discrepancies from the true EMDs, rendering their interpretation fraught with uncertainty. These inherent limitations to the method should be carefully considered when using these distributions to constrain coronal heating.

Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cross-calibration of the Transition Radiation Detector of AMS-02 for an Energy Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since May 2011 the AMS-02 experiment is installed on the International Space Station and is observing cosmic radiation. It consists of several state-of-the-art sub-detectors, which redundantly measure charge and energy of traversing particles. Due to the long exposure time of AMS-02 of many years the measurement of momentum for protons and ions is limited systematically by the spatial resolution and magnetic field strength of the silicon tracker. The maximum detectable rigidity for protons is about 1.8~TV, for helium about 3.6~TV. We investigate the possibility to extend the range of the energy measurement for heavy nuclei ($Z\\geq2$) with the transition radiation detector (TRD). The response function of the TRD shows a steep increase in signal from the level of ionization at a Lorentz factor $\\gamma$ of about 500 to $\\gamma\\approx20000$, where the transition radiation signal saturates. For heavy ions the signal fluctuations in the TRD are sufficiently small to allow an energy measurement with the TRD beyond t...

Obermeier, Andreas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Accepted as "Opinion" article in WIREs Climate Change Rethinking climate engineering categorization in the context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reductions. Local targeted climate modification can be seen as an adaptation measure as long the impacts of climate change4 . Due to the strong emphasis on the climate modification aspect, we favor

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

Solar Radiation, its Measurement and Application in Solar Energy Utilization Programme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electromagnetic radiation emitted by the sun, covers a very large range of wavelengths, from radiowaves through the visible to X-rays and gamma rays. But 99 percent of this energy is contained in the region 0...

A. Mani

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Measuring short electron bunch lengths using coherent smith-purcell radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for directly determining the length of sub-picosecond electron bunches. A metallic grating is formed with a groove spacing greater than a length expected for the electron bunches. The electron bunches are passed over the metallic grating to generate coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. The angular distribution of the coherent Smith-Purcell radiation is then mapped to directly deduce the length of the electron bunches.

Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

On the Usage of Spectral and Broadband Satellite Instrument Measurements to Differentiate Climate Models with Different Cloud Feedback Strengths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere radiometric signals associated with different high- and low-cloud–radiative feedbacks have been examined through the use of an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE). The OSSE simulates variations in the spectrally ...

Daniel R. Feldman; Daniel M. Coleman; William D. Collins

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A 25-month database of stratus cloud properties generated from ground-based measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect

A 25-month database of the macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties of isolated and overcast low-level stratus clouds has been generated using a newly developed parameterization and surface measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement central facility in Oklahoma. The database (5-min resolution) includes two parts: measurements and retrievals. The former consist of cloud base and top heights, layer-mean temperature, cloud liquid water path, and solar transmission ratio measured by a ground-based lidar/ceilometer and radar pair, radiosondes, a microwave radiometer, and a standard Eppley precision spectral pyranometer, respectively. The retrievals include the cloud-droplet effective radius and number concentration and broadband shortwave optical depth and cloud and top-of-atmosphere albedos. Stratus without any overlying mid or high-level clouds occurred most frequently during winter and least often during summer. Mean cloud-layer altitudes and geometric thicknesses were higher and greater, respectively, in summer than in winter. Both quantities are positively correlated with the cloud-layer mean temperature. Mean cloud-droplet effective radii range from 8.1 {mu}m in winter to 9.7 {mu}m during summer, while cloud-droplet number concentrations during winter are nearly twice those in summer. Since cloud liquid water paths are almost the same in both seasons, cloud optical depth is higher during the winter, leading to greater cloud albedos and lower cloud transmittances. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

Dong, Xiquan [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States)] [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States); Ackerman, Thomas P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States); Clothiaux, Eugene E. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Mace, Gerald G. [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Long, Charles N. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Liljegren, James C. [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)] [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

Mobile Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Records Annual Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa Because dust can block incoming solar energy, and because solar energy drives weather and climate, scientists around the world are looking for ways to better understand these natural phenomena. In 2006, scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility conducted a year-long field campaign in Niamey, Niger, to provide key information for the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses, or AMMA, project. During the 12-month experiment at the airport in Niamey, researchers used a portable atmospheric laboratory, airplanes, and satellites to collect information about clouds, aerosols, and solar and terrestrial energy in the skies above the site. Measurements obtained

209

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

210

Radiation exposure during liver surgery after treatment with 90Y microspheres, evaluated with computer simulations and dosimeter measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose. Two patients with liver tumours were planned for a combined treatment, including surgery with preceding injections of ?? radiation emitting 90Y microspheres (SIRTEX®). The aim of this paper is to present a method of pre-surgical computer simulations of the absorbed dose rate on the surface of tumour tissue, combined with measurements of the actual absorbed dose rate on resected tissue, in order to estimate the absorbed dose to a surgeon's fingers during such surgery procedures. Methods and Materials. The dose rates from ?? radiation on the surface of tumour tissue were simulated with the software VARSKIN® Mod 2. The activity concentrations in tumours were estimated, based on SPECT/CT distribution studies of 99mTc-MAA and confirmed by SPECT/CT bremsstrahlung studies of 90Y microspheres. The activity distributions were considered as homogeneous within the tumour regions. The absorbed dose rates at different tumour tissue spots were calculated based on measurements with thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD) fastened on resected tissue. Results. The simulations showed a good agreement with the averaged absorbed dose rates based on TLD measurements performed on resected tissue, differing by 13% and 4% respectively. The absorbed dose rates at the measured maximum hotspots were twice as high as the average dose rates for both patients. Conclusion. The data is not sufficient in order to draw any general conclusions about dose rates on tumour tissue during similar surgeries, neither about the influence of dose rate heterogeneities nor about average dose rates. However, the agreement between simulations and measurements on these limited data indicate that this approach is a promising method for estimations of the radiation exposure to the surgeons' fingers during this kind of surgery procedure. More data from similar surgeries are necessary in order to validate the method.

Jonas Högberg; Magnus Rizell; Ragnar Hultborn; Johanna Svensson; Olof Henrikson; Peter Gjertsson; Peter Bernhardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cloud-Climate Feedback: Lessons Learned From Two El nio Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud-Climate Feedback: Lessons Learned From Two El niño Events Minghua Zhang Institute - ABSTRACT Monthly ERBE and CERES measurements are used to study the response of cloud radiative forcing that the response of cloud forcing to SST over the whole tropics is very different from that to local SST changes

Zhang, Minghua

212

The Role of Global Observations for Climate and Other Applications  

SciTech Connect

Most of the current earth-observing systems have been designed primarily for the needs of weather forecasting. Weather forecasting is an initial condition problem; the success of the forecast is heavily dependent on the quality of the specified initial state of the atmosphere. Thus, weather forecasting observing systems tend to focus on determining the 3D values of the state variables of the system namely temperature, humidity, and wind vector. While weather forecasting requires accurate observations, spatial patterns and relative accuracy across those patterns are the primary concern. Climate, on the other hand, is a boundary condition problem, i.e., climate simulation depends on knowing the energy fluxes into and out of the system, and quantities such as CO2 that affect the flow of those energy fluxes in the system. Consequently, climate-observing systems must extend beyond measurements of state variables to flux measurements of radiation energy and water. We focus on these two cycles because the dominant forms of energy transfer in the climate system (solar energy, thermal infrared energy, evaporation, and condensation) involve these two quantities. Further, because climate is a search for small system trends and imbalances in the midst of large weather variability, climate observations require a much higher degree of precision than do weather observations.

T.P. Ackerman

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Role of Global Observations for Climate and Other Applications  

SciTech Connect

Most of the current earth-observing systems have been designed primarily for the needs of weather forecasting. Weather forecasting is an initial condition problem; the success of the forecast is heavily dependent on the quality of the specified initial state of the atmosphere. Thus, weather forecasting observing systems tend to focus on determining the 3D values of the state variables of the system – namely temperature, humidity, and wind vector. While weather forecasting requires accurate observations, spatial patterns and relative accuracy across those patterns are the primary concern. Climate, on the other hand, is a boundary condition problem, i.e., climate simulation depends on knowing the energy fluxes into and out of the system, and quantities such as CO2 that affect the flow of those energy fluxes in the system. Consequently, climate-observing systems must extend beyond measurements of state variables to flux measurements of radiation energy and water. We focus on these two cycles because the dominant forms of energy transfer in the climate system (solar energy, thermal infrared energy, evaporation, and condensation) involve these two quantities. Further, because climate is a search for small system trends and imbalances in the midst of large weather variability, climate observations require a much higher degree of precision than do weather observations.

Ackerman, TP

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Net radiative effect of dust aerosols from satellite measurements over Sahara  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Radiant Energy System (CERES) to calculate the top-of-atmosphere SW and LW flux radiative effect due to oceans where the shortwave effect dominates. Citation: Yang, E.-S., P. Gupta, and S. A. Christopher (2009 of aerosols, space-borne sensors use information from the ultraviolet (UV) to the visible and thermal infrared

Christopher, Sundar A.

215

Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere: Further interpretations of collocated aircraft measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere: Further interpretations of collocated%) of this enhanced cloud absorption occurs at wavelengths 680 nm, and that the observed cloud absorption does stated, the purpose of ARESE was to address the issue of cloud shortwave (SW) absorption. Do clouds

Zender, Charles

216

Glass transition in thaumatin crystals revealed through temperature-dependent radiation-sensitivity measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation damage to protein crystals exhibits two regimes of temperature-activated behavior between T = 300 and 100 K, with a crossover at the protein glass transition near 200 K. These results have implications for mechanistic studies of proteins and for structure determination when cooling to T = 100 K creates excessive disorder.

Warkentin, M.

2010-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

217

National Solar Radiation Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Solar Radiation Database National Solar Radiation Database Jump to: navigation, search The National Solar Radiation Database, or NSRDB, describes the amount of solar energy which is available at any location in the United States. It is generated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, with the assistance of many collaborators.[1] Technical Overview Per its user's manual, "The NSRDB is a serially complete collection of hourly values of the three most common measurements of solar radiation (global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal) over a period of time adequate to establish means and extremes, and at a sufficient number of locations to represent regional solar radiation climates."[2] There have been two releases of the NSRDB, each covering different time

218

Sensitivity of the simulated climate to a diagnostic formulation for cloud liquid water  

SciTech Connect

The accurate treatment of clouds and their radiative properties is widely regarded to be among the most important problems facing global climate modeling. A number of the more serious systematic simulation biases in the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2) appear to be related to deficiencies in the treatment of cloud optical properties. In this paper, a simple diagnostic parameterization for cloud liquid water is presented. The sensitivity of the simulated climate to this alternative formulation, both in terms of mean climate metrics and measures of the climate system response, is illustrated. Resulting simulations show significant reductions in CCM2 systematic biases, particularly with respect to surface temperature, precipitation, and extratropical geopotential height-field anomalies. Many aspects of the simulated response to ENSO forcing are also substantially improved.

Hack, J.J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Geologic and climatic controls on the formation of the Permian coal measures in the Sohagpur coal field, Madhya Pradesh, India  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of India (GSI) are concluding a cooperative study of the coking coal deposits in the Sohagpur coal field in central India. Because of the importance of coal in India's economy, the Coal Wing of the Geological Survey of India has studied the area intensely since the early 1980's. This report summarizes the overall stratigraphic, tectonic, and sedimentologic framework of the Sohagpur coal field area, and the interpretations of the geologic and climatic environments required for the accumulation of the thick Gondwana coal deposits, both coking and non-coking.

Milici, R.C.; Warwick, P.D.; Mukhopadhyah, A.; Adhikari, S.; Roy, S.P.; Bhattacharyya, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Climate VISION: News Archive  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

News Archive News Archive Collapse all | Expand all 2007 November 30, 2007 USTR Schwab to Announce New Climate Initiatives for WTO, Including a New Environmental Goods and Services Agreement November 28, 2007 U.S. Energy Information Administration Anounces U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Declined 1.5 Percent in 2006 November 20, 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for Research on Climate Change Awarded to U.S. Forest Service Scientists November 16, 2007 Our Changing Planet: The U.S. Climate Change Science Program for Fiscal Year 2008 Report Released October 18, 2007 U.S. DOE Issues Third U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report October 15, 2007 The Government of India Hosts the Second Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate Ministerial Meeting Fall 2007 EPA's 2nd measurement campaign to evaluate the performance of installed PFC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Radiation Measurements 41 (2006) 101107 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dosimetry 1. Introduction Methods for long-term passive radon measurements based on nuclear track detectors- tive dosimetry based on measurements of 210Po activity in objects was proposed. Atoms of short

Yu, K.N.

222

Estimation of the contribution of photon radiation for measurement of the exposure dose rate of neutron sources based on 252Cf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for the estimation of the contribution of photon radiation to the detector readings for measurement of the exposure dose rate and the equivalent activity of neutron ... screens and filters is considered....

N. F. Demchenko; R. N. Minvaliev; V. I. Shipilov…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes  

SciTech Connect

A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.

