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1

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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4

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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5

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

11

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program North Slope, Alaska Bringing Climate Change Into The Classroom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to solar energy coming in as well as an insulator trapping heat below. An indication of climate change going out exceeds incoming solar energy; global warming occurs when the incoming solar energy is greater use to shield their plants fomr the outside weather. Greenhouses trap solar energy and keep the inside

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

13

A Year of Radiation Measurements at the North Slope of Alaska Second Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the second quarter metrics are reported in Evaluation of Simulated Precipitation in CCSM3: Annual Cycle Performance Metrics at Watershed Scales. For ARM, the metrics will produce and make available new continuous time series of radiative fluxes based on one year of observations from Barrow, Alaska, during the International Polar Year and report on comparisons of observations with baseline simulations of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM).

S.A. McFarlane, Y. Shi, C.N. Long

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Measuring Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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15

Generated using V3.2 of the official AMS LATEX templatejournal page layout FOR AUTHOR USE ONLY, NOT FOR SUBMISSION! Can Top Of Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on global-mean outgoing radiation is that an at- 1 #12;mosphere/ocean climate model with a poor simulation, NOT FOR SUBMISSION! Can Top Of Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part 1: Tuning. Simon. Rowlands Atmospheric, Oceanic & Planetary Physics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road

16

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incident radiation are distinguished, and albedos for oceanOceans using multiple satellite datasets in conjunction with MACR (Monte Carlo Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation)ocean temperature is coupled with the rest of the climate system, the dimming of surface radiation

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

2007 Radiation & Climate GRC ( July 29-August 3, 2007)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theme of the fifth Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate is 'Integrating multiscale measurements and models for key climate questions'. The meeting will feature lectures, posters, and discussion regarding these issues. The meeting will focus on insights from new types of satellite and in situ data and from new approaches to modeling processes in the climate system. The program on measurements will highlight syntheses of new satellite data on cloud, aerosols, and chemistry and syntheses of satellite and sub-orbital observations from field programs. The program on modeling will address both the evaluation of cloud-resolving and regional aerosol models using new types of measurements and the evidence for processes and physics missing from global models. The Conference will focus on two key climate questions. First, what factors govern the radiative interactions of clouds and aerosols with regional and global climate? Second, how well do we understand the interaction of radiation with land surfaces and with the cryosphere?

William Collins

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The solar radiation climate of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE SOLAR RADIATION CLIMATE OF TEXAS A Thesis By VAUGHAN W. HALL Major& USAF Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967 Major Subject...: METEOROLOGY THE SOLAR RADIATION CLIMATE OF TEXAS A Thesis By VAUGHAN W. HALL Major, USAF Approved as to style and content by: Ch irman o ommittee Head of epa ent Member / ' 6p trCc-aCZm ~ Me er May 1967 The Solar Radiation Climate of Texas. (May...

Hall, Vaughan Walter

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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20

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeV. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeapproximation for solar radiation in the NCAR Community

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Constructive Contrasts Between Modeled and Measured Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constructive Contrasts Between Modeled and Measured Climate Responses Over a Regional Scale of simulated net primary production (NPP) to climate variables and the response observed in field measurements of NPP. Residual contrasts com- pared deviations of NPP from the empirical surface to identify groupings

Hargrove, William W.

22

Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

Ackerman, T

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Climatic features of the Mediterranean Sea detected by the analysis of the longwave radiative bulk formulae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an open ocean with the same amount of net longwave radiation. Furthermore, the twofold climatic regime's climate system is the net radiation budget at the ocean surface. Due to the scarcity of direct radiationClimatic features of the Mediterranean Sea detected by the analysis of the longwave radiative bulk

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and less surface solar radiation in China from 1955 to 2000,2001 in China, and meanwhile, both surface solar radiationsolar heating greatly decreases RH in the lower troposphere for both China and

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

27

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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28

Growing More Effective Ways to Measure Climate Change  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Growing More Effective Ways to Measure Climate Change For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research Highlight...

29

''Measuring the Costs of Climate Change Policies''  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of the costs of climate change policies have utilized a variety of measures or metrics for summarizing costs. The leading economic models have utilized GNP, GDP, the ''area under a marginal cost curve,'' the discounted present value of consumption, and a welfare measure taken directly from the utility function of the model's representative agent (the ''Equivalent Variation''). Even when calculated using a single model, these metrics do not necessarily give similar magnitudes of costs or even rank policies consistently. This paper discusses in non-technical terms the economic concepts lying behind each concept, the theoretical basis for expecting each measure to provide a consistent ranking of policies, and the reasons why different measures provide different rankings. It identifies a method of calculating the ''Equivalent Variation'' as theoretically superior to the other cost metrics in ranking policies. When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes empirically these two properties of different costs measures as they pertain to assessing the costs of the carbon abatement policies, especially the Kyoto Protocol, under alternative assumptions about implementation.

Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P.M.

2003-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

30

Journal of Climate How ocean circulation can decouple sea surface temperature from global radiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Climate How ocean circulation can decouple sea surface temperature from global radiative net radiation. The positively- correlated regime is associated with increased Southern Ocean balance and sea surface height --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: Full Title: How ocean circulation

Gnanadesikan, Anand

31

Evaluation of Arctic Broadband Surface Radiation Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure the total, direct and diffuse components of incoming and outgoing broadband shortwave (SW) and broadband thermal infrared, or longwave (LW) radiation. Enhancements can include various sensors for measuring irradiance in various narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that rotate sensors and shading devices that track the sun. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating sensors in a pristine undisturbed location free of artificial blockage (such as buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the instruments and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, a comparison is made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) shortwave measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both shortwave and longwave measurements. Solutions to these operational problems are proposed that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols.

Matsui, N.; Long, Charles N.; Augustine, J. A.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, Taneil; Longenecker, D.; Niebergale, J.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, January 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject of this newsletter is the ARM unmanned aerospace vehicle program. The ARM Program's focus is on climate research, specifically research related to solar radiation and its interaction with clouds. The SGP CART site contains highly sophisticated surface instrumentation, but even these instruments cannot gather some crucial climate data from high in the atmosphere. The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense joined together to use a high-tech, high-altitude, long-endurance class of unmanned aircraft known as the unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV). A UAV is a small, lightweight airplane that is controlled remotely from the ground. A pilot sits in a ground-based cockpit and flies the aircraft as if he were actually on board. The UAV can also fly completely on its own through the use of preprogrammed computer flight routines. The ARM UAV is fitted with payload instruments developed to make highly accurate measurements of atmospheric flux, radiance, and clouds. Using a UAV is beneficial to climate research in many ways. The UAV puts the instrumentation within the environment being studied and gives scientists direct measurements, in contrast to indirect measurements from satellites orbiting high above Earth. The data collected by UAVs can be used to verify and calibrate measurements and calculated values from satellites, therefore making satellite data more useful and valuable to researchers.

Sisterson, D.L.

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

PCB Radiation Mechanisms: Using Component-Level Measurements to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PCB Radiation Mechanisms: Using Component-Level Measurements to PCB Radiation Mechanisms: Using Component-Level Measurements to Determine System-Level Radiated EmissionsDetermine System-Level Radiated Radiation Directly from PCB StructuresRadiation Directly from PCB Structures Signal or component voltage

Stuart, Steven J.

34

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, December 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiometer Characterization System--The new Radiometer Characterization System (RCS) installed on the Guest Instrument Facility mezzanine at the SGP central facility will permit side-by-side evaluations of several new and modified broadband radiometers and comparisons with radiometers currently in use. If the new designs or modifications give substantially more accurate measurements, ARM scientists might elect to replace or modify the existing broadband radiometers. The RCS will also permit ARM scientists to determine whether the radiometers need cleaning more frequently than the current biweekly schedule, and an automatic radiometer washer will be evaluated for reliability and effectiveness in daily cleaning. A radiometer is an instrument used to measure radiant energy. ARM uses a pyranometer to measure the solar radiation reaching Earth's surface. Clouds, water vapor, dust, and other aerosol particles can interfere with the transmission of solar radiation. The amount of radiant energy reaching the ground depends on the type and quantity of absorbers and reflectors between the sun and Earth's surface. A pyranometer can also measure solar radiation reflected from the surface. A pyranometer has a thermoelectric device (a wire-wound, plated thermopile) that produces an electric current proportional to the broadband shortwave solar radiation reaching a detector. The detector, which is painted black, is mounted in a precision-ground glass sphere for protection from the elements. The glass must be kept very clean, because dirt and dust scatter and absorb solar radiation and make the measurement incorrect. Accurate measurements of solar radiation are needed so that scientists can accurately replicate the interactions of solar radiation and clouds in global climate models--a major goal of the ARM program. TX-2002 AIRS Validation Campaign Winding Down--The TX-2002 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Validation Campaign ended on December 13, 2002. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted this intensive operations period, in which a high-altitude ER-2 aircraft made measurements over the CART site. These measurements are being compared to data from ground-based ARM instruments to validate measurements by the AIRS instrument aboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite. (See June 2002 ARM Facility Newsletter for details on Aqua.)

Holdridge, D. J.

2003-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

35

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the B-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8 MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3% and 0.001 at 90% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed. 1 Introduction Silica aerogels(aerogels) are a colloidal form of glass, in which globules of silica are connected in three dimensional networks with siloxan bonds. They are solid, very light, transparent and their refractive index can be controlled in the production process. Many high energy and nuclear physics experiments have used aerogels instead of pressurized gas for their Cerenkov coun...

Belle Preprint; Sahu Wang; M. Z. Wang; R. Suda; R. Enomoto; K. C. Peng; C. H. Wang; I. Adachi; M. Amami

36

Radiative forcing in the ACCMIP historical and future climate simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) examined the short-lived drivers of climate change in current climate models. Here we evaluate the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of which also participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The models reproduce present-day total aerosol optical depth (AOD) relatively well, though many are biased low. Contributions from individual aerosol components are quite different, however, and most models underestimate east Asian AOD. The models capture most 1980-2000 AOD trends well, but underpredict increases over the Yellow/Eastern Sea. They strongly underestimate absorbing AOD in many regions. We examine both the direct radiative forcing (RF) and the forcing including rapid adjustments (effective radiative forcing; ERF, including direct and indirect effects). The models’ all-sky 1850 to 2000 global mean annual average total aerosol RF is (mean; range) ?0.26Wm?2; ?0.06 to ?0.49Wm?2. Screening based on model skill in capturing observed AOD yields a best estimate of ?0.42Wm?2; ?0.33 to ?0.50Wm?2, including adjustment for missing aerosol components in some models. Many ACCMIP and CMIP5 models appear to produce substantially smaller aerosol RF than this best estimate. Climate feedbacks contribute substantially (35 to ?58 %) to modeled historical aerosol RF. The 1850 to 2000 aerosol ERF is ?1.17Wm?2; ?0.71 to ?1.44Wm?2. Thus adjustments, including clouds, typically cause greater forcing than direct RF. Despite this, the multi-model spread relative to the mean is typically the same for ERF as it is for RF, or even smaller, over areas with substantial forcing. The largest 1850 to 2000 negative aerosol RF and ERF values are over and near Europe, south and east Asia and North America. ERF, however, is positive over the Sahara, the Karakoram, high Southern latitudes and especially the Arctic. Global aerosol RF peaks in most models around 1980, declining thereafter with only weak sensitivity to the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP). One model, however, projects approximately stable RF levels, while two show increasingly negative RF due to nitrate (not included in most models). Aerosol ERF, in contrast, becomes more negative during 1980 to 2000. During this period, increased Asian emissions appear to have a larger impact on aerosol ERF than European and North American decreases due to their being upwind of the large, relatively pristine Pacific Ocean. There is no clear relationship between historical aerosol ERF and climate sensitivity in the CMIP5 subset of ACCMIP models. In the ACCMIP/CMIP5 models, historical aerosol ERF of about ?0.8 to ?1.5Wm?2 is most consistent with observed historical warming. Aerosol ERF masks a large portion of greenhouse forcing during the late 20th and early 21st century at the global scale. Regionally, aerosol ERF is so large that net forcing is negative over most industrialized and biomass burning regions through 1980, but remains strongly negative only over east and southeast Asia by 2000. Net forcing is strongly positive by 1980 over most deserts, the Arctic, Australia, and most tropical oceans. Both the magnitude of and area covered by positive forcing expand steadily thereafter.

Shindell, Drew; Lamarque, J.-F.; Schulz, M.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Chin, Mian; Young, P. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Rotstayn, Leon; Mahowald, N. M.; Milly, G.; Faluvegi, G.; Balkanski, Y.; Collins, W. J.; Conley, Andrew; Dalsoren, S.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Liu, Xiaohong; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Takemura, T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Lo, Fiona

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial Facility  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM data is collected both through permanent monitoring stations and field campaigns around the world. Airborne measurements required to answer science questions from researchers or to validate ground data are also collected. To find data from all categories of aerial operations, follow the links from the AAF information page at http://www.arm.gov/sites/aaf. Tables of information will provide start dates, duration, lead scientist, and the research site for each of the named campaigns. The title of a campaign leads, in turn, to a project description, contact information, and links to the data. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol radiative forcing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

No. DE- Summary: : WHY MEASUREMENTS ALONE CANNOT QUANTIFY AEROSOL RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE Stephen E. Schwartz... of radiative forcing of climate change by aerosols,...

39

A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.

Robert G. Ellingson

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

40

Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gordon Research Conference on Radiation & Climate in 2009, July 5 -10  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2009 Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate will present cutting-edge research on the outstanding issues in global climate change with focus on the radiative forcing and sensitivity of the climate system and associated physical processes. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, including grand challenges in radiation and climate, radiative forcing, climate feedbacks, cloud processes in climate system, hydrological cycle in changing climate, absorbing aerosols and Asian monsoon, recent climate changes, and geo-engineering. The invited speakers will present the recent most important advances and future challenges in these areas. The Conference will bring together a collection of leading investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for scientists especially junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented.

Quiang Fu

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

Climatic Impact of Global-Scale Deforestation: Radiative versus Nonradiative Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climatic Impact of Global-Scale Deforestation: Radiative versus Nonradiative Processes EDOUARD L­ocean­atmosphere GCM is used to explore the biogeophysical impact of large-scale deforestation on surface climate that the surface albedo increase owing to deforestation has a cooling effect of 21.36 K globally. On the other hand

Haak, Hein

43

THE EFFECT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION ON THE ACCURACY OF PYRHELIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

r Presented at the Solar Radiation workshop of Solar Rising,MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION D. Grether, D.Diffuse, and Total Solar Radiation," Solar Energy, vol. 4,

Grether, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Diabat L., Blanc Ph., Wald L., Solar radiation climate in Africa. Solar Energy, 76, 733-744, 2004. SOLAR RADIATION CLIMATE IN AFRICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diabaté L., Blanc Ph., Wald L., Solar radiation climate in Africa. Solar Energy, 76, 733-744, 2004 is very useful for preliminary assessment and modeling of solar energy systems. Following the approach: clearness index, atmosphere optics, clustering, interpolation, map, solar energy systems Nomenclature: (KTd

Boyer, Edmond

45

The relative contributions of radiative forcing and internal climate variability to the late 20th Century winter drying  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of anthropogenic climate change and internal climate variability in causing the Mediterranean region's late 20th Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report. The observed drying was influenced by the robustThe relative contributions of radiative forcing and internal climate variability to the late 20th

46

Methods of and apparatus for radiation measurement, and specifically for in vivo radiation measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of and apparatus for in vivo radiation measurements rely on a MOSFET dosimeter of high radiation sensitivity which operates in both the passive mode to provide an integrated dose detector and active mode to provide an irradiation rate detector. A compensating circuit with a matched unirradiated MOSFET is provided to operate at a current designed to eliminate temperature dependence of the device. Preferably, the MOSFET is rigidly mounted in the end of a miniature catheter and the catheter is implanted in the patient proximate the radiation source.

Huffman, D.D.; Hughes, R.C.; Kelsey, C.A.; Lane, R.; Ricco, A.J.; Snelling, J.B.; Zipperian, T.E.

1986-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

47

Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: Interactions and feedbacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects, they could accelerate the rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase and subsequent climate change beyond current predictions. The effects of predicted changes in climate and solar UV radiation on carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are expected to vary significantly between regions. The balance of positive and negative effects on terrestrial carbon cycling remains uncertain, but the interactions between UV radiation and climate change are likely to contribute to decreasing sink strength in many oceanic regions. Interactions between climate and solar UV radiation will affect cycling of elements other than carbon, and so will influence the concentration of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. For example, increases in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean caused by climate change are projected to enhance the emissions of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gas. Future changes in UV-induced transformations of aquatic and terrestrial contaminants could have both beneficial and adverse effects. Taken in total, it is clear that the future changes in UV radiation coupled with human-caused global change will have large impacts on biogeochemical cycles at local, regional and global scales.

Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Video  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 .2004The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement

49

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Niamey, Niger for the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) operates at non-permanent sites selected by the ARM Program. Sometimes these sites can become permanent ARM sites, as was the case with Graciosa Island in the Azores. It is now known as the Eastern North Atlantic permanent site. In January 2006 the AMF deployed to Niamey, Niger, West Africa, at the Niger Meteorological Office at Niamey International Airport. This deployment was timed to coincide with the field phases and Special Observing Periods of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). The ARM Program participated in this international effort as a field campaign called "Radiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST).The primary purpose of the Niger deployment was to combine an extended series of measurements from the AMF with those from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) Instrument on the Meteosat operational geostationary satellite in order to provide the first well-sampled, direct estimates of the divergence of solar and thermal radiation across the atmosphere. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Niamey are available via a link from ARM's Niamey, Niger site information page. Other data can be found at the related websites mentioned above and in the ARM Archive. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

50

Collaborative Research: The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to an accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR climate model. To better understand and eventually better represent these processes, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, intra-seasonal oscillations and the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. The effect of the MIT and AER physics also has been tested in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 (hereinafter STD) and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics (hereinafter MOD) are still unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of the intra-seasonal oscillations (ISOs). The new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor relative to satellite measurements.

Dr. Kerry Emanuel; Michael J. Iacono

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

51

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

52

MEASUREMENT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION - STATUS REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15, 1976. "Circumsolar Radiation Data for Central Receiverdata on the instantaneous values of circum- solar radiation andradiation over the course of a day, month or year; and 3) detailed data

Grether, D.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

54

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Specific Measurement Categories  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM Program gathers a wide variety of measurements from many different sources. Each day, the Data Archive stores and distributes large quantities of data collected from these sources. Scientists then use these data to research atmospheric radiation balance and cloud feedback processes, which are critical elements of global climate change. The huge archive of ARM data can be organized by measurement categories into six "collections:" Aerosols, Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties, Radiometric, and Surface Properties. Clicking on one of the measurement categories leads to a page that breaks that category down into sub-categories. For example, "Aerosols" is broken down into Microphysical and Chemical Properties (with 9 subsets) and Optical and Radiative Properties (with 7 subsets). Each of the subset links, in turn, leads to detailed information pages and links to specific data streams. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

55

Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component automotiveWe need to characterize automotive components the way we characterize circuitcomponents the way we

Stuart, Steven J.

56

Roshna Maharjan Climate Change and its Impacts on Agriculture: Farmers' Perception and Adaptation Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roshna Maharjan Climate Change and its Impacts on Agriculture: Farmers' Perception and Adaptation Measures Climate Change and its Impacts on Agriculture: Farmers' Perception and Adaptation Measures A Case in agricultural production. 4. Respondents are aware about the change in climate and they have been adopting

Richner, Heinz

57

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. Scientists are using the information obtained from the permanent SGP site to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the SGP site. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions over the typical distribution of land uses within the site. The continuous observations at the SGP site are supplemented by intensive observation periods, when the frequency of measurements is increased and special measurements are added to address specific research questions. During such periods, 2 gigabytes or more of data (two billion bytes) are generated daily. SGP data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/ http. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

58

Non-Kyoto Radiative Forcing in Long-Run Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate policies designed to achieve climate change objectives must consider radiative forcing from the Kyoto greenhouse gas, as well as other forcing constituents, such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone. Net positive forcing leads to global average temperature increases. Modeling of non-Kyoto forcing is a relatively new component of climate management scenarios. Five of the nineteen models in the EMF-27 Study model both Kyoto and non-Kyoto forcing. This paper describes and assesses current non-Kyoto radiative forcing modeling within these integrated assessment models. The study finds negative forcing from aerosols masking significant positive forcing in reference non-climate policy projections. There are however large differences across models in projected non-Kyoto emissions and forcing, with differences stemming from differences in relationships between Kyoto and non-Kyoto emissions and fundamental differences in modeling structure and assumptions. Air pollution and non-Kyoto forcing decline in the climate policy scenarios. However, non-Kyoto forcing appears to be influencing mitigation results, including allowable carbon dioxide emissions, and further evaluation is merited. Overall, there is substantial uncertainty related to non-Kyoto forcing that must be considered.

Rose, Steven K.; Richels, Richard G.; Smith, Steven J.; Riahi, Keywan; Stefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

59

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3Radiative

60

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Motivation Measurements EVA Results Issues/Future Work Weather and Climate Extremes: cape times shear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivation Measurements EVA Results Issues/Future Work Weather and Climate Extremes: cape times Weather/Climate Extremes 1 / 19 c University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. All rights reserved scales. E Gilleland Weather/Climate Extremes 2 / 19 c University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Gilleland, Eric

63

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry...

