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1

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

2

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

3

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiation emitted by the earth. This instrument is onboard a European Union geostationary weather satellite launched in December 2005; it is collecting data over Niamey and the...

4

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

5

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

6

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

7

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

8

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, June 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARM Intensive Operational Period Scheduled to Validate New NASA Satellite--Beginning in July, all three ARM sites (Southern Great Plains [SGP], North Slope of Alaska, and Tropical Western Pacific; Figure 1) will participate in the AIRS Validation IOP. This three-month intensive operational period (IOP) will validate data collected by the satellite-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) recently launched into space. On May 4, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched Aqua, the second spacecraft in the Earth Observing System (EOS) series. The EOS satellites monitor Earth systems including land surfaces, oceans, the atmosphere, and ice cover. The first EOS satellite, named Terra, was launched in December 1999. The second EOS satellite is named Aqua because its primary focus is understanding Earth's water cycle through observation of atmospheric moisture, clouds, temperature, ocean surface, precipitation, and soil moisture. One of the instruments aboard Aqua is the AIRS, built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA agency. The AIRS Validation IOP complements the ARM mission to improve understanding of the interactions of clouds and atmospheric moisture with solar radiation and their influence on weather and climate. In support of satellite validation IOP, ARM will launch dedicated radiosondes at all three ARM sites while the Aqua satellite with the AIRS instrument is orbiting overhead. These radiosonde launches will occur 45 minutes and 5 minutes before selected satellite overpasses. In addition, visiting scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will launch special radiosondes to measure ozone and humidity over the SGP site. All launches will generate ground-truth data to validate satellite data collected simultaneously. Data gathered daily by ARM meteorological and solar radiation instruments will complete the validation data sets. Data from Aqua-based instruments, including AIRS, will aid in weather forecasting, climate modeling, and greenhouse gas studies. These instruments will provide more accurate, detailed global observations of weather and atmospheric parameters that will, in turn, improve the accuracy and quality of weather forecasts. A satellite-based instrument is cost-effective because it can provide continuous global measurements, eliminating isolated yet costly weather balloon releases. Aqua, launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California (Figure 2), carries six state-of-the-art instruments that measure various water vapor parameters: (1) AIRS, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity, land and sea surface temperatures, cloud properties, and radiative energy flux; (2) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity during both cloudy and cloud-free periods; (3) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, precipitation rates, land surface wetness, sea ice, snow cover, sea surface temperature, and wind fields; (4) Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System, which measures radiative energy flux; (5) Humidity Sounder for Brazil, which measures atmospheric humidity by using a passive scanning microwave radiometer; and (6) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, aerosol properties, land cover and land use change, vegetation dynamics, land surface temperature, fire occurrence, volcanic effects, sea surface temperature, ocean color, snow cover, atmospheric temperature and humidity, and sea ice. The data-gathering capabilities of the Aqua instruments will provide an unprecedented view of atmosphere-land interactions (Figure 3). The availability of more frequent, more accurate global measurements of important atmospheric parameters will both improve our capabilities for short-term weather forecasting and lead to a better understanding of climate variability and climate change. Simultaneous measurements of many parameters will allow scientists to study complicated forcings and feedbacks of the atmosphere, which can be

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

10

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

11

Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE`s programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: (1) Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including water vapor and clouds, and to surface properties, and sample sufficient variety of situations so as to span a wide range of climatologically relevant possibilities; (2) develop and test parameterizations that can be used to accurately predict the radiative properties and to model the radiative interactions involving water vapor and clouds within the atmosphere, with the objective of incorporating these parameterizations into general circulation models. The primary observational methods remote sending and other observations at the surface, particularly remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

14

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

15

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

16

DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February 1990  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Forward In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change Research Program coordinated by the Committee on Earth Sciences (CES) of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The recent heightened concern about global warming from an enhanced greenhouse effect has prompted the Department to accelerate the research to improve predictions of climate change. The emphasis is on

17

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, January 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject of this newsletter is the ARM unmanned aerospace vehicle program. The ARM Program's focus is on climate research, specifically research related to solar radiation and its interaction with clouds. The SGP CART site contains highly sophisticated surface instrumentation, but even these instruments cannot gather some crucial climate data from high in the atmosphere. The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense joined together to use a high-tech, high-altitude, long-endurance class of unmanned aircraft known as the unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV). A UAV is a small, lightweight airplane that is controlled remotely from the ground. A pilot sits in a ground-based cockpit and flies the aircraft as if he were actually on board. The UAV can also fly completely on its own through the use of preprogrammed computer flight routines. The ARM UAV is fitted with payload instruments developed to make highly accurate measurements of atmospheric flux, radiance, and clouds. Using a UAV is beneficial to climate research in many ways. The UAV puts the instrumentation within the environment being studied and gives scientists direct measurements, in contrast to indirect measurements from satellites orbiting high above Earth. The data collected by UAVs can be used to verify and calibrate measurements and calculated values from satellites, therefore making satellite data more useful and valuable to researchers.

Sisterson, D.L.