Famiano, M.A.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

Physics of climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of our present understanding of the global climate system, consisting of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere, and their complex interactions and feedbacks is given from the point of view of a physicist. This understanding is based both on real observations and on the results from numerical simulations. The main emphasis in this review is on the atmosphere and oceans. First, balance equations describing the large-scale climate and its evolution in time are derived from the basic thermohydrodynamic laws of classical physics. The observed atmosphere-ocean system is then described by showing how the balances of radiation, mass, angular momentum, water, and energy are maintained during present climatic conditions. Next, a hierarchy of mathematical models that successfully simulate various aspects of the climate is discussed, and examples are given of how three-dimensional general circulation models are being used to increase our understanding of the global climate "machine." Finally, the possible impact of human activities on climate is discussed, with main emphasis on likely future heating due to the release of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

José P. Peixóto and Abraham H. Oort

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

On the Correlation between Forcing and Climate Sensitivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible correlation between climate sensitivity and radiative forcing is studied using versions of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) model with different climate sensitivities. No such correlation was found ...

Sokolov, Andrei

226

The influence of laser clipped by the laser entrance hole on hohlraum radiation measurement on Shenguang-III prototype  

SciTech Connect

Measuring the x-ray flux exiting the target's laser entrance hole (LEH) is the most common diagnostic that quantifies the x-ray intensity inside the laser-driven hohlraum. However, this signal accounts for only a small portion of the incident laser power and thus is likely to be affected by unwanted x-ray background from non-target area, leading to an overestimation of the hohlraum drive. Unwanted emission might be produced when the laser light is clipped by the LEH (LEH clipping) because of a lack of clearance for laser spot, or with a laser spot comprising of discrete structure, or even with a poor pointing accuracy. Its influence on the hohlraum radiation diagnostic is investigated on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility with the typical 1 ns square pulse. The experiment employed three types of targets to excite the unwanted x-ray background from LEH clipping, unconverted light, and both effects, respectively. This work gives an absolute evaluation of x-ray produced by the LEH clipping, which is measured by flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRD) at multiple view angles. The result indicates that there is little variation in measured emission to various view angles, because the unwanted x-rays are mainly generated at the side face of the LEH lip when laser is obliquely incident. Therefore, the LEH clipping brings more overestimation in hohlraum radiation measurement at larger view angle since the hohlraum LEH as an emitting source viewed by FXRD is decreased as the view angle increases. In our condition, the LEH clipping contributes 2%–3.5% overestimation to the hohlraum flux measurement.

Yang, Dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China) [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Climate change and the importance of empowering citizens.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Educational response to climate change is one of the measures to prepare people to combat climate change. This thesis explores the lived experiences of… (more)

Maharjan, Ramesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Measurement of natural radioactivity and dose rate assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation in the soil of southern Punjab, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......terrestrial background radiation mainly due to these...assess the population radiation doses(4-9). However...data are available on naturally occuring and artificial radionulides...order to assess the radiation doses for the general......

I. Fatima; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; M. Daud; S. A. Ahmad; S. N. A. Tahir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Quality Control Quantification (QCQ): A Tool to Measure the Value of Quality Control Checks in Radiation Oncology  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To quantify the error-detection effectiveness of commonly used quality control (QC) measures. Methods: We analyzed incidents from 2007-2010 logged into a voluntary in-house, electronic incident learning systems at 2 academic radiation oncology clinics. None of the incidents resulted in patient harm. Each incident was graded for potential severity using the French Nuclear Safety Authority scoring scale; high potential severity incidents (score >3) were considered, along with a subset of 30 randomly chosen low severity incidents. Each report was evaluated to identify which of 15 common QC checks could have detected it. The effectiveness was calculated, defined as the percentage of incidents that each QC measure could detect, both for individual QC checks and for combinations of checks. Results: In total, 4407 incidents were reported, 292 of which had high-potential severity. High- and low-severity incidents were detectable by 4.0 {+-} 2.3 (mean {+-} SD) and 2.6 {+-} 1.4 QC checks, respectively (P<.001). All individual checks were less than 50% sensitive with the exception of pretreatment plan review by a physicist (63%). An effectiveness of 97% was achieved with 7 checks used in combination and was not further improved with more checks. The combination of checks with the highest effectiveness includes physics plan review, physician plan review, Electronic Portal Imaging Device-based in vivo portal dosimetry, radiation therapist timeout, weekly physics chart check, the use of checklists, port films, and source-to-skin distance checks. Some commonly used QC checks such as pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy QA do not substantially add to the ability to detect errors in these data. Conclusions: The effectiveness of QC measures in radiation oncology depends sensitively on which checks are used and in which combinations. A small percentage of errors cannot be detected by any of the standard formal QC checks currently in broad use, suggesting that further improvements are needed. These data require confirmation with a broader incident-reporting database.

Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Terezakis, Stephanie; Souranis, Annette; Harris, Kendra [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

National Climate Assessment: Indicators System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indicators System Print E-mail Indicators System Print E-mail What are the goals for the NCA indicators? The vision for the National Climate Assessment (NCA) is to create a system of indicators that will help inform policy-makers and citizens understand key aspects of our changing climate. Scientific information about physical climate conditions, climate impacts, vulnerabilities, and preparedness will be tracked and compiled. These measures are called indicators. The goals of the Indicators System are to: Provide meaningful, authoritative climate-relevant measures about the status, rates, and trends of key physical, ecological, and societal variables and values Inform decisions on management, research, and education at regional to national scales Identify climate-related conditions and impacts to help develop effective mitigation and adaptation measures

231

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Specific Instruments Used in the ARM Program  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ARM is known for its comprehensive set of world-class, and in some cases, unique, instruments available for use by the global scientific community. In addition to the ARM instruments, the ARM Climate Research Facility identifies and acquires a wide variety of data including model, satellite, and surface data, from "external instruments," to augment the data being generated within the program. External instruments belong to organizations that are outside of the ARM Program. Field campaign instruments are another source of data used to augment routine observations. The huge archive of ARM data can be organized by instrument categories into twelve "collections:" Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties, Derived Quantities and Models, Ocean Observations, Radiometric, Satellite Observations, Surface Meteorology, Surface/Subsurface Properties, and Other. Clicking on one of the instrument categories leads to a page that breaks that category down into sub-categories. For example, "Atmospheric Profiling" is broken down into ARM instruments (with 11 subsets), External Instruments (with 6 subsets), and Field Campaign Instruments (with 42 subsets). Each of the subset links, in turn, leads to detailed information pages and links to specific data streams. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading.

232

Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

233

Design of a New Recoil Separator for Measurements of Radiative Capture Reactions in Astrophysics  

SciTech Connect

The rates of proton- and alpha-capture reactions on unstable proton-rich nuclei are needed to understand the energy generation and element synthesis occurring in novae, X-ray bursts, and other explosions. Direct measurements of the cross sections of some of these reactions are now possible with radioactive beams and a recoil separator. A new device for such measurements, the Separator for CApture Reactions [SECAR], is being designed for use at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The specifications and preliminary conceptual design will be discussed along with plans for the first set of measurements.

Berg, Georg P. A.; Couder, Manoel; Wiescher, Michael [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, 46556-5670 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Blackmon, Jeff C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70803-4001 (United States); Greife, U. [Dept. of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Montes, F.; Schatz, Hendrik [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Rehm, K. Ernst [Physics Division, Argonne National Lab, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Smith, Michael S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Zeller, Al [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States)

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

Radiative transfer effects on Doppler measurements as sources of surface effects in sunspot seismology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the use of Doppler shifts of Zeeman sensitive spectral lines to observe wavesn in sunspots is subject to measurement specific phase shifts arising from, (i) altered height range of spectral line formation and the propagating character of p mode waves in penumbrae, and (ii) Zeeman broadening and splitting. We also show that these phase shifts depend on wave frequencies, strengths and line of sight inclination of magnetic field, and the polarization state used for Doppler measurements. We discuss how these phase shifts could contribute to local helioseismic measurements of 'surface effects' in sunspot seismology.

S. P. Rajaguru; K. Sankarasubramanian; R. Wachter; P. H. Scherrer

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

A proposed measurement of the reverse Cherenkov radiation effect in a metamaterial-loaded circular waveguide  

SciTech Connect

The authors have recently proposed an experiment on verification of the Reverse Cherenkov Radiation (RCR) effect in a Left-Handed-Material-loaded waveguide. Applications of the RCR effect may range from novel higher-order-mode suppressors in microwave and millimeter-wave sources to improved particle detectors for satellite non-proliferation missions. The experimental configuration includes a circular waveguide filled with an artificial metamaterial with simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability, in which the electromagnetic wave with a frequency of 95 GHz will interact with an electron beam. They have demonstrated that for certain values of effective permittivity and permeability only the backward-propagating mode can be exited by the electron beam. At the conference they will present some newly developed metamaterial designs, which they plan to employ for producing the proper effective medium parameters for this experiment.

Shchegolkov, Dmitry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Azad, Abul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smirnova, Evgenya I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Implementing the Climate Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implementing the Climate Action Plan Implementing the Climate Action Plan When implementing climate action plans on research campuses, two important and related questions must be answered. How do we pay for climate actions? And, who will manage and oversee implementation of the plan? The answer to each question will be specific to your campus. Narrow climate action plans focus on incremental savings through low-cost and voluntary measures. This approach begs the question about what should be done after the short-term, incremental improvements are completed. In contrast, a portfolio approach can help achieve deep reductions in energy consumption and move toward campus-wide climate neutrality. Build a Portfolio After considering a wide array of individual measures, a single portfolio is created for implementation. This approach allows research campuses to

237

Ship-Track Clouds, Aerosol, and Ship Dynamic Effects; A Climate Perspective from Ship-Based Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Ship-track clouds are marine boundary layer clouds that form behind ocean ships and are observed from satellites in the visible and near infrared. Ship-track clouds provide a rare opportunity to connect aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) emissions and observable changes in marine stratiform clouds. A very small change in the reflectivity of these eastern Pacific and Atlantic clouds (about 4%) provides a climate feedback of similar magnitude to doubling CO{sub 2} (increasing cloud reflectivity corresponds to global cooling). The Department of Energy sponsored research from 1991 to 1995 to study ship-track clouds including two ocean-based experiments in the summers of 1991 and 1994. These experiments showed that ship-track cloud properties were often more complex those related to a reduction of droplet size with an increase in number associated with increasing CCN from the ship's plume. The clouds showed evidence of morphological changes more likely to be associated with cloud dynamic effects either initiated by the increased CCN or directly by the ship's heat output or turbulent air wake. The fact that marine stratiform clouds, that are susceptible to ship track formation, are starved for both CCN and convective turbulence complicates the separation of the two effects.

Porch, W.M.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

238

A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century Miche`le B; accepted 30 November 2006; published 10 January 2007. [1] A Climate Change Index (CCI) is developed to a single index that is a measure for the strength of future climate change relative to today's natural

Fischlin, Andreas

239

Climate Indices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indices Indices Climate Indices Climate indices are diagnostic tools used to describe the state of the climate system and monitor climate. They are most often represented with a time series, where each point in time corresponds to one index value. An index can be constructed to describe almost any atmospheric event; as such, they are myriad. Therefore, CDIAC provides these links to other web sites to help guide users to the most widely used climate indices, which in many cases are updated monthly. Data Set Website/Name NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, Monitoring and Data Index Page NOAA's Earth Systems Research Laboratory, Monthly Atmospheric and Ocean Time Series Page (plot, analyze, and compare time series) The Monthly Teleconnection Indices Page from NOAA's National

240

Alanine-EPR dosimetry for measurements of ionizing radiation absorbed doses in the range 0.5-10 kGy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The usefulness of two, easy accessible alanine dosimeters (ALANPOL from IChTJ and foil dosimeter from Gamma Service, Radeberg, Germany) to radiation dose measurement in the range of 0.5-10 kGy, were investigated. In both cases, the result of the test was positive. The foil dosemeter from Gamma Service is recommended for dose distribution measurements in fantoms or products, ALANPOL - for routine measurements. The EPR-alanine method based on the described dosimeters can be successfully used, among others, in the technology of radiation protection of food.

Peimel-Stuglik, Z

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Radiation Measurements 36 (2003) 161164  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 Abstract Solid state nuclear track detectors are commonly used for measurements of concentrations methodologies regarding short-lived radon progeny has attracted much attention in the Ăżeld of radon dosimetry. There are a few di erent approaches to this problem, all of them being based on the usage of solid state nuclear

Yu, K.N.

242

Radiation Measurements 43 (2008) 14171422 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.40 Keywords: PADC; Tracks; Etching; Light; Simulation 1. Introduction Solid-state nuclear track detectors, scattered light was used to measure track densities from exper- iments related to neutron dosimetry (Harvey) developed a model for laser light scattering by nuclear tracks in CR-39 detectors. The model was based

Yu, K.N.

243

Radiation Measurements 43 (2008) S427S430 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significantly with the building age. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Retrospective dosimetry based on nuclear track detectors have been very well established and widely used. Surveys of existing- tion to this problem, retrospective dosimetry based on measure- ments of 210Po activity in objects

Yu, K.N.

244

Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

SciTech Connect

This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

Guss, P. P.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

246

The CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT): Where Climate Simulation Meets Weather Prediction  

SciTech Connect

To significantly improve the simulation of climate by general circulation models (GCMs), systematic errors in representations of relevant processes must first be identified, and then reduced. This endeavor demands, in particular, that the GCM parameterizations of unresolved processes should be tested over a wide range of time scales, not just in climate simulations. Thus, a numerical weather prediction (NWP) methodology for evaluating model parameterizations and gaining insights into their behavior may prove useful, provied that suitable adaptations are made for implementation in climate GCMs. This method entails the generation of short-range weather forecasts by realistically initialized climate GCM, and the application of six-hourly NWP analyses and observations of parameterized variables to evaluate these forecasts. The behavior of the parameterizations in such a weather-forecasting framework can provide insights on how these schemes might be improved, and modified parameterizations then can be similarly tested. In order to further this method for evaluating and analyzing parameterizations in climate GCMs, the USDOE is funding a joint venture of its Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: the CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT). This article elaborates the scientific rationale for CAPT, discusses technical aspects of its methodology, and presents examples of its implementation in a representative climate GCM. Numerical weather prediction methods show promise for improving parameterizations in climate GCMs.