64

Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

65

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticlesHumanJune 2008 Basic Energy Sciences

66

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3 ARM

67

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3 ARM7

68

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3 ARM79

69

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3 ARM792

70

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3 ARM7928

71

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3 ARM79289

72

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3

73

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility - annual report 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik -GrownAnAtmospheric

74

Extreme measures : mechanisms driving changes in climate extremes in Australia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Changes in the frequency and/or severity of extreme climate events have the potential to have profound societal and ecological impacts and observations suggest that in… (more)

Alexander, Lisa Victoria

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our overall goal is identical to that of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: the development of new and improved parameterizations of cloud-radiation effects and related processes, using ARM data at all three ARM sites, and the implementation and testing of these parameterizations in global and regional models. To test recently developed prognostic parameterizations based on detailed cloud microphysics, we have first compared single-column model (SCM) output with ARM observations at the Southern Great Plains (SGP), North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Topical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. We focus on the predicted cloud amounts and on a suite of radiative quantities strongly dependent on clouds, such as downwelling surface shortwave radiation. Our results demonstrate the superiority of parameterizations based on comprehensive treatments of cloud microphysics and cloud-radiative interactions. At the SGP and NSA sites, the SCM results simulate the ARM measurements well and are demonstrably more realistic than typical parameterizations found in conventional operational forecasting models. At the TWP site, the model performance depends strongly on details of the scheme, and the results of our diagnostic tests suggest ways to develop improved parameterizations better suited to simulating cloud-radiation interactions in the tropics generally. These advances have made it possible to take the next step and build on this progress, by incorporating our parameterization schemes in state-of-the-art 3D atmospheric models, and diagnosing and evaluating the results using independent data. Because the improved cloud-radiation results have been obtained largely via implementing detailed and physically comprehensive cloud microphysics, we anticipate that improved predictions of hydrologic cycle components, and hence of precipitation, may also be achievable. We are currently testing the performance of our ARM-based parameterizations in state-of-the--art global and regional models. One fruitful strategy for evaluating advances in parameterizations has turned out to be using short-range numerical weather prediction as a test-bed within which to implement and improve parameterizations for modeling and predicting climate variability. The global models we have used to date are the CAM atmospheric component of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) CCSM climate model as well as the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) numerical weather prediction model, thus allowing testing in both climate simulation and numerical weather prediction modes. We present detailed results of these tests, demonstrating the sensitivity of model performance to changes in parameterizations.

Somerville, R.C.J.; Iacobellis, S.F.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

Method and apparatus for measuring spatial uniformity of radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for measuring the spatial uniformity of the intensity of a radiation beam from a radiation source based on a single sampling time and/or a single pulse of radiation. The measuring apparatus includes a plurality of radiation detectors positioned on planar mounting plate to form a radiation receiving area that has a shape and size approximating the size and shape of the cross section of the radiation beam. The detectors concurrently receive portions of the radiation beam and transmit electrical signals representative of the intensity of impinging radiation to a signal processor circuit connected to each of the detectors and adapted to concurrently receive the electrical signals from the detectors and process with a central processing unit (CPU) the signals to determine intensities of the radiation impinging at each detector location. The CPU displays the determined intensities and relative intensity values corresponding to each detector location to an operator of the measuring apparatus on an included data display device. Concurrent sampling of each detector is achieved by connecting to each detector a sample and hold circuit that is configured to track the signal and store it upon receipt of a "capture" signal. A switching device then selectively retrieves the signals and transmits the signals to the CPU through a single analog to digital (A/D) converter. The "capture" signal. is then removed from the sample-and-hold circuits. Alternatively, concurrent sampling is achieved by providing an A/D converter for each detector, each of which transmits a corresponding digital signal to the CPU. The sampling or reading of the detector signals can be controlled by the CPU or level-detection and timing circuit.

Field, Halden (Boulder, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and extreme values determine climate for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate zones? The sun is the ultimate power source for the climate "machine". The uneven distribution conditions. Typical variables to consider are temperature (maximum, miniumum), precipitation (includes rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc), sunlight/cloudiness, wind, humidity, ice cover, sea temperature, etc... Many

Allan, Richard P.

78

Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

Fu, Tairan, E-mail: trfu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Measurement and analysis of near ultraviolet solar radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photocatalytic detoxification of organic contaminants is currently being investigated by a number of laboratories, universities, and institutions throughout the world. The photocatalytic oxidation process requires that contaminants come in contact with a photocatalyst such as titanium dioxide, under illumination of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in order for the decomposition reaction to take place. Researches from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories are currently investigating the use of solar energy as a means of driving this photocatalytic process. Measurements of direct-normal and global-horizontal ultraviolet (280--385 nm) and full-spectrum (280--4000 nm) solar radiation taken in Golden, Colorado over a one-year period are analyzed, and comparisons are made with data generated from a clear-sky solar radiation model (BRITE) currently in use for predicting the performance of solar detoxification processes. Analysis of the data indicates a ratio of global-horizontal ultraviolet to full-spectrum radiation of 4%--6% that is weakly dependent on air mass. Conversely, data for direct-normal ultraviolet radiation indicate a much large dependence on air mass, with a ratio of approximately 5% at low air mass to 1% at higher at masses. Results show excellent agreement between the measured data and clear-sky predictions for both the ultraviolet and the full-spectrum global-horizontal radiation. For the direct-normal components, however, the tendency is for the clear-sky model to underpredict the measured that. Averaged monthly ultraviolet radiation available for the detoxification process indicates that the global-horizontal component of the radiation exceeds the direct-normal component throughout the year. 9 refs., 7 figs.

Mehos, M.S.; Pacheco, K.A.; Link, H.F.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Evaluation of the Multi-scale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is to provide long-term observations for evaluating and improving cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, the traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties for gridcells that are tens to hundreds kilometers across from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with time series of ground based observations at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the scale gap. The MMF consists of a two-dimensional or small three-dimensional cloud resolving model (CRM) embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. We present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru Island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both the CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with the MMF as well as the CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from the MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from the CAM run. This change is attributed to the improved representation of convective clouds in the MMF compared to the conventional climate model. For the SGP, the MMF shows little to no improvement in predicting the same quantities. Possible causes of this lack of improvement are discussed.

Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluation of Energy Efficiency Measures in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hot and humid climates present some of the most complex challenges for sustainable building designs. High temperatures coupled with high humidity create extreme comfort problems and exacerbate the potential for condensation, mold and mildew...

Zhao, Y.; Erwine, B.; Leonard, P.; Pease, B.; Dole, A.; Lee, A.

82

High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

DeCampo, J A; Raft, P D

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Measurement of parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the measurement of optics parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source, which include betatron tune, beta function, dispersion function, natural chromaticity, corrected chromaticity, central RF frequency, momentum compaction factor, and linear betatron coupling. Two methods were used for beta function measurement; a conventional quadrupole scan method and a method using the fitting of the orbit response matrix. A robust Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used for nonlinear least square fitting of the orbit response matrix. In this paper, detailed methods for the parameter measurements are described. The measured results are discussed and compared with the theoretical values obtained using accelerator simulation code Accelerator Toolbox in MATLAB.

Ghodke, A. D.; Husain, Riyasat; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Surendra; Puntambekar, T. A. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, 452013, Indore (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Lens transmission measurement for an absolute radiation thermometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lens transmission for the National Institute of Metrology of China absolute radiation thermometer is measured by a hybrid method. The results of the lens transmission measurements are 99.002% and 86.792% for filter radiometers with center wavelengths 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively. These results, after correcting for diffraction factors and the size-of-source effect when the lens is incorporated within the radiometer, can be used for measurement of thermodynamic temperature. The expanded uncertainty of the lens transmission measurement system has been evaluated. It is 1.3×10{sup ?3} at 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively.

Hao, X.; Yuan, Z.; Lu, X. [Division of Thermometry and Materials Evaluation, National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)] [Division of Thermometry and Materials Evaluation, National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: • Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. • Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. • Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. • Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. • Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. • Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. • Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM’s Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

TP Ackerman; AD Del Genio; RG Ellingson; RA Ferrare; SA Klein; GM McFarquhar; PJ Lamb; CN Long; J Verlinde

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Measurement and modeling of the Saharan dust radiative impact: Overview of the Saharan Dust Experiment (SHADE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Climate Change (IPCC), 2001]. Among the different aerosol types, mineral dust is one of the major to their scattering and absorbing properties that affect the solar radiation, they also perturb the terrestrial but they still represent one of the largest uncer- tainties in climate change studies [Intergovernmental Panel

Highwood, Ellie

87

Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

2009-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Climate response and radiative forcing from mineral aerosols during the last glacial maximum, pre-industrial, current and doubled-carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate response and radiative forcing from mineral aerosols during the last glacial maximum, pre-industrial, current and doubled-carbon dioxide climates Natalie M. Mahowald,1,2 Masaru Yoshioka,1,2 William D. Collins July 2006; accepted 9 August 2006; published 27 October 2006. [1] Mineral aerosol impacts on climate

Mahowald, Natalie

90

Atmospheric radiation measurement unmanned aerospace vehicle (ARM-UAV) program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARM-UAV is part of the multi-agency U.S. Global Change Research Program and is addressing the largest source of uncertainty in predicting climatic response: the interaction of clouds and the sun`s energy in the Earth`s atmosphere. An important aspect of the program is the use of unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) as the primary airborne platform. The ARM-UAV Program has completed two major flight series: The first series conducted in April, 1994, using an existing UAV (the General Atomics Gnat 750) consisted of eight highly successful flights at the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. The second series conducted in September/October, 1995, using two piloted aircraft (Egrett and Twin Otter), featured simultaneous measurements above and below clouds and in clear sky. Additional flight series are planned to continue study of the cloudy and clear sky energy budget in the Spring and Fall of 1996 over the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Bolton, W.R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Implementation of a Cloud Radiative Adjustment Method to Change the Climate Sensitivity of CAM3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting probabilistic climate projections with a particular climate model requires the ability to vary the model’s characteristics, such as its climate sensitivity. In this study, we implement and validate a method to ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

93

Deriving cloud velocity from an array of solar radiation measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

medium term operational solar radiation forecasts in the US.term forecasting of solar radiation: a statistical approachterm forecasting of solar radiation based on satellite data.

Bosch, J.L.; Zheng, Y.; Kleissl, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Measure Guideline: Supplemental Dehumidification in Warm-Humid Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document covers a description of the need and applied solutions for supplemental dehumidification in warm-humid climates, especially for energy efficient homes where the sensible cooling load has been dramatically reduced. In older homes in warm-humid climates, cooling loads are typically high and cooling equipment runs a lot to cool the air. The cooling process also removes indoor moisture, reducing indoor relative humidity. However, at current residential code levels, and especially for above-code programs, sensible cooling loads have been so dramatically reduced that the cooling system does not run a lot to cool the air, resulting in much less moisture being removed. In these new homes, cooling equipment is off for much longer periods of time especially during spring/fall seasons, summer shoulder months, rainy periods, some summer nights, and some winter days. In warm-humid climates, those long off periods allow indoor humidity to become elevated due to internally generated moisture and ventilation air change. Elevated indoor relative humidity impacts comfort, indoor air quality, and building material durability. Industry is responding with supplemental dehumidification options, but that effort is really in its infancy regarding year-round humidity control in low-energy homes. Available supplemental humidity control options are discussed. Some options are less expensive but may not control indoor humidity as well as more expensive and comprehensive options. The best performing option is one that avoids overcooling and avoids adding unnecessary heat to the space by using waste heat from the cooling system to reheat the cooled and dehumidified air to room-neutral temperature.

Rudd, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Impact of subgrid-scale radiative heating variability on the stratocumulus-to-trade cumulus transition in climate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subgrid-scale interactions between turbulence and radiation are potentially important for accurately reproducing marine low clouds in climate models. To better understand the impact of these interactions, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is configured for large eddy simulation (LES) to study the stratocumulus-to-trade cumulus (Sc-to-Cu) transition. Using the GEWEX Atmospheric System Studies (GASS) composite Lagrangian transition case and the Atlantic Trade Wind Experiment (ATEX) case, it is shown that the lack of subgrid-scale turbulence-radiation interaction, as is the case in current generation climate models, accelerates the Sc-to-Cu transition. Our analysis suggests that in cloud-topped boundary layers subgrid-scale turbulence-radiation interactions contribute to stronger production of temperature variance, which in turn leads to stronger buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy and helps to maintain the Sc cover.

Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Wang, Hailong

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

97

Statistical correlation between hourly and daily values of solar radiation on horizontal surface at sea level in the Italian climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

219- Statistical correlation between hourly and daily values of solar radiation on horizontal- nalières du rayonnement solaire. Abstract. 2014 The knowledge of hourly data of solar radiation is required data measured in Italian stations and propose a method to estimate hourly solar radiation

Boyer, Edmond

98

Evaluation of the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was to provide long-term observations for evaluation of cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with observed time series at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called the multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the gap. MMF consists of a two-dimensional cloud system resolving model (CSRM) embedded into each CAM grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. Because the approach is computationally expensive only limited simulations have been carried out. In this presentation, we will present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with MMF as well as CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from CAM run. For the SGP, the improvements are marginal.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

20 Years of Solar Measurements: The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at NREL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 Years of Solar Measurements: The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at NREL Tom to provide for: · Maximum annual solar access · Continuous measurements of key solar radiation resources · Calibrations of instruments used to measure solar radiation · Training of meteorological station operators

100

ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

Kurzeja, R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Radiation Pattern Reconstruction Techniques for Antenna Measurement using Chebyshev Polynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method of antenna radiation pattern reconstruction using Chebyshev polynomials was presented in this paper. The analysis starts from the data measured in the frequency domain, and it corresponds to a direct propagating between two antennas and reflected propagating waves from the copper plate. The accuracy of this technique is evaluated at the frequency of 3.35GHz by the anechoic conditions. As a result, the Chebyshev method shows us a good performance in the E-plane in the range of -70{\\deg} ~0{\\deg}.

Zhou Du; Minwook Kwon; Dongsun Choi; Jinhwan Koh

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to the accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). To better understand and eventually better represent these processes in this major national climate model, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global climate models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, on intra-seasonal oscillations and on the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. In addition, the MIT and AER physics packages have been incorporated and tested in combination within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model for the purpose of evaluating and improving convective and radiative processes on time scales appropriate to weather simulations. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics are unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of dynamical intra-seasonal oscillations such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation. In addition, it has been shown that the new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor in CAM as established through the comparison of modeled and observed satellite radiances. This suggests that continuing regional discrepancies in water vapor amounts in the climate model may not be solely related to convective or radiative processes. The major results of this project have been described in more detail in a journal article titled â??The Impacts of AER Radiation and MIT Convection on the Water Cycle Simulated by CAM3.5â? that will be submitted for publication during Fall 2010.

Emanuel, Kerry; Iacono, Michael J.

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

Solar Radiation Modeling and Measurements for Renewable Energy Applications: Data and Model Quality; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurement and modeling of broadband and spectral terrestrial solar radiation is important for the evaluation and deployment of solar renewable energy systems. We discuss recent developments in the calibration of broadband solar radiometric instrumentation and improving broadband solar radiation measurement accuracy. An improved diffuse sky reference and radiometer calibration and characterization software and for outdoor pyranometer calibrations is outlined. Several broadband solar radiation model approaches, including some developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, for estimating direct beam, total hemispherical and diffuse sky radiation are briefly reviewed. The latter include the Bird clear sky model for global, direct beam, and diffuse terrestrial solar radiation; the Direct Insolation Simulation Code (DISC) for estimating direct beam radiation from global measurements; and the METSTAT (Meteorological and Statistical) and Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) models that estimate solar radiation from meteorological data. We conclude that currently the best model uncertainties are representative of the uncertainty in measured data.

Myers, D. R.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Radiation Hard Hybrid Pixel Detectors, and a bbbar Cross Section Measurement at the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is placed on the effects of the high radiation environment on the detector operation. Measurements of the charge collection efficiency, interpixel capacitance, and other properties of the pixel sensors as a function of the radiation damage are presented...

Sibille, Jennifer Ann

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes insitu polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

106

Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

Britton, Jr.; Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

Radiation Parameterization for Three-Dimensional Inhomogeneous Cirrus Clouds Applied to ARM Data and Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 (a) We developed a 3D radiative transfer model to simulate the transfer of solar and thermal infrared radiation in inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The model utilized a diffusion approximation approach (four-term expansion in the intensity) employing Cartesian coordinates. The required single-scattering parameters, including the extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor, for input to the model, were parameterized in terms of the ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size. The incorporation of gaseous absorption in multiple scattering atmospheres was accomplished by means of the correlated k-distribution approach. In addition, the strong forward diffraction nature in the phase function was accounted for in each predivided spatial grid based on a delta-function adjustment. The radiation parameterization developed herein is applied to potential cloud configurations generated from GCMs to investigate broken clouds and cloud-overlapping effects on the domain-averaged heating rate. Cloud inhomogeneity plays an important role in the determination of flux and heating rate distributions. Clouds with maximum overlap tend to produce less heating than those with random overlap. Broken clouds show more solar heating as well as more IR cooling as compared to a continuous cloud field (Gu and Liou, 2001). (b) We incorporated a contemporary radiation parameterization scheme in the UCLA atmospheric GCM in collaboration with the UCLA GCM group. In conjunction with the cloud/radiation process studies, we developed a physically-based cloud cover formation scheme in association with radiation calculations. The model clouds were first vertically grouped in terms of low, middle, and high types. Maximum overlap was then used for each cloud type, followed by random overlap among the three cloud types. Fu and Liou's 1D radiation code with modification was subsequently employed for pixel-by-pixel radiation calculations in the UCLA GCM. We showed that the simulated cloud cover and OLR fields without special tuning are comparable to those of ISCCP dataset and the results derived from radiation budget experiments. Use of the new radiation and cloud schemes enhances the radiative warming in the middle to upper tropical troposphere and alleviates the cold bias in the UCLA atmospheric GCM. We also illustrated that ice crystal size and cloud inhomogeneous are significant factors affecting the radiation budgets at the top of the atmosphere and the surface (Gu et al. 2003). (c) An innovative approach has been developed to construct a 3D field of inhomogeneous clouds in general and cirrus in particular in terms of liquid/ice water content and particle size on the basis of a unification of satellite and ground-based cloud radar data. Satellite remote sensing employing the current narrow-band spectro-radiometers has limitation and only the vertically integrated cloud parameters (optical depth and mean particle size) can be determined. However, by combining the horizontal cloud mapping inferred from satellites with the vertical structure derived from the profiling Doppler cloud radar, a 3D cloud field can be constructed. This represents a new conceptual approach to 3D remote sensing and imaging and offers a new perspective in observing the cloud structure. We applied this novel technique to AVHRR/NOAA satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data obtained from the ARM achieve and assessed the 3D cirrus cloud field with the ice crystal size distributions independently derived from optical probe measurements aboard the University of North Dakota Citation. The retrieved 3D ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size involving an impressive cirrus cloud occurring on April 18, 1997, are shown to be comparable to those derived from the analysis of collocated and coincident in situ aircraft measurements (Liou et al. 2002). (d) Detection of thin cirrus with optical depths less than 0.5, particularly those occurring i n the tropics remains a fundamental problem in remote sensing. We developed a new detection scheme for the

Kuo-Nan Liou

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

alpha radiation measuring: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plant species. Search method: In nature, most alpha radiation exposure is caused by radon progeny. Exposure is particularly high below ground, and is also elevated on plant...

109

Appropriate Conservation Measures for Single-Family Buildings in Hot, Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and skin wetness, and they should be investigated. REFERENCES 1. "Residential Conservation Service Model Audit Manual," Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL/CON-103, October 1983. 2. "WE-2 Reference Manual, Version 2. LA," LBL-8706, Rev. 2, May 1981..., Thermal Comfort, Krieger Publishing Co., Malabar, Florida, 1982. 9. H. A. McLain, J. M. MacDonald, D. Goldenberg, "Appropriate Conservation Measures for Single-Family Buildings in Hot Humid Climates,'' ORNL/CON report, to be issued. 10. R. Messenger...