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

18

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial Facility  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM data is collected both through permanent monitoring stations and field campaigns around the world. Airborne measurements required to answer science questions from researchers or to validate ground data are also collected. To find data from all categories of aerial operations, follow the links from the AAF information page at http://www.arm.gov/sites/aaf. Tables of information will provide start dates, duration, lead scientist, and the research site for each of the named campaigns. The title of a campaign leads, in turn, to a project description, contact information, and links to the data. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

19

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

LR Roeder

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Niamey, Niger for the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) operates at non-permanent sites selected by the ARM Program. Sometimes these sites can become permanent ARM sites, as was the case with Graciosa Island in the Azores. It is now known as the Eastern North Atlantic permanent site. In January 2006 the AMF deployed to Niamey, Niger, West Africa, at the Niger Meteorological Office at Niamey International Airport. This deployment was timed to coincide with the field phases and Special Observing Periods of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). The ARM Program participated in this international effort as a field campaign called "Radiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST).The primary purpose of the Niger deployment was to combine an extended series of measurements from the AMF with those from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) Instrument on the Meteosat operational geostationary satellite in order to provide the first well-sampled, direct estimates of the divergence of solar and thermal radiation across the atmosphere. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Niamey are available via a link from ARM's Niamey, Niger site information page. Other data can be found at the related websites mentioned above and in the ARM Archive. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

22

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Specific Measurement Categories  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The ARM Program gathers a wide variety of measurements from many different sources. Each day, the Data Archive stores and distributes large quantities of data collected from these sources. Scientists then use these data to research atmospheric radiation balance and cloud feedback processes, which are critical elements of global climate change. The huge archive of ARM data can be organized by measurement categories into six "collections:" Aerosols, Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties, Radiometric, and Surface Properties. Clicking on one of the measurement categories leads to a page that breaks that category down into sub-categories. For example, "Aerosols" is broken down into Microphysical and Chemical Properties (with 9 subsets) and Optical and Radiative Properties (with 7 subsets). Each of the subset links, in turn, leads to detailed information pages and links to specific data streams. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

25

Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although shallow cumuli are common over large areas of the globe, their impact on the surface radiative forcing has not been carefully evaluated. This study addresses this shortcoming by analyzing data from days with shallow cumuli collected over eight summers (2000-2007) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (collectively ACRF) Southern Great Plains site. During periods with clouds, the average shortwave and longwave radiative forcings are 45.5 W m-2 and +11.6 W m-2, respectively. The forcing has been defined so that a negative (positive) forcing indicates a surface cooling (warming). On average, the shortwave forcing is negative, however, instances with positive shortwave forcing are observed approximately 20% of the time. These positive values of shortwave forcing are associated with three-dimensional radiative effects of the clouds. The three-dimensional effects are shown to be largest for intermediate cloud amounts. The magnitude of the three-dimensional effects decreased with averaging time, but it is not negligibly small even for large averaging times as long as four hours.

Berg, Larry K.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Mills Jr., David L.

2011-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

26

Atmospheric radiation measurement unmanned aerospace vehicle (ARM-UAV) program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARM-UAV is part of the multi-agency U.S. Global Change Research Program and is addressing the largest source of uncertainty in predicting climatic response: the interaction of clouds and the sun`s energy in the Earth`s atmosphere. An important aspect of the program is the use of unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) as the primary airborne platform. The ARM-UAV Program has completed two major flight series: The first series conducted in April, 1994, using an existing UAV (the General Atomics Gnat 750) consisted of eight highly successful flights at the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. The second series conducted in September/October, 1995, using two piloted aircraft (Egrett and Twin Otter), featured simultaneous measurements above and below clouds and in clear sky. Additional flight series are planned to continue study of the cloudy and clear sky energy budget in the Spring and Fall of 1996 over the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Bolton, W.R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ozonesonde measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Billings, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ozonesonde instruments were prepared and released at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site located near Billings, Oklahoma. Ozone sensors, associated radiosondes, balloons, and other parts and pieces required for the ozone observations were provided by WFF on a reimbursable arrangement with ANL. Observations were scheduled daily at 1,700 UTC beginning on September 22, 1995. Attempts to maintain this schedule were frustrated by a few simultaneous operations involving different electronic devices in use resulting in considerable rf noise. Since radiosondes are necessarily low-cost instruments their reception is particularly susceptible to noisy rf fields. Overall, however, 36 ozonesonde flights were made with the last observation occurring on November 1, 1995. Ozone data were processed on-site through the ground-station software and preliminary data delivered to Mike Splitt at the ARM site.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Proceedings of the third Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) science team meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1993 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held in Morman, Oklahoma. To put these papers in context, it is useful to consider the history and status of the ARM Program at the time of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Objective Analysis Schemes to Monitor Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data in Near Real-Time M. Splitt University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Recent work in this area by Charles Wade (1987) lays out the groundwork for monitoring data quality for projects with large networks of instruments such as the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Wade generated objectively analyzed fields of meteorological variables (temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind) and then compared the objectively analyzed value at the sensor location with the value produced by the sensor. Wade used a Barne's objective analysis scheme to produce objective data values for a given meteorological variable (q) in two- dimensional space. The objectively analyzed value should

31

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Point Reyes, California for the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, was the location of the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The ARM Program collaborated with the U.S. Office of Naval Research and DOE's Aerosol Science Program in the Marine Stratus, Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) project. Their objectives were to collect data from cloud/aerosol interactions and to improve understanding of cloud organization that is often associated with patches of drizzle. Between March and September 2005, the AMF and at least two research aircraft were used to collect data.

32

Electron density and temperature measurement by continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electron-atom neutral bremsstrahlung continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized plasmas is investigated for electron density and temperature diagnostics. The continuum spectrum in 450–1000?nm emitted from the argon atmospheric pressure plasma is found to be in excellent agreement with the neutral bremsstrahlung formula with the electron-atom momentum transfer cross-section given by Popovi?. In 280–450?nm, however, a large discrepancy between the measured and the neutral bremsstrahlung emissivities is observed. We find that without accounting for the radiative H{sub 2} dissociation continuum, the temperature, and density measurements would be largely wrong, so that it should be taken into account for accurate measurement.

Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Youn Moon, Se [High-enthalpy Plasma Research Center, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaeyoung [5771 La Jolla Corona Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20 20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

34

DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

35

DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

36

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

37

Evaluation of the Multi-scale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is to provide long-term observations for evaluating and improving cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, the traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties for gridcells that are tens to hundreds kilometers across from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with time series of ground based observations at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the scale gap. The MMF consists of a two-dimensional or small three-dimensional cloud resolving model (CRM) embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. We present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru Island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both the CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with the MMF as well as the CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from the MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from the CAM run. This change is attributed to the improved representation of convective clouds in the MMF compared to the conventional climate model. For the SGP, the MMF shows little to no improvement in predicting the same quantities. Possible causes of this lack of improvement are discussed.

Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Evaluation of the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was to provide long-term observations for evaluation of cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with observed time series at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called the multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the gap. MMF consists of a two-dimensional cloud system resolving model (CSRM) embedded into each CAM grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. Because the approach is computationally expensive only limited simulations have been carried out. In this presentation, we will present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with MMF as well as CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from CAM run. For the SGP, the improvements are marginal.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. Scientists are using the information obtained from the permanent SGP site to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the SGP site. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions over the typical distribution of land uses within the site. The continuous observations at the SGP site are supplemented by intensive observation periods, when the frequency of measurements is increased and special measurements are added to address specific research questions. During such periods, 2 gigabytes or more of data (two billion bytes) are generated daily. SGP data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/ http. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

40

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites ARMlUnmanned Air VehiclelSatelites The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Program: An Overview P. A. Crowley Environmental Sciences Division U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. J. Vitko, Jr. Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA 94550 Introduction for leased UA V operation over the next year. Examples include, but are not limited to, the existing Gnat 750-45, with its 7-8 km ceiling, as well as the planned FY93 demonstration of two 20 km capable UA Vs-the Perseus- B and the Raptor. Thus the funding of some initial flights and the availability of leased UAVs will enable us to start up the ARM-UAV program. Additional funding will be required to continue this program. Interim Science Team This paper and the one that follows describe the start-up

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41

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

42

Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

DOE/SC-ARM-13-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the...

44

Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere: Further interpretations of collocated aircraft measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere: Further interpretations of collocated%) of this enhanced cloud absorption occurs at wavelengths 680 nm, and that the observed cloud absorption does stated, the purpose of ARESE was to address the issue of cloud shortwave (SW) absorption. Do clouds

Zender, Charles

45

Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) Central Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, a data analysis is performed to determine the area-averaged, spectral albedo at ARM's SGP central facility site. The spectral albedo is then fed into radiation transfer models to show that the diffuse discrepancy is diminished when the spectral albedo is used (as opposed to using the broadband albedo).

Michalsky, Joseph J.; Min, Qilong; Barnard, James C.; Marchand, Roger T.; Pilewskie, Peter

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

48

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program - unmanned aerospace vehicle: The follow-on phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) demonstration flights (UDF) are designed to provide an early demonstration of the scientific utility of UAVs by using an existing UAV and instruments to measure broadband radiative flux profiles under clear sky conditions. UDF is but the first of three phases of ARM-UAV. The second phase significantly extends both the UAV measurement techniques and the available instrumentation to allow both multi-UAV measurements in cloudy skies and extended duration measurements in the tropopause. These activities build naturally to the third and final phase, that of full operational capability, i.e., UAVs capable of autonomous operations at 20-km altitudes for multiple days with a full suite of instrumentation for measuring radiative flux, cloud properties, and water vapor profiles.

Vitko, J. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planet’s remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energy’s GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities’ pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric radiation measurement Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 22 CHAPTER 7. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT We examine in this chapter the role played by atmospheric gases in Summary:...

51

Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

52

Analyses of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) multiple data sets for studying cloud absorption Z. Li and A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environment Service, Environment Canada from aircraft observations was 37% of the incoming solar irradiance, almost twice that of model

Li, Zhanqing

53

A 25-month database of stratus cloud properties generated from ground-based measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 25-month database of the macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties of isolated and overcast low-level stratus clouds has been generated using a newly developed parameterization and surface measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement central facility in Oklahoma. The database (5-min resolution) includes two parts: measurements and retrievals. The former consist of cloud base and top heights, layer-mean temperature, cloud liquid water path, and solar transmission ratio measured by a ground-based lidar/ceilometer and radar pair, radiosondes, a microwave radiometer, and a standard Eppley precision spectral pyranometer, respectively. The retrievals include the cloud-droplet effective radius and number concentration and broadband shortwave optical depth and cloud and top-of-atmosphere albedos. Stratus without any overlying mid or high-level clouds occurred most frequently during winter and least often during summer. Mean cloud-layer altitudes and geometric thicknesses were higher and greater, respectively, in summer than in winter. Both quantities are positively correlated with the cloud-layer mean temperature. Mean cloud-droplet effective radii range from 8.1 {mu}m in winter to 9.7 {mu}m during summer, while cloud-droplet number concentrations during winter are nearly twice those in summer. Since cloud liquid water paths are almost the same in both seasons, cloud optical depth is higher during the winter, leading to greater cloud albedos and lower cloud transmittances. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

Dong, Xiquan [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States)] [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States); Ackerman, Thomas P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States); Clothiaux, Eugene E. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Mace, Gerald G. [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Long, Charles N. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Liljegren, James C. [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)] [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

Retrieval of optical and microphysical properties of ice clouds using Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)????????????????.33 b. North Slope of Alaska (NSA)???????????????...49 6. CONCLUSIONS????????????????????????58 REFERENCES????????????????????????..60 VITA????????????????????????????.?.63 vii LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Comparison of the computed phase function... Smith?s method and expanded it to the 1800-3000 cm -1 wavenumber region, which he referred to as the Band II region (note that the region used by Smith et al. (1993) is referred to as the Band I region). DeSlover and Smith (1999) used the Atmospheric...