Phillips, T J; Potter, G L; Williamson, D L; Cederwall, R T; Boyle, J S; Fiorino, M; Hnilo, J J; Olson, J G; Xie, S; Yio, J J

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluating Solar Radiation Attenuation Models to Assess the Effects of Climate and Geographical Location on the Heliostat Field Efficiency in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Most of the solar power plants using a central receiver which are currently in operation are installed in the Sun Belt region, specifically above the Tropic of Cancer. These plants are located in regions characterized by a dry summers and a yearly sum of Direct Normal Irradiation (DNI) of over 2300 kWh/m2. These regions include the Mojave Desert (semi-arid climate) and Andalucía in southern Spain (Mediterranean and semi-arid climate). Potential locations for installing such plants in Brazil, identified in previous studies, are the Săo Francisco river basin and the Sobradinho area in the Northeast Region of the country. These locations are characterized by high humidity levels and yearly DNI values ranging from 1800 to 2300 kWh/m2, which is in clear contrast with the dry and desert climates where the solar tower projects currently in operation are located. Besides the combined effects of climate and the inter-tropicalization of the site, based on the solar angles and atmospheric attenuation, the potential locations in Brazil provide a small variation between the monthly averages DNI values. In this paper, the effects of these particularities on the performance of a heliostat field are assessed. For instance, the effects of the atmospheric water vapor and aerosol concentration on the optical performance of the heliostat field are analyzed. The results suggest that, for the same DNI level, the heliostat field in Brazil should be 4% larger due to the effect of the water vapor concentration in the atmosphere. This is an important finding, which shows that the current models for calculating the attenuation between the heliostat and the receiver need to be reviewed and compared with experimental observations and validated for the conditions prevailing at potential locations in Brazil.

JM Cardemil; AR Starke; VK Scariot; IL. Grams; S Colle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Radiation environment simulations at the Tevatron, studies of the beam profile and measurement of the Bc meson mass  

SciTech Connect

The description of a computer simulation of the CDF detector at Fermilab and the adjacent accelerator parts is detailed, with MARS calculations of the radiation background in various elements of the model due to the collision of beams and machine-related losses. Three components of beam halo formation are simulated for the determination of the principal source of radiation background in CDF due to beam losses. The effect of a collimator as a protection for the detector is studied. The simulation results are compared with data taken by a CDF group. Studies of a 150 GeV Tevatron proton beam are performed to investigate the transverse diffusion growth and distribution. A technique of collimator scan is used to scrape the beam under various experimental conditions, and computer programs are written for the beam reconstruction. An average beam halo growth speed is given and the potential of beam tail reconstruction using the collimator scan is evaluated. A particle physics analysis is conducted in order to detect the B{sub c} {yields} J/{psi}{pi} decay signal with the CDF Run II detector in 360 pb{sup -1} of data. The cut variables and an optimization method to determine their values are presented along with a criterion for the detection threshold of the signal. The mass of the B{sub c} meson is measured with an evaluation of the significance of the signal.

Nicolas, Ludovic Y.; /Glasgow U.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

Betatron radiation based measurement of the electron-beam size in a wakefield accelerator  

SciTech Connect

We present a spatial and spectral characterization of a laser-plasma based betatron source which allows us to determine the betatron oscillation amplitude of the electrons which decreases with increasing electron energies. Due to the observed oscillation amplitude and the independently measured x-ray source size of (1.8{+-}0.3){mu}m we are able to estimate the electron bunch diameter to be (1.6{+-}0.3){mu}m.

Schnell, Michael; Saevert, Alexander; Reuter, Maria [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich- Schiller- Universitaet, Jena (Germany); and others

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

252

Measurements of forbidden line radiation of Ar II (6. 99. mu. m) in W3 IRS 1  

SciTech Connect

Observations of the (Ar II) (6.99 ..mu..m) line flux in W3 IRS 1 are combined with previously obtained measurements of the (Ar III) (8.99 ..mu..m) line flux. The observed ratio of (Ar II)/(Ar III) is inconsistent with the calculated ratio for an H II region with the densities required by radio observations and with a central 40,000--45,000 K star with atmosphere as described by a Mihalas model. A solar effective UV radiation field is required; a dusty model we had previously invoked fits the observations. In addition we determine that the argon abundance is n(Ar)/n(H)roughly-equal8 x 10/sup -6/, a value about twice that usually adopted for normal solar abundance; however, there are uncertainties in the extinction and the model which do not allow us to preclude solar abundance.

Herter, T.; Pipher, J.L.; Helfer, H.L.; Willner, S.P.; Puetter, R.C.; Rudy, R.J.; Soifer, B.T.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Measurements and modeling of coherent synchrotron radiation and its impact on the Linac Coherent Light Source electron beam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to reach the high peak current required for an x-ray free electron laser, two separate magnetic dipole chicanes are used in the Linac Coherent Light Source accelerator to compress the electron bunch length in stages. In these bunch compressors, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can be emitted either by a short electron bunch or by any longitudinal density modulation that may be on the bunch. In this paper, we report detailed measurements of the CSR-induced energy loss and transverse emittance growth in these compressors. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and multiparticle tracking studies. We also describe direct observations of CSR at optical wavelengths and compare with analytical models based on beam microbunching.

K. L. F. Bane; F.-J. Decker; Y. Ding; D. Dowell; P. Emma; J. Frisch; Z. Huang; R. Iverson; C. Limborg-Deprey; H. Loos; H.-D. Nuhn; D. Ratner; G. Stupakov; J. Turner; J. Welch; J. Wu

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Adapting to Climate Change in Wisconsin Strategies for Conservation Professionals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) gr

Sheridan, Jennifer

255

National Climate Plan Published by NOAA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the extent to which solar and earth radiation modify climatic conditions, and 4) Gathering more data probably will rely on leased aircraft, an antenna system that will mount on any type of aircraft would

256

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Clouds and radiation in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local Clouds and radiation in the Arctic coastal system - effects of local heterogeneity Key, Erica University of Miami, RSMAS Minnett, Peter University of Miami Improving our comprehension of the influence of clouds in the polar regions is important as a prerequisite to refining our understanding of the earth's climate system. Polar clouds modulate the radiative heat loss to space in the regions that serve as the heat sink of the climate system. The local feedbacks between cloud formation and changing surface albedo that result from the ice melting and refreezing cycle, and the small space scales over which significant gradients occur, render this a very complex system to study. Difficulties in making appropriate measurements in the harsh Arctic environment lead to sparse, if not absent information on the

257

Energy performance of a dual airflow window under different climates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ventilated windows have shown great potential in conserving energy in buildings and provide fresh air to improve indoor air quality. This paper reports our effort to use EnergyPlus to simulate the energy performance of a dual airflow window under different climates. Our investigation first developed a network model to account for the two-dimensional heat transfer in the window system and implemented it in EnergyPlus. The two-dimensional assumption and the modified EnergyPlus program were validated by the measured temperatures of the window and the energy demand of a test cell with the window under actual weather conditions. Then EnergyPlus was applied to analyze energy performance of a small apartment installed with the dual airflow windows in five different climate zones in China. The energy used by the apartment with blinds windows and low-e windows was also calculated for comparison. The dual airflow window can reduce heating energy of the apartment, especially in cold climate. The cooling energy reduction by the window was less important than that by shading solar radiation. The dual airflow window is recommended for colder climate. If improving air quality is a major consideration for a building, the window can be used in any climate.

Jingshu Wei; Jianing Zhao; Qingyan Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Measurements of net radiation, ground heat flux and surface temperature in an urban canyon  

SciTech Connect

The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect data to increase our knowledge of dispersion in urban areas. Air motions in and around urban areas are very complicated due to the influence of urban structures on both mechanical and thermal forcing. During JU2003, meteorological instruments were deployed at various locations throughout the urban area to characterize the processes that influence dispersion. Some of the instruments were deployed to characterize urban phenomena, such as boundary layer development. In addition, particular sites were chosen for more concentrated measurements to investigate physical processes in more detail. One such site was an urban street canyon on Park Avenue between Broadway and Robinson Avenues in downtown Oklahoma City. The urban canyon study was designed to examine the processes that control dispersion within, into and out of the urban canyon. Several towers were deployed in the Park Avenue block, with multiple levels on each tower for observing the wind using sonic anemometers. Infrared thermometers, net radiometers and ground heat flux plates were deployed on two of the towers midway in the canyon to study the thermodynamic effects and to estimate the surface energy balance. We present results from the surface energy balance observations.

Gouveia, F J; Leach, M J; Shinn, J H

2003-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

259

Climate determinism revisited: multiple equilibria in a complex climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marshall and Brian Rose Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts June 17th, 2010 Submitted to Journal of Climate Corresponding author by incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. We demonstrate that the multiple equilibria owe

Marshall, John

260

Climate forcing Climate forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters (solar distance factors) solar luminosity moon orbit volcanoes and other geothermal sources,000 years (large panels) and since 1750 (inset panels). Measurements are shown from ice cores (symbols forcings are shown on the right hand axes of the large panels. {Figure 6.4} !"#$#%&'(!&#)$&*$+#$,-.$/0

MacKinnon, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Time dependence of FEL-induced surface photovoltage on semiconductor interfaces measured with synchroton radiation photoemission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

During the last year, the first surface science experiments simultaneously using a Free Electron Laser (FEL) and Synchrotron Radiation (SR) have been performed on SuperACO at LURE (Orsay, France). These {open_quotes}two color{close_quotes} experiments studied the surface photovoltage (SPV) induced on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces by the SuperACO FEL, a storage ring FEL delivering 350 nm photons which am naturally synchronized with the SR; the SPV was measured by synchrotron radiation core-level photoemission spectroscopy on the high-resolution SU3 undulator beamline. We will describe the experimental setup, which allowed us to convey the FEL light onto the samples sitting in the SU3 experimental station by means of a series of mirrors, and show the results we obtained for prototypical systems such as Ag/GaAs(110) and Si(111) 2 x 1. The dependence of the SPV was studied in function of various parameters, changing sample doping and photon flux; but our efforts were mainly devoted to studying its dependence on the time delay between the FEL pump and the SR probe. On SuperACO, such delay can be varied between 1 and 120 ns, the limits being given by the time duration of a SR pulse and by the interval between two consecutive positron bunches, respectively. The results show a clear temporal dependence of the amount of SPV on cleaved Si surfaces, where as the Ag/GaAs(110) does not show any difference on the ns time scale. We will discuss these results in terms of the role of surface recombination in the dynamics of the photoinduced electron-hole pairs. These studies follow the evolution of the density of electrostatic charge at surfaces and interfaces on a nanosecond time scale, and might pave the way for a new series of experiments: for example, one might explore what are the physical mechanisms limiting the time response of Schottky diodes.

Marsi, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Delboulbe, A.; Garzella, D. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CLIMATE 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CLIMATE 1 CLIMATE 1 CLIMATE 1 logo. Global climate data atlas consisting of a data base and a software for data access and visualization. The data base contains more than 1200 station data sets distributed all over the globe. Station data consist of 16 monthly mean data sets: Temperature: mean, min., max., extreme min. and max. rel. humidity, precipitation: mean, min., max., day maximum, days with precipitation, potential evaporation, global radiation, sunshine hours, wind speed and direction. Once a station is selected, its data are displayed graphically on the screen, and the data can be exported for other applications. A graphical user interface with topographic and climatic maps makes the tool easy to handle. Screen Shots Keywords climate data, climatic maps, sun chart

263

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water ({approximately}40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and ground water streams (the primary water types of interest to the DOE). As an example of the user demand for such an analytical instrument, a portion of the Field Test for the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was on the DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation, at two test locations in the Y-12 Site's Bear Creek Valley.

Unknown

1999-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

From global change to a butterfly flapping: biophysics and behaviour affect tropical climate change impacts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...documented the importance of solar radiation in predicting...quantify the influence of solar radiation, morphology...influence a population's capacity to respond to climatic...otherwise minimizing solar radiation. However...behavioural thermoregulation capacity [52]. As shown in...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but increasingly so in developing countries and economies in transition. Certain measures that integrate climateORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation and adaptation: an insurance an aggregator of the impacts of climate change and a market actor able to play a material role in decreasing

266

Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis 2010 CTS Research Conference Carissa impact analysis (EIA) as a tool to address climate change ·! Consider approaches to measuring and addressing climate change at the project scale #12;Purpose ·! Funded by U of M Institute on the Environment

Minnesota, University of

267

aerosols and climate : uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

268

Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

Pan, Feifei

269

Information Theory and Climate Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper introduces the use of information theory in characterizing climate predictability. Specifically, the concepts of entropy and transinformation are employed. Entropy measures the amount of uncertainty in our knowledge of the state of the ...

Lai-Yung Leung; Gerald R. North

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Initial optical-transition radiation measurements of the electron beam for the Boeing free-electron-laser experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential for characterization of electron beams at ? 100 MeV at the Boeing Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility by optical-transition radiation (OTR) techniques has been demonstrated as an important complement to other diagnostic means. Electron beam properties such as spatial profile and position, current intensity, emittance and energy were studied using OTR. Initial examples including transport through the 5 m wiggler and the resolution of Cherenkov radiation and spontaneous-emission radiation competitive sources are discussed.