McLain, H. A.; MacDonald, J. M.; Goldenberg, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

Navarro, Thomas; Forget, François; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Proceedings of the sixth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1996 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held at San Antonio, Texas. The history and status of the ARM program at the time of the meeting helps to put these papers in context. The basic themes have not changed. First, from its beginning, the Program has attempted to respond to the most critical scientific issues facing the US Global Change Research Program. Second, the Program has been strongly coupled to other agency and international programs. More specifically, the Program reflects an unprecedented collaboration among agencies of the federal research community, among the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) national laboratories, and between DOE`s research program and related international programs, such as Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) and the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program. Next, ARM has always attempted to make the most judicious use of its resources by collaborating and leveraging existing assets and has managed to maintain an aggressive schedule despite budgets that have been much smaller than planned. Finally, the Program has attracted some of the very best scientific talent in the climate research community and has, as a result, been productive scientifically.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Additional measurements of the radiation environment at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility at LAMPF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foil activation dosimetry experiments were conducted in a ''rabbit'' system at the completed Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF). The ''raffit'' system contains four tubes spaced radially outward 0.12, 0.18, 0.27, and 0.38 meters off beam centerline. Foils were irradiated for 3 to 62 hours to measure the neutron flux and energy spectrum radially from beam centerline, along the beamline, and the effect of the Isotope Production (IP) target loadings on the neutron flux in the neutron irradiation locations. Irradiations showed a decrease in the radial flux by a factor of 6 in 0.15 meters of iron outside the IP targets. An enchancement was seen in the 24-keV energy region outside 0.15 meters. There was little difference in the shape of the spectra outside the IP targets and the beam stop with the exception of the high energy tail (energies above 20 MeV). The decrease in the high energy tail outside the beam stop is due to the degradation of the energy of the proton beam in the IP targets. Irradiations outside the beam stop with zero and eight IP targets gave the same spectral shape with the exception of the high energy tail. The magnitude of the integral flux decreased by a factor of 2 when eight IP targets were present. Irradiations with five ''rabbits'' stacked on top of each other showed no difference in the integral flux below, on and above beam centerline.

Davidson, D.R.; Reedy, R.C.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Wechsler, M.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

CRYOPUMP MEASUREMENTS RELATING TO SAFETY, PUMPING SPEED, AND RADIATION OUTGASSING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Gas Pulse Typical Data for Dynamic Pumping Speed Measurements with Deuterium Plan View of Reactor

Graham, W.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Country level risk measures of climate-related natural disasters and implications for adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to climate change Nick Brooks and W. Neil Adger January 2003 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research for adaptation to climate change Nick Brooks and W. Neil Adger Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research are nearly all developing countries with many of them showing a high degree of consistency in their rankings

Watson, Andrew

116

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic March 2010; accepted 9 April 2010; published 31 August 2010. [1] The seismic coda consists of scattered of radiated wave energy. We apply an empirical Green's function (EGF) method to the seismic coda in order

Prieto, Germán A.

117

Scientific system for high-resolution measurement of the circumsolar radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a camera based system for measurements of the circumsolar radiation with a high angular resolution of 0.1 mrad. Subsequent measurements may be taken at intervals as short as 15 s. In this publication we describe the optical system in detail and discuss some aspects of the measurement method. First results from two days of measurement at Freiburg i. Br., Germany, are presented and compared to data from literature. The good results encourage us to perform longer measurement campaigns in future to better understand the influence of circumsolar radiation on the power yield of concentrating photovoltaic systems.

Schrott, Simeon, E-mail: thomas.schmidt@ise.fraunhofer.de; Schmidt, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.schmidt@ise.fraunhofer.de; Hornung, Thorsten, E-mail: thomas.schmidt@ise.fraunhofer.de; Nitz, Peter, E-mail: thomas.schmidt@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Point Reyes, California for the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, was the location of the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The ARM Program collaborated with the U.S. Office of Naval Research and DOE's Aerosol Science Program in the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) project. Their objectives were to collect data from cloud/aerosol interactions and to improve understanding of cloud organization that is often associated with patches of drizzle. Between March and September 2005, the AMF and at least two research aircraft were used to collect data.

119

Improving the reliability and accuracy of a multipyranometer array measuring solar radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of solar radiation is crucial for the use of solar energy in fields including power generation, agriculture and meteorology. In the building sciences, It is essential for daylighting studies, energy use calculations, and thermal...

Klima, Peter Miloslaw

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Spacecraft Habitation Systems, Water Recovery and Waste Active Charged Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-PMWC) Orbital Technologies Corporation Technical Abstract Model calculations and risk assessment estimates Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement Technologies Technical Abstract The innovative High Efficiency the resultant plastic tiles. This system requires access to power, data, and cooling interfaces. The system

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Radiation Measurements 43 (2008) S427S430 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for retrospective radon progeny measurements in 17 dwellings based on implanted 210Po activities in glass objects; Radon progeny; 210Po; Glass objects 1. Introduction Methods for long-term passive radon measurementsRadiation Measurements 43 (2008) S427­S430 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas Retrospective radon

Yu, K.N.

122

Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

Stoffel, T

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Evaluation of ground-based remotely sensed liquid water cloud properties using shortwave radiation measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of low level water clouds. A number of remote sensing retrieval techniques provide either radar-only retrie- vals or combine millimeter-wave radar with microwave radiometer measurements (Frisch et al., 1995 radiation measurements from the ground. The remote sensing observations of radar reflectivity, microwave

Haak, Hein

124

Radiation Measurements 43 (2008) S357S363 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-term measurements of radon progeny concentrations with solid state nuclear track detectors. Radiat. Meas. 40, 560. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Radon progeny; Equilibrium factor; Long due to radon progeny, but not the radon gas itself. Therefore, long-term measurements

Yu, K.N.

125

Retrievals of Cloud Fraction and Cloud Albedo from Surface-based Shortwave Radiation Measurements: A Comparison of 16 Year Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-based radiation measurements have been widely conducted to gain information on clouds and the surface radiation budget; here several different techniques for retrieving cloud fraction (Long2006, Min2008 and XL2013) and cloud albedo (Min2008, Liu2011 and XL2013) from ground-based shortwave broadband and spectral radiation measurements are examined, and sixteen years of retrievals collected at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared. The comparison shows overall good agreement between the retrievals of both cloud fraction and cloud albedo, with noted differences however. The Long2006 and Min2008 cloud fractions are greater on average than the XL2013 values. Compared to Min2008 and Liu2011, the XL2013 retrieval of cloud albedo tends to be greater for thin clouds but smaller for thick clouds, with the differences decreasing with increasing cloud fraction. Further analysis reveals that the approaches that retrieve cloud fraction and cloud albedo separately may suffer from mutual contamination of errors in retrieved cloud fraction and cloud albedo. Potential influences of cloud absorption, land-surface albedo, cloud structure, and measurement instruments are explored.

Xie, Yu; Liu, Yangang; Long, Charles N.; Min, Qilong

2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Radiation environment along the INTEGRAL orbit measured with the IREM monitor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The INTEGRAL Radiation Environment Monitor (IREM) is a payload supporting instrument on board the INTEGRAL satellite. The monitor continually measures electron and proton fluxes along the orbit and provides this information to the spacecraft on board data handler. The mission alert system broadcasts it to the payload instruments enabling them to react accordingly to the current radiation level. Additionally, the IREM conducts its autonomous research mapping the Earth radiation environment for the space weather program. Its scientific data are available for further analysis almost without delay.

W. Hajdas; P. Bühler; C. Eggel; P. Favre; A. Mchedlishvili; A. Zehnder

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

A New Measurement of the $?^0$ Radiative Decay Width  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

I. Larin; D. McNulty; E. Clinton; P. Ambrozewicz; D. Lawrence; I. Nakagawa; Y. Prok; A. Teymurazyan; A. Ahmidouch; A. Asratyan; K. Baker; L. Benton; A. M. Bernstein; V. Burkert; P. Cole; P. Collins; D. Dale; S. Danagoulian; G. Davidenko; R. Demirchyan; A. Deur; A. Dolgolenko; G. Dzyubenko; R. Ent; A. Evdokimov; J. Feng; M. Gabrielyan; L. Gan; A. Gasparian; S. Gevorkyan; A. Glamazdin; V. Goryachev; V. Gyurjyan; K. Hardy; J. He; M. Ito; L. Jiang; D. Kashy; M. Khandaker; P. Kingsberry; A. Kolarkar; M. Konchatnyi; A. Korchin; W. Korsch; S. Kowalski; M. Kubantsev; V. Kubarovsky; X. Li; P. Martel; V. Matveev; B. Mecking; B. Milbrath; R. Minehart; R. Miskimen; V. Mochalov; S. Mtingwa; S. Overby; E. Pasyuk; M. Payen; R. Pedroni; B. Ritchie; T. E. Rodrigues; C. Salgado; A. Shahinyan; A. Sitnikov; D. Sober; S. Stepanyan; W. Stephens; J. Underwood; A. Vasiliev; V. Vishnyakov; M. Wood; S. Zhou

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Field comparisons of direct and component measurements of net radiation under clear skies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate measurements of net radiation are basic to all studies of the surface energy budget. In preparation for an energy budget experiment significant differences were found between direct and component measurement of net radiation, which prompted this investigation of their cause. The instruments involved were an all-black single-dome Fritschen-type net pyrradiometer, two Eppley model 8-48 pyranometers, and an Eppley model PIR pyrgeometer. Each had recently been calibrated. The accuracy of the component instruments was considered first. Comparisons of about one hour on each of three nights between the pyrgeometer and five empirical formulas showed that the average departure over all formulas from the pyrgeometer average was {minus}1%. Other comparisons between the pyrgeometer and an infrared thermometer viewing the surface yielded similar results. Alternate shading and unshading of the pyrgeometer looking upward during daytime resulted in a formula that was used to correct the downward longwave radiation under clear skies. The correction is dependent on wind speed, in contrast to a recent paper showing negligible dependence, but is in accord with earlier findings. Based on manufacturer`s specifications, the pyranometer calibrations were considered to be within 2% of the World Radiation Reference. Thus a series of experiments was carried out using what were believed to be reasonably accurate component measurements of net radiation and measurements from the net pyrradiometer.

Duchon, C.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Wilk, G.E. [National Weather Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

Chuyu Liu

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 26, NO. 4, 2009, 748762 Climate Responses to Direct Radiative Forcing of Anthropogenic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is internally mixed with other aerosols. Model results indicate that the simulated climate change over 1951 of Sciences, Beijing 100049 4 Climate Change Research Center (CCRC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing model is applied in this work to compare climate responses to chang- ing concentrations of long

132

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program - unmanned aerospace vehicle: The follow-on phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) demonstration flights (UDF) are designed to provide an early demonstration of the scientific utility of UAVs by using an existing UAV and instruments to measure broadband radiative flux profiles under clear sky conditions. UDF is but the first of three phases of ARM-UAV. The second phase significantly extends both the UAV measurement techniques and the available instrumentation to allow both multi-UAV measurements in cloudy skies and extended duration measurements in the tropopause. These activities build naturally to the third and final phase, that of full operational capability, i.e., UAVs capable of autonomous operations at 20-km altitudes for multiple days with a full suite of instrumentation for measuring radiative flux, cloud properties, and water vapor profiles.

Vitko, J. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) Central Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, a data analysis is performed to determine the area-averaged, spectral albedo at ARM's SGP central facility site. The spectral albedo is then fed into radiation transfer models to show that the diffuse discrepancy is diminished when the spectral albedo is used (as opposed to using the broadband albedo).

Michalsky, Joseph J.; Min, Qilong; Barnard, James C.; Marchand, Roger T.; Pilewskie, Peter

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

array (MPA). The earliest work on an MPA related device for measuring diffuse sky radiation was performed in Finland by M. H2milllien et al. (1985). Further development on the MPA was performed in several countries including the United States where...

Munger, B.; Haberl, J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

ON THE SUITABILITY OF LONGITUDINAL PROFILE MEASUREMENTS USING COHERENT SMITH-PURCELL RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kittelmann, C. Thomas, ESS, Lund, Sweden Abstract The use of Smith-Purcell radiation to measure electrons power, it is mandatory to understand the beam dynamics and to determine the beam size and profile with precision. In high power proton Linacs, such under- standing would allow a full characterization of the beam

Boyer, Edmond

137

Remote sensing of tropical tropopause layer radiation balance using A-train measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the relevant horizontal and vertical information for assessing TTL solar heating and infrared cooling rates; accepted 8 August 2008; published 12 November 2008. [1] Determining the level of zero net radiative heating the distribution of cloud properties relevant to heating rate analysis. The ability of CloudSat measurements

Liou, K. N.

138

Continuous Profiles of Cloud Microphysical Properties for the Fixed Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program defined a specific metric for the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2006 to produce and refine a one-year continuous time series of cloud microphysical properties based on cloud radar measurements for each of the fixed ARM sites. To accomplish this metric, we used a combination of recently developed algorithms that interpret radar reflectivity profiles, lidar backscatter profiles, and microwave brightness temperatures into the context of the underlying cloud microphysical structure.

Jensen, M; Jensen, K

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

An Assessment of Envelope Measures in Mild Climate Deep Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy end-uses and interior comfort conditions have been monitored in 11 Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs) in a mild marine climate. Two broad categories of DER envelope were identified: first, bringing homes up to current code levels of insulation and airtightness, and second, enhanced retrofits that go beyond these code requirements. The efficacy of envelope measures in DERs was difficult to determine, due to the intermingled effects of enclosure improvements, HVAC system upgrades and changes in interior comfort conditions. While energy reductions in these project homes could not be assigned to specific improvements, the combined effects of changes in enclosure, HVAC system and comfort led to average heating energy reductions of 76percent (12,937 kWh) in the five DERs with pre-retrofit data, or 80percent (5.9 kWh/ft2) when normalized by floor area. Overall, net-site energy reductions averaged 58percent (15,966 kWh; n=5), and DERs with code-style envelopes achieved average net-site energy reductions of 65percent (18,923 kWh; n=4). In some homes, the heating energy reductions were actually larger than the whole house reductions that were achieved, which suggests that substantial additional energy uses were added to the home during the retrofit that offset some heating savings. Heating system operation and energy use was shown to vary inconsistently with outdoor conditions, suggesting that most DERs were not thermostatically controlled and that occupants were engaged in managing the indoor environmental conditions. Indoor temperatures maintained in these DERs were highly variable, and no project home consistently provided conditions within the ASHRAE Standard 55-2010 heating season comfort zone. Thermal comfort and heating system operation had a large impact on performance and were found to depend upon the occupant activities, so DERs should be designed with the occupants needs and patterns of consumption in mind. Beyond-code building envelopes were not found to be strictly necessary for the achievement of deep energy savings in existing uninsulated homes in mild marine climates, provided that other energy end-uses were comprehensively reduced. We recommend that mild climate DERs pursue envelopes in compliance with the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and pair these with high efficiency, off-the-shelf HVAC equipment. Enhanced building envelopes should be considered in cases where very low heating energy use (<1,000 kWh/year or <0.5 kWh/ft2-year) and enhanced thermal comfort (ASHRAE 55-2010) are required, as well as in those situations where substantial energy uses are added to the home, such as decorative lighting, cooling or smart home A/V and communication equipment.

Walker, Iain; Less, Brennan

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC Lehman20

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE/SC-ARM-12-015 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6 ARM85

142

DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6 ARM851

143

DOE/SC-ARM-13-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6 ARM8511

144

DOE/SC-ARM-13-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6 ARM85117

145

DOE/SC-ARM-13-013 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6 ARM851173

146

DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)38232 Revision 1SC6 ARM8511730

147

DOE/SC-ARM-14-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of4 The2-0231241

148

DOE/SC-ARM-14-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of4 The2-023124157

149

DOE/SC-ARM-14-019 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of42 The35 ARM69

150

DOE/SC-ARM-14-025 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of42 The35 ARM69145

151

DOE/SC-ARM-15-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of42 The350

152

DOE/SC-ARM-15-018 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of42 The3504 ARM718

153

FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced OilExtracting theExtremeM ^Education t

154

FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced OilExtracting theExtremeM ^Education t f

155

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: â?¢ Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. â?¢ Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. â?¢ Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

Measuring Hawking Radiation of a Kerr-Newman Black Hole in a Superconducting Transmission Line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying a dimensional reduction technique and a coordinates transformation approach, we deduce the Kerr-Newman space-time into a Painlev\\'{e}-like form, and obtain its corresponding event horizon and the Hawking radiation temperature. We find that, the event horizon of a Kerr-Newman black hole can be simulated in a superconducting transmission line. Moreover, by running some numerical simulation, we confirm that the Hawking radiation of a Kerr-Newman Black Hole can be experimentally measured in a superconducting transmission line.

X. G. Lan; D. Y. Chen; L. F. Wei

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

157

L- and M-shell absorption measurements of radiatively heated Fe plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of iron-plasma absorption spectrum over 150-1200 eV photon energy range were reported at temperature T = (72 {+-} 4) eV. The electron temperature was diagnosed with the absorption spectrum of aluminum mixed with iron. The density was not diagnosed directly but obtained from a radiative hydrodynamic simulation with the Multi-1D code. The broad photon energy range enables simultaneous observation of the L-shell and M-shell transitions that dominate the radiation transport at this temperature. The spectrally resolved transmission data were compared to the detailed-configuration-accounting model calculations and reasonable agreement was found.

Zhang Jiyan; Li Hang; Zhao Yang; Xiong Gang; Yuan Zheng; Zhang Haiying; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiamin; Liu Shenye; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu Yan; Meng Xujun; Yan Jun [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

TESLA-FEL 2004-01 Silica Aerogel Radiators for Bunch Length Measurements ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cherenkov radiators based on Silica aerogel are used to measure the electron bunch length at the photo injector test facility at DESY Zeuthen (PITZ). The energy range of those electrons is 4-5 MeV. In this paper the time resolution defined by the usage of aerogel is calculated analytically and Monte Carlo simulations are performed. It is shown that Silica aerogel gives the possibility to reach a time resolution of about 0.1 ps for high photon intensities and a time resolution of about 0.02 ps can be obtained for thin Silica aerogel radiators. Key words: silica aerogel, bunch length, time resolution, PITZ 1

J. Bähr A; V. Djordjadze A; D. Lipka A; A. Onuchin B; F. Stephan A

159

Measurement of the surface wavelength distribution of narrow-band radiation by a colorimetric method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is suggested for determining the wavelength of narrow-band light from a digital photograph of a radiating surface. The digital camera used should be appropriately calibrated. The accuracy of the wavelength measurement is better than 1 nm. The method was tested on the yellow doublet of mercury spectrum and on the adjacent continuum of the incandescent lamp radiation spectrum. By means of the method suggested the homogeneity of holographic sensor swelling was studied in stationary and transient cases. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Kraiskii, A V; Mironova, T V; Sultanov, T T [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Radiation measurements of uranium ingots from the electrometallurgical treatment of spent fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation measurements and gamma spectroscopy analyses were made on numerous uranium ingots produced during the treatment of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) spent nuclear fuel. The objective of these measurements was to provide background data for shielding concerns and potential process optimization. The uranium ingots resulted from the processing of both driver and blanket fuel by the electrometallurgical treatment process. The observed variation in the measurements was traced to the levels of certain fission product residues that remained in the uranium ingots produced during spent fuel treatment. A minor process change to hold the material at an elevated temperature for a specified length of time was found to significantly reduce concentrations of high-activity fission products and, thus the radiation field.

Westphal, B. R.; Liaw, J. R.; Krsul, J. R.; Maddison, D. W.; Jensen, B. A.

2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electron density and temperature measurement by continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electron-atom neutral bremsstrahlung continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized plasmas is investigated for electron density and temperature diagnostics. The continuum spectrum in 450–1000?nm emitted from the argon atmospheric pressure plasma is found to be in excellent agreement with the neutral bremsstrahlung formula with the electron-atom momentum transfer cross-section given by Popovi?. In 280–450?nm, however, a large discrepancy between the measured and the neutral bremsstrahlung emissivities is observed. We find that without accounting for the radiative H{sub 2} dissociation continuum, the temperature, and density measurements would be largely wrong, so that it should be taken into account for accurate measurement.

Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Youn Moon, Se [High-enthalpy Plasma Research Center, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaeyoung [5771 La Jolla Corona Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Dust Aerosol Impact on North Africa Climate: A GCM Investigation of Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Using A-Train Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol indirect effect based on cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in the climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD). When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced, since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing could exceed aerosol forcing. With the aerosol indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced for ice water path (IWP) larger than 20 g m-2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP. AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect result in less OLR and net solar flux at the top of the atmosphere over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. The increased precipitation seems to be associated with enhanced ice water contents in this region. The 200 mb radiative heating rate shows more cooling with the aerosol indirect effect since greater cooling is produced at the cloud top with smaller ice crystal size. The 500 mb omega indicates strong upward motion, which, together with the increased cooling effect, results in the increased ice water contents. Adding the aerosol direct effect into the model simulation reduces the precipitation in the normal rainfall band over North Africa, where precipitation is shifted to the south and the northeast produced by the absorption of sunlight and the subsequent heating of the air column by dust particles. As a result, rainfall is drawn further inland to the northeast. This study represents the first attempt to quantify the climate impact of aerosol indirect effect using a GCM in connection with A-train satellite data. The parameterization for the aerosol first indirect effect developed in this study can be readily incorporated for application to any other GCMs.

Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Jiang, Jonathan; Su, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

The role of water vapor and solar radiation in determining temperature changes and trends measured at Armagh, 18812000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of water vapor and solar radiation in determining temperature changes and trends measured in atmospheric circulation, are discussed. Citation: Stanhill, G. (2011), The role of water vapor and solar radiation in determining temperature changes and trends measured at Armagh, 1881­2000, J. Geophys. Res., 116

166

A Leakage Current-based Measurement of the Radiation Damage in the ATLAS Pixel Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module measurement of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

Gorelov, Igor V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

Voyles, JW

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Shallow Underground Laboratory for Low-Background Radiation Measurements and Materials Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths worldwide houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This manuscript describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Day, Anthony R.; Erikson, Luke E.; Fast, James E.; Forrester, Joel B.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Merriman, Jason H.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Overman, Nicole R.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Runkle, Robert C.