Kinney, Jacqueline Anne

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Specific Instruments Used in the ARM Program  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ARM is known for its comprehensive set of world-class, and in some cases, unique, instruments available for use by the global scientific community. In addition to the ARM instruments, the ARM Climate Research Facility identifies and acquires a wide variety of data including model, satellite, and surface data, from "external instruments," to augment the data being generated within the program. External instruments belong to organizations that are outside of the ARM Program. Field campaign instruments are another source of data used to augment routine observations. The huge archive of ARM data can be organized by instrument categories into twelve "collections:" Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties, Derived Quantities and Models, Ocean Observations, Radiometric, Satellite Observations, Surface Meteorology, Surface/Subsurface Properties, and Other. Clicking on one of the instrument categories leads to a page that breaks that category down into sub-categories. For example, "Atmospheric Profiling" is broken down into ARM instruments (with 11 subsets), External Instruments (with 6 subsets), and Field Campaign Instruments (with 42 subsets). Each of the subset links, in turn, leads to detailed information pages and links to specific data streams. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading.

56

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

57

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

58

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

59

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

60

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U U r r b b a a n n A A t t m m o o s s p p h h e e r r i i c c O O b b s s e e r r v v a a t t o o r r y y ( ( U U A A O O ) ) F F i i r r s s t t P P l l a a n n n n i i n n g g W W o o r r k k s s h h o o p p - - A A t t t t e e n n d d e e e e s s 2 2 7 7 - - 2 2 8 8 J J a a n n u u a a r r y y , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 3 ****************************************************************** Sean Ahearn Hunter College North Bldg., 10 th Floor New York City, NY sca@everest.hunter.cuny.edu (W) 212-772-5327 Robert Bornstein San Jose State University Dept. of Meteorology San Jose, CA 951920-0104 pblmodel@hotmail.com (W) 408-924-5205 (F) 408-924-5191 David Brown Argonne National Lab 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 dbrown@anl.gov (W) 608-442-1249 Michael Brown LANL, Drop Point 19S, SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road Group D4-MS F604 Los Alamos, NM 87545 mbrown@lanl.gov (W) 505- 667-1788

62

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models. As an important factor in growing crops, soil moisture dictates a farmer's success or failure. Too much soil moisture can drown out croplands and cause flooding,...

63

ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description This data product contains atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

64

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii for the Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) Field Campaign (an AMF2 Deployment)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

From October 2012 through September 2013, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed on the container ship Spirit, operated by Horizon Lines, for the Marine ARM GPCI* Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign. During approximately 20 round trips between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, AMF2 obtained continuous on-board measurements of cloud and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; surface meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric profiles from weather balloons launched every six hours. During two two-week intensive observational periods in January and July 2013, additional instruments were deployed and balloon soundings were be increased to every three hours. These additional data provided a more detailed characterization of the state of the atmosphere and its daily cycle during two distinctly different seasons. The primary objective of MAGIC was to improve the representation of the stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition in climate models. AMF2 data documented the small-scale physical processes associated with turbulence, convection, and radiation in a variety of marine cloud types.

65

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Radiative heating rate The heating rate due to the divergence of long and shortwave radiative flux. Categories Radiometric, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 : Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS

66

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to other sites as determined. In 2007 the AMF operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. COPS was endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading.

67

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring data was collected at four locations in China during 2008. The various sites are located in regions with different climate regimes and with high aerosol loadings of different optical, physical, and chemical properties. Measurements obtained at all the AMF sites during the 8-month deployment in China will help scientists to validate satellite-based findings, understand the mechanisms of the aerosol indirect effects in the region, and examine the roles of aerosols in affecting regional climate and atmospheric circulation, with a special focus on the impact of the East Asian monsoon system. As with other collections from the ARM Mobile Facility, the datasets are available from the ARM Archive. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

68

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

69

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

70

Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HICKS, B.B., A SIMULATION OF THE EDDY ACCUMULATION...CLOSURES IN 2ND-ORDER MODELING, JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC...Their advantag-es are rapid response, linear output...the measurement and modeling of surface fluxes are...the appli-cation of automated conditional sampling...

W. F. Dabberdt; D. H. Lenschow; T. W. Horst; P. R. Zimmerman; S. P. Oncley; A. C. Delany

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

71

Atmospheres and radiating surfaces of neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a breakthrough in the studies of thermal radiation of neutron stars. Observations with modern space telescopes have provided a wealth of valuable information. Being correctly interpreted, this information can elucidate physics of superdense matter in the interiors of these stars. The theory of formation of thermal spectra of neutron stars is based on the physics of plasmas and radiative processes in stellar photospheres. It provides the framework for interpretation of observational data and for extracting neutron-star parameters from these data. This paper presents a review of the current state of the theory of surface layers of neutron stars and radiative processes in these layers, with the main focus on the neutron stars that possess strong magnetic fields. In addition to the conventional deep (semi-infinite) atmospheres, radiative condensed surfaces of neutron stars and "thin" (finite) atmospheres are also considered.