A.H. Lumpkin; R.B. Fiorito; D.W. Rule; D.H. Dowell; W.C. Sellyey; A.R. Lowrey

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A compact pyrodetector for measuring the radiation energy of pulsed plasma light sources in the vacuum ultraviolet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A compact noise-resistant pyroelectric calorimeter has been developed in which radiation is spectrally selected by quartz and inert-gas filters. The calorimeter is ...

Bedrin, A G; Vorypaev, G G; Golubev, E M; Zhilin, A N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Climate zones for maritime clouds  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we use a commercially available lidar ceilometer to investigate how the basic structure of marine boundary-layer clouds varies for four different marine climate regimes. We obtained most of the data used in this analysis from ship-based ceilometer measurements recorded during several different atmospheric and oceanographic field programs conducted in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. For comparison, we show the results obtained at a mid-latitude continental location and at an ice camp on the Arctic ice shelf. For each analyzed case, we use an extended time series to generate meaningful cloud base and cloud fraction statistics. The Vaisala CT 12K ceilometer uses a GaAs diode laser to produce short (150 ns), high-intensity pulses of infrared radiation (904 nm wavelength). The return signals from a large number of consecutive pulses are coherently summed to boost the signal-to-noise ratio. Each resulting 30-s profile of backscattered power (15-m resolution) is analyzed to detect cloud layers using a specified cloud detection limit. In addition to measurements of cloud base, the ceilometer can also provide information on cloud fraction using a time series of the {open_quotes}cloud{close_quotes} or {open_quotes} no cloud{close_quotes} status reported in the 30-s data.

White, A.B.; Ruffieux, D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Non-climatic thermal adaptation: implications for species' responses to climate warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Grahamstown, South Africa 3 The Swire Institute of...non-climatic heat sources (solar and geothermal) seems likely...Wald 2001 The European solar radiation atlas: a valuable digital tool. Solar Energy 71, 81-83. ( doi:10...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U r r b b a a n n A A t t m m o o s s p p h h e e r r i i c c O O b b s s e e r r v v a a t t o o r r y y ( ( U U A A O O ) ) F F i i r r s s t t P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g W W o o r r k k s s h h o o p p - - A A t t t t e e n n d d e e e e s s 2 2 7 7 - - 2 2 8 8 J J a a n n u u a a r r y y , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 3 ****************************************************************** Sean Ahearn Hunter College North Bldg., 10 th Floor New York City, NY sca@everest.hunter.cuny.edu (W) 212-772-5327 Robert Bornstein San Jose State University Dept. of Meteorology San Jose, CA 951920-0104 pblmodel@hotmail.com (W) 408-924-5205 (F) 408-924-5191 David Brown Argonne National Lab 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 dbrown@anl.gov (W) 608-442-1249 Michael Brown LANL, Drop Point 19S, SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road Group D4-MS F604 Los Alamos, NM 87545 mbrown@lanl.gov (W) 505- 667-1788

275

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

models. As an important factor in growing crops, soil moisture dictates a farmer's success or failure. Too much soil moisture can drown out croplands and cause flooding,...

276

Solar Influences on Climate Professor Joanna Haigh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Influences on Climate Professor Joanna Haigh Executive Summary The Sun provides the energy to be much smaller than those due to increasing greenhouse gases. What are the sources of variation in solar radiation? There are two main sources of variation in solar radiation. First, there are internal stellar

Rosso, Lula

277

Review: Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

Smith, Jennifer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

UNDERSTANDING THE INFLUENCES OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.ecd.bnl.gov/steve BOB BRAWDY / AP #12;OVERVIEW Aerosol influences on climate and climate change Earth's energy balance remarks #12;DMS #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN Light scattering by aerosols decreases absorption of solar radiation. #12;AEROSOLS AS SEEN FROM SPACE Fire plumes from southern

Schwartz, Stephen E.

279

Estimating the Contribution of Sea Ice Response to Climate Sensitivity in a Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of sea ice to climate change affects Earth’s radiative properties in ways that contribute to yet more climate change. Here, a configuration of the Community Earth System Model, version 1.0.4 (CESM 1.0.4), with a slab ocean model and a ...

Ken Caldeira; Ivana Cvijanovic

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This project investigates the impact of air infiltration and ventilation on space cooling and moisture in residential buildings; research was conducted in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

In-situ measurements of the mixing state and optical properties of soot with implications for radiative forcing estimates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of fresh soot emissions from diesel trucks (24). Temporal Characteristics...Asian climate and hydrological cycle . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 102 : 5326...Edwards JM Shine KP ( 1997 ) General circulation model calculations of the direct...mode particles from heavy duty diesel vehicles using aerosol time-of-flight...

Ryan C. Moffet; Kimberly A. Prather

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Radiative Importance of ÂŤThinÂŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Accomplishments of the Cloud Properties Working Group (CPWG) August 2006 Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Using ARM Data to Establish Testable Metrics for GCM Predictions of Cloud Feedback Gerald Mace University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah The scientific underpinning of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is largely based on the premise that long term ground-based measurements of certain quantities provide information sufficient to test the skill of general circulation models (GCMs) to predict radiative heating and cloud feedbacks (Stokes and Schwartz, 1994; Ackerman and Stokes, 2003). This hypothesis is based on the assumption that some set of long-term ground-based measurements provide sufficient information to characterize the physical state of the atmospheric

283

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species Niklaus E. Zimmermanna,1 of climate extremes suggests the importance of understanding their additional influence on range limits. Here, we assess how measures representing climate extremes (i.e., interannual variability in climate

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

284

Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect

Clouds represent a critical component of the Earth’s atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Solar Radiometric Data Quality Assessment of SIRS, SKYRAD and GNDRAD Measurements (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Solar radiation is the driving force for the earth's weather and climate. Understanding the elements of this dynamic energy balance requires accurate measurements of broadband solar irradiance. Since the mid-1990's the ARM Program has deployed pyrheliometers and pyranometers for the measurement of direct normal irradiance (DNI), global horizontal irradiance (GHI), diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), and upwelling shortwave (US) radiation at permanent and mobile field research sites. This poster summarizes the basis for assessing the broadband solar radiation data available from the SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD measurement systems and provides examples of data inspections.

Habte, A.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Gotseff, P.; Anderberg, M.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A new scenario framework for climate change research: The concept of Shared Climate Policy Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the concept of shared climate policy assumptions as an important element of the new scenario framework. Shared climate policy assumptions capture key climate policy dimensions such as the type and scale of mitigation and adaptation measures. They are not specified in the socio-economic reference pathways, and therefore introduce an important third dimension to the scenario matrix architecture. Climate policy assumptions will have to be made in any climate policy scenario, and can have a significant impact on the scenario description. We conclude that a meaningful set of shared climate policy assumptions is useful for grouping individual climate policy analyses and facilitating their comparison. Shared climate policy assumptions should be designed to be policy relevant, and as a set to be broad enough to allow a comprehensive exploration of the climate change scenario space.

Kriegler, Elmar; Edmonds, James A.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Ebi, Kristie L.; Kram, Tom; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Climate Change and Extinctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

Sinervo, Barry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The measurement and verification of parameters of pulse electromagnetic radiation generated by a large-radius ring current  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental and analytic studies of the generation and propagation of electromagnetic radiation due to repetitive current pulses of a nanosecond duration (peak power to 1 MW, current slew rate of 3.5 A/ns) ar...

V. M. Fedorov; E. F. Lebedev; V. E. Ostashev; V. P. Tarakanov…

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Impacts on ocean heat from transient mesoscale eddies in a hierarchy of climate models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We characterize impacts on heat in the ocean climate system from transient ocean mesoscale eddies. Our tool is a suite of centennial-scale 1990 radiatively forced numerical climate simulations from three GFDL coupled models comprising the CM2-O ...

Stephen M. Griffies; Michael Winton; Whit G. Anderson; Rusty Benson; Thomas L. Delworth; Carolina O. Dufour; John P. Dunne; Paul Goddard; Adele k. Morrison; Anthony Rosati; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Jianjun Yin; Rong Zhang

290

Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical needs of policymakers charged with exploring possible interventions in the context of climate change. By `mainstream' we mean the type of climate science that dominates in universities and research centres, which we will term `academic' climate science, in contrast to `policy' climate science; aspects of this distinction will become clearer in what follows. In a nutshell, we do not think that academic climate science equips climate scientists to be as helpful as they might be, when involved in climate policy assessment. Partly, we attribute this to an over-investment in high resolution climate simulators, and partly to a culture that is uncomfortable with the inherently subjective nature of climate uncertainty.

Rougier, Jonathan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Ly?. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (?) has increased slightly from ? = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to ? = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Saul, L.; Wurz, P. [University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Frisch, P. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gruntman, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mueller, H. R. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ?

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Modeling Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP B. Schmid and J. Redemann Bay Area Environmental Research Institute National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California W. P. Arnott Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada A. Bucholtz and J. Reid Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, California P. Colarco Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. Covert and R. Elleman University of Washington Seattle, Washington J. Eilers, P. Pilewskie, and A. Strawa National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames, Research Center Moffett Field, California R. A. Ferrare

294

Climate analysis with satellite versus weather station data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper compares how well satellite versus weather station measurements of climate predict agricultural performance ... , India, and the United States. Although weather stations give accurate measures of groun...

Robert Mendelsohn; Pradeep Kurukulasuriya; Alan Basist; Felix Kogan…

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Transportation Sector: Climate Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: climate.dot.gov/methodologies/analysis-resources.html Cost: Free USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse Screenshot References: USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse[1] "Assessments of available models and analytical tools can be used to compare greenhouse gas measurement methods and analytical approaches. This

296

Incorporation of 3D Shortwave Radiative Effects within the Weather Research and Forecasting Model  

SciTech Connect

A principal goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to understand the 3D cloud-radiation problem from scales ranging from the local to the size of global climate model (GCM) grid squares. For climate models using typical cloud overlap schemes, 3D radiative effects are minimal for all but the most complicated cloud fields. However, with the introduction of ''superparameterization'' methods, where sub-grid cloud processes are accounted for by embedding high resolution 2D cloud system resolving models within a GCM grid cell, the impact of 3D radiative effects on the local scale becomes increasingly relevant (Randall et al. 2003). In a recent study, we examined this issue by comparing the heating rates produced from a 3D and 1D shortwave radiative transfer model for a variety of radar derived cloud fields (O'Hirok and Gautier 2005). As demonstrated in Figure 1, the heating rate differences for a large convective field can be significant where 3D effects produce areas o f intense local heating. This finding, however, does not address the more important question of whether 3D radiative effects can alter the dynamics and structure of a cloud field. To investigate that issue we have incorporated a 3D radiative transfer algorithm into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Here, we present very preliminary findings of a comparison between cloud fields generated from a high resolution non-hydrostatic mesoscale numerical weather model using 1D and 3D radiative transfer codes.

O'Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P.; Gautier, C.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

297

Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Finland by M. HW1'aien et al. (1985). Further development on the MPA was performed in several countries ineluding the United States where Perez (1986) presented a method for deriving beam radiation from a series of vertically mounted pyranometers...

Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

Baugher, Elizabeth

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

299

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS’ high sampling resolution to study the “twilight zone” around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM’s 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM’s operational data processing.

Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine [University of Reading] [University of Reading

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

300

Climate Change Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Climate change action plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

302

Climate Change Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

303

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

304

Climate Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

305

Perception of risk: proceedings of the XVth annual meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The book is a conglomerate of formal papers, discussions, and the textual minutes of a round table discussion with audience participation. The first part, and most interesting from my view-point, deals with the perception of risk or harm and societal attitudes. The second part contains papers that seem to be historical primers concerning radiobiology. This subject is surrounded by controversy, and it seems in part to be approached as an elephant would be by a tribe of blind zoologists. They poke and pinch, sometimes describe small parts in great detail, but never exactly circumscribe the object of the study. The purpose is to present a discussion of the harm due to radiation, specifically radiation from power sources. Closely related to this is the question of the regulatory agencies' role.

Goris, M.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Future Climate Engineering Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Associations from around the world are part of the project `Future Climate - Engineering Solu- tions'. Within the project the participating associations have been developing national climate plansFuture Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering

307

Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

localization that limits the present measurements. The knowledge thus gained will have input not only to fusion research, but to may ques- tions of basic plasma physics....

308

Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the Department of Physics & Astronomy. Chapel Hill 2005 Approved: A. E. Champagne, Advisor J. C. Blackmon, Reader C. Iliadis, Reader ABSTRACT Ryan P. Fitzgerald: Measurement of...

309

The Community Climate System Model: CCSM3  

SciTech Connect

A new version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) has been developed and released to the climate community. CCSM3 is a coupled climate model with components representing the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land surface connected by a flux coupler. CCSM3 is designed to produce realistic simulations over a wide range of spatial resolutions, enabling inexpensive simulations lasting several millennia or detailed studies of continental-scale climate change. This paper will show results from the configuration used for climate-change simulations with a T85 grid for atmosphere and land and a 1-degree grid for ocean and sea-ice. The new system incorporates several significant improvements in the scientific formulation. The enhancements in the model physics are designed to reduce or eliminate several systematic biases in the mean climate produced by previous editions of CCSM. These include new treatments of cloud processes, aerosol radiative forcing, land-atmosphere fluxes, ocean mixed-layer processes, and sea-ice dynamics. There are significant improvements in the sea-ice thickness, polar radiation budgets, equatorial sea-surface temperatures, ocean currents, cloud radiative effects, and ENSO teleconnections. CCSM3 can produce stable climate simulations of millenial duration without ad hoc adjustments to the fluxes exchanged among the component models. Nonetheless, there are still systematic biases in the ocean-atmosphere fluxes in western coastal regions, the spectrum of ENSO variability, the spatial distribution of precipitation in the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and the continental precipitation and surface air temperatures. We conclude with the prospects for extending CCSM to a more comprehensive model of the Earth's climate system.