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Passive and Active Radiation Measurements Capability at the INL Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility is a Department of Energy facility located in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex. It contains various nuclear and non-nuclear materials that are available to support many radiation measurement assessments. User-selected, single material, nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be readily utilized with ZPPR clamshell containers with almost no criticality concerns. If custom, multi-material configurations are desired, the ZPPR clamshell or an approved aluminum Inspection Object (IO) Box container may be utilized, yet each specific material configuration will require a criticality assessment. As an example of the specialized material configurations possible, the National Nuclear Security Agency’s Office of Nuclear Verification (NNSA/NA 243) has sponsored the assembly of six material configurations. These are shown in the Appendixes and have been designated for semi-permanent storage that can be available to support various radiation measurement applications.

Robert Neibert; John Zabriskie; Collin Knight; James L. Jones

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-PA-13-11-02 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Improved Methodology to Measure Normal... Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array Juan-Carlos Baltazar*, Yifu Sun, Jeff Haberl Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station, The Texas A&M University System College Station, TX 77845, U.S.A. Abstract...

Baltazar, J.C.; Sun, Y.; Haberl, J.

171

Spectral Fluctuations of Incoherent Radiation And Measurement of Longitudinal Bunch Profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for measurement of ultrashort beam current profile I{sub b}(t) is proposed that is based on detecting fluctuations of the spectral intensity P ({omega}) of single bunch incoherent radiation. We show that the variance of the Fourier transform of the spectrum is proportional to the convolution function of the beam current. After the convolution function is found, using phase retrieval technique one can restore the shape of the pulse in many practical cases.

Zolotorev, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere: Further interpretations of collocated aircraft measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Vitko Jr. , Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudyet al. , Absorption of solar radiation by clouds: Observa-1999 Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere:

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Gamma spectroscopic measurements using the PID350 pixelated CdTe radiation detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopic measurements are presented using the PID350 pixelated gamma radiation detectors. A high-speed data acquisition system has been developed in order to reduce the data loss during the data reading in case of a high flux of photons. A data analysis framework has been developed in order to improve the resolution of the acquired energy spectra, using specific calibration parameters for each PID350's pixel. Three PID350 detectors have been used to construct a stacked prototype system and spectroscopic measurements have been performed in order to test the ability of the prototype to localize radioactive sources.

Karafasoulis, K; Seferlis, S; Papadakis, I; Loukas, D; Lambropoulos, C; Potiriadis, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Gamma spectroscopic measurements using the PID350 pixelated CdTe radiation detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopic measurements are presented using the PID350 pixelated gamma radiation detectors. A high-speed data acquisition system has been developed in order to reduce the data loss during the data reading in case of a high flux of photons. A data analysis framework has been developed in order to improve the resolution of the acquired energy spectra, using specific calibration parameters for each PID350's pixel. Three PID350 detectors have been used to construct a stacked prototype system and spectroscopic measurements have been performed in order to test the ability of the prototype to localize radioactive sources.

K. Karafasoulis; K. Zachariadou; S. Seferlis; I. Papadakis; D. Loukas; C. Lambropoulos; C. Potiriadis

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Characteristic measurements of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas generated in a Planckian radiation environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temporally and spatially resolved characteristics of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas were studied using x-ray spectroscopy. The plasma was generated in the near-Planckian radiation environment within gold hohlraum targets irradiated by laser pulses with a total energy of 2.4 kJ in 1 ns. The contributions of silicon ions at different charge states to the specific components of the measured absorption spectra were also investigated. It was found that each main feature in the absorption spectra of the measured silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas was contributed by two neighboring silicon ionic species.

Dong Quanli; Wang Shoujun; Li Yutong; Zhang Yi; Zhao Jing [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei Huigang; Shi Jianrong; Zhao Gang [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang Jiyan; Gu Yuqiu; Ding Yongkun; Wen Tianshu; Zhang Wenhai; Hu Xin; Liu Shenye; Zhang Lin; Tang Yongjian; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center for Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Oliktok Point, Alaska (an AMF3 Deployment)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Located at the North Slope of Alaska on the coast of the Arctic Ocean, Oliktok Point is extremely isolated, accessible only by plane. From this remote spot researchers now have access to important data about Arctic climate processes at the intersection of land and sea ice. As of October 2013, Oliktok Point is the temporary home of ARM’s third and newest ARM Mobile Facility, or AMF3. The AMF3 is gathering data using about two dozen instruments that obtain continuous measurements of clouds, aerosols, precipitation, energy, and other meteorological variables. Site operators will also fly manned and unmanned aircraft over sea ice, drop instrument probes and send up tethered balloons. The combination of atmospheric observations with measurements from both the ground and over the Arctic Ocean will give researchers a better sense of why the Arctic sea ice has been fluctuating in fairly dramatic fashion over recent years. AMF3 will be stationed at Oliktok Point.

178

Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results...

Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Climate VISION: Contact Us  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing of ClimateCONTACT US

180

Climate VISION: News  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing of ClimateCONTACTNews

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con#12;gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

Delgado-Aparicio, L [PPPL; Bell, R E [PPPL; Faust, I [MIT; Tritz, K [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21209, USA; Diallo, A [PPPL; Gerhardt, S P [PPPL; Kozub, T A [PPPL; LeBlanc, B P [PPPL; Stratton, B C [PPPL

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evaluation of Radiometric Measurements from the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR): Two- and Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Modeling of an Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Cloud Deck  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1999, NASA launched the Terra satellite. This platform carries five instruments that measure important properties of the Earth climate system. One of these instruments is the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MISR. This instrument measures light reflected from the Earth at a spatial resolution of 275-1100 m, at four wavelengths (446, 558, 672, and 866 nm), and at nine different viewing angles that vary from +70 to -70 degrees along the direction of flight [Diner et al., 2002]. These multiangle data have the potential to provide information on aerosols, surface, and cloud characteristics that compliments traditional single-view-direction satellite measurements. Before this potential can be realized, the accuracy of the satellite radiance measurements must be carefully assessed, and the implications of the radiometric accuracy on remote-sensing algorithms must be evaluated. In this article, we compare MISR multiangle measurements against two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D radiative transfer calculations from an inhomogeneous cloud scene. Inputs to the radiative transfer code are based entirely on independently gathered data (ground-based radar, lidar, microwave radiometer, in situ aircraft data, etc.). The 2-D radiative transfer calculations compare favorably near nadir and in most of the forward scattering directions, but differ by as much as 10% in the backscattering directions. Using 3-D radiative transfer modeling, we show that this difference is due to the 3-D structure of the cloud deck, including variations in the cloud top height on scales less than 275 m, which are not resolved in the 2-D simulations. Comparison of the 2-D calculations to the MISR measurements, after accounting for the 3-D structure, show residual differences that are less than 4% at all angles at the MISR blue and green wavelengths. The comparison also reveals that the MISR measurements at the red and near-infrared wavelengths are too bright relative to measurements in the blue and green bands. On the basis of the results of this study, along with results from five other comparisons, the MISR calibration is being adjusted to reduce the red and nearinfrared Radiances.

Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

Data Quality Assessment and Control for the ARM Climate Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is to provide observations of the earth climate system to the climate research community for the purpose of improving the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their coupling with the Earth's surface. In order for ARM measurements to be useful toward this goal, it is important that the measurements are of a known and reasonable quality. The ARM data quality program includes several components designed to identify quality issues in near-real-time, track problems to solutions, assess more subtle long-term issues, and communicate problems to the user community.

Peppler, R

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

Measurements and modeling of soot formation and radiation in microgravity jet diffusion flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a computational and experimental study for soot formation and radiative heat transfer in jet diffusion flames under normal gravity (1-g) and microgravity (0-g) conditions. Instantaneous soot volume fraction maps are measured using a full-field imaging absorption technique developed by the authors. On modeling, the authors have coupled flame structure and soot formation models with detailed radiation transfer calculations. Favre-averaged boundary layer equations with a k-e-g turbulence model are used to predict the flow field, and a conserved scalar approach with an assumed {beta}-pdf are used to predict gaseous species mole fraction. Scalar transport equations are used to describe soot volume fraction and number density distributions, with formation and oxidation terms modeled by one-step rate equations and thermophoretic effects included. An energy equation is included to couple flame structure and radiation analyses through iterations, neglecting turbulence-radiation interactions. The YIX solution for a finite cylindrical enclosure is used for radiative heat transfer calculations. The spectral absorption coefficient for soot aggregates is calculated from the Rayleigh solution using complex refractive index data from a Drude-Lorentz model. The exponential-wide-band model is used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficient for H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. Predicted soot volume fraction and temperature results agree well with published data for a normal gravity co-flow laminar flames and turbulent jet flames. Predicted soot volume fraction results also agree with the data for 1-g and 0-g laminar jet flames as well as 1-g turbulent jet flames.

Ku, J.C.; Tong, L. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Greenberg, P.S. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Microgravity Combustion Branch

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 {mu}m were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved.

Hessling, T.; Blazevic, A.; Stoehlker, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Measurement of radiative widths of $a_2(1320)$ and $?_2(1670)$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COMPASS Collaboration at CERN has investigated the reaction $\\pi^- \\gamma \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ embedded in the Primakoff reaction of $190~\\textrm{GeV}$ pions scattering in the Coulomb field of a lead target, $\\pi^- \\text{Pb} \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+ \\text{Pb}$. Exchange of quasi-real photons is selected by isolating the sharp Coulomb peak observed at momentum transfer below $0.001~(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. Using a partial-wave analysis the amplitudes and relative phases of the $a_2(1320)$ and $\\pi_2(1670)$ mesons have been extracted, and the Coulomb and the diffractive contributions have been disentangled. Measuring absolute production cross sections we have determined the radiative width of the $a_2(1320)$ to be $\\Gamma_0(a_2(1320) \\rightarrow \\pi\\gamma) = (358 \\pm 6_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 42_{\\textrm{syst}})~\\textrm{keV}$. As the first measurement, $\\Gamma_0(\\pi_2(1670) \\rightarrow \\pi\\gamma) = (181 \\pm 11_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 27_{\\textrm{syst}})~\\textrm{keV} \\cdot (\\textrm{BR}^{\\textrm{PDG}}_{f_2 \\pi}/\\textrm{BR}_{f_2 \\pi})$ is obtained for the radiative width of the $\\pi_2(1670)$, where in this analysis the branching ratio $\\textrm{BR}^{\\textrm{PDG}}_{f_2 \\pi}=0.56$ has been used. We compare these values to previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

C. Adolph; R. Akhunzyanov; M. G. Alekseev; G. D. Alexeev; A. Amoroso; V. Andrieux; V. Anosov; A. Austregesilo; B. Badelek; F. Balestra; J. Barth; G. Baum; R. Beck; Y. Bedfer; A. Berlin; J. Bernhard; K. Bicker; J. Bieling; R. Birsa; J. Bisplinghoff; M. Bodlak; M. Boer; P. Bordalo; F. Bradamante; C. Braun; A. Bressan; M. Buechele; E. Burtin; L. Capozza; M. Chiosso; S. U. Chung; A. Cicuttin; M. L. Crespo; Q. Curiel; S. Dalla Torre; S. S. Dasgupta; S. Dasgupta; O. Yu. Denisov; S. V. Donskov; N. Doshita; V. Duic; W. Duennweber; M. Dziewiecki; A. Efremov; C. Elia; P. D. Eversheim; W. Eyrich; M. Faessler; A. Ferrero; A. Filin; M. Finger; M. Finger~jr.; H. Fischer; C. Franco; N. du~Fresne~von~Hohenesche; J. M. Friedrich; V. Frolov; F. Gautheron; O. P. Gavrichtchouk; S. Gerassimov; R. Geyer; I. Gnesi; B. Gobbo; S. Goertz; M. Gorzellik; S. Grabmueller; A. Grasso; B. Grube; A. Guskov; T. Guthoerl; F. Haas; D. von Harrach; D. Hahne; R. Hashimoto; F. H. Heinsius; F. Herrmann; F. Hinterberger; Ch. Hoeppner; N. Horikawa; N. d'Hose; S. Huber; S. Ishimoto; A. Ivanov; Yu. Ivanshin; T. Iwata; R. Jahn; V. Jary; P. Jasinski; P. Joerg; R. Joosten; E. Kabuss; B. Ketzer; G. V. Khaustov; Yu. A. Khokhlov; Yu. Kisselev; F. Klein; K. Klimaszewski; J. H. Koivuniemi; V. N. Kolosov; K. Kondo; K. Koenigsmann; I. Konorov; V. F. Konstantinov; A. M. Kotzinian; O. Kouznetsov; Z. Kral; M. Kraemer; Z. V. Kroumchtein; N. Kuchinski; F. Kunne; K. Kurek; R. P. Kurjata; A. A. Lednev; A. Lehmann; S. Levorato; J. Lichtenstadt; A. Maggiora; A. Magnon; N. Makke; G. K. Mallot; C. Marchand; A. Martin; J. Marzec; J. Matousek; H. Matsuda; T. Matsuda; G. Meshcheryakov; W. Meyer; T. Michigami; Yu. V. Mikhailov; Y. Miyachi; A. Nagaytsev; T. Nagel; F. Nerling; S. Neubert; D. Neyret; V. I. Nikolaenko; J. Novy; W. -D. Nowak; A. S. Nunes; I. Orlov; A. G. Olshevsky; M. Ostrick; R. Panknin; D. Panzieri; B. Parsamyan; S. Paul; M. Pesek; S. Platchkov; J. Pochodzalla; V. A. Polyakov; J. Pretz; M. Quaresma; C. Quintans; S. Ramos; G. Reicherz; E. Rocco; A. Rychter; N. S. Rossiyskaya; D. I. Ryabchikov; V. D. Samoylenko; A. Sandacz; S. Sarkar; I. A. Savin; G. Sbrizzai; P. Schiavon; C. Schill; T. Schlueter; A. Schmidt; K. Schmidt; H. Schmieden; K. Schoenning; S. Schopferer; M. Schott; O. Yu. Shevchenko; L. Silva; L. Sinha; S. Sirtl; M. Slunecka; S. Sosio; F. Sozzi; A. Srnka; L. Steiger; M. Stolarski; M. Sulc; R. Sulej; H. Suzuki; A. Szabelski; T. Szameitat; P. Sznajder; S. Takekawa; J. ter~Wolbeek; S. Tessaro; F. Tessarotto; F. Thibaud; S. Uhl; I. Uman; M. Vandenbroucke; M. Virius; J. Vondra; L. Wang; T. Weisrock; M. Wilfert; R. Windmolders; H. Wollny; K. Zaremba; M. Zavertyaev; E. Zemlyanichkina; M. Ziembicki.

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

188

Update this !!! What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with higher humidity and precipitation. #12;4 #12;5 For two identical beams of sunlight (solar energy of the Earth's axis causes the solar beam at B to become more concentrated, thereby providing more energy than regions of Australia. #12;999 The constant supply of radiative energy from the sun would continue to heat

Allan, Richard P.

189

Measurement of the energy spectrum of underground muons at Gran Sasso with a transition radiation detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured directly the residual energy of cosmic ray muons crossing the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. For this measurement we have used a transition radiation detector consisting of three identical modules, each of about 12 m^2 area, operating in the energy region from 100 GeV to 1 TeV. The results presented here were obtained with the first module collecting data for more than two years. The average single muon energy is found to be 320 +/- 4 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) GeV in the rock depth range 3000-6500 hg/cm^2. The results are in agreement with calculations of the energy loss of muons in the rock above the detector.

The MACRO Collaboration; M. Ambrosio et al

1998-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (ozone · Result: a statistical range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW

Sheridan, Jennifer

193

Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

New portable hand-held radiation instruments for measurements and monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hand-held radiation monitors are often used to search pedestrians and motor vehicles for special nuclear material (SNM) as part of a physical protection plan for nuclear materials. Recently, the Los Alamos Advanced Nuclear Technology group has commercialized an improved hand-held monitor that can be used for both physical-protection monitoring and verification measurements in nuclear material control and waste management. The new monitoring instruments are smaller and lighter; operate much longer on a battery charge; are available with NaI(Tl) or neutron and gamma-ray sensitive plastic scintillation detectors; and are less expensive than other comparable instruments. They also have a second operating mode for making precise measurements over counting times as long as 99 s. This mode permits making basic verification measurements that may be needed before transporting nuclear material or waste outside protected areas. Improved verification measurements can be made with a second new hand-held instrument that has a stabilized detector and three separate gamma-ray energy windows to obtain spectral information for SNM quantity, enrichment, or material-type verification.

Fehlau, P.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii for the Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) Field Campaign (an AMF2 Deployment)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

From October 2012 through September 2013, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed on the container ship Spirit, operated by Horizon Lines, for the Marine ARM GPCI* Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign. During approximately 20 round trips between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, AMF2 obtained continuous on-board measurements of cloud and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; surface meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric profiles from weather balloons launched every six hours. During two two-week intensive observational periods in January and July 2013, additional instruments were deployed and balloon soundings were be increased to every three hours. These additional data provided a more detailed characterization of the state of the atmosphere and its daily cycle during two distinctly different seasons. The primary objective of MAGIC was to improve the representation of the stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition in climate models. AMF2 data documented the small-scale physical processes associated with turbulence, convection, and radiation in a variety of marine cloud types.

196

IX. IMPACT OF AEROSOLS FROM THE ERUPTION OF EL CHICHN ON BEAM RADIATION IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measured on clear days the effects of normal climatic differences are avoided. Solar radiation data taken of following this procedure for the clear day solar noon global radiation is shown in Fig. 21. The data shown27 IX. IMPACT OF AEROSOLS FROM THE ERUPTION OF EL CHICHÃ?N ON BEAM RADIATION IN THE PACIFIC

Oregon, University of

197

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planet’s remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energy’s GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities’ pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

198

Method and apparatus for the measurement of signals from radiation sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The preferred embodiments of the present invention include a device for measuring an ionizing event in a radiation sensor. The device can include a charge amplifier and a timing shaper. The charge amplifier receives a cathode signal and is configured to output an amplified cathode signal. The timing shaper is operatively connected to the charge amplifier to receive the amplified cathode signal. The timing shaper is configured to generate a first pulse in response to a beginning of the ionizing event and a second pulse in response to an end of the ionizing event. The first and second pulses are associated with a depth of interaction of the ionizing event and are generated in response to a slope of the amplified cathode signal changing.

De Geronimo, Gianluigi

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

Indoor and Outdoor in Situ High-Resolution Gamma Radiation Measurements in Urban Areas of Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of Th-232 and U-238 series, and K-40 are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +- 0.5.

Svoukis, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Indoor and Outdoor in Situ High-Resolution Gamma Radiation Measurements in Urban Areas of Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of Th-232 and U-238 series, and K-40 are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +- 0.5.

E. Svoukis; H. Tsertos

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Oritz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Marlow, William H. (College Station, TX)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Climate Change and Runoff Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UV radiation Solar radiation Reflected by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (ozone layer) Greenhouse Effect-natural #12 range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW-Madison #12;Temperature

Sheridan, Jennifer

203

A Century of Solar Ca ii Measurements and Their Implication for Solar UV Driving of Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9330-0 A Century of Solar Ca II Measurements and Theirstrong resonance line of Ca II (K line) provide the longestrecent reductions of the Ca II K spectroheliograms obtained

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

Myers, D. R.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Irradiators for measuring the biological effects of low dose-rate ionizing radiation fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological response to ionizing radiation differs with radiation field. Particle type, energy spectrum, and dose-rate all affect biological response per unit dose. This thesis describes methods of spectral analysis, ...

Davidson, Matthew Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like a rock that slowly wears away beneath the pressure of a waterfall, planet earth?s climate is almost imperceptibly changing. Glaciers are getting smaller, droughts are lasting longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods, and tornadoes are occurring with greater frequency. Why? Part of the answer is clouds and the amount of solar radiation they reflect or absorb. These two factors clouds and radiative transfer represent the greatest source of error and uncertainty in the current generation of general circulation models used for climate research and simulation. The U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 established an interagency program within the Executive Office of the President to coordinate U.S. agency-sponsored scientific research designed to monitor, understand, and predict changes in the global environment. To address the need for new research on clouds and radiation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. As part of the DOE?s overall Climate Change Science Program, a primary objective of the ARM Program is improved scientific understanding of the fundamental physics related to interactions between clouds and radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere.

Voyles, J.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

COLORADO CLIMATE Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness Climate - the statistical collection;The Earth's Energy Balance Incoming energy from the sun (solar radiation) heats the Earth Some by the Earth and re-emitted Incoming solar radiation is shorter wavelengths (higher energy) than what

208

ENERGY FLOWS CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY FLOWS FORCINGS CLIMATE CHANGE A REALLY TOUGH PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz, BNL, 7-20-11 www average temperature 15°C or 59°F #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Power per area Energy per time per area Unit" temperature to radiative flux. #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per

Schwartz, Stephen E.