Potekhin, A Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) was designed to provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the ARM Mobile Facility and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System were deployed on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations were supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods, one in the summer and a second in the winter.

73

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements Tim Arnolda,1's radiative budget; however, our understand- ing of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited together with an atmo- spheric model and inverse method, we estimate that the global emissions of NF3

Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

74

Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

75

Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Validation of Surface Retrieved Cloud Optical Properties with in situ Measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) South Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface inferred cloud optical properties from a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer have been validated against the in situ measurements during the second ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE II) field campaign at the ARM South Great Plains (SGP) site. On the basis of eight effective radius profiles measured by the in situ Forward Spectra Scattering Probe (FSSP), our retrieved cloud effective radii for single-layer warm water clouds agree well with in situ measurements, within 5.5%. The sensitivity study also illustrates that for this case a 13% uncertainty in observed liquid water path (LWP, 20 g/m2) results in 1.5% difference in retrieved cloud optical depth and 12.7% difference in referred cloud effective radius, on average. The uncertainty of the LWP measured by the microwave radiometer (MWR) is the major contributor to the uncertainty of retrieved cloud effective radius. Further, we conclude that the uncertainty of our inferred cloud optical properties is better than 5% for warm water clouds based on a surface closure study, in which cloud optical properties inferred from narrowband irradiances are applied to a shortwave model and the modeled broadband fluxes are compared to a surface pyranometer.

Min, Qilong; Duan, M.; Marchand, Roger T.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

An Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. J. S. Delamere, S. A. Clough, E. J. Mlawer, Sid-Ahmed Boukabara, K. Cady-Pereira, and M. Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Maine Introduction Over the last decade, a suite of radiative transfer models has been developed at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) with support from the Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. These models span the full spectral regime from the microwave to the ultraviolet, and range from monochromatic to band calculations. Each model combines the latest spectroscopic advancements with radiative transfer algorithms to efficiently compute radiances, fluxes, and cooling

79

Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ĺngström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Measuring Nighttime Atmospheric Opacity Using Images From the Mars Exploration Rovers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by KERI MARIE BEAN MEASURING NIGHTTIME ATMOSPHERIC OPACITY USING IMAGES FROM THE MARS EXPLORATION ROVERS Approved by: Research Advisor: Mark...&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Mark Lemmon Department of Atmospheric Sciences Atmospheric opacity, otherwise known as optical depth, is the measurement of the amount of radiation reaching the surface through the atmosphere. The spatial and temporal...

Bean, Keri M

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castańo, Gabriel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A U. S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program DOESC-ARMP-07-003 Science and Research Data Products Climate Data for the World A primary objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation...

83

Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide Water vapor #12;Atmospheric composition (parts per million by volume) · Nitrogen (N2) 780Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere Bill Satzer 3M Company #12;Outline,840 · Oxygen (O2) 209,460 · Argon (Ar) 9340 · Carbon dioxide (CO2) 394 · Methane (CH4) 1.79 · Ozone (O3) 0

Olver, Peter

84

Measurements of the Infrared SpectraLines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures P. Varanasi and Q. Zou Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York Introduction Water vapor is undoubtedly the most dominant greenhouse gas in the terrestrial atmosphere. In the two facets of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research, atmospheric remote sensing (air-borne as well as Cloud and Radiation Testbed [CART] site-based) and modeling of atmospheric radiation, the spectrum of water vapor, ranging from the microwave to the visible wavelengths, plays a significant role. Its spectrum has been the subject of many studies throughout the last century. Therefore, it is natural to presume it should be fairly well established by now. However, the need for a

85

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

86

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Title Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Salamanca, Francisco, Shaheen R. Tonse, Surabi Menon, Vishal Garg, Krishna P. Singh, Manish Naja, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 4 Abstract We evaluate differences in clear-sky upwelling shortwave radiation reaching the top of the atmosphere in response to increasing the albedo of roof surfaces in an area of India with moderately high aerosol loading. Treated (painted white) and untreated (unpainted) roofs on two buildings in northeast India were analyzed on five cloudless days using radiometric imagery from the IKONOS satellite. Comparison of a radiative transfer model (RRTMG) and radiometric satellite observations shows good agreement (R2 = 0.927). Results show a mean increase of ~50 W m-2 outgoing at the top of the atmosphere for each 0.1 increase of the albedo at the time of the observations and a strong dependence on atmospheric transmissivity.

87

Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols R. A. Ferrare and K. D. Evans (a) Hughes STX Corporation Lanham, Maryland S. H. Melfi and D. N. Whiteman NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland The principal objective of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) is to develop a better understanding of the atmospheric radiative balance in order to improve the parameterization of radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs) which are used to study climate change. Meeting this objective requires detailed measurements of both water vapor and aerosols since these atmospheric constituents affect the radiation balance directly, through scattering and absorption of solar and

88

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

89

Solar Radiation Estimated Through Mesoscale Atmospheric Modeling over Northeast Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of renewable energy sources like solar wind and biomass is rapidly increasing in recent years with solar radiation as a particularly abundant energy source over Northeast Brazil. A proper quantitative knowledge of the incoming solar radiation is of great importance for energy planning in Brazil serving as basis for developing future projects of photovoltaic power plants and solar energy exploitation. This work presents a methodology for mapping the incoming solar radiation at ground level for Northeast Brazil using a mesoscale atmospheric model (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System—RAMS) calibrated and validated using data from the network of automatic surface stations from the State Foundation for Meteorology and Water Resources from Ceará (Fundaçăo Cearense de Meteorologia e Recursos Hídricos? FUNCEME). The results showed that the model exhibits systematic errors overestimating surface radiation but that after the proper statistical corrections using a relationship between the model?predicted cloud fraction the ground?level observed solar radiation and the incoming solar radiation estimated at the top of the atmosphere a correlation of 0.92 with a confidence interval of 13.5? W / m 2 is found for monthly data. Using this methodology we found an estimate for annual average incoming solar radiation over Ceará of 215? W / m 2 (maximum in October: 260? W / m 2 ).