Collins, W D; Blackmon, M; Bitz, C; Bonan, G; Bretherton, C S; Carton, J A; Chang, P; Doney, S; Hack, J J; Kiehl, J T; Henderson, T; Large, W G; McKenna, D; Santer, B D; Smith, R D

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

ARM - Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Change A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change The U.S. Environmental...

311

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

312

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

313

Corporate Climate Change Adaptation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? On-going and future climate change is universally acknowledged. Climate changeincorporating global mean temperature rise, impacts on global hydrology and ecosystems willaffect human society and… (more)

Herbertsson, Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Chapter 20 Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate Short-term interruption of construction, operation, and maintenance of the transmission line due to climate could occur, but could be mitigated No impact would occur where...

315

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fossil fuel, biofuel and biomass combustion, organic carbonincomplete combustion of fossil fuel and biomass burning. BCof incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, black

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Climate & Environmental Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy, Water and Ecosystem Engineering Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis Renewable Energy Systems Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Scientists Scott Brooks and Carrie Miller collect water quality data, East Fork Poplar Creek, November 15, 2012. Sampling site for mercury. Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including

317

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

318

Radiation protection and measurement issues related to cargo scanning with accelerator-produced high-energy X rays, NCRP Commentary No. 20  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......December 2008 book-review Book Review Radiation protection...technology in the current regulatory environment. The Introduction...radiation protection plan. Although there is not...radiation protection plan, the information can......

Robert May

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) was designed to provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the ARM Mobile Facility and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System were deployed on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations were supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods, one in the summer and a second in the winter.

320

Measurements of photon ionizing radiation fields in the reactor room of the 4th power-generating unit of the chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radiation examination of the reactor room of the damaged fourth unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was performed. The most strongly radiating surfaces...

A. G. Volkovich; V. N. Potapov; S. V. Smirnov; L. I. Urutskoev…

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ORISE: U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Reference Network (USCRN) Climate Reference Network (USCRN) U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) Map courtesy of the National Climatic Data Center The U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN), a network of climate stations, records real-time temperature, precipitation, wind speed, and solar radiation trends across the rural United States and in some parts of Canada. A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) initiative, the USCRN consists of a total of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. With an unparalleled 99.9 percent reporting accuracy, the USCRN provides the most accurate and reliable environmental climate data that the U.S. has ever collected. Its primary purpose is to provide consistent, long-term (50 to 100 years) observations of temperature

322

Validation of Surface Retrieved Cloud Optical Properties with in situ Measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) South Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect

The surface inferred cloud optical properties from a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer have been validated against the in situ measurements during the second ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE II) field campaign at the ARM South Great Plains (SGP) site. On the basis of eight effective radius profiles measured by the in situ Forward Spectra Scattering Probe (FSSP), our retrieved cloud effective radii for single-layer warm water clouds agree well with in situ measurements, within 5.5%. The sensitivity study also illustrates that for this case a 13% uncertainty in observed liquid water path (LWP, 20 g/m2) results in 1.5% difference in retrieved cloud optical depth and 12.7% difference in referred cloud effective radius, on average. The uncertainty of the LWP measured by the microwave radiometer (MWR) is the major contributor to the uncertainty of retrieved cloud effective radius. Further, we conclude that the uncertainty of our inferred cloud optical properties is better than 5% for warm water clouds based on a surface closure study, in which cloud optical properties inferred from narrowband irradiances are applied to a shortwave model and the modeled broadband fluxes are compared to a surface pyranometer.

Min, Qilong; Duan, M.; Marchand, Roger T.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

323

"Managing Department Climate Change"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

Sheridan, Jennifer

324

programs in climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

325

Climate Zones Robinson Projection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Zones Africa ´Robinson Projection Copyright 2007. The Trustees of Columbia University University. Population, Landscape, and Climate Estimates (PLACE). Further information available at: http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/place/ Publish Date: 03/13/07 0 500 km Climate zones were taken from the Köppen Climate Classification map

Columbia University

326

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ocean projections. Mk3.5 captures a number of robust changes common to most climate models that contribute to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3), an initiative by the World Climate Research projected by climate models. However, the response of these currents to climate change may directly affect m

Feng, Ming

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing radiation dose Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiation; radiation measurement; and dose information. ATOMS... Assessments, DOETIC-11026. RADIATION Radiation, or radiant energy, is energy in the form of waves... )...

328

Department of Energy Announces $7 Million in Funding for Climate...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of clouds. Through these field studies, scientists in DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program will gather crucial data on the complex interplay between radiation,...

329

Climate Change Science and Impacts In the Western Lake Superior Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reflected by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Downscaling: Focus global projections to a scale relevant to climate impacts in Wisconsin GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW-Madison Result: a statistical range of probable climate change* #12

Sheridan, Jennifer

330

Incorporating biologic measurements (SF2, CFE) into a tumor control probability model increases their prognostic significance: a study in cervical carcinoma treated with radiation therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess whether incorporation of measurements of surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) and colony-forming efficiency (CFE) into a tumor control probability (tcp) model increases their prognostic significance. Methods and Materials: Measurements of SF2 and CFE were available from a study on carcinoma of the cervix treated with radiation alone. These measurements, as well as tumor volume, dose, and treatment time, were incorporated into a Poisson tcp model (tcp?,?). Regression analysis was performed to assess the prognostic power of tcp?,? vs. the use of either tcp models with biologic parameters fixed to best-fit estimates (but incorporating individual dose, volume, and treatment time) or the use of SF2 and CFE measurements alone. Results: In a univariate regression analysis of 44 patients, tcp?,? was a better prognostic factor for both local control and survival (p CFE alone (p = 0.015 for local control, p = 0.38 for survival). In multivariate analysis, tcp?,? emerged as the most important prognostic factor for local control (p CFE was still a significant independent prognostic factor for local control, whereas SF2 was not. The sensitivities of tcp?,? and SF2 as predictive tests for local control were 87% and 65%, respectively. Specificities were 70% and 77%, respectively. Conclusions: A Poisson tcp model incorporating individual SF2, CFE, dose, tumor volume, and treatment time was found to be the best independent prognostic factor for local control and survival in cervical carcinoma patients.

Francesca Meteora Buffa; Susan E. Davidson; Robert D. Hunter; Alan E. Nahum; Catharine M.L. West

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Results No measured results exist at this time in terms of greenhouse gas intensity reductions, given the recent start-up of the Climate VISION program and evolving industry...

332

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement - Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Results No measured results exist at this time in terms of greenhouse gas intensity reductions, given the recent start-up of the Climate VISION program and evolving industry...

333

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Results No measured results exist at this time in terms of greenhouse gas intensity reductions, given the recent start-up of the Climate VISION program and evolving industry...

334

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

335

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

Polz, Martin

336

Selected Translated Abstracts of Chinese-Language Climate Change Publications  

SciTech Connect

This report contains English-translated abstracts of important Chinese-language literature concerning global climate change for the years 1995-1998. This body of literature includes the topics of adaptation, ancient climate change, climate variation, the East Asia monsoon, historical climate change, impacts, modeling, and radiation and trace-gas emissions. In addition to the biological citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Chinese. Author and title indexes are included to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

Cushman, R.M.; Burtis, M.D.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Details of U.S. Climate Zones:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones: The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA climate division is placed into one of five CBECS climate zones based on its 30-year average heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) for the period 1971 through 2000. (These climate zones have been updated for the 2003 CBECS. All previous CBECS used averages for the 45-year period from 1931 through 1975.) A HDD is a measure of how cold a location was over a period of time, relative to a base temperature (in CBECS, 65 degrees Fahrenheit). The heating degree-day is the difference between that day's average temperature and 65 degrees if the daily average is less than 65; it is zero if the daily average temperature is greater than or equal to 65. For example, if the average temperature for a given day is 40 degrees, then the heating degree-days for that single day equal 25. Heating degree-days for a year are the sum of the daily heating degree-days that year.

338

Climate Reference Network Daily01 Product | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daily01 Product Daily01 Product Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Climate Reference Network Daily01 Product Dataset Summary Description The U.S. Climate Reference Network is designed specifically to monitor national climate change with best scientific practice and adherence to the accepted principles of climate observations. USCRN daily temperature mean, maximum, and minimum, daily precipitation, daily global solar radiation, and daily average surface infrared temperature data are available in the Daily01 file set for all stations in the network. Daily mean, maximum, and minimum relative humidity are available for most stations. Tags {"Climate Reference Network",USCRN,CRN,"air temperature",temperature,precipitation,"global solar radiation"," surface temperature","surface infrared temperature","relative humidity","natural resources",water,air,"soil "}

339

Antecedents to Financial Statement Misreporting: The Influence of Organizational Business Strategy, Ethical Culture and Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., fraudulent reporting and asset misappropriation), find a significant correlation between individual rationalization measures and ethical climate measures (specifically those associated with an egoism- based climate), thus giving some empirical support...

Bentley, Kathleen

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

340

Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

qualitatively development and climate impacts of LEDS technologies and measures Key Products Qualitative impact assessment of priority improved practices or technologies List...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Climate Mag_27JUN2013_ms07022013.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development of validated parameterizations of new carbon- climate feedbacks for Earth System Models. LANL is also working with Chevron and DOE Fossil Energy on measuring CH 4...

342

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

343

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

344

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Review: Preparing for Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Preparing for Climate Change By Michael D.Stephen, Preparing for Climate Change. A Boston Review Book.alkaline paper. “Climate change is inevitable, but disaster

Kunnas, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Global air quality and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP;of chemistry–climate models with RCP emissions thus projectto project air quality responses to future climate change

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The BOOMERANG North America Instrument: A Balloon-borne Bolometric Radiometer Optimized for Measurements of Cosmic Background Radiation Anisotropies from 03 to 4°  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the BOOMERANG North America instrument, a balloon-borne bolometric radiometer designed to map the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation with 03 resolution over a significant portion of the sky. This receiver employs new technologies in bolometers, readout electronics, millimeter-wave optics and filters, cryogenics, scan, and attitude reconstruction. All these subsystems are described in detail in this paper. The system has been fully calibrated in flight using a variety of techniques, which are described and compared. Using this system, we have obtained a measurement of the first peak in the CMB angular power spectrum in a single, few hour long balloon flight. The instrument described here was a prototype of the BOOMERANG Long Duration Balloon experiment.

F. Piacentini; P. A. R. Ade; R. S. Bhatia; J. J. Bock; A. Boscaleri; P. Cardoni; B. P. Crill; P. de Bernardis; H. Del Castillo; G. De Troia; P. Farese; M. Giacometti; E. F. Hivon; V. V. Hristov; A. Iacoangeli; A. E. Lange; S. Masi; P. D. Mauskopf; L. Miglio; C. B. Netterfield; P. Palangio; E. Pascale; A. Raccanelli; S. Rao; G. Romeo; J. Ruhl; F. Scaramuzzi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections C. Hannay and R. Pincus National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Diagnostics Center Boulder, Colorado K. F. Evans Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds in the atmosphere are finite in extent and variable in every direction and in time. Long data sets from ground-based profilers, such as lidars or cloud radars, could provide a very valuable set of observations to characterize this variability. We may ask how well such profiling instruments can represent the cloud structure as measured by the magnitude of the three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer effect. The 3D radiative transfer effect is the difference between the domain average broadband solar surface

350

Measuring Up: How to Track and Evaluate Local Sustainability Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join this EPA Local Climate and Energy webinar to learn how to measure and evaluate the results of local climate, energy, and sustainability projects.

351

Climate change impact, adaptation and associated costs for coastal risks in France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change impact, adaptation and associated costs for coastal risks in France Gonéri Le.Pons@developpement-durable.gouv.fr Abstract As part of the French climate plan, an inter-ministerial working group called "climate change by climate change and to identify possible mitigation measures. Seven thematic committees were organized

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

352

PhD Student Position Vacancy Satellite Humidity Climate Data Records  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's objective is to improve weather and climate predictions with the help of satellite data, particularly from1 PhD Student Position Vacancy Satellite Humidity Climate Data Records Climate change is a key satellite measurements of atmospheric humidity and clouds, and with climate model results. The group

Hamburg,.Universität

353

Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols R. A. Ferrare and K. D. Evans (a) Hughes STX Corporation Lanham, Maryland S. H. Melfi and D. N. Whiteman NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland The principal objective of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) is to develop a better understanding of the atmospheric radiative balance in order to improve the parameterization of radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs) which are used to study climate change. Meeting this objective requires detailed measurements of both water vapor and aerosols since these atmospheric constituents affect the radiation balance directly, through scattering and absorption of solar and

354

Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

356

The Climate Policy Dilemma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

357

The Climate Policy Dilemma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

358

Earth'future climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...their visions of the future I. Astronomy and Earth sciences compiled by J. M. T. Thompson Earth'future climate Mark A. Saunders 1 1 Benfield...provide informed scientific projections for Earth's climate into the next millennium. This...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to address the most challenging and demanding climate-change issues. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) is designed to accel-erate the development and applica-tion of...