209

RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY DURING THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION INTERCOMPARISON STUDY, MAY-JUNE 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WHOI buoy radiometer intercomparison took place during May and June, 2000 at the WHOI facility. The WHOI IMET, JAMSTEC Triton, and NOAA TAO buoy systems were operated from a beach site and the Brookhaven National Laboratory set up two Portable Radiation Package systems (P01 and P02) alongside the WHOI instrumentation on the roof of the Clark Building, about 300 m away. The BNL instruments were named ''P01'' and ''P02'' and were identical. Buoy instruments were all leveled to {+-}1{degree} to horizontal. The purpose of the project was to compare the buoy systems with precision measurements so that any differences in data collection or processing would be evaluated. BNL was pleased to participate so the PRP system could be evaluated as a calibration tool. The Portable Radiation Package is an integral component of the BNL Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) system. It is designed to make accurate downwelling radiation measurements, including the three solar irradiance components (direct normal, diffuse and global) at six narrowband channels, aerosol optical depth measurements, and broadband longwave and shortwave irradiance measurements.

REYNOLDS, R.M.; BARTHOLOMEW, M.J.; MILLER, M.A.; SMITH, S.; EDWARDS, R.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Climate VISION: How to Participate  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing of ClimateCONTACT

211

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring data was collected at four locations in China during 2008. The various sites are located in regions with different climate regimes and with high aerosol loadings of different optical, physical, and chemical properties. Measurements obtained at all the AMF sites during the 8-month deployment in China will help scientists to validate satellite-based findings, understand the mechanisms of the aerosol indirect effects in the region, and examine the roles of aerosols in affecting regional climate and atmospheric circulation, with a special focus on the impact of the East Asian monsoon system. As with other collections from the ARM Mobile Facility, the datasets are available from the ARM Archive. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

212

Determination of neutral beam energy fractions from collisional radiative measurements on DIII-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutral beams based on positive ion source technology are a key component of contemporary fusion research. An accurate assessment of the injected beam species mix is important for determining the actual plasma heating and momentum input as well as proper interpretation of beam-based diagnostics. On DIII-D, the main ion charge-exchange spectroscopy system is used to extract well-resolved intensity ratios of the Doppler-shifted D{sub {alpha}} emission from the full, half, and third energy beam components for a variety of beam operational parameters. In conjunction with accurate collisional-radiative modeling, these measurements indicate the assumed species mix and power fractions can vary significantly and should be regularly monitored and updated for the most accurate interpretation of plasma performance. In addition, if stable active control of the power fractions can be achieved through appropriate source tuning, the resulting control over the deposition profile can serve as an additional experimental knob for advanced tokamak studies, e.g., varying the off axis beam current drive without altering the beam trajectory.

Thomas, D. M.; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the ARM Program, the DOE funded the development of several highly instrumented ground stations for studying cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer, and for measuring other parameters that determine the radiative properties of the atmosphere. This scientific infrastructure, and resultant data archive, is a valuable national and international asset for advancing scientific knowledge of Earth systems. In fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE designated ARM sites as a national scientific user facility: the ARM Climate Research (ACRF). The ACRF has enormous potential to contribute to a wide range interdisciplinary science in areas such as meteorology, atmospheric aerosols, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, and satellite validation, to name only a few.

J. Voyles

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

High-resolution tangential absolute extreme ultraviolet arrays for radiated power density measurements on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiated-power-density diagnostic on the equatorial midplane for the NSTX-U tokamak will be upgraded to measure the radial structure of the photon emissivity profile with an improved radial resolution. This diagnostic will enhance the characterization and studies of power balance, impurity transport, and MHD. The layout and response expected of the new system is shown for different plasma conditions and impurity concentrations. The effect of toroidal rotation driving poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities is also addressed.

Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kozub, T. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Faust, I. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Tritz, K. [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21209 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to other sites as determined. In 2007 the AMF operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. COPS was endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading.

217

INVESTIGATING THE RELIABILITY OF CORONAL EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION DIAGNOSTICS USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determining the temperature distribution of coronal plasmas can provide stringent constraints on coronal heating. Current observations with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on board Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide diagnostics of the emission measure distribution (EMD) of the coronal plasma. Here we test the reliability of temperature diagnostics using three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations. We produce synthetic observables from the models and apply the Monte Carlo Markov chain EMD diagnostic. By comparing the derived EMDs with the 'true' distributions from the model, we assess the limitations of the diagnostics as a function of the plasma parameters and the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We find that EMDs derived from EIS synthetic data reproduce some general characteristics of the true distributions, but usually show differences from the true EMDs that are much larger than the estimated uncertainties suggest, especially when structures with significantly different density overlap along the line of sight. When using AIA synthetic data the derived EMDs reproduce the true EMDs much less accurately, especially for broad EMDs. The differences between the two instruments are due to the: (1) smaller number of constraints provided by AIA data and (2) broad temperature response function of the AIA channels which provide looser constraints to the temperature distribution. Our results suggest that EMDs derived from current observatories may often show significant discrepancies from the true EMDs, rendering their interpretation fraught with uncertainty. These inherent limitations to the method should be carefully considered when using these distributions to constrain coronal heating.

Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Measuring short electron bunch lengths using coherent Smith-Purcell radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for directly determining the length of sub-picosecond electron bunches. A metallic grating is formed with a groove spacing greater than a length expected for the electron bunches. The electron bunches are passed over the metallic grating to generate coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. The angular distribution of the coherent Smith-Purcell radiation is then mapped to directly deduce the length of the electron bunches. 8 figs.

Nguyen, D.C.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Measuring short electron bunch lengths using coherent smith-purcell radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for directly determining the length of sub-picosecond electron bunches. A metallic grating is formed with a groove spacing greater than a length expected for the electron bunches. The electron bunches are passed over the metallic grating to generate coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. The angular distribution of the coherent Smith-Purcell radiation is then mapped to directly deduce the length of the electron bunches.

Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Improvements in Near-Terminator and Nocturnal Cloud Masks using Satellite Imager Data over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud detection using satellite measurements presents a big challenge near the terminator where the visible (VIS; 0.65 {micro}m) channel becomes less reliable and the reflected solar component of the solar infrared 3.9-{micro}m channel reaches very low signal-to-noise ratio levels. As a result, clouds are underestimated near the terminator and at night over land and ocean in previous Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program cloud retrievals using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager data. Cloud detection near the terminator has always been a challenge. For example, comparisons between the CLAVR-x (Clouds from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer [AVHRR]) cloud coverage and Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) measurements north of 60{sup o}N indicate significant amounts of missing clouds from AVHRR because this part of the world was near the day/night terminator viewed by AVHRR. Comparisons between MODIS cloud products and GLAS at the same regions also shows the same difficulty in the MODIS cloud retrieval (Pavolonis and Heidinger 2005). Consistent detection of clouds at all times of day is needed to provide reliable cloud and radiation products for ARM and other research efforts involving the modeling of clouds and their interaction with the radiation budget. To minimize inconsistencies between daytime and nighttime retrievals, this paper develops an improved twilight and nighttime cloud mask using GOES-9, 10, and 12 imager data over the ARM sites and the continental United States (CONUS).

Trepte, Q.Z.; Minnis, P.; Heck, P.W.; Palikonda, R.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A 25-month database of stratus cloud properties generated from ground-based measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 25-month database of the macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties of isolated and overcast low-level stratus clouds has been generated using a newly developed parameterization and surface measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement central facility in Oklahoma. The database (5-min resolution) includes two parts: measurements and retrievals. The former consist of cloud base and top heights, layer-mean temperature, cloud liquid water path, and solar transmission ratio measured by a ground-based lidar/ceilometer and radar pair, radiosondes, a microwave radiometer, and a standard Eppley precision spectral pyranometer, respectively. The retrievals include the cloud-droplet effective radius and number concentration and broadband shortwave optical depth and cloud and top-of-atmosphere albedos. Stratus without any overlying mid or high-level clouds occurred most frequently during winter and least often during summer. Mean cloud-layer altitudes and geometric thicknesses were higher and greater, respectively, in summer than in winter. Both quantities are positively correlated with the cloud-layer mean temperature. Mean cloud-droplet effective radii range from 8.1 {mu}m in winter to 9.7 {mu}m during summer, while cloud-droplet number concentrations during winter are nearly twice those in summer. Since cloud liquid water paths are almost the same in both seasons, cloud optical depth is higher during the winter, leading to greater cloud albedos and lower cloud transmittances. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

Dong, Xiquan [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States)] [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States); Ackerman, Thomas P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States); Clothiaux, Eugene E. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Mace, Gerald G. [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Long, Charles N. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Liljegren, James C. [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)] [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

222

Planning for Climate Impacts Wisconsin's Coastal Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reflected by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat relevant to climate impacts in Wisconsin GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW-Madison Result

Sheridan, Jennifer

223

Interpolation of surface radiative temperature measured from polar orbiting satellites to a diurnal cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Instruments on polar orbiting satellites, such as advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) or Moderate. This approach is based on the surface energy balance with the soil heat flux being treated by a conventional in temperate and tropical regions, observed empirical relationships between solar radiative energy and skin

Jin, Menglin

224

Radiation Measurements 41 (2006) 903909 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Effect of high-dose irradiation on the optically stimulated luminescence of Al2O3:C. Radiat. Meas. 38 dependence of OSL intensity due to competition during irradiation and readout V. Pagonisa , R. Chenb,,1 , J effect has been observed in the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of some materials such as quartz

Chen, Reuven

225

Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere: Further interpretations of collocated aircraft measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere: Further interpretations of collocated%) of this enhanced cloud absorption occurs at wavelengths 680 nm, and that the observed cloud absorption does stated, the purpose of ARESE was to address the issue of cloud shortwave (SW) absorption. Do clouds

Zender, Charles

226

Radiated power measurement during the thermal quench phase of a density limit disruption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but is believed to conduct preferentially to the divertor plates.4,5 In future reactor-size tokamaks, where stored of highly radiating impurities usually a noble gas such as neon , either through a massive gas puff11 to affect the plasma after being triggered and are therefore not fast enough to mitigate the entire dis

California at San Diego, University of

227

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Site.  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is one of the four fixed sites. It consists of three climate research facilities; the Manus facility on Los Negros Island in Manus, Papua New Guinea (established in 1996); the Nauru facility on Nauru Island, Republic of Nauru (1998); and the Darwin facility in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (2002). The operations are supported by government agencies in each host country. Covering the area roughly between 10 degrees N and 10 degrees S of the equator and from 130 degrees E to 167 degrees E, the TWP locale includes a region that plays a large role in the interannual variability observed in the global climate system. More than 250,000 TWP data sets from 1996 to the present reside in the ARM Archive. Begin at the TWP information page for links or access data directly from the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

229

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Radiation Measurements 38 (2004) 13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commonly used for measurements of concentrations of radon gas and/or radon progeny. These measurements methodologies regard- ing short-lived radon progeny. There are a few di erent approaches to this problem, all

Yu, K.N.

230

METEOROLOGY 5503 CLIMATE DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Present Average Climate System Behavior (14 lectures) History; Vision of Victor Starr; Global Budgets of Angular Momentum, Energy, Water Vapor; Regional Water Budget; Meridional Ocean Heat Transport 3 and Indices: Diagnostic Tools (wind stress curl, velocity potential, outgoing LW radiation); ENSO cycles

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

231

Statistics and Climate Models Cari Kaufman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Climate System · Atmosphere · Ocean · Cryosphere · Land surface, biosphere · Atmospheric chemistry SAMSI Components of climate models: · Radiation - input, absorption, and emission · Dynamics - movement of energy's planetary radiation budget · Can run on a desktop computer · Predict surface temperature · Usually are 0-D

232

The radiation stability of glycine in solid CO2 - in situ laboratory measurements with applications to Mars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of biologically important, organic molecules on Mars is an important goal that may soon be reached. However, the current small number of organic detections at the Martian surface may be due to the harsh UV and radiation conditions there. It seems likely that a successful search will require probing the subsurface of Mars, where penetrating cosmic rays and Solar energetic particles dominate the radiation environment, with an influence that weakens with depth. Toward the goal of understanding the survival of organic molecules in cold radiation-rich environments on Mars, we present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of glycine diluted in frozen carbon dioxide. Rate constants were measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy, without additional sample manipulation, for irradiations at 25, 50, and 75 K with 0.8-MeV protons. The resulting half-lives for glycine in CO2-ice are compared to previous results for glycine in H2O-ice and show that glycine in CO2-ice is much less stable in a radia...

Gerakines, P A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The influence of laser clipped by the laser entrance hole on hohlraum radiation measurement on Shenguang-III prototype  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measuring the x-ray flux exiting the target's laser entrance hole (LEH) is the most common diagnostic that quantifies the x-ray intensity inside the laser-driven hohlraum. However, this signal accounts for only a small portion of the incident laser power and thus is likely to be affected by unwanted x-ray background from non-target area, leading to an overestimation of the hohlraum drive. Unwanted emission might be produced when the laser light is clipped by the LEH (LEH clipping) because of a lack of clearance for laser spot, or with a laser spot comprising of discrete structure, or even with a poor pointing accuracy. Its influence on the hohlraum radiation diagnostic is investigated on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility with the typical 1 ns square pulse. The experiment employed three types of targets to excite the unwanted x-ray background from LEH clipping, unconverted light, and both effects, respectively. This work gives an absolute evaluation of x-ray produced by the LEH clipping, which is measured by flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRD) at multiple view angles. The result indicates that there is little variation in measured emission to various view angles, because the unwanted x-rays are mainly generated at the side face of the LEH lip when laser is obliquely incident. Therefore, the LEH clipping brings more overestimation in hohlraum radiation measurement at larger view angle since the hohlraum LEH as an emitting source viewed by FXRD is decreased as the view angle increases. In our condition, the LEH clipping contributes 2%–3.5% overestimation to the hohlraum flux measurement.

Yang, Dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China) [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Radiation Dose Measurement System for the BaBar Electromagnetic Calorimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An array of 116 p-channel radiation sensitive MOSFET transistors (RadFETs) has been operational for the past 6 years at the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric B-Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This system maps the integrated dose absorbed by different regions of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC) during the running of the experiment. We report on the design and implementation of the system and finally, the performance of the monitoring system during the last 6 years of BaBar data-taking.

Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Meyer, W.T.; /Iowa State U.; Stelzer, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Yi, Jong; /Manchester U.

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Instrument Report Fourth Quarter: October 1–December 30, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report January 1–March 30, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, and (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved.

Sivaraman, C

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cloud-Climate Feedback: Lessons Learned From Two El nio Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud-Climate Feedback: Lessons Learned From Two El niño Events Minghua Zhang Institute - ABSTRACT Monthly ERBE and CERES measurements are used to study the response of cloud radiative forcing that the response of cloud forcing to SST over the whole tropics is very different from that to local SST changes

Zhang, Minghua

238

Quality Control Quantification (QCQ): A Tool to Measure the Value of Quality Control Checks in Radiation Oncology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify the error-detection effectiveness of commonly used quality control (QC) measures. Methods: We analyzed incidents from 2007-2010 logged into a voluntary in-house, electronic incident learning systems at 2 academic radiation oncology clinics. None of the incidents resulted in patient harm. Each incident was graded for potential severity using the French Nuclear Safety Authority scoring scale; high potential severity incidents (score >3) were considered, along with a subset of 30 randomly chosen low severity incidents. Each report was evaluated to identify which of 15 common QC checks could have detected it. The effectiveness was calculated, defined as the percentage of incidents that each QC measure could detect, both for individual QC checks and for combinations of checks. Results: In total, 4407 incidents were reported, 292 of which had high-potential severity. High- and low-severity incidents were detectable by 4.0 {+-} 2.3 (mean {+-} SD) and 2.6 {+-} 1.4 QC checks, respectively (P<.001). All individual checks were less than 50% sensitive with the exception of pretreatment plan review by a physicist (63%). An effectiveness of 97% was achieved with 7 checks used in combination and was not further improved with more checks. The combination of checks with the highest effectiveness includes physics plan review, physician plan review, Electronic Portal Imaging Device-based in vivo portal dosimetry, radiation therapist timeout, weekly physics chart check, the use of checklists, port films, and source-to-skin distance checks. Some commonly used QC checks such as pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy QA do not substantially add to the ability to detect errors in these data. Conclusions: The effectiveness of QC measures in radiation oncology depends sensitively on which checks are used and in which combinations. A small percentage of errors cannot be detected by any of the standard formal QC checks currently in broad use, suggesting that further improvements are needed. These data require confirmation with a broader incident-reporting database.

Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Terezakis, Stephanie; Souranis, Annette; Harris, Kendra [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Radiation Measurements 36 (2003) 161164  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of radon gas and/or radon progeny. All these measurements depend critically on the thickness of the removed, there is no widely accepted methods for long-term passive measurements of radon progeny concentrations, despite methodologies regarding short-lived radon progeny has attracted much attention in the ÿeld of radon dosimetry

Yu, K.N.

240

Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Solar UV radiation exposure of seamen - Measurements, calibration and model calculations of erythemal irradiance along ship routes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seamen working on vessels that go along tropical and subtropical routes are at risk to receive high doses of solar erythemal radiation. Due to small solar zenith angles and low ozone values, UV index and erythemal dose are much higher than at mid-and high latitudes. UV index values at tropical and subtropical Oceans can exceed UVI = 20, which is more than double of typical mid-latitude UV index values. Daily erythemal dose can exceed the 30-fold of typical midlatitude winter values. Measurements of erythemal exposure of different body parts on seamen have been performed along 4 routes of merchant vessels. The data base has been extended by two years of continuous solar irradiance measurements taken on the mast top of RV METEOR. Radiative transfer model calculations for clear sky along the ship routes have been performed that use satellite-based input for ozone and aerosols to provide maximum erythemal irradiance and dose. The whole data base is intended to be used to derive individual erythemal exposure of seamen during work-time.

Feister, Uwe [German Meteorological Service, Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg - Richard-Assmann-Observatory, Am Observatorium 12, 15848 Lindenberg (Germany); Meyer, Gabriele; Kirst, Ulrich [German Social Accident Insurance Institution for Transport and Traffic, Ottenser Hauptstrasse 54, 22765 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

242

Estimating direct, diffuse, and global solar radiation for various cities in Iran by two methods and their comparison with the measured data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two computational methods for calculating hourly, daily, and monthly average values of direct, diffuse, and global solar radiation on horizontal collectors have been presented in this article for location with different latitude, altitude, and atmospheric conditions in Iran. These methods were developed using two different independent sets of measured data from the Iranian Meteorological Organization (IMO) for two cities in Iran (Tehran and Isfahan) during 14 years of measurement for Tehran and 4 years of measurement for Isfahan. Comparison of calculated monthly average global solar radiation, using the two models for Tehran and Isfahan with measured data from the IMO, has indicated a good agreement between them. Then these developed methods were extended to another location (city of Bandar-Abbas), where measured data are not available. But the work of Daneshyar predicts its monthly global radiation. The maximum discrepancy of 7% between the developed models and the work of Daneshyar was observed.

Ashjaee, M.; Roomina, M.R.; Ghafouri-Azar, R. (Univ. of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Specific Instruments Used in the ARM Program  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ARM is known for its comprehensive set of world-class, and in some cases, unique, instruments available for use by the global scientific community. In addition to the ARM instruments, the ARM Climate Research Facility identifies and acquires a wide variety of data including model, satellite, and surface data, from "external instruments," to augment the data being generated within the program. External instruments belong to organizations that are outside of the ARM Program. Field campaign instruments are another source of data used to augment routine observations. The huge archive of ARM data can be organized by instrument categories into twelve "collections:" Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties, Derived Quantities and Models, Ocean Observations, Radiometric, Satellite Observations, Surface Meteorology, Surface/Subsurface Properties, and Other. Clicking on one of the instrument categories leads to a page that breaks that category down into sub-categories. For example, "Atmospheric Profiling" is broken down into ARM instruments (with 11 subsets), External Instruments (with 6 subsets), and Field Campaign Instruments (with 42 subsets). Each of the subset links, in turn, leads to detailed information pages and links to specific data streams. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading.

244

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report May 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

245

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information October 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report August 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information December 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report June 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report July 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

250

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information March 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information January 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

252

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information February 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information April 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report September 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radiation Measurements 40 (2005) 146159 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

margins. Technological applications have expanded from biological filters, radon mapping, and dosimetry aerogels capable of measuring kinetic energies of hypervelocity interstellar and interplanetary dust grains; Thermochronology; Biological filters; Radon mapping; Dosimetry; Ion track microlithography; Ion track etching

Price, P. Buford

256

Geologic and climatic controls on the formation of the Permian coal measures in the Sohagpur coal field, Madhya Pradesh, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of India (GSI) are concluding a cooperative study of the coking coal deposits in the Sohagpur coal field in central India. Because of the importance of coal in India's economy, the Coal Wing of the Geological Survey of India has studied the area intensely since the early 1980's. This report summarizes the overall stratigraphic, tectonic, and sedimentologic framework of the Sohagpur coal field area, and the interpretations of the geologic and climatic environments required for the accumulation of the thick Gondwana coal deposits, both coking and non-coking.