Otacilio Leandro de Menezes Neto; Alexandre Araújo Costa; Fernando Pinto Ramalho; Paulo Henrique Santiago de Maria

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Thomson scattering measurements in atmospheric plasma jets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electron temperature and electron density in a dc plasma jet at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using Thomson laser scattering. Measurements performed at various scattering angles have revealed effects that are not accounted for by the standard scattering theory. Differences between the predicted and experimental results suggest that higher order corrections to the theory may be required, and that corrections to the form of the spectral density function may play an important role.

G. Gregori; J. Schein; P. Schwendinger; U. Kortshagen; J. Heberlein; E. Pfender

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

92

Posters Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties Measured  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Cloud Microphysical and Radiative Properties Measured by Combined Lidar, Radar, and Infrared Radiometer W. L. Eberhard and J. M. Intrieri National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. P. Chan and G. Feingold Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Boulder, Colorado also an order of magnitude smaller. These features make simple approximations in scattering calculations adequate for some applications, e.g., Eberhard (1993a). They also provide some unique capabilities, especially the technique described below for measuring drop sizes. One of the four IDP tasks is to characterize cloud signatures obtained by CO 2 lidar. For instance, our earlier work discovered that depolarization from ice particles was almost

93

Detection of atmospheric Cherenkov radiation using solar heliostat mirrors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gamma-ray energy region between 20 and 250 GeV is largely unexplored. Ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov detectors offer a possible way to explore this region, but large Cherenkov photon collection areas are needed to achieve low energy thresholds. This paper discusses the development of a Cherenkov detector using the heliostat mirrors of a solar power plant as the primary collector. As part of this development, we built a prototype detector consisting of four heliostat mirrors and used it to record atmospheric Cherenkov radiation produced in extensive air showers created by cosmic ray particles.

Ong, R A

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of precipitation. These data will be combined with coincident radar, aircraft, and satellite data to improve how clouds and precipitation in low-mountain regions are...

96

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen trifluoride (NF[subscript 3]) has potential to make a growing contribution to the Earth’s radiative budget; however, our understanding of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited. Based on a ...

Ivy, Diane J.

97

Radar Measurement of the Upper Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the Upper Atmosphere James C. G...two decades large radars have...of the upper atmosphere. These radars...ionospheric plasma, all as functions...ionospheric plasma by detection...is wasted. Atmospheric radar scientists...305 m and an area of 73,000...frequency of 430 MHz. The radar...

James C. G. Walker

1979-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Measurement of radiation impedance of stepped piston radiator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was noted in a paper given in 1972 [A. H. Lubell J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 52 1310 (1972)] that the radiation mass of a stepped piston underwater loudspeaker was approximately half of the value expected from simple piston theory. Recently the integral equation approach was used to compute the radiation impedance for the Lubell Laboratories model 98 underwater loudspeaker and new measurements were made. This paper reviews the measurement and data reduction procedures and compares measured and theoretical radiation impedances. The original observation of reduced radiation mass is supported. A companion paper covers the integral equation computation. [This work was supported by Lubell Laboratories Inc.

Alan H. Lubell

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements David M. Slocum,* Thomas M such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

100

Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

Karl, Jr., Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric longwave radiation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 1995, Dallas, TX. (56.12) THE GREENHOUSEEFFECT VISUALIZER Summary: to greenhouse effect is provided by subtracting the top of the atmosphere longwave radiation flux...

102

Measurement of solar radiation exergy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods of estimating the energy of solar radiation during it conversion into other forms of energy-thermal, photoelectric, and chemical-during photosynthesis of plants are examined. Analytical expressions are gi...

I. I. Sventitskii; A. P. Grishin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Estimation of the Radiation Dose to the Public Due to Atmospheric Emissions from the Rostov NPP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiation dose to the public due to atmospheric emissions from the Rostov NPP is calculated using a point conservative approach and a complex of migration and dosimetric models. The radiation exposure path...

L. A. Sharpan; E. I. Karpenko; S. I. Spiridonov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

Elliott, Emily M.

105

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of radiative fluxes for the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research, the Netherlands Knap, Wouter Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI Los, Alexander KNMI...

106

Absorption of solar radiation by the atmosphere as determined using satellite, aircraft, and surface data during the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorption of solar radiation by the atmosphere as determined using satellite, aircraft overcast conditions the aircraft measurements yield an absorptance of 0.32 0.03 for the layer between the aircraft (0.5­13 km), while the GOES 8 albedo versus surface transmittance analysis gives an absorptance

Dong, Xiquan

107

Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Bragg scattering measurement of atmospheric plasma decay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The decay processes of the plasma layers generated by two intersecting microwave pulses in 1 torr dry air are investigated by Bragg scattering method. The results of measurement show that the electrons decay i...