360

Climate Leadership Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking lead­ers from busi­ness, gov­ern...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

7, 72357275, 2007 Adaptive radiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discussions Two adaptive radiative transfer schemes for numerical weather prediction models V. Venema 1 , A numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. The atmosphere and the land surface are complex-stream approximation. In most weather prediction models these parameterisation schemes are therefore called infre

Boyer, Edmond

362

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

363

Ionizing radiation dosimetry in the absorbed dose range 0.01–50 \\{MGy\\} based on resistance and ESR linewidth measurements of organic conducting crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The materials studied in the present work as high-dose dosimeters are members of a large class of molecular crystals which are organic conductors of electricity. Very different from each other in the details of their molecular and crystal structures, they all behave in the same way when subjected to increasing high doses of radiation, at least from the point of view of their electronic transport properties, because of the quasi-one-dimensional character of the conduction process. Their resistivities increase exponentially with the absorbed dose while their electron spin resonance (ESR) linewidths decrease exponentially. Very small single crystals less than 10 ?m thick can be used as dosimeters in the dose range 0.01–50 \\{MGy\\} for ? rays as well as for electron irradiations, by applying four probe resistance measurements. Only a few compounds over a large number of candidates have been irradiated in the present work with ?-rays, low energy x-rays and electrons. In some favourable cases the energy and temperature dependences of the dosimeters have been checked experimentally. Their mass energy absorption coefficients and electron stopping powers have been also calculated. It is hoped to extend this kind of dosimetry to lower and higher doses by trying new compounds from the large family of organic conductors or by improving the resistivity and ESR measurement techniques.

L. Zuppiroli; S. Bouffard; J.J. Jacob

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Radiation source rate estimation through data assimilation of gamma dose rate measurements for operational nuclear emergency response systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of an innovative data assimilation method that has been recently developed in NCSR Demokritos for estimating an unknown emission rate of radionuclides in the atmosphere, with real-scale experimental data. The efficient algorithm is based on the assimilation of gamma dose rate measured data in the Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model DIPCOT and uses variational principles. The DIPCOT model is used in the framework of the nuclear emergency response system (ERS) RODOS. The evaluation is performed by computational simulations of dispersion of Ar-41 that was emitted routinely by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) previous research reactor, HIFAR, located in Sydney, Australia. In this paper the algorithm is evaluated against a more complicated case than the others used in previous studies: there was only one monitoring station available each day and the site topography is characterised as moderately complex. Overall the estimated release rate approaches the real one to a very satisfactory degree as revealed by the statistical indicators of errors.

Vasiliki Tsiouri; Spyros Andronopoulos; Ivan Kovalets; Leisa L. Dyer; John G. Bartzis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Environment and Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

Galles, David

366

Forest Research: Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

367

Climate Change Workshop 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

368

Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

review and input from scholars with expertise in climate change and communication. #12; Welcome Thank youCampus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE CAMPUS Southwestern Pennsylvania Program booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994

Attari, Shahzeen Z.

369

Investment Dimension: Enhanced Data Equals Better Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy provided the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility with $60 million for new and upgraded instrumentation, equipment, and infrastructure to improve atmospheric data sets. These enhancements will take place among the permanent ARM research sites in Oklahoma and Alaska in the United States, and near the equator in the tropical Western Pacific. They will also advance the capabilities of ARM’s mobile and aerial research platforms. This article focuses on key enhancements - particularly new scanning radars, enhanced lidar technologies, aerosol observation systems, and in situ aircraft probes - that will provide unprecedented data sets for the modeling community.

Roeder, Lynne R.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model  

SciTech Connect

The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Climate Change Economics and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

Romano, Daniela

372

Developing public awareness for climate change: Support from international research programs  

SciTech Connect

Developing regional and local public awareness and interest in global climate change has been mandated as an important step for increasing the ability for setting policy and managing the response to climate change. Research programs frequently have resources that could help reach regional or national goals for increasing the capacity for responding to climate change. To obtain these resources and target recipients appropriately, research investigators need clear statements of national and regional strategies or priorities as a guide. One such program, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, has a requirement to develop local or regional education enrichment programs at their observational sites in the central US, the tropical western Pacific (TWP), and on the north slope of alaska. ARM's scientific goals will result in a flow of technical data and as well as technical expertise that can assist with regional needs to increase the technical resources needed to address climate change issues. Details of the ARM education program in the Pacific will be presented.

Barnes, F.J.; Clements, W.E.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Changes in the Land Surface Energy Budget in Eastern China over the Past Three Decades: Contributions of Land-Cover Change and Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sensible heat flux (H), latent heat flux (LE), and net radiation (NR) are important surface energy components that directly influence climate systems. In this study, the changes in the surface energy and their contributions from global climate ...

J. W. Yan; J. Y. Liu; B. Z. Chen; M. Feng; S. F. Fang; G. Xu; H. F. Zhang; M. L. Che; W. Liang; Y. F. Hu; W. H. Kuang; H. M. Wang

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.org/cfo/node/256 Language: English Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Screenshot References: Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies[1] Tool Overview "This guidebook is part of a series of manuals, guidebooks, and toolkits that draw upon the experience and information generated by UNDP's support

375

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......occupational illness to personnel, major damage...acceptable levels. Selection of control measures...or equipment operating correctly in...99 103 to 104 Personnel life safety...and abnormal operating conditions under...radiation risk to personnel, public and...worker radiation training) reduces the......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

Hansen, James E.

377

Climate Literacy Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Literacy Framework Print E-mail Climate Literacy Framework Print E-mail A Guide for Individuals and Communities The Essential Principles of Climate Science presents important information for individuals and communities to understand Earth's climate, impacts of climate change, and approaches for adapting and mitigating change. Principles in the guide can serve as discussion starters or launching points for scientific inquiry. The guide can also serve educators who teach climate science as part of their science curricula. Development of the guide began at a workshop sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Multiple science agencies, non-governmental organizations, and numerous individuals also contributed through extensive review and comment periods. Discussion at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and NOAA-sponsored Atmospheric Sciences and Climate Literacy workshop contributed substantially to the refinement of the document.

378

Little Climates -- Part One  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part One Part One Nature Bulletin No. 478-A January 27, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LITTLE CLIMATES -- Part One: Weather in the Soi. Climate vitally affects our lives. Wherever we live, climate has largely determined the plant and animal life in that region, the development of civilization there and what people do. The climate of any region represents its overall weather picture: the sum of its weather today, tomorrow, and during past centuries. We are accustomed to think of climate as a set of conditions occurring entirely in the atmosphere above the earth's surface, and it may sound silly when we say that there are climates underground -- little climates just as real as those above -- but it's true, There are special kinds of weather in the soil.

379

Future Climate Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure 1), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Revision 00 of this AMR was prepared in accordance with the ''Work Direction and Planning Document for Future Climate Analysis'' (Peterman 1999) under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-97NV12033 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The planning document for the technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department''. (BSC 2001b, Addendum B, Section 4.1).

James Houseworth

2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

Global variation in thermal tolerances and vulnerability of endotherms to climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...precipitation and radiation) within a year (variables...precipitation seasonality or radiation seasonality (all climatic...single model (mammals, radiation seasonality), we did...as implemented in the software spatial analysis in...mismatch, whereas thermal safety was recorded when maximum...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Testing and Performance Validation of a Sensitive Gamma Ray Camera Designed for Radiation Detection and Decommissioning Measurements in Nuclear Facilities-13044  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the measurements, testing and performance validation of a sensitive gamma ray camera designed for radiation detection and quantification in the environment and decommissioning and hold-up measurements in nuclear facilities. The instrument, which is known as RadSearch, combines a sensitive and highly collimated LaBr{sub 3} scintillation detector with an optical (video) camera with controllable zoom and focus and a laser range finder in one detector head. The LaBr{sub 3} detector has a typical energy resolution of between 2.5% and 3% at the 662 keV energy of Cs-137 compared to that of NaI detectors with a resolution of typically 7% to 8% at the same energy. At this energy the tungsten shielding of the detector provides a shielding ratio of greater than 900:1 in the forward direction and 100:1 on the sides and from the rear. The detector head is mounted on a pan/tile mechanism with a range of motion of ±180 degrees (pan) and ±90 degrees (tilt) equivalent to 4 ? steradians. The detector head with pan/tilt is normally mounted on a tripod or wheeled cart. It can also be mounted on vehicles or a mobile robot for access to high dose-rate areas and areas with high levels of contamination. Ethernet connects RadSearch to a ruggedized notebook computer from which it is operated and controlled. Power can be supplied either as 24-volts DC from a battery or as 50 volts DC supplied by a small mains (110 or 230 VAC) power supply unit that is co-located with the controlling notebook computer. In this latter case both power and Ethernet are supplied through a single cable that can be up to 80 metres in length. If a local battery supplies power, the unit can be controlled through wireless Ethernet. Both manual operation and automatic scanning of surfaces and objects is available through the software interface on the notebook computer. For each scan element making up a part of an overall scanned area, the unit measures a gamma ray spectrum. Multiple radionuclides may be selected by the operator and will be identified if present. In scanning operation the unit scans a designated region and superimposes over a video image the distribution of measured radioactivity. For the total scanned area or object RadSearch determines the total activity of operator selected radionuclides present and the gamma dose-rate measured at the detector head. Results of hold-up measurements made in a nuclear facility are presented, as are test measurements of point sources distributed arbitrarily on surfaces. These latter results are compared with the results of benchmarked MCNP Monte Carlo calculations. The use of the device for hold-up and decommissioning measurements is validated. (authors)

Mason, John A.; Looman, Marc R.; Poundall, Adam J.; Towner, Antony C.N. [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom)] [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom); Creed, Richard; Pancake, Daniel [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the �¢����solar-background�¢��� mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM�¢����s zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS�¢���� 1 Hz sampling to study the �¢����twilight zone�¢��� around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM�¢����s 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM�¢����s operational data processing.

D. Jui-Yuan Chiu

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the report "Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations," the 10th in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) managed by U.S. federal agencies. Developed under the leadership of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this report, SAP 3.1, describes computer models of the Earth's climate and their ability to simulate current climate change. "Complex climate models are tools that provide insights and knowledge into how future climate may evolve. To assure that future climate projections

384

MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate) Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), World Bank Climate Smart Planning Platform Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.mca4climate.info/ Program Start: 2011 Cost: Free Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate) Screenshot References: MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning[1]

385

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications References: IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research[1] "IISD's work related to climate change and agriculture has been supported by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada." It include the two following publications: Expanding Agriculture's Role in a Post-2012 Regime (PDF - 712 kb) and Climate Change Mitigation through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors References ↑ "IISD Climate Change and Agriculture Research"

386

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

387

Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

Browder, Tom

388

Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

Hulme, Mike

389

Sandia National Laboratories: Accelerated Climate Modeling for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy New Project Is the ACME of Computer Science to Address Climate Change On December 3, 2014, in Analysis, Climate, Global Climate & Energy,...

390

Additional Climate Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Reports Internationally, many assessments have been produced to address important questions related to environmental issues such as ozone depletion, climate change, and the loss of biodiversity. Many of these assessments have provided the scientific basis for the elaboration of international agreements, including the Assessment Report Series from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC is a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). IPCC assesses the scientific, technical and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of the risk of human-induced climate change. Because of its intergovernmental nature, the IPCC is able to provide scientific technical and socio-economic information in a policy-relevant but policy neutral way to decision makers.

391

National Climate Assessment: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Team Production Team Indicators System Coastal Resilience Resources Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally National Climate Assessment: Overview Print E-mail What is the National Climate Assessment (NCA)? The NCA is an important resource for understanding and communicating climate change science and impacts in the United States. It informs the nation about already observed changes, the current status of the climate, and anticipated trends for the future. The NCA report process integrates scientific information from multiple sources and sectors to highlight key findings and significant gaps in our knowledge. The NCA also establishes consistent methods for evaluating climate impacts in the U.S. in the context of broader global change. Finally, findings from the NCA provide input to Federal science priorities and are used by U.S. citizens, communities, and businesses as they create more sustainable and environmentally sound plans for the nation's future.

392

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Pincus, Robert NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Category: Modeling Statistical cloud schemes (or assumed probability distribution function cloud schemes) are attractive because they provide a way to implement horizontal sub-grid scale cloud heterogeneity in a self-consistent way between physical parameterizations of the a climate model, such as radiation and cloud microphysics. In this work, we will present results dealing with two aspects of our ongoing work towards the implementation of statistical cloud scheme ideas in the climate model of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. First, we will address the representation of cloud

393

International Finance and Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

Zhang, Junshan

394

Drought Update Colorado Climate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drought Update Colorado Climate Center Roger Pielke, Sr., Director Prepared by Tara Green and Odie Bliss http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 2 http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2003/mar/st005dv00pcp200303.html #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 3 #12;© 2003

395

Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

396

Conservation and Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

Landweber, Laura

397

Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

398

Climate Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and hydrological monitoring stations, and improving the projections on future climate change. Climate change. This project continues the state's climate monitoring and analysis program. Project Description in climate projections for the 21st century. · Provide analyses and interpretation of regional climate

399

The Climate Impacts LINK Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate change is relatively undeveloped.The Climate Impacts LINK Project was conceived to encourage research

Feigon, Brooke

400

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoscience, Climate and Consequence Effect at Sandia National Laboratories presented on "Hydraulic Fracturing: Role of Government-Sponsored R&D." Marianne's presentation was part...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Future Climate Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this report provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the following reports: ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]), ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]), ''Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170012]), and ''Features, Events, and Processes in SZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170013]). Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one available forecasting method for establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The selection of different methods is directly dependent on the available evidence used to build a forecasting argument. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. While alternative analyses are possible for the case presented for Yucca Mountain, the evidence (data) used would be the same and the conclusions would not be expected to drastically change. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Other alternative approaches could include simulation of climate over the 10,000-year period; however, this modeling extrapolation is well beyond the bounds of current scientific practice and would not provide results with better confidence. A corroborative alternative approach may be found in ''Future Climate Analysis-10,000 Years to 1,000,000 Years After Present'' (Sharpe 2003 [DIRS 161591]). The current revision of this report is prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]).