Milici, R.C.; Warwick, P.D.; Mukhopadhyah, A.; Adhikari, S.; Roy, S.P.; Bhattacharyya, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Final Report - Satellite Calibration and Verification of Remotely Sensed Cloud and Radiation Properties Using ARM UAV Data (February 28, 1995 - February 28, 1998)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work proposed under this agreement was designed to validate and improve remote sensing of cloud and radiation properties in the atmosphere for climate studies with special emphasis on the use of satellites for monitoring these parameters to further the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program.

Minnis, Patrick

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Climate VISION: 1605 (B) Reporting Guidelines  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing of Climate

259

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiation Measurements 43 (2008) 14171422 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.40 Keywords: PADC; Tracks; Etching; Light; Simulation 1. Introduction Solid-state nuclear track detectors, scattered light was used to measure track densities from exper- iments related to neutron dosimetry (Harvey) developed a model for laser light scattering by nuclear tracks in CR-39 detectors. The model was based

Yu, K.N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

Guss, P. P.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

Radiation Measurements 42 (2007) 15871599 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements made during dating appli- cations. This may be carried out using the thermoluminescence (TL data of Wintle and Murray [1998. Towards the development of a preheat procedure for OSL dating of a short ther- mal treatment (such as 10 s at 260 C) is commonly employed during dating studies of quartz

Chen, Reuven

263

NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

264

Radiation environment simulations at the Tevatron, studies of the beam profile and measurement of the Bc meson mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The description of a computer simulation of the CDF detector at Fermilab and the adjacent accelerator parts is detailed, with MARS calculations of the radiation background in various elements of the model due to the collision of beams and machine-related losses. Three components of beam halo formation are simulated for the determination of the principal source of radiation background in CDF due to beam losses. The effect of a collimator as a protection for the detector is studied. The simulation results are compared with data taken by a CDF group. Studies of a 150 GeV Tevatron proton beam are performed to investigate the transverse diffusion growth and distribution. A technique of collimator scan is used to scrape the beam under various experimental conditions, and computer programs are written for the beam reconstruction. An average beam halo growth speed is given and the potential of beam tail reconstruction using the collimator scan is evaluated. A particle physics analysis is conducted in order to detect the B{sub c} {yields} J/{psi}{pi} decay signal with the CDF Run II detector in 360 pb{sup -1} of data. The cut variables and an optimization method to determine their values are presented along with a criterion for the detection threshold of the signal. The mass of the B{sub c} meson is measured with an evaluation of the significance of the signal.

Nicolas, Ludovic Y.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Betatron radiation based measurement of the electron-beam size in a wakefield accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a spatial and spectral characterization of a laser-plasma based betatron source which allows us to determine the betatron oscillation amplitude of the electrons which decreases with increasing electron energies. Due to the observed oscillation amplitude and the independently measured x-ray source size of (1.8{+-}0.3){mu}m we are able to estimate the electron bunch diameter to be (1.6{+-}0.3){mu}m.

Schnell, Michael; Saevert, Alexander; Reuter, Maria [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich- Schiller- Universitaet, Jena (Germany); and others

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

On the Correlation between Forcing and Climate Sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possible correlation between climate sensitivity and radiative forcing is studied using versions of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) model with different climate sensitivities. No such correlation was found ...

Sokolov, Andrei

267

Climate change and the importance of empowering citizens.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Educational response to climate change is one of the measures to prepare people to combat climate change. This thesis explores the lived experiences of… (more)

Maharjan, Ramesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Projected climate change effects on winterkill in shallow lakes in the northern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each winter, hundreds of ice-covered, shallow lakes in the northern US are aerated to prevent winterkill, the death of fish due to oxygen depletion under the ice. How will the projected climate warming influence winterkill and the need to artificially aerate lakes? To answer this question, a deterministic, one-dimensional year-round water quality model, which simulates daily dissolved oxygen (DO) profiles and associated water temperatures as well as ice/snow covers on lakes, was applied. Past and projected climate scenarios were investigated. The lake parameters required as model input are surface area, maximum depth, and Secchi depth as a measure of radiation attenuation and trophic state. The model is driven by daily weather data. Weather records from 209 stations in the contiguous US for the period 1961--1979 were used to represent past climate conditions. The projected climate change due to a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} was obtained from the output of the Canadian Climate Center General Circulation Model. To illustrate the effect of projected climate change on lake DO characteristics, the authors present herein DO information simulated, respectively, with inputs of past climate conditions and with a projected 2 x CO{sub 2} climate scenario, as well as differences of those values. Specific parameters obtained were minimum under-ice and lake bottom DO concentration in winter, duration of under-ice anoxic conditions and low DO conditions, and percentage of anoxic and low DO lake volumes during the ice cover period. Under current climate conditions winterkill occurs typically in shallow eutrophic lakes of the northern contiguous US. Climate warming is projected to eliminate winterkill in these lakes. This would be a positive effect of climate warming. Fish species under ice may still experience periods of stress and zero growth due to low DO conditions under projected climate warming.

Fang, X.; Stefan, H.G.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nuclear Reaction Cross-Section Measurements via Characterization of Soft Radiation Emitting Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear reaction cross-section measurements via the activation technique are generally made using high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometry. However, in cases where the radioactive product decays exclusively by EC (without emitting a {gamma}-ray) resort has to be made to the rather subtle technique of x-ray spectrometry. Similarly for characterisation of pure {beta}- emitters, gas-flow proportional or liquid-scintillation counting is applied. In both cases the use of radiochemical methods is most essential. We studied the natTi(p,xn)49V and 85Rb(p,4n)82Sr reactions via x-ray spectrometry. In each case a clean radiochemical separation was performed and a thin source was prepared. The radioactivity of 49V was determined using the soft 4.5-keV k{alpha} x-rays and that of 82Sr via the 13.4-keV k{alpha} x-rays. In another study, the reactions natTi(p,x)45Ca, 89Y(n,p)89Sr, and natPb(p,x)204Tl were investigated. All the products are pure {beta}- emitters and therefore clean radiochemical separations were mandatory. The radioactivity of each of the three products was determined via low-level anticoincidence {beta}- counting. Furthermore, in the case of 45Ca, liquid-scintillation counting was also used. The results obtained using different techniques are compared.

Kettern, K.; Spahn, I.; Spellerberg, S.; Qaim, S.M.; Coenen, H.H. [Institut fuer Nuklearchemie, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

ARM Climate Research Facility Radar Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roles, responsibilities, and processes associated with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Radar Operations.

Voyles, JW

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water ({approximately}40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and ground water streams (the primary water types of interest to the DOE). As an example of the user demand for such an analytical instrument, a portion of the Field Test for the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was on the DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation, at two test locations in the Y-12 Site's Bear Creek Valley.

Unknown

1999-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century Miche`le B; accepted 30 November 2006; published 10 January 2007. [1] A Climate Change Index (CCI) is developed to a single index that is a measure for the strength of future climate change relative to today's natural

Fischlin, Andreas

274

Adapting to Climate Change in Wisconsin Strategies for Conservation Professionals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) gr

Sheridan, Jennifer

275

Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

National Climate Plan Published by NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the extent to which solar and earth radiation modify climatic conditions, and 4) Gathering more data probably will rely on leased aircraft, an antenna system that will mount on any type of aircraft would

277

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid RainTheimage

278

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August 1999 ARM

279

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August 1999

280

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August 1999July

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August

282

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3 ARM 2003

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced space radiators Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of space and time structures of the radiation. Daily calibration factors of the satellite sensors... for solar radiation, local climate, and the space and time local...

284

Climate determinism revisited: multiple equilibria in a complex climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. We demonstrate that the multiple equilibria owe `snowball' state. Although low-order energy balance models of the climate are known to exhibit-640 Ma ago, e.g. Hoffmann et al. 1998), to a warm-house (no-ice) in the Cretaceous (e.g. Zachos et al

Marshall, John

285

Climate Forcings and Climate Sensitivities Diagnosed from Coupled Climate Model Integrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple technique is proposed for calculating global mean climate forcing from transient integrations of coupled Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs). This 'climate forcing' differs from the conventionally defined radiative forcing as it includes semi-direct effects that account for certain short timescale responses in the troposphere. Firstly, we calculate a climate feedback term from reported values of 2 x CO{sub 2} radiative forcing and surface temperature time series from 70-year simulations by twenty AOGCMs. In these simulations carbon dioxide is increased by 1%/year. The derived climate feedback agrees well with values that we diagnose from equilibrium climate change experiments of slab-ocean versions of the same models. These climate feedback terms are associated with the fast, quasi-linear response of lapse rate, clouds, water vapor and albedo to global surface temperature changes. The importance of the feedbacks is gauged by their impact on the radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We find partial compensation between longwave and shortwave feedback terms that lessens the inter-model differences in the equilibrium climate sensitivity. There is also some indication that the AOGCMs overestimate the strength of the positive longwave feedback. These feedback terms are then used to infer the shortwave and longwave time series of climate forcing in 20th and 21st Century simulations in the AOGCMs. We validate the technique using conventionally calculated forcing time series from four AOGCMs. In these AOGCMs the shortwave and longwave climate forcings we diagnose agree with the conventional forcing time series within {approx}10%. The shortwave forcing time series exhibit order of magnitude variations between the AOGCMs, differences likely related to how both natural forcings and/or anthropogenic aerosol effects are included. There are also factor of two differences in the longwave climate forcing time series, which may indicate problems with the modeling of well-mixed-greenhouse-gas changes. The simple diagnoses we present provide an important and useful first step for understanding differences in AOGCM integrations, indicating that some of the differences in model projections can be attributed to different prescribed climate forcing, even for so-called standard climate change scenarios.

Forster, P M A F; Taylor, K E

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Climate forcing Climate forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters (solar distance factors) solar luminosity moon orbit volcanoes and other geothermal sources,000 years (large panels) and since 1750 (inset panels). Measurements are shown from ice cores (symbols forcings are shown on the right hand axes of the large panels. {Figure 6.4} !"#$#%&'(!&#)$&*$+#$,-.$/0

MacKinnon, Jennifer

287

Climate Change Worksheet Energy Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of distance from the equator). The tropics are net absorbers of energy as the amount of absorbed solar energyClimate Change Worksheet «» Energy Budget For any balanced budget, what comes in must equal what goes out. In the case of planets orbiting the Sun, this means that the incoming solar radiation must

Allan, Richard P.

288

Colorado Climate Update Nolan Doesken  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Colorado Farm Show Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Prepared by Wendy Ryan and Zach Schwalbe #12;Topics we;Monitoring our Climate · Elements: temperature, precipitation, snow, wind, solar, evaporation, soil Average Solar Radiation National Renewal Energy Laboratory: www.nrel.gov Colorado is a part

289

SPECTRAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE AND ITS ENTROPIC EFFECT ON EARTH'S CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPECTRAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE AND ITS ENTROPIC EFFECT ON EARTH'S CLIMATE Wei Wu1 , Yangang Liu1 of the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) at the top of the Earth's atmosphere by the Solar Radiation and Climate's entropy flux from the TOA incident solar radiation. Two extreme cases are examined by using Planck

290

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but increasingly so in developing countries and economies in transition. Certain measures that integrate climateORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation and adaptation: an insurance an aggregator of the impacts of climate change and a market actor able to play a material role in decreasing

291

Solar Radiometric Data Quality Assessment of SIRS, SKYRAD and GNDRAD Measurements (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar radiation is the driving force for the earth's weather and climate. Understanding the elements of this dynamic energy balance requires accurate measurements of broadband solar irradiance. Since the mid-1990's the ARM Program has deployed pyrheliometers and pyranometers for the measurement of direct normal irradiance (DNI), global horizontal irradiance (GHI), diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), and upwelling shortwave (US) radiation at permanent and mobile field research sites. This poster summarizes the basis for assessing the broadband solar radiation data available from the SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD measurement systems and provides examples of data inspections.

Habte, A.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Gotseff, P.; Anderberg, M.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

aerosols and climate : uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

293

AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

SCHWARTZ, S.E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

Pan, Feifei

295

SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Ly?. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (?) has increased slightly from ? = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to ? = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Saul, L.; Wurz, P. [University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Frisch, P. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gruntman, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mueller, H. R. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Solar Influences on Climate Professor Joanna Haigh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Influences on Climate Professor Joanna Haigh Executive Summary The Sun provides the energy to be much smaller than those due to increasing greenhouse gases. What are the sources of variation in solar radiation? There are two main sources of variation in solar radiation. First, there are internal stellar

Rosso, Lula

297

Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clouds represent a critical component of the Earth’s atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country`s vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

Bhatti, N.; Cirillo, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dixon, R.K. [U.S. Country Studies Program, Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmospheric and cold regions to warm more than other regions. Keywords Climate dynamics Á Climate change Á Climate

Dommenget, Dietmar

300

Review: Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

Smith, Jennifer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Apportioning Climate Change Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

Farber, Daniel A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

Battisti, David

303

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

Baugher, Elizabeth

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Finland by M. HW1'aien et al. (1985). Further development on the MPA was performed in several countries ineluding the United States where Perez (1986) presented a method for deriving beam radiation from a series of vertically mounted pyranometers...

Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Novel Retrieval Algorithm for Cloud Optical Properties from the Atmopsheric Radiation Measurement Program's Two-Channel Narrow-Field-of-View Radiometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud optical depth is the most important of all cloud optical properties, and vital for any cloud-radiation parameterization. To estimate cloud optical depth, the atmospheric science community has widely used ground-based flux measurements from either broadband or narrowband radiometers in the past decade. However, this type of technique is limited to overcast conditions and, at best, gives us an "effective" cloud optical depth instead of its "local" value. Unlike flux observations, monochromatic narrow-field-of-view (NFOV) radiance measurements contain information of local cloud properties, but unfortunately, the use of radiance to interpret optical depth suffers from retrieval ambiguity. We have pioneered an algorithm to retrieve cloud optical depth in a fully three-dimensional cloud situation using new Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) NFOV measurements. The underlying principle of the algorithm is that these two channels have similar cloud properties but strong spectral contrast in surface reflectance. This algorthm offers the first opportunity to illustrate cloud evolution with high temporal resolution retrievals. A combination of two-channel NFOV radiances with multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) fluxes for the retrieval of cloud optical properties is also discussed.

Wiscombe, Warren J.; Marshak, A.; Chiu, J.-Y. C.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

A Statistician's view of the Climate Douglas Nychka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistician's climate system 18 · Towers measuring CO2 fluxes · Dry and wet deposition · Flask samples of CO2 · Weather vs. Climate · Issues of Climate Change · Earth's climate system: Green house effect, Thermohaline surface temperatures Cooling: La Nina Warming: El Nino #12;hydrologic cycle and societal impacts D. Nychka

Nychka, Douglas

307

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species Niklaus E. Zimmermanna,1 of climate extremes suggests the importance of understanding their additional influence on range limits. Here, we assess how measures representing climate extremes (i.e., interannual variability in climate

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

308

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS’ high sampling resolution to study the “twilight zone” around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM’s 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM’s operational data processing.

Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine [University of Reading] [University of Reading

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Changing Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these data with predictions from the IPCC. Professor of geography at Texas State University, Dr. David Butler, does climate change research mainly in the Rocky Moun- tains with U.S. Geological Survey funding. He has also done research on how climate...://wiid.twdb.state.tx.us Detailed information about individual water wells. This system uses a geographic information system-based tool to show locations of water wells and download data on water levels and water quality. Reports that were developed about on-site conditions...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A new scenario framework for climate change research: The concept of Shared Climate Policy Assumptions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the concept of shared climate policy assumptions as an important element of the new scenario framework. Shared climate policy assumptions capture key climate policy dimensions such as the type and scale of mitigation and adaptation measures. They are not specified in the socio-economic reference pathways, and therefore introduce an important third dimension to the scenario matrix architecture. Climate policy assumptions will have to be made in any climate policy scenario, and can have a significant impact on the scenario description. We conclude that a meaningful set of shared climate policy assumptions is useful for grouping individual climate policy analyses and facilitating their comparison. Shared climate policy assumptions should be designed to be policy relevant, and as a set to be broad enough to allow a comprehensive exploration of the climate change scenario space.

Kriegler, Elmar; Edmonds, James A.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Ebi, Kristie L.; Kram, Tom; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Perception of risk: proceedings of the XVth annual meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book is a conglomerate of formal papers, discussions, and the textual minutes of a round table discussion with audience participation. The first part, and most interesting from my view-point, deals with the perception of risk or harm and societal attitudes. The second part contains papers that seem to be historical primers concerning radiobiology. This subject is surrounded by controversy, and it seems in part to be approached as an elephant would be by a tribe of blind zoologists. They poke and pinch, sometimes describe small parts in great detail, but never exactly circumscribe the object of the study. The purpose is to present a discussion of the harm due to radiation, specifically radiation from power sources. Closely related to this is the question of the regulatory agencies' role.

Goris, M.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

5, 1170311728, 2005 Measurements of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate and Global Change Research, Finnish Meteorological Institute, P.O. Box 503, 00 101 Helsinki polluted trajec- tory patterns represented air masses from the Kola Peninsula, Scandinavia and Russia15 There is a growing evidence that the Earth's radiation budget, and thus climate, is affected through radiative

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

313

astroph/9507030 Gravitational Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

astro­ph/9507030 10 Jul 95 Gravitational Radiation and Very Long Baseline Interferometry Ted Pyne of gravitational radiation on astrometric observations. We derive an equation for the time delay measured by two antennae observing the same source in an Einstein­de Sitter spacetime containing gravitational radiation

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

314

Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ?

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Climate Change and Extinctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

Sinervo, Barry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Measurement of natural radioactivity and assessment of radiation hazard indices in soil samples at Pengerang, Kota Tinggi, Johor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pengerang area consists of a mix of private plantation, individual residential lots and state land, which is leased for agriculture related activities. The analysis was conducted to determine the specific activity of the initial value and the radiation hazard indices in the surrounding area in Pengerang. This area will be developed into a major downstream for oil and gas. The aims of this preliminary study were 1) to determine the specific activities of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K of soil samples at six selected areas by Gamma-ray spectrometry and 2) to calculate the radiation hazard indices. The specific activities (Bq/kg) of the samples ranged from 7.08±5.01 to 36.29±25.72 Bq/kg, 5.62±3.98 to 34.53±24.07 Bq/kg, 4.75±3.42 to 24.76±17.66 Bq/kg and 10.58±7.51 to 101.25±72.00 Bq/kg for {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K, respectively. These values were well within the range that reported by UNSCEAR. The study also examined the radiation hazard indices, the mean values obtained were 48.49±28.06 Bq/kg for Radium Equivalent Activity (Raeq), 0.34 Bq/kg for Representative Level Index (I{sub ?}), 21.83 nGy/h for Absorbed dose rates (D), 0.27 mSv/y for Annual Effective Dose Rates (Deff), 0.13 and 0.18 for External Hazards Index (H{sub ex}) and Internal Hazard Index (H{sub in}), respectively. These calculated hazard indices were used to estimate the potential radiological health risk in soil and the dose rates associated with it were well below their permissible limit. The overall findings show that no radiological threat to the health of the population in the study area.

Hassan, Nur Nazihah; Khoo, Kok Siong [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) was designed to provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the ARM Mobile Facility and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System were deployed on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations were supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods, one in the summer and a second in the winter.

318

Individualism Submerged: Climate Change and the Perils of an Engineered Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Warming Climate on Water Availa- bility in Snow-of Natural Water Supplies . c.radiation or ameliorate sea-water inundation. In place of

Chepaitis, Daniel J.; Panagakis, Andrea K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy Jonathan Rougier University of Bristol, UK Michel1.tex. 1 Introduction This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical

320

A climatic thermostat making Earth habitable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mean surface temperature on Earth and other planets with atmospheres is determined by the radiative balance between the non-reflected incoming solar radiation and the outgoing long-wave black-body radiation from the atmosphere. The surface temperature is higher than the black-body temperature due to the greenhouse warming. Balancing the ice-albedo cooling and the greenhouse warming gives rise to two stable climate states. A cold climate state with a completelyice-covered planet, called Snowball Earth, and a warm state similar to our present climate where greenhouse warming prevents the total glacition. The warm state has dominated Earth in most of its geological history despite a 30 % fainter young Sun. The warming could have been controlled by a greenhouse thermostat operating by temperature control of the weathering process depleting the atmosphere from $CO_2$. This temperature control has permitted life to evolve as early as the end of the heavy bombartment 4 billion years ago.