Y. S. Zhang; S. P. Kuo

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Absorption of infra-red radiation by atmospheric molecular cluster-ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protonated water clusters are a common species of atmospheric molecular cluster-ion, produced by cosmic rays throughout the troposphere and stratosphere. Under clear-sky conditions or periods of increased atmospheric ionisation, such as solar proton events, the IR absorption by atmospheric ions may affect climate through the radiative balance. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry in a long path cell, of path length 545m, has been used to detect IR absorption by corona-generated positive molecular cluster-ions. The column concentration of ions in the laboratory spectroscopy experiment was estimated to be ~10^13 m-2; the column concentration of protonated atmospheric ions estimated using a simple model is ~10^14 m-2. Two regions of absorption, at 12.3 and 9.1 um are associated with enhanced ion concentrations. After filtering of the measured spectra to compensate for spurious signals from neutral water vapour and residual carbon dioxide, the strongest absorption region is at 9.5 to 8.8 um (1050 to 1140 cm-1)...

Aplin, K L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Millimeter radiation from a 3D model of the solar atmosphere I. Diagnosing chromospheric thermal structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. We use advanced 3D NLTE radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmosphere to carry out detailed tests of chromospheric diagnostics at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Methods. We focused on the diagnostics of the thermal structure of the chromosphere in the wavelength bands from 0.4 mm up to 9.6 mm that can be accessed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) and investigated how these diagnostics are affected by the instrumental resolution. Results. We find that the formation height range of the millimeter radiation depends on the location in the simulation domain and is related to the underlying magnetic structure. Nonetheless, the brightness temperature is a reasonable measure of the gas temperature at the effective formation height at a given location on the solar surface. There is considerable scatter in this relationship, but this is significantly reduced when very weak magnetic fields are avoided. Our results indicate that although instrumental smearin...

Loukitcheva, Maria; Carlsson, Mats; White, Stephen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Anthropogenic NO2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anthropogenic NO Anthropogenic NO 2 in the Atmosphere: Estimates of the Column Content and Radiative Forcing A. N. Rublev Institution of Molecular Physics Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russia N Chubarova Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University Moscow, Russia G. Gorchakov Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction The work summarizes the different methodical aspects, firstly, the use of atmosphere optical depths presented in Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data for NO 2 column retrievals, and, secondly, its radiative forcing calculated as difference between integral solar fluxes absorbed in the atmosphere with and without NO 2 under given air mass or the sun zenith angle.

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric radiative transfer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University Collection: Geosciences 49 The Greenhouse Effect without Feedbacks Summary: Number microns10.016.7 7.14 T261K 12;Radiative...

113

Impact of Atmospheric Chromatic Effects on Weak Lensing Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current and future imaging surveys will measure cosmic shear with statistical precision that demands a deeper understanding of potential systematic biases in galaxy shape measurements than has been achieved to date. We use analytic and computational techniques to study the impact on shape measurements of two atmospheric chromatic effects for ground-based surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST): (i) atmospheric differential chromatic refraction (DCR) and (ii) wavelength dependence of seeing. We investigate the effects of using the point spread function (PSF) measured with stars to determine the shape of a galaxy that has a different spectral energy distribution (SED) than the stars. For (i), we extend a study by Plazas & Bernstein based on analytic calculations that show that DCR leads to significant biases in galaxy shape measurements for future surveys, if not corrected. For (ii), we find that the wavelength dependence of seeing leads to significant bia...

Meyers, Joshua E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

On Correction of Diffuse Radiation Measured by MFRSR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measured by MFRSR T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS Tomsk, Russia M. A. Sviridenkov and P. P. Anikin A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS...

116

You are here: OUP USA Home > U.S. General Catalog > Atmospheric Science > Climatology Radiation and Cloud Processes in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

You are here: OUP USA Home > U.S. General Catalog > Atmospheric Science > Climatology Radiation and long-range levels. The author here offers a systematic discussion of the transfer of solar and thermal important topics in atmospheric radiation, cloud physics, and thermal equilibrium. Aspects

Liou, K. N.

117

An Open-path Laser Transmissometer for Atmospheric Extinction Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A transmissometer is an optical instrument which measures transmitted intensity of monochromatic light over a fixed pathlength. Prototype of a simple laser transmissometer has been developed for transmission (or extinction) measurements through suspended absorbers and scatterers in the atmosphere over tens of meters. Instrument consists of a continuous green diode pumped solid state laser, transmission optics, photodiode detectors and A/D data acquisition components. A modulated laser beam is transmitted and subsequently reflected and returned to the unit by a retroreflecting mirror assembly placed several tens of meters away. Results from an open-path field measurement of the instrument are described.

Chandran, P. M. Satheesh; Krishnakumar, C. P.; Varma, Ravi [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Calicut, Kerala 673 601 (India); Yuen, Wangki; Rood, Mark J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GASLAB Network GASLAB Network CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace Gases (April 2003) data Data Investigators L.P. Steele, P.R. Krummel, and R.L. Langenfelds Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) DOI 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1021 Data are available for four atmospheric trace gases at nine stationary sites and one moving platform (aircraft over Cape Grim, Tasmania, and Bass Strait, between the Australian continent and Tasmania). The trace gases are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen (H2). Measurements of δ13C from CO2 are also included in this database. The nine stationary sites are, from north to south: Alert, Canada; Shetland Islands, Scotland; Estevan Point, Canada; Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Cape Ferguson,

119

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

Measurements of Relative K Radiative Decay Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relative radiative decay rates were measured for K-shell vacancies for elements between Z=62 and 92 with a high-resolution Ge(Li) spectrometer. The ratios ?2?1, ?1??1, and ?2??1 (Siegbahn notation) were determined, with ?2?1 significantly higher (4-14%) than those reported by Beckman but in excellent agreement with recent Hartree-Slater calculations of Scofield. The ratios ?1??1 and ?2??1 do not agree with either Beckman's experiment or Scofield's calculations.

P. J. Ebert and V. W. Slivinsky

1969-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Satellite Data Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction Models. Part I: Forward Radiative Transfer and Jacobian Modeling in Cloudy Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satellite data assimilation requires rapid and accurate radiative transfer and radiance gradient models. For a vertically stratified scattering and emitting atmosphere, the vector discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model (VDISORT) was developed ...

Fuzhong Weng; Quanhua Liu

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Asymmetry in the Diurnal Cycle of Atmospheric Downwelling Radiation at the ARM SGP CF Site Over 1995-2001 Period A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction The shape of the diurnal cycle of atmospheric downwelling radiation is an important climatic feature of cloud-radiation interactions and atmospheric properties. Adequate characterization of this diurnal cycle is critical for accurate determination of monthly and seasonal radiation budgets from a limited data sampling. This is especially important for establishing the optimal sampling and temporal interpolation schemes employed in satellite radiation budget missions, such as Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB), and Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System

123

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model: Optimization and Evaluation of Simulated Radiative Fluxes and Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work continues the presentation and evaluation of the Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM), focusing on the model’s ability to represent radiation and precipitation. OLAM is a new, state-of-the-art earth system model, capable of user-specified ...

David Medvigy; Robert L. Walko; Martin J. Otte; Roni Avissar

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Diagnostic analysis of atmospheric moisture and clear-sky radiative feedback in the Hadley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagnostic analysis of atmospheric moisture and clear-sky radiative feedback in the Hadley Centre and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate models Richard P. Allan Hadley Centre, Met Office Jersey, USA A. Slingo1 Hadley Centre, Met Office, Bracknell, UK Received 23 July 2001; revised 20

Allan, Richard P.

125

Climate monitoring with Earth radiation budget measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) and its geographical distribution is intimately linked with the earth’s climate and with the general circulation. We analyze 10 years of global Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) measurements from 2000 to 2010 and 8 years of diurnally resolved Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) from 2004 to 2011 to illustrate this link and to verify if we can detect climate variability or systematic change. In response to the diurnal wave of solar heating three tropical convection maxima exist over South America Africa and around Indonesia. The Indonesian convection maximum is unstable due to a lack of a stabilizing land mass; this is the root cause of the El Ni?o/La Ni?a inter-annual variation with a global pattern of teleconnected variations through the general Walker circulation. Since 2000 a change in global dynamics seems to have occurred. There was a general strengthening of La Ni?a coinciding with a ‘break in global temperature rise’ and with an ‘eastern dimming’ i.e. an increase of aerosols over Asia. There is a resemblance to the period of ‘western dimming’ from 1945 to 1980 and a contrast with the period of global temperature rise and El Ni?o strengthening from 1980 to 2000. It is of paramount importance that the suspected link between the eastern dimming the strengthening of La Ni?a and the break in global temperature rise is thoroughly investigated. This can best be done by a move of a satellite of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) series over the Indian Ocean. MSG provides diurnally resolved measurements of the key variables of the ERB clouds and aerosols and of the auxiliary variables of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and static stability.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A passive measurement of dissociated atom densities in atmospheric pressure air discharge plasmas using vacuum ultraviolet self-absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a method for determining the dissociation degree of atmospheric pressure air discharges by measuring the self-absorption characteristics of vacuum ultraviolet radiation from O and N atoms in the plasma. The atom densities are determined by modeling the amount of radiation trapping present in the discharge, without the use of typical optical absorption diagnostic techniques which require external sources of probing radiation into the experiment. For an 8.0?mm spark discharge between needle electrodes at atmospheric pressure, typical peak O atom densities of 8.5?×?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3} and peak N atom densities of 9.9?×?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3} are observed within the first ?1.0?mm of plasma near the anode tip by analyzing the OI and NI transitions in the 130.0–132.0?nm band of the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum.

Laity, George [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Applied Science and Technology Maturation Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Fierro, Andrew; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Frank, Klaus [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University at Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

128

Modeling Io's Sublimation-Driven Atmosphere: Gas Dynamics and Radiation Emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Io's sublimation-driven atmosphere is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. These rarefied gas dynamics simulations improve upon earlier models by using a three-dimensional domain encompassing the entire planet computed in parallel. The effects of plasma impact heating, planetary rotation, and inhomogeneous surface frost are investigated. Circumplanetary flow is predicted to develop from the warm subsolar region toward the colder night-side. The non-equilibrium thermal structure of the atmosphere, including vibrational and rotational temperatures, is also presented. Io's rotation leads to an asymmetric surface temperature distribution which is found to strengthen circumplanetary flow near the dusk terminator. Plasma heating is found to significantly inflate the atmosphere on both day- and night-sides. The plasma energy flux also causes high temperatures at high altitudes but permits relatively cooler temperatures at low altitudes near the dense subsolar point due to plasma energy depletion. To validate the atmospheric model, a radiative transfer model was developed utilizing the backward Monte Carlo method. The model allows the calculation of the atmospheric radiation from emitting/absorbing and scattering gas using an arbitrary scattering law and an arbitrary surface reflectivity. The model calculates the spectra in the {nu}{sub 2} vibrational band of SO{sub 2} which are then compared to the observational data.

Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.; Stewart, Benedicte [University of Texas at Austin, Department of Aerospace Engineering, 210 East 24. Street W. R. Woolrich Laboratories 1 University Station, C0600 Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gratiy, Sergey L.; Levin, Deborah A. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Aerospace Engineering, 229 Hammond, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Radiation measurements with heat-proof polyethylene terephthalate bottles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1009 145 1006 55 Radiation measurements