C. G. Cambell

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Climate Change, Drought & Environment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

403

Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

404

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities ORISE partners with NOAA to operate climate monitoring network U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) station in Hawaii The U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) consists of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. The stations use highly accurate and reliable sensors and gauges to measure temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The network allows scientists to study the climate of an area over sustained periods, from 50 to 100 years. Pictured here is a CRN station at the Mauna Loa Slope Observatory in Hawaii. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works closely with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to perform lower

405

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

407

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Water Heating Systems: Life-Cycle Analyses and Opportunities for Cost Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper regarding research in potential cost-savings measures for cold-climate solar domestic water hearing systems.

Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

411

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, Illinois Introduction Improving the representation of cloud-radiation interaction is a major challenge for the global climate simulation. The development of cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and the extensive Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARMs) provide a unique opportunity for shading some lights on this problem. Current general circulation models (GCMs) predict cloud cover fractions and hydrometeor concentra- tions only in individual model layers, where clouds are assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in a

412

A U. S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program DOESC-ARMP-07-003 Science and Research Data Products Climate Data for the World A primary objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation...

413

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

414

book review: Climate change mapped  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of millions 2 .   Climate change is a moving target and introductions  to  climate change’, the Atlas stands out media reporting on climate change.   Cambridge University 

Shanahan, Mike

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Climate Change at Annual Timescales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

Stine, Alexander Robin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developing countries "can significantly offset the adverse effects of climate change").Climate Change, 2 which calls on developed countries (but not developing countries)developing countries that will bear the bulk of the effects of climate change.

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associ- ated with climate change are multi-dimensional, andpotential consequences of climate change in coming decades.designed to forecast climate changes at mid-cen- tury and

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

419

Dynamic Effects on the Tropical Cloud Radiative Forcing and Radiation Budget JIAN YUAN, DENNIS L. HARTMANN, AND ROBERT WOOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the tropics, using the methodology suggested by Bony et al. Cloud and radiation budget quantities source of uncertainty in pre- dicting future climate (Cess et al. 2001b; Stephens 2005; Solomon et al

Wood, Robert

420

DOE/SC-ARM-10-032 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-032 10-032 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2010 Recovery Act HigHligHts September 2009 * One hundred percent of allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 released to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. October 2009 * Preliminary design reviews successfully completed for new solar spectrometer and Data Management Facility (DMF) upgrades. December 2009 * Preliminary design reviews successfully completed for 18 new radars and upgrades to existing radars. January 2010 * Design reviews completed for DMF, radars, and shipborne radar wind profiler. * Installation and integration of new equipment in process for the ARM Data Archive and aircraft infrastructure, data systems, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

TROPICAL METEOROLOGY & Climate | Hadley Circulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synopsis The Hadley circulation, a prominent circulation feature characterized by rising air near the Equator and sinking air in the subtropics, defines the position of dry subtropical areas and is a fundamental regulator of the earth's energy and momentum budgets. The character of the Hadley circulation, and its related precipitation regimes, exhibits variation and change in response to both climate variability and radiative forcing changes. The strength and position of the Hadley circulation change from year to year paced by El Nińo and La Nińa events. Over the last few decades of the twentieth century, the Hadley cell has expanded poleward in both hemispheres, with changes in atmospheric composition (including stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse gas increases) thought to have contributed to its expansion. This article introduces the basic phenomenology and driving mechanism of the Hadley circulation and discusses its variations under both natural and anthropogenic climate forcings. This article is a revision of the previous edition article by I N James, volume 3, pp 919–924, © 2003, Elsevier Ltd.

J. Lu; G.A. Vecchi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Moving Toward Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a response to climate disruption. Even the most optimistic models forecast that if greenhouse-gas emissions Appendix 1 Solutions on the Ground 67 Appendix 2 Reliability of Trends and Forecasts 78 Literature Cited 81. In the absence of substantial reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, the climate of the Y2Y region

423

MAPPING HIGH-RESOLUTION LAND SURFACE RADIATIVE FLUXES FROM MODIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important to life and to the use of clean renewable solar energy to improve the quality of the environment and biogeophysical mod- eling, solar energy applications, and agriculture. The Earth's surface radiation budget (SRB) is the key quantity that determines global climate and climate change from elevated greenhouse gases, air

Liang, Shunlin

424

Radiation Dose Measurement by Electron Spin Resonance Studies of Tooth Enamel in Lime and Non-lime Consuming Individuals from the Silchar Region of Northeast India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......uranium in nuclear workers occupationally exposed to uranium in Rocketdyne, USA (19501994). Apart from the known toxic effects of...radiation exposure on cancer mortality in nuclear workers at Rocketdyne/Atomics Interna- tional. Environ Health Perspect. 108......

Deborshi Bhattacharjee; Alexander I. Ivannikov; Kassym Zhumadilov; Valeriy F. Stepanenko; Kenichi Tanaka; Satoru Endo; Megu Ohtaki; Shin Toyoda; Joyeeta Bhattacharyya; Masaharu Hoshi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Carbon–Concentration and Carbon–Climate Feedbacks in CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnitude and evolution of parameters that characterize feedbacks in the coupled carbon–climate system are compared across nine Earth system models (ESMs). The analysis is based on results from biogeochemically, radiatively, and fully coupled ...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer; Pierre Friedlingstein; Michael Eby; Chris D. Jones; James R. Christian; Gordon Bonan; Laurent Bopp; Victor Brovkin; Patricia Cadule; Tomohiro Hajima; Tatiana Ilyina; Keith Lindsay; Jerry F. Tjiputra; Tongwen Wu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Climate VISION: News  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

News Climate Vison RSS Recent News Feed News Climate Vison RSS Recent News Feed July 20, 2010 Secretary Chu Announces Initiatives to Promote Clean Energy at First Clean Energy Ministerial Read the Press Release and Download Fact Sheet (PDF 76 KB) July 20, 2010 Government and corporate leaders announced a new public-private partnership, Global Superior Energy Performancecm at the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington D.C. Read More and Download Fact Sheet (PDF 124 KB) June 20, 2010 Seventh Meeting of the Leaders' Representatives of the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate Read the Co-Chair's Summary June 1, 2010 Department of State releases Fifth U.S. Climate Action Report Read the Press Release December 18, 2009 Remarks by the President at the Morning Plenary Session of the United Nations Climate Change Conference

427

climate | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

climate climate Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, cooling degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Source NOAA Date Released Unknown Date Updated June 24th, 2005 (9 years ago) Keywords climate cooling degree days NOAA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon hcs_51_avg_cdd.xls (xls, 215.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

428

National Climate Assessment: Production Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCA & Development Advisory Committee NCA & Development Advisory Committee Production Team Indicators System Coastal Resilience Resources Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally National Climate Assessment: Production Team Print E-mail National Climate Assessment Staff (USGCRP National Coordination Office) Current NCA Staff Dr. Fabien Laurier, Director, Third National Climate Assessment Dr. Glynis Lough, Chief of Staff for the National Climate Assessment Emily Therese Cloyd, Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Bryce Golden-Chen, Program Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Alison Delgado, Scientist Dr. Ilya Fischhoffkri, Scientist Melissa Kenney, Indicators Coordinator Dr. Fred Lipschultz, Regional Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment

429

Urban Growth and Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and Developing Countries:climate change matters because it is likely to be the case that local governments in developing countries

Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Climate Change/Paleoclimate & Geochronology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate ChangePaleoclimate & Geochronology "The instrumental record is generally considered not to be long enough to give a complete picture of climate variability... It is...

431

Climate Change | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

adaptive capacity and amplify potential impacts. Source: Gautam, M. R.; Chief, K.; Smith Jr., W.J. (2013). Climatic Change Climate Change Webinar Series Recordings and...

432

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This case study describes research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

433

USING SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS AND REANALYSES TO EVALUATE CLIMATE AND WEATHER FORECAST MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USING SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS AND REANALYSES TO EVALUATE CLIMATE AND WEATHER FORECAST MODELS Richard Email: rpa@mail.nerc-essc.ac.uk ABSTRACT Satellite observations of water vapour and radiative fluxes are used in combination with reanalyses data to evaluate the Met Office weather and climate prediction

Allan, Richard P.

434

Energy performance of a dual airflow window under different climates Jingshu Wei1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

great po tential in conserving energy in buildings and provide fresh air to improve indoor air qua lity that by shading solar radiation. The dual airflow window is recomm ended for colder climate. If improving air airflow window; Energy demand; Indoor air quality; Different climates 1. Introduction Energy dem

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

435

Challenges in using probabilistic climate change information for impact assessments: an example from the water sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...periods for the GCM grid box that covers...radiation and wind speed) with the...many previous impacts assessments...climate change impact on the flood regime...Barthelmie2005Climate change impacts on wind speeds and wind energy density in northern...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

CO/sub 2/-induced climate change and forest resources  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to examine potential forest responses to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ and to CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Forests both affect and respond to changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ and climate. Forests directly affect climate at the global scale by altering the earth's albedo, hydrological regimes, and atmospheric CO/sub 2/. At a local scale they can alter air temperature, humidity, and solar radiation. In turn, forests are affected by CO/sub 2/ and climate at many spatial and temporal scales. Forest responses to CO/sub 2/ and climate may be examined by using five biotic paradigms. Each paradigm has its own spatial and temporal scale and its own set of unique phenomena responsive to CO/sub 2/ and climate changes. We will first use these paradigms to review forest responses to CO/sub 2/ and climate. We will then describe the linkages between these paradigms and the implications of these linkages for future research on the impact of elevated atmospheric CO/sub 2/ and climate change on forest resources. 51 refs., 1 fig.

Graham, R.L.; Turner, M.G.; Dale, V.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

TOPICS IN CLIMATE RESEARCH Course Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projects 6 Climate Theory; Climate Forcing; Climate Feedbacks I 4 7 Climate Theory; Climate ForcingTOPICS IN CLIMATE RESEARCH AT 755 Course Description: This course is a survey of current topics in climate research, including the decadal to paleoclimate observational record, the impacts of climate

438

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions ŕ prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

439

Estimating Energy Efficiency Impacts Using Climate Wise "Wise Rules"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use. Climate Wise provides technical assistance in the form of efficiency check-lists, handbooks, and one-on-one support through a toll-free Wise Line to help partners identify efficiency measures and quantify project impacts. Climate Wise has...

Milmoe, P. H.; Winkelman, S. R.

440

Quality Assurance of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data  

SciTech Connect

This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as it existed in 2008. The performance of ACRF instruments, sites, and data systems is measured in terms of the availability, usability, and accessibility of the data to a user. First, the data must be available to users; that is, the data must be collected by instrument systems, processed, and delivered to a central repository in a timely manner. Second, the data must be usable; that is, the data must be inspected and deemed of sufficient quality for scientific research purposes, and data users must be able to readily tell where there are known problems in the data. Finally, the data must be accessible; that is, data users must be able to easily find, obtain, and work with the data from the central repository. The processes described in this report include instrument deployment and calibration; instrument and facility maintenance; data collection and processing infrastructure; data stream inspection and assessment; the roles of value-added data processing and field campaigns in specifying data quality and haracterizing the basic measurement; data archival, display, and distribution; data stream reprocessing; and engineering and operations management processes and procedures. Future directions in ACRF data quality assurance also are presented.

RA Peppler; KE Kehoe; KL Sonntag; CP Bahrmann; SJ Richardson; SW Christensen; RA McCord; DJ Doty; R Wagener; RC Eagan; JC Lijegren; BW Orr; DL Sisterson; TD Halter; NN Keck; CN Long; MC Macduff; JH Mather; RC Perez; JW Voyles; MD Ivey; ST Moore; DL Nitschke; BD Perkins; DD Turner

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Draconian measures needed to avert climate change  

SciTech Connect

On Nov. 12, 2008, the Paris-based International Energy Agency (IEA) released its World Energy Outlook. This year's edition is gloomier than usual, essentially reinforcing the message that others have been saying for some time. Short of a miracle technological breakthrough and/or a bold global agreement to cut back greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere are likely to continue to grow, leading to rising global mean temperatures. Negotiators at the international conference in Copenhagen to agree to a post-Kyoto treaty will face insurmountable obstacles. Already, there are indications that many rich countries are hedging their bets that if developing countries do not come on board, they will not do their share either. The crux of the problem is the current inequalities in per capita GHG emissions between the rich and the poor.