Peter D. Ditlevsen

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report First Quarter: October 01-December 31, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

Sivaraman, C

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Fourth Quarter: July 1–September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

Sivaraman, C

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

Optical Measurement Technologies for High Temperature, Radiation Exposure, and Corrosive Environments—Significant Activities and Findings: In-vessel Optical Measurements for Advanced SMRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of advanced Small Modular Reactors (aSMRs) is key to providing the United States with a sustainable, economically viable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The aSMR designs have attractive economic factors that should compensate for the economies of scale that have driven development of large commercial nuclear power plants to date. For example, aSMRs can be manufactured at reduced capital costs in a factory and potentially shorter lead times and then be shipped to a site to provide power away from large grid systems. The integral, self-contained nature of aSMR designs is fundamentally different than conventional reactor designs. Future aSMR deployment will require new instrumentation and control (I&C) architectures to accommodate the integral design and withstand the extreme in-vessel environmental conditions. Operators will depend on sophisticated sensing and machine vision technologies that provide efficient human-machine interface for in-vessel telepresence, telerobotic control, and remote process operations. The future viability of aSMRs is dependent on understanding and overcoming the significant technical challenges involving in-vessel reactor sensing and monitoring under extreme temperatures, pressures, corrosive environments, and radiation fluxes

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Suter, Jonathan D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Radiative Flux Analysis  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

Long, Chuck [NOAA

325

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Validation of Surface Retrieved Cloud Optical Properties with in situ Measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) South Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface inferred cloud optical properties from a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer have been validated against the in situ measurements during the second ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE II) field campaign at the ARM South Great Plains (SGP) site. On the basis of eight effective radius profiles measured by the in situ Forward Spectra Scattering Probe (FSSP), our retrieved cloud effective radii for single-layer warm water clouds agree well with in situ measurements, within 5.5%. The sensitivity study also illustrates that for this case a 13% uncertainty in observed liquid water path (LWP, 20 g/m2) results in 1.5% difference in retrieved cloud optical depth and 12.7% difference in referred cloud effective radius, on average. The uncertainty of the LWP measured by the microwave radiometer (MWR) is the major contributor to the uncertainty of retrieved cloud effective radius. Further, we conclude that the uncertainty of our inferred cloud optical properties is better than 5% for warm water clouds based on a surface closure study, in which cloud optical properties inferred from narrowband irradiances are applied to a shortwave model and the modeled broadband fluxes are compared to a surface pyranometer.

Min, Qilong; Duan, M.; Marchand, Roger T.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

Improved Cloud-Radiation Parameterization for GCMs through the ARM Program. Final Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate sensitivity is an important determinant of climate change. In terms of global climate response, climate sensitivity determines the magnitude of climate change due to radiative forcings by greenhouse gases. The IPCC reports have pointed out that much of the uncertainty in climate projections can be attributed to the disparity in modeled climate sensitivity. Thus, it is imperative to understand the magnitude of climate sensitivity for a given model, and an understanding of what role physical processes play in determining the models particular climate sensitivity.

Kiehl, J. T.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Climate Change Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

329

Climate change action plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

330

Climate Change Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

331

The Microwave Air Yield Beam Experiment (MAYBE): measurement of GHz radiation for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present first measurements by MAYBE of microwave emission from an electron beam induced air plasma, performed at the electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Coherent radio Cherenkov, a major background in a previous beam experiment, is not produced by the 3 MeV beam, which simplifies the interpretation of the data. Radio emission is studied over a wide range of frequencies between 3 and 12 GHz. This measurement provides further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

M. Monasor; M. Bohacova; C. Bonifazi; G. Cataldi; S. Chemerisov; J. R. T. De Mello Neto; P. Facal San Luis; B. Fox; P. W. Gorham; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; R. Meyhandan; L. C. Reyes; B. Rouille D'Orfeuil; E. M. Santos; J. Pochez; P. Privitera; H. Spinka; V. Verzi; C. Williams; J. Zhou

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Introduction Radiation is the primary energy source and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Introduction Radiation is the primary energy source and the ultimate energy sink for the Earth research was the primary reason for the joint scientific committee of the World Climate Research Programme as the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global Climate Observing system (GCOs; http

Haak, Hein

333

Climate Past, Climate Present, Climate Future Douglas Nychka,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

series and an energy balance model. 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 -1.5-1.0-0.50.00.5 Year Degree. Supported by US NSF 7th World Congress Prob. and Stat., Singapore July 2008 #12;What is climate? Climate will use statistics to talk about the "known un- knowns" for the Earth's climate Statistics uses

Nychka, Douglas

334

Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

Roybal, Lyle Gene

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

335

Future Climate Engineering Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Engineering Solutions ­ A Climate call from engineers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Summaries of National Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Summary of The Climate Plan

336

Protecting climate with forests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Climate Code Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

338

DO AEROSOLS CHANGE CLOUD COVER AND AFFECT CLIMATE?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter Schwartz, 1996, modified from;AEROSOL INFLUENCES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE #12;DMS #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN Light scattering by aerosols decreases absorption of solar radiation. #12;AEROSOLS

Schwartz, Stephen E.

339

Measurement of the Total Hadronic Cross-Section Below the Upsilon(4S) Resonance at BaBar Using Initial-State Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present an inclusive measurement of {Delta}{alpha}{sub had}{sup (5)}(m{sub Z}{sup 2}) at BABAR using the Initial State Radiation (ISR) technique in e{sup +}e{sup -} interactions to simultaneously explore the whole low energy range at reduced center-of-mass energies below 7 GeV, where the current knowledge of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} hadrons production limits the precision of the prediction of the running of {alpha}. The BABAR ISR data sample is considerably larger than existing e{sup +}e{sup -} R scan measurement data over most of the low energy range, and there are also many systematic advantages with the ISR technique to allow significantly improved precision on the integral for {Delta}{alpha}{sub had}{sup (5)}(m{sub Z}{sup 2}). This thesis reports on a measurement of {Delta}{alpha}{sub had}{sup (5)}(m{sub Z}{sup 2}) at the 3% precision level, improving on the current knowledge of this quantity.

Berger, Nicolas J.P.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

340

Corporate Climate Change Adaptation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? On-going and future climate change is universally acknowledged. Climate changeincorporating global mean temperature rise, impacts on global hydrology and ecosystems willaffect human society and… (more)

Herbertsson, Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Climate Change Response  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

342

Climate Action Plan (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commonwealth of Kentucky established the Kentucky Climate Action Plan Council (KCAPC) process to identify opportunities for Kentucky to respond to the challenge of global climate change while...

343

Innovation That Matters Mapping Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to implement emissions reduction measures, stabilisation at 450 ppmv CO2e is estimated to only provide between, with annual CO2 and greenhouse gas emission reductions of only 1% (excluding the increasing emissions from #12;Executive Summary Climate Change Climate change resulting from emissions of CO2 as well as other

Watson, Andrew

344

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

345

Near-Core and In-Core Neutron Radiation Monitors for Real Time Neutron Flux Monitoring and Reactor Power Level Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MPFDs are a new class of detectors that utilize properties from existing radiation detector designs. A majority of these characteristics come from fission chamber designs. These include radiation hardness, gamma-ray background insensitivity, and large signal output.

Douglas S. McGregor; Marvin L. Adams; Igor Carron; Paul Nelson

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

346

Identification of Linear Climate Models from the CMIP3 Multimodel Ensemble  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to geoengineering of the climate based on solar radiation management (SRM). 1. INTRODUCTION In response to the risks and advocates to consider a "Plan B" response known as geoengineering or climate engineering. Broadly defined, geoengineering involves deliberate and large-scale interventions in the Earth's climatic system to counter

Phipps, Steven J.

347

Climate at high-obliquity David Ferreiraa,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the poles receive more solar radiation in the annual mean than the Equator, opposite to the present day of a dynamical ocean in controlling the surface climate at high obliquity, which in turn requires understanding ocean-atmosphere-sea ice GCM configured on an aquaplanet is employed. Except for the absence

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

348

Sunlight, Clouds, and Climate Charlie Zender  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of temperature, rainfall, wind... ­ Averages taken over 1000's of miles, many years ­ Climate is intrinsically" = "Radiation" = "Light" = "Photons" ­ Photons are Light travel at the speed of light ­ Photons travel like (Axial tilt): 41 ka cycle ­ Angle of inclination cycles from 22.1­24.5 ­ Angle is 23.5 now

Zender, Charles

349

Climate Change Science and Impacts In the Western Lake Superior Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reflected by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Downscaling: Focus global projections to a scale relevant to climate impacts in Wisconsin GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW-Madison Result: a statistical range of probable climate change* #12

Sheridan, Jennifer

350

aerial surveying radiation monitoring: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measurement system, in-core neutron monitor, medical radiation diagnostic device, nondestructive inspection device, environmental radiation monitoring, cosmic-ray measurement,...

351

NEW Fe IX LINE IDENTIFICATIONS USING SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY/SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET MEASUREMENT OF EMITTED RADIATION AND HINODE/EIS JOINT OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we study joint observations of Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation of Fe IX lines emitted by the same level of the high energy configuration 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 5}4p. The intensity ratios of these lines are dependent on atomic physics parameters only and not on the physical parameters of the emitting plasma, so that they are excellent tools to verify the relative intensity calibration of high-resolution spectrometers that work in the 170-200 A and 700-850 A wavelength ranges. We carry out extensive atomic physics calculations to improve the accuracy of the predicted intensity ratio, and compare the results with simultaneous EIS-SUMER observations of an off-disk quiet Sun region. We were able to identify two ultraviolet lines in the SUMER spectrum that are emitted by the same level that emits one bright line in the EIS wavelength range. Comparison between predicted and measured intensity ratios, wavelengths and energy separation of Fe IX levels confirms the identifications we make. Blending and calibration uncertainties are discussed. The results of this work are important for cross-calibrating EIS and SUMER, as well as future instrumentation.

Landi, E.; Young, P. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

Precision Measurement of a low-loss Cylindrical Dumbbell-Shaped Sapphire Mechanical Oscillator using Radiation Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present first results from a number of experiments conducted on a 0.53 kg cylindrical dumbbell-shaped sapphire crystal. This is the first reported optomechanical experiment of this nature utilising a novel modification to the typical cylindrical architecture. Mechanical motion of the crystal structure alters the dimensions of the crystal, and the induced strain changes the permittivity. These two effects result in parametric frequency modulation of resonant microwave whispering gallery modes that are simultaneously excited within the crystal. A novel low-noise microwave readout system is implemented allowing extremely low noise measurements of this frequency modulation near our modes of interest, having a phase noise floor of -165 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz. Fine-tuning of the crystal's suspension has allowed for the optimisation of mechanical quality factors in preparation for cryogenic experiments, with a value of Q=8 x 10^7 achieved at 127 kHz. This results in a Q x f product of 10^13, equivalent to the best mea...

Bourhill, Jeremy; Tbar, Michael

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

"Managing Department Climate Change"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

Sheridan, Jennifer

354

programs in climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

355

7, 72357275, 2007 Adaptive radiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Two adaptive radiative transfer schemes for numerical weather prediction models V. Venema 1 , A numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. The atmosphere and the land surface are complex-stream approximation. In most weather prediction models these parameterisation schemes are therefore called infre

Boyer, Edmond

356

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Modeling Climate Dynamically James Walsh and Richard McGehee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to tropical latitudes, leaving a narrow strip of open ocean water about the equator? Can mathematical models and present day evidence. Global climate is determined by the radiation balance of the planet. The Earth warms through the absorption of incoming solar radiation (or insolation). Due to the shortwave nature

Wilmer, Elizabeth

358

Climate Change Science and Impacts in Northeast Wisconsin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reflected by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat claims paid Source: FEMA, WEM DNR #12;Heat Mortality Average temperatures projected to increase 4-9°F grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW-Madison Result: a statistical range of probable climate

Sheridan, Jennifer

359

Selected Translated Abstracts of Chinese-Language Climate Change Publications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains English-translated abstracts of important Chinese-language literature concerning global climate change for the years 1995-1998. This body of literature includes the topics of adaptation, ancient climate change, climate variation, the East Asia monsoon, historical climate change, impacts, modeling, and radiation and trace-gas emissions. In addition to the biological citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Chinese. Author and title indexes are included to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

Cushman, R.M.; Burtis, M.D.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

qualitatively development and climate impacts of LEDS technologies and measures Key Products Qualitative impact assessment of priority improved practices or technologies List...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Climate Mag_27JUN2013_ms07022013.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

development of validated parameterizations of new carbon- climate feedbacks for Earth System Models. LANL is also working with Chevron and DOE Fossil Energy on measuring CH 4...

362

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

363

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

Polz, Martin

364

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust Documentation DataProductswsicloudwsicloudsummarygifAOS Processing

365

Testing and Performance Validation of a Sensitive Gamma Ray Camera Designed for Radiation Detection and Decommissioning Measurements in Nuclear Facilities-13044  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the measurements, testing and performance validation of a sensitive gamma ray camera designed for radiation detection and quantification in the environment and decommissioning and hold-up measurements in nuclear facilities. The instrument, which is known as RadSearch, combines a sensitive and highly collimated LaBr{sub 3} scintillation detector with an optical (video) camera with controllable zoom and focus and a laser range finder in one detector head. The LaBr{sub 3} detector has a typical energy resolution of between 2.5% and 3% at the 662 keV energy of Cs-137 compared to that of NaI detectors with a resolution of typically 7% to 8% at the same energy. At this energy the tungsten shielding of the detector provides a shielding ratio of greater than 900:1 in the forward direction and 100:1 on the sides and from the rear. The detector head is mounted on a pan/tile mechanism with a range of motion of ±180 degrees (pan) and ±90 degrees (tilt) equivalent to 4 ? steradians. The detector head with pan/tilt is normally mounted on a tripod or wheeled cart. It can also be mounted on vehicles or a mobile robot for access to high dose-rate areas and areas with high levels of contamination. Ethernet connects RadSearch to a ruggedized notebook computer from which it is operated and controlled. Power can be supplied either as 24-volts DC from a battery or as 50 volts DC supplied by a small mains (110 or 230 VAC) power supply unit that is co-located with the controlling notebook computer. In this latter case both power and Ethernet are supplied through a single cable that can be up to 80 metres in length. If a local battery supplies power, the unit can be controlled through wireless Ethernet. Both manual operation and automatic scanning of surfaces and objects is available through the software interface on the notebook computer. For each scan element making up a part of an overall scanned area, the unit measures a gamma ray spectrum. Multiple radionuclides may be selected by the operator and will be identified if present. In scanning operation the unit scans a designated region and superimposes over a video image the distribution of measured radioactivity. For the total scanned area or object RadSearch determines the total activity of operator selected radionuclides present and the gamma dose-rate measured at the detector head. Results of hold-up measurements made in a nuclear facility are presented, as are test measurements of point sources distributed arbitrarily on surfaces. These latter results are compared with the results of benchmarked MCNP Monte Carlo calculations. The use of the device for hold-up and decommissioning measurements is validated. (authors)

Mason, John A.; Looman, Marc R.; Poundall, Adam J.; Towner, Antony C.N. [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom)] [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom); Creed, Richard; Pancake, Daniel [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the �¢����solar-background�¢��� mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM�¢����s zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS�¢���� 1 Hz sampling to study the �¢����twilight zone�¢��� around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM�¢����s 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM�¢����s operational data processing.

D. Jui-Yuan Chiu

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

net impact of climate change on agriculture in California,of Climate Change on California Agriculture. ” PresentationEffects of Climate Change on California Agriculture Positive

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

Fisher, Anthony

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Review: Preparing for Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Preparing for Climate Change By Michael D.Stephen, Preparing for Climate Change. A Boston Review Book.alkaline paper. “Climate change is inevitable, but disaster

Kunnas, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Urban Growth and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007a The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence fromGreenstone. 2007b. Climate Change, Mortality and Adaptation:and Ariel Dinar, 1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and

Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid RainThe Pacificabsorption ARM

375

ARM - Measurement - Photosynthetically Active Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARMnumber concentration ARM Data

376

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARMnumberDoppler ARM Data

377

Climate change impact, adaptation and associated costs for coastal risks in France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change impact, adaptation and associated costs for coastal risks in France Gonéri Le.Pons@developpement-durable.gouv.fr Abstract As part of the French climate plan, an inter-ministerial working group called "climate change by climate change and to identify possible mitigation measures. Seven thematic committees were organized

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

378

Investment Dimension: Enhanced Data Equals Better Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy provided the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility with $60 million for new and upgraded instrumentation, equipment, and infrastructure to improve atmospheric data sets. These enhancements will take place among the permanent ARM research sites in Oklahoma and Alaska in the United States, and near the equator in the tropical Western Pacific. They will also advance the capabilities of ARM’s mobile and aerial research platforms. This article focuses on key enhancements - particularly new scanning radars, enhanced lidar technologies, aerosol observation systems, and in situ aircraft probes - that will provide unprecedented data sets for the modeling community.

Roeder, Lynne R.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Analysis of the Energy Savings Potential in K-5 Schools in Hot and Humid Climates: Application of High Performance Measures and Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-08-05 of the building. Since the DOE-2 simulation program is not capable of simulating solar thermal and PV systems, the F-Chart and PV F-Chart program were used to calculate the hot water and the electricity generation from a solar thermal and PV system... measures were applied to the target building. Those measures include: increased glazing U-value, VFD application for the HVAC system, cold deck reset, variable speed for pumps, high-efficiency boiler, skylights, and the application of solar thermal...

Im, P.; Haberl, J.

380

Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

383

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Thermodynamic Influence of Subgrid Orography in a Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessments of the impacts of climate change typically require information at scales of 10 km or less. Such a resolution will not be achieved by global climate models for many years. We have developed an alternative to explicit resolution that can meet the needs of climate change impact assessment now. We have applied to a global climate model a physically-based subgrid-scale treatment of the influence of orography on temperature, clouds, precipitation, and land surface hydrology. The treatment represents subgrid variations in surface elevation in terms of fractional area distributions of discrete elevation classes. For each class it calculates the height rise/descent of air parcels traveling through the grid cell, and applies the influence of the rise/descent to the temperature and humidity profiles of the elevation class. Cloud, radiative, and surface processes are calculated separately for each elevation class using the same physical parameterizations used by the model without the subgrid parameterization. The simulated climate fields for each elevation class can then be distributed in post-processing according to the spatial distribution of surface elevation within each grid cell. Parallel 10-year simulations with and without the subgrid treatment have been performed. The simulated temperature, precipitation and snow water are mapped to 2.5 minute (~5 km) resolution and compared with gridded analyses of station measurements. The simulation with the subgrid scheme produces a much more realistic distribution of snow water and significantly more realistic distributions of temperature and precipitation than the simulation without the subgrid scheme. Moreover, the grid cell means of most other fields are virtually unchanged by the subgrid scheme. This suggests that the tuning of the climate model without the subgrid scheme is also applicable to the model with the scheme.

Ghan, Steven J.; Bian, Xindi; Hunt, Allen G.; Coleman, Andre M.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Developing public awareness for climate change: Support from international research programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing regional and local public awareness and interest in global climate change has been mandated as an important step for increasing the ability for setting policy and managing the response to climate change. Research programs frequently have resources that could help reach regional or national goals for increasing the capacity for responding to climate change. To obtain these resources and target recipients appropriately, research investigators need clear statements of national and regional strategies or priorities as a guide. One such program, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, has a requirement to develop local or regional education enrichment programs at their observational sites in the central US, the tropical western Pacific (TWP), and on the north slope of alaska. ARM's scientific goals will result in a flow of technical data and as well as technical expertise that can assist with regional needs to increase the technical resources needed to address climate change issues. Details of the ARM education program in the Pacific will be presented.

Barnes, F.J.; Clements, W.E.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp University of Wisconsin ADVANCE-IT Slides) #12;Why focus on departmental climate? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace negative climate than male faculty Improving department climate is critical for retention and advancement

Tilbury, Dawn

389

The Climate Policy Dilemma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

390

The Climate Policy Dilemma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

391

Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

Feng, Ming

393

Campus Climate Camden Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus Climate Report Camden Campus New Brunswick/Piscataway Campus Newark Campus Student Survey #12;I. INTRODUCTION Executive Summary The Rutgers Campus Climate Survey was designed to determine how University, the campus climate surveys revealed strong areas of satisfaction with the Rutgers University

Hanson, Stephen José

394

Forest Research: Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

395

Climate Change Workshop 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

396

Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

review and input from scholars with expertise in climate change and communication. #12; Welcome Thank youCampus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE CAMPUS Southwestern Pennsylvania Program booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994

Attari, Shahzeen Z.

397

Environment and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

Galles, David

398

Climate Change Economics and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

Romano, Daniela

399

Climate effects of anthropogenic sulfate: Simulations from a coupled chemistry/climate model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we use a more comprehensive approach by coupling a climate model with a 3-D global chemistry model to investigate the forcing by anthropogenic aerosol sulfate. The chemistry model treats the global-scale transport, transformation, and removal of SO{sub 2}, DMS and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} species in the atmosphere. The mass concentration of anthropogenic sulfate from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning is calculated in the chemistry model and provided to the climate model where it affects the shortwave radiation. We also investigate the effect, with cloud nucleation parameterized in terms of local aerosol number, sulfate mass concentration and updraft velocity. Our simulations indicate that anthropogenic sulfate may result in important increases in reflected solar radiation, which would mask locally the radiative forcing from increased greenhouse gases. Uncertainties in these results will be discussed.

Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Walton, J.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Climate VISION: Program Mission  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing ofPROGRAM MISSION

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Climate VISION: Sitemap  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing ofPROGRAMSECURITY

402

Climate Vision: Presidential Statements  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing

403

Climate Vision: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative ForcingTECHNOLOGY PATHWAYS

404

Wireless passive radiation sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

405

Correction factors for the sun shield used with the Eppley pyranometer for the measurement of sky radiation under clear and partly cloudy skies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

times. This process is termed multiple scattering. In a qualitative sense, however, Ray- leigh's theory leads us to the conclusion that sky radiation is anisotropic and that its maximum intensity should be concentrated in the vicinity of the solar... of solar radiation are discussed. The method in which a metal. band is utilized to screen the direct rays of Sun from the pyrano- metric sensor is examined in detail. Based on the assumption that the distribution of skI ~adiation is isotropic...

Albro, William Arthur

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

Hansen, James E.

408

Rapid and extensive warming following cessation of solar radiation management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar radiation management (SRM) has been proposed as a means to alleviate the climate impacts of ongoing anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, its efficacy depends on its indefinite maintenance, without ...

McCusker, Kelly E

409

Parameterization and analysis of 3-D radiative transfer in clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of major accomplishments from the project. The project examines the impact of radiative interactions between neighboring atmospheric columns, for example clouds scattering extra sunlight toward nearby clear areas. While most current cloud models don�t consider these interactions and instead treat sunlight in each atmospheric column separately, the resulting uncertainties have remained unknown. This project has provided the first estimates on the way average solar heating is affected by interactions between nearby columns. These estimates have been obtained by combining several years of cloud observations at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sites (in Alaska, Oklahoma, and Papua New Guinea) with simulations of solar radiation around the observed clouds. The importance of radiative interactions between atmospheric columns was evaluated by contrasting simulations that included the interactions with those that did not. This study provides lower-bound estimates for radiative interactions: It cannot consider interactions in cross-wind direction, because it uses two-dimensional vertical cross-sections through clouds that were observed by instruments looking straight up as clouds drifted aloft. Data from new DOE scanning radars will allow future radiative studies to consider the full three-dimensional nature of radiative processes. The results reveal that two-dimensional radiative interactions increase overall day-and-night average solar heating by about 0.3, 1.2, and 4.1 Watts per meter square at the three sites, respectively. This increase grows further if one considers that most large-domain cloud simulations have resolutions that cannot specify small-scale cloud variability. For example, the increases in solar heating mentioned above roughly double for a fairly typical model resolution of 1 km. The study also examined the factors that shape radiative interactions between atmospheric columns and found that local effects were often much larger than the overall values mentioned above, and were especially large for high sun and near convective clouds such as cumulus. The study also found that statistical methods such as neural networks appear promising for enabling cloud models to consider radiative interactions between nearby atmospheric columns. Finally, through collaboration with German scientists, the project found that new methods (especially one called �stepwise kriging�) show great promise in filling gaps between cloud radar scans. If applied to data from the new DOE scanning cloud radars, these methods can yield large, continuous three-dimensional cloud structures for future radiative simulations.

Varnai, Tamas

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

Dynamic Effects on the Tropical Cloud Radiative Forcing and Radiation Budget JIAN YUAN, DENNIS L. HARTMANN, AND ROBERT WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the tropics, using the methodology suggested by Bony et al. Cloud and radiation budget quantities source of uncertainty in pre- dicting future climate (Cess et al. 2001b; Stephens 2005; Solomon et al

Wood, Robert

411

The Radiative Properties of Small Clouds: Multi-Scale Observations and Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Warm, liquid clouds and their representation in climate models continue to represent one of the most significant unknowns in climate sensitivity and climate change. Our project combines ARM observations, LES modeling, and satellite imagery to characterize shallow clouds and the role of aerosol in modifying their radiative effects.

Feingold, Graham [NOAA ESRL; McComiskey, Allison [CIRES, University of Colorado

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Direct radiative forcing due to aerosols in Asia during Soon-Ung Parka,, Jaein I. Jeongb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct radiative forcing due to aerosols in Asia during March 2002 Soon-Ung Parka,, Jaein I. Jeongb Model (CRM) of Community Climate Model 3 and the output of the fifth generation of meso-scale model (MM5 in the global climate system by changing atmospheric radiation balance (Tegen and Fung, 1994; Andreae, 1996; Li

Park, Rokjin

413

Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Climate proxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Climate proxies 18O Climate History & Paleoclimate ­ September 30, 2011 #12;How do we know about the past? Instrumental Historical Through proxies Climate proxies Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 #12;What is a `proxy'? "Proxy, as used here

Gilli, Adrian

414

Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building for constraining climate predictions based on observations of past climate change. The first uses large ensembles

415

Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Future climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Future climate Climate History & Paleoclimate - December 9, 2011 1 #12;Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 IPCC 2007 4th Assessment report (AR4) More information can be found: http://www.ipcc.ch/ Remark: 5th assessment report is due in 2013/2014 2 #12;Climate

Gilli, Adrian

416

Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

Hulme, Mike

417

Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour;1 Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour? Thomas D. Lowe 1 these kinds of messages (which have recently been dubbed `climate porn' (Ereaut and Segnit, 2006)), can

Watson, Andrew

418

Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

Browder, Tom

419

The ARM Climate Research Facility: A Review of Structure and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program (www.arm.gov) is a Department of Energy, Office of Science, climate research user facility that provides atmospheric observations from diverse climatic regimes around the world. Use of ARM data is free and available to anyone through the ARM data archive. ARM is approaching 20 years of operations. In recent years, the facility has grown to add two mobile facilities and an aerial facility to its network of fixed-location sites. Over the past year, ARM has enhanced its observational capabilities with a broad array of new instruments at its fixed and mobile sites and the aerial facility. Instruments include scanning millimeter- and centimeter-wavelength radars; water vapor, cloud/aerosol extinction, and Doppler lidars; a suite of aerosol instruments for measuring optical, physical, and chemical properties; instruments including eddy correlation systems to expand measurements of the surface and boundary layer; and aircraft probes for measuring cloud and aerosol properties. Taking full advantage of these instruments will involve the development of complex data products. This work is underway but will benefit from engagement with the broader scientific community. In this article we will describe the current status of the ARM program with an emphasis on developments over the past eight years since ARM was designated a DOE scientific user facility. We will also describe the new measurement capabilities and provide thoughts for how these new measurements can be used to serve the climate research community with an invitation to the community to engage in the development and use of these data products.

Mather, James H.; Voyles, Jimmy W.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Final Report - From Measurements to Models: Cross-Comparison of Measured and Simulated Behavioral States of the Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) were constructed to make measurements of the atmosphere and radiation system in order to quantify deficiencies in the simulation of clouds within models and to make improvements in those models. While the measurement infrastructure of ARM is well-developed and a model parameterization testbed capability has been established, additional effort is needed to develop statistical techniques which permit the comparison of simulation output from atmospheric models with actual measurements. Our project establishes a new methodology for objectively comparing ARM measurements to the outputs of leading global climate models and reanalysis data. The quantitative basis for this comparison is provided by a statistical procedure which establishes an exhaustive set of mutually-exclusive, recurring states of the atmosphere from sets of multivariate atmospheric and cloud conditions, and then classifies multivariate measurements or simulation outputs into those states. Whether measurements and models classify the atmosphere into the same states at specific locations through time provides an unequivocal comparison result. Times and locations in both geographic and state space of model-measurement agreement and disagreement will suggest directions for the collection of additional measurements at existing sites, provide insight into the global representativeness of the current ARM sites (suggesting locations and times for use of the AMF), and provide a basis for improvement of models. Two different analyses were conducted: One, using the Parallel Climate Model, focused on an IPCC climate change scenario and clusters that characterize long-term changes in the hydrologic cycle. The other, using the GISS Model E GCM and the ARM Active Remotely Sensed Cloud Layers product, explored current climate cloud regimes in the Tropical West Pacific.

Del Genio, Anthony D; Hoffman, Forrest M; Hargrove, Jr, William W

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Climate Impacts LINK Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

Feigon, Brooke

424

Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

425

Conservation and Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

Landweber, Laura

426

Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

427

Presented by Climate End Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Department of Energy Bettge_LCF Climate_SC10 CESM working groups · Application ­ Climate change, paleoclimate climate change projections for IPCC AR5 Gerald Meehl and Warren Washington, NCAR · Climate changePresented by Climate End Station Thomas Bettge National Center for Atmospheric Research James B

428

The Corn and Climate Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Science Program Office Part 2: Climate Impacts on Midwestern Agriculture: MonitoringThe Corn and Climate Report An overview of climate science in the service of Midwestern agriculture Administration National Weather Service North Central Bioeconomy Consortium US Climate Change Science Program

Debinski, Diane M.

429

International Finance and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

Zhang, Junshan

430

Drought Update Colorado Climate Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drought Update Colorado Climate Center Roger Pielke, Sr., Director Prepared by Tara Green and Odie Bliss http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 2 http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2003/mar/st005dv00pcp200303.html #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 3 #12;© 2003

431

Climate Change, Drought & Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

432

Climate Action Plan (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Governor Timothy M. Kaine established the Governor's Commission on Climate Change in December 2007. The commission prepared a plan for Virginia that identified ways to reduce greenhouse gas...

433

Protecting climate with forests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

much more than carbon sequestration does, and often in abiophysics, carbon sequestration, climate change, climatethe accompanying carbon sequestration does—and sometimes in

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors Nadine Ungera,b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact, as expressed by radiative forcing in watts per meter squared, of individual chemical species profiles differ greatly, this approach fosters the development of smart climate policy and is useful

435

Climatic Change (2011) 106:315326 DOI 10.1007/s10584-010-9903-9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an increase in surface temperature, decreasing the absorption of solar radiation, thereby diminishing and its probable uncertainty range as given by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2007

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NOAA is committed to helping governments, businesses, and communities manage climate risks, adapt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ka'imimoana, collect oceanic and atmospheric data such as solar radiation, carbon dioxide, and other-stop monitoring required for effective climate models, forecasts, and projections. NOAA's Carbon Tracker is widely

437

ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

438

1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

439

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Conceptualizing climate change in the context of a climate system: implications for climate and environmental education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conceptualizing climate change in the context of a climate system: implications for climate 1 September 2011) Today there is much interest in teaching secondary students about climate change. Much of this effort has focused directly on students' understanding of climate change. We hypothesize

Niyogi, Dev

442

Global air quality and climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Chemistry- Climate Models 5, 2010. 320 S. Wu,and R. Van Dorland, in Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalInter- governmental Panel on Climate Change, ed. D. Qin, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Climate Change at Annual Timescales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1900–93, Journal of Climate, 10 (5), 1004–1020, 1997. Zhou,University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (Jones etand those from WCRP “Climate of the Twentieth Century”

Stine, Alexander Robin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

445

book review: Climate change mapped  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of millions 2 .   Climate change is a moving target and introductions  to  climate change’, the Atlas stands out media reporting on climate change.   Cambridge University 

Shanahan, Mike

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Climate Change at Annual Timescales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

Stine, Alexander Robin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developing countries "can significantly offset the adverse effects of climate change").Climate Change, 2 which calls on developed countries (but not developing countries)developing countries that will bear the bulk of the effects of climate change.

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to absorption of solar radiation in the climate system is found to be irrelevant to the maximized prop- erties from hot to cold places, thereby producing the kinetic energy of the fluid itself. His generalTHE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY

Lorenz, Ralph D.

449

Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. OurRole of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars Yongyun Hu1 and Jun Yang Laboratory for Climate and Atmosphere­Ocean Studies, Department of Atmospheric

Hu, Yongyun

450

Quality Assurance of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as it existed in 2008. The performance of ACRF instruments, sites, and data systems is measured in terms of the availability, usability, and accessibility of the data to a user. First, the data must be available to users; that is, the data must be collected by instrument systems, processed, and delivered to a central repository in a timely manner. Second, the data must be usable; that is, the data must be inspected and deemed of sufficient quality for scientific research purposes, and data users must be able to readily tell where there are known problems in the data. Finally, the data must be accessible; that is, data users must be able to easily find, obtain, and work with the data from the central repository. The processes described in this report include instrument deployment and calibration; instrument and facility maintenance; data collection and processing infrastructure; data stream inspection and assessment; the roles of value-added data processing and field campaigns in specifying data quality and haracterizing the basic measurement; data archival, display, and distribution; data stream reprocessing; and engineering and operations management processes and procedures. Future directions in ACRF data quality assurance also are presented.

RA Peppler; KE Kehoe; KL Sonntag; CP Bahrmann; SJ Richardson; SW Christensen; RA McCord; DJ Doty; R Wagener; RC Eagan; JC Lijegren; BW Orr; DL Sisterson; TD Halter; NN Keck; CN Long; MC Macduff; JH Mather; RC Perez; JW Voyles; MD Ivey; ST Moore; DL Nitschke; BD Perkins; DD Turner

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http://aerosol.ucsd.edu/courses.html Text: Curry & Webster Atmospheric Thermodynamics Ch1 Composition Ch2 Laws Ch3 Transfers Ch12 Energy Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http

Russell, Lynn

452

Moving Toward Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a response to climate disruption. Even the most optimistic models forecast that if greenhouse-gas emissions Appendix 1 Solutions on the Ground 67 Appendix 2 Reliability of Trends and Forecasts 78 Literature Cited 81. In the absence of substantial reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, the climate of the Y2Y region

453

International Governance of Climate Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change, Geoengineering, and International1992); David W. Keith, Geoengineering the Climate: HistoryStephen H. Schneider, Geoengineering: Could — Or Should — We

Parson, Edward; Ernst, Lia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Urban Growth and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and Developing Countries:climate change matters because it is likely to be the case that local governments in developing countries

Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, B.T.

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

457

Estimating Energy Efficiency Impacts Using Climate Wise "Wise Rules"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use. Climate Wise provides technical assistance in the form of efficiency check-lists, handbooks, and one-on-one support through a toll-free Wise Line to help partners identify efficiency measures and quantify project impacts. Climate Wise has...

Milmoe, P. H.; Winkelman, S. R.

458

Final report for the project "Improving the understanding of surface-atmosphere radiative interactions by mapping surface reflectance over the ARM CART site" (award DE-FG02-02ER63351)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface spectral reflectance (albedo) is a fundamental variable affecting the transfer of solar radiation and the Earth’s climate. It determines the proportion of solar energy absorbed by the surface and reflected back to the atmosphere. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified surface albedo among key factors influencing climate radiative forcing. Accurate knowledge of surface reflective properties is important for advancing weather forecasting and climate change impact studies. It is also important for determining radiative impact and acceptable levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which makes this work strongly linked to major scientific objectives of the Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Most significant accomplishments of eth project are listed below. I) Surface albedo/BRDF datasets from 1995 to the end of 2004 have been produced. They were made available to the ARM community and other interested users through the CCRS public ftp site ftp://ftp.ccrs.nrcan.gc.ca/ad/CCRS_ARM/ and ARM IOP data archive under “PI data Trishchenko”. II) Surface albedo properties over the ARM SGP area have been described for 10-year period. Comparison with ECMWF data product showed some deficiencies in the ECMWF surface scheme, such as missing some seasonal variability and no dependence on sky-conditions which biases surface energy budget and has some influence of the diurnal cycle of upward radiation and atmospheric absorption. III) Four surface albedo Intensive Observation Period (IOP) Field Campaigns have been conducted for every season (August, 2002, May 2003, February 2004 and October 2004). Data have been prepared, documented and transferred to ARM IOP archive. Nine peer-reviewed journal papers and 26 conference papers have been published.

Alexander P. Trishchenko; Yi Luo; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov, William M. Park; Zhanqing Li; Maureen Cribb

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

Climate impacts of ice nucleation A. Gettelman,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

back to space, cooling the planet. However, ice clouds, being cold, radiate much less long wave and cooling, with warming thought to be slightly larger. [3] Changes to ice cloud microphysics might alterClimate impacts of ice nucleation A. Gettelman,1,2 X. Liu,3 D. Barahona,4,5 U. Lohmann,2 and C

Gettelman, Andrew

460

Climate Change and the Hydrologic Budget of the Himalaya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) findings on Himalayan glacial retreat 1. There are no `typical ttemperature, precipitation, and solar radiation on glaciers? What are the glacial response times? 3. Issue) 3. Changes in river-catchment runoff behavior · more rapid snow melting in spring (but based

California at Santa Barbara, University of

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1 Department of Mathematics University;Abstract We provide a statistical interpretation of current practice in climate mod- elling. This includes: definitions for weather and climate; clarifying the relationship between simulator output and simulator

Dixon, Peter

462

Dealing in Doubt: The Climate Denial Industry and Climate Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dealing in Doubt: The Climate Denial Industry and Climate Science A Brief History of Attacks action on climate change has become more likely. This time, though, there is a difference. In recent, despite its lack of evidence or scientific support. The last peak in the climate denial campaign

Fairchild, Mark D.

463

The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change William Collins UC Berkeley Research Boulder, Colorado, USA #12;2 Prior Research on Absorption and Climate Field Experiments: · Central · Climate with enhanced cloud absorption Synthesis of models and aerosol observations: · Development

464

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earth’s surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

How Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide;#12;Summary The tourism sector is not only affected by climate change but also has an impact on the Earth of such measures, we calculated the climate efficiency of the tourism sector in the case of Switzerland.We defined

Fischlin, Andreas

468

Climate Economics and Law Conference Supported by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vöhringer Canada ­ measures affecting the renewable energy sector ­ an initial legal analysis Joachim Veronesi Energy abundance, trade and industry location Nicole Mathys Universal metrics to compare and climate change: adaptation and mitigation Ole W. Pedersen Old wine in new bottles? The shift

Mühlemann, Oliver

469

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Biological Impacts of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

McCarty, John P.

471

Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate and cultural changes are observed in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East [e.g., Bookman et1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 112 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2012) 112:769-789 DOI

Gvirtzman, Haim

472

Understanding and Attributing Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Understanding and Attributing Climate Change Coordinating Lead Authors: Gabriele C. Hegerl (USA. Nicholls, J.E. Penner and P.A. Stott, 2007: Under- standing and Attributing Climate Change. In: Climate of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M

Box, Jason E.

473

Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD SPECIAL REPORT 290 #12;#12;Committee on Climate Change and U Washington, D.C. 2008 www.TRB.org Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION

Sheridan, Jennifer

474

SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office 130 DeSoto Street G-7 Parran with sources of ionizing radiation are required to be instructed in the basic principles of radiation protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide

Sibille, Etienne

476

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

477

Estimating GroundEstimating Ground--Level Solar RadiationLevel Solar Radiation and Evapotranspiration In Puerto Ricoand Evapotranspiration In Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating GroundEstimating Ground--Level Solar RadiationLevel Solar Radiation radiation, therefore, solar radiation measurements throughout the island are essential. #12;Currently, including solar radiation ·In PR, solar radiation is only available at selected locations. · The majority

Gilbes, Fernando

478

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1994 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Atmospheric and climate research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) occurs in conjunction with the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) and with the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) Program. Solicitations for proposals and peer review were used to select research projects for funding in FY 1995. Nearly all ongoing projects were brought to a close in FY 1994. Therefore, the articles in this volume include a summary of the long-term accomplishments as well as the FY 1994 progress made on these projects. The following articles present summaries of the progress in FY 1994 under these research tasks: continental and oceanic fate of pollutants; research aircraft operations; ASCOT program management; coupling/decoupling of synoptic and valley circulations; interactions between surface exchange processes and atmospheric circulations; and direct simulations of atmospheric turbulence. Climate change research at PNL is aimed at reducing uncertainties in the fundamental processes that control climate systems that currently prevent accurate predictions of climate change and its effects. PNL is responsible for coordinating and integrating the field and laboratory measurement programs, modeling studies, and data analysis activities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program. In FY 1994, PNL scientists conducted 3 research projects under the ARM program. In the first project, the sensitivity of GCM grid-ad meteorological properties to subgrid-scale variations in surface fluxes and subgrid-scale circulation patterns is being tested in a single column model. In the second project, a new and computationally efficient scheme has been developed for parameterizing stratus cloud microphysics in general circulation models. In the last project, a balloon-borne instrument package is being developed for making research-quality measurements of radiative flux divergence profiles in the lowest 1,500 meters of the Earth`s atmosphere.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Refining climate models  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

480

Climate Action Plan (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recognizing the implications that global climate change may have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Minnesota, Governor Tim Pawlenty signed into law the 2007 Next Generation Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement climate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Climate Action Plan (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

There is a growing scientific consensus that increasing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are affecting the temperature and variability of the Earth’s climate. Recognizing the...

482

Refining climate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

A Typology of Foredune Textures: Sand Patches and Climate Controls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foredunes are formed and developed in association with vegetation. A bare sand area has been viewed as a measure of dune mobility or activity and researched in association with climate controls: particularly wind power, annual mean precipitation...

Ryu, Wansang

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

484

Purdue Climate Change Research Center Emissions Trading Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purdue Climate Change Research Center Emissions Trading Workshop Introduction and Overview manner. Workshop rather than conference. #12;What is Emissions Trading? (or "Cap and Trade") · Cap & Enforcement · Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) mechanisms for reductions #12;Five Emissions

485

Sensitivity of climate change to diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The diapycnal diffusivity of the ocean is one of the least known parameters in cur- rent climate models. Measurements of this diffusivity are sparse and insufficient for compiling a global map. Inferences from inverse ...

Dalan, Fabio, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Climate Science and Drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Climate Change and Drought Wendy Gordon, Ph.D. The University of Texas ? Austin Environmental Science Institute Texas Wildfires 2011 From the beginning of the fire season on November 15, 2010 to October 31, 2011 nearly 28,000 fires had... have been particularly severe due to the ongoing 2011 Southern US drought, and exacerbating the problem is land management practices, the unusual convergence of strong winds, unseasonably warm temperatures, and low humidity. Climate...

Gordon, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in