NONE

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1 Department of Mathematics University;Abstract We provide a statistical interpretation of current practice in climate mod- elling. This includes: definitions for weather and climate; clarifying the relationship between simulator output and simulator

Dixon, Peter

443

Modelling the local climate in island environments: water balance applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In small volcanic islands the local scale climate is influenced by the regional scale climate and by the orography and orientation of air masses movement over the islands. A model was developed in a GIS environment to generate local scale climate variables from those observed at the synoptic scale, from coastal weather stations. An advective submodel, based on the Foehn effect and assuming the conservation of mass and energy, computes local scale air temperature, relative humidity, clouds occurrence and precipitation. A radiative submodel, using information generated by the advective submodel, computes local scale global radiation. A rotational terrain model allows that computations be performed according to the direction of wind. Because the model works within a GIS, results concern the spatial distribution of all climatic variables on the island territory. Results of the validation of temperature, relative humidity, global radiation and rainfall are presented. For agro-meteorological purposes, an application of generated data to perform the sequential water balance is also analysed by comparing results from computations using simulated and observed data at a control weather station located at medium altitude. Results support assumptions utilised in the model and the further use of generated local climate fields for water management and environmental studies in small island environments.

Eduardo Brito de Azevedo; Lu??s Santos Pereira; Bernard Itier

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Climate VISION: Program Mission  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

PROGRAM MISSION PROGRAM MISSION Climate VISION - Voluntary Innovative Sector Initiatives: Opportunities Now - is a voluntary public-private partnership initiative to improve energy efficiency and greenhouse gas intensity in energy-intensive industrial sectors. Climate VISION - Voluntary Innovative Sector Initiatives: Opportunities Now - is a public-private partnership initiative launched by the Department of Energy on February 12, 2003. Its primary goal is to identify and pursue cost-effective options to improve the energy or GHG intensity of industry operations by accelerating the transition to technologies, practices, and processes that are cleaner, more efficient, and capable of reducing, capturing or sequestering GHGs. Climate VISION links these objectives with technology development,

445

Climate impacts of ice nucleation A. Gettelman,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

back to space, cooling the planet. However, ice clouds, being cold, radiate much less long wave and cooling, with warming thought to be slightly larger. [3] Changes to ice cloud microphysics might alterClimate impacts of ice nucleation A. Gettelman,1,2 X. Liu,3 D. Barahona,4,5 U. Lohmann,2 and C

Gettelman, Andrew

446

Chapter 15. BIOLOGICALPHYSICAL INTERACTIONS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

605 Chapter 15. BIOLOGICAL­PHYSICAL INTERACTIONS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME LESSONS FROM EARTH, absorb- ing long-wave radiation emitted from the planet surface and warming Earth's surface temperature combined. The idea that burning a relatively small amount of coal, oil, and gas can affect such a large

Schrag, Daniel

447

Understanding and Attributing Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9 Understanding and Attributing Climate Change Coordinating Lead Authors: Gabriele C. Hegerl (USA. Nicholls, J.E. Penner and P.A. Stott, 2007: Under- standing and Attributing Climate Change. In: Climate of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M

Box, Jason E.

448

Biological Impacts of Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

McCarty, John P.

449

"Bivariate Downscaling for Climate Projections"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Bivariate Downscaling for Climate Projections" Xuming He Department of Statistics University is a useful technique to localize global or regional climate model projections to assess the potential impact of climate changes. It requires quantifying a relationship between climate model output and local

Wang, Lily

450

How Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide;#12;Summary The tourism sector is not only affected by climate change but also has an impact on the Earth of such measures, we calculated the climate efficiency of the tourism sector in the case of Switzerland.We defined

Fischlin, Andreas

451

Related Federal Climate Efforts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Federal Climate Efforts Print E-mail Related Federal Climate Efforts Print E-mail Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage The Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a group of technologies for capturing, compressing, transporting and permanently storing power plant and industrial source emissions of carbon dioxide. Rapid development and deployment of clean coal technologies, particularly CCS, will help position the United States as a leader in the global clean energy race. Climate Change Adaptation Task Force The Task Force's work has been guided by a strategic vision of a resilient, healthy, and prosperous Nation in the face of a changing climate. To achieve this vision, the Task Force identified a set of guiding principles that public and private decision-makers should consider in designing and implementing adaptation strategies.

452

G-Climate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67 67 AUDIT REPORT THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTIVITIES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES APRIL 2000 April 6, 2000 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The U.S. Department of Energy's Global Climate Change Activities" BACKGROUND The President's Climate Change Proposal of October 1997 and the United Nation's Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), were intended to identify methods of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The FCCC was ratified by the U.S. Senate in 1992 and put into force in July 1994. The purpose of the Kyoto

453

Climate Vision: Presidential Statements  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Remarks by the President at the Morning Plenary Session of the United Remarks by the President at the Morning Plenary Session of the United Nations Climate Change Conference Bella Center Copenhagen, Denmark December 18, 2009 (Read the White House Press page.) THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. It is an honor for me to join this distinguished group of leaders from nations around the world. We come here in Copenhagen because climate change poses a grave and growing danger to our people. All of you would not be here unless you -- like me -- were convinced that this danger is real. This is not fiction, it is science. Unchecked, climate change will pose unacceptable risks to our security, our economies, and our planet. This much we know. The question, then, before us is no longer the nature of the challenge -- the question is our capacity to meet it. For while the reality of climate

454

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

455

Climate Vision: Presidential Statements  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

President-Elect Obama's Address to the Global Climate Summit President-Elect Obama's Address to the Global Climate Summit November 18, 2008 THE PRESIDENT: Let me begin by thanking the bipartisan group of U.S. governors who convened this meeting. Few challenges facing America - and the world - are more urgent than combating climate change. The science is beyond dispute and the facts are clear. Sea levels are rising. Coastlines are shrinking. We've seen record drought, spreading famine, and storms that are growing stronger with each passing hurricane season. Climate change and our dependence on foreign oil, if left unaddressed, will continue to weaken our economy and threaten our national security. I know many of you are working to confront this challenge. In particular, I want to commend Governor Sebelius, Governor Doyle, Governor Crist, Governor

456

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director of Sandia's Geoscience, Climate, and Consequence Effects Center, spoke on "Hydraulic Fracturing: The Role of Government-Sponsored R&D" as part of a session on "The...

457

Valuing Climate Forecast Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article describes research opportunities associated with evaluating the characteristics of climate forecasts in settings where sequential decisions are made. Illustrative results are provided for corn production in east central Illinois. ...

Steven T. Sonka; James W. Mjelde; Peter J. Lamb; Steven E. Hollinger; Bruce L. Dixon

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

USDA Climate Hubs Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This webinar will explain the purpose, structure, and background of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Regional Climate Hubs, which were announced by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack on...

459

Climatic data, sample of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The representative sample data given below is derived from Climates of the World (Environmental Data Service, 1972). To facilitate conversion from degrees Fahrenheit, inches of precipitation, and elevation in fee...

John E. Oliver

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Refining climate models  

SciTech Connect

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Refining climate models  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

462

DOE Releases Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan Releases Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan DOE Releases Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan September 20, 2006 - 9:01am Addthis Plan Outlines Strategies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Development and Deployment of Advanced Technologies WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) Strategic Plan, which details measures to accelerate the development and reduce the cost of new and advanced technologies that avoid, reduce, or capture and store greenhouse gas emissions. CCTP is the technology component of a comprehensive U.S. strategy introduced by President Bush in 2002 to combat climate change that include measures to slow the growth of greenhouse gas emissions through

463

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research [EVS Program Area]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research Atmospheric Science and Climate Research EVS research, combined with portable, high-performance climate and weather applications, offers a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. In an ever-changing, dynamic climate, we measure, model, and analyze atmospheric processes that are vital to understanding our planet. Our measurement capabilities range from remote sensing and surface meteorology instruments to instrumentation designed to quantify the land-atmosphere exchange of energy, water, and greenhouse gases. Modeling capabilities begin with regional-scale climate, air quality, and aerosol modeling and extend to global chemical transport models, general circulation models of the atmosphere, models of the biosphere, and coupled Earth system models.

464

Climate Science and Drought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Climate Change and Drought Wendy Gordon, Ph.D. The University of Texas ? Austin Environmental Science Institute Texas Wildfires 2011 From the beginning of the fire season on November 15, 2010 to October 31, 2011 nearly 28,000 fires had... have been particularly severe due to the ongoing 2011 Southern US drought, and exacerbating the problem is land management practices, the unusual convergence of strong winds, unseasonably warm temperatures, and low humidity. Climate...

Gordon, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A Typology of Foredune Textures: Sand Patches and Climate Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foredunes are formed and developed in association with vegetation. A bare sand area has been viewed as a measure of dune mobility or activity and researched in association with climate controls: particularly wind power, annual mean precipitation...

Ryu, Wansang

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Sensitivity of climate change to diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diapycnal diffusivity of the ocean is one of the least known parameters in cur- rent climate models. Measurements of this diffusivity are sparse and insufficient for compiling a global map. Inferences from inverse ...

Dalan, Fabio, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections  

SciTech Connect

What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

McDowell, Nate

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

469

Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

McDowell, Nate

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

470

Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshop on Mainstreaming Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) Sector: Climate Topics: Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Training materials, Workshop Website: www.gcca.eu/pages/75_2-OCT-Workshop.html Cost: Free References: GCCA Countries Training Workshop[1] A GCCA workshop for OCT countries took place 27-28 January 2012 immediately following the OCT-EU Forum meeting in Brussels, Belgium. The workshop aimed at sharing views, knowledge, tools and experiences on climate change mitigation and adaptation and at raising awareness on the benefits and

471

Final report for the project "Improving the understanding of surface-atmosphere radiative interactions by mapping surface reflectance over the ARM CART site" (award DE-FG02-02ER63351)  

SciTech Connect

Surface spectral reflectance (albedo) is a fundamental variable affecting the transfer of solar radiation and the Earth’s climate. It determines the proportion of solar energy absorbed by the surface and reflected back to the atmosphere. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified surface albedo among key factors influencing climate radiative forcing. Accurate knowledge of surface reflective properties is important for advancing weather forecasting and climate change impact studies. It is also important for determining radiative impact and acceptable levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which makes this work strongly linked to major scientific objectives of the Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Most significant accomplishments of eth project are listed below. I) Surface albedo/BRDF datasets from 1995 to the end of 2004 have been produced. They were made available to the ARM community and other interested users through the CCRS public ftp site ftp://ftp.ccrs.nrcan.gc.ca/ad/CCRS_ARM/ and ARM IOP data archive under “PI data Trishchenko”. II) Surface albedo properties over the ARM SGP area have been described for 10-year period. Comparison with ECMWF data product showed some deficiencies in the ECMWF surface scheme, such as missing some seasonal variability and no dependence on sky-conditions which biases surface energy budget and has some influence of the diurnal cycle of upward radiation and atmospheric absorption. III) Four surface albedo Intensive Observation Period (IOP) Field Campaigns have been conducted for every season (August, 2002, May 2003, February 2004 and October 2004). Data have been prepared, documented and transferred to ARM IOP archive. Nine peer-reviewed journal papers and 26 conference papers have been published.

Alexander P. Trishchenko; Yi Luo; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov, William M. Park; Zhanqing Li; Maureen Cribb

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

472

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)  

SciTech Connect

Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and 'aged' urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial results from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of planned data analyses and focused modeling efforts that will facilitate the integration of new knowledge into improved representations of key aerosol processes in climate models.

Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shaw, William J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D.; Baidar, Sunil; Banta, Robert M.; Barnard, James C.; Beranek, Josef; Berg, Larry K.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, John F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, Christopher D.; Chand, Duli; China, Swarup; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Easter, Richard C.; Erickson, Matthew H.; Fast, Jerome D.; Floerchinger, Cody; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, Edward; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Gilles, Mary K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, William I.; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Hair, John; Hardesty, Michael; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, Scott C.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, Bertram T.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, Chongai; Kubatova, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Mei, F.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Nelson, Danny A.; Obland, Michael; Oetjen, Hilke; Onasch, Timothy B.; Ortega, Ivan; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, Ray; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, Art; Senff, Christoph; Senum, Gunar; Setyan, Ari; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Song, Chen; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Wallace, Hoyt A.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zhang, Qi

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Degradation of Solid Polymethylmethacrylate by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Polymethylmethacrylate by Ionizing Radiation P. Alexander A. Charlesby...inversely proportional to the radiation dose (plus a small quantity of...of measuring high-energy radiation doses in the range of about 1 million rontgens...

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Posters Climate Zones for Maritime Clouds A. B. White and D....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

marine climate regimes. We obtained most of the data used in this analysis from ship-based ceilometer measurements recorded during several different atmospheric and...

476

NICCR - National Institute for Climate Change Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shuur Abstract Shuur Abstract The Effect of Moisture and Temperature Manipulation on Plant Allocation and Soil Carbon Dynamics in Black Spruce Forests: Using Radiocarbon to Detect Multiple Climate Change Impacts on Boreal Ecosystem Carbon Cycling Principle Investigator: Dr. Edward A.G. Schuur, University of Florida Co-Investigators: Dr. Jason G. Vogel, University of Florida Dr. Stith T. Gower, University of Wisconsin Abstract: Our primary research objective is to understand how the carbon (C) cycle of black spruce (Picea mariana) forests, the largest boreal forest type in North America, will respond to climate change. A second objective is to provide an explicit link between the extensive research conducted on this forest type in Alaska to ongoing international research conducted in Canada where climate and substrates can differ. These objectives will be achieved by connecting observational and experimental field measurements to a common modeling framework.

477

Geoengineering the Earth's Climate  

SciTech Connect

Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

Google Tech Talks

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

478

ELPIS-JP: a dataset of local-scale daily climate change scenarios for Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis Canada A1B, B1, A2 Flato et al. [37] mean...minimum temperatures, precipitation, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind...temperatures, (f) maximum temperatures, (g) solar radiation, (h)-relative humidity and...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Zones to Climate Zones to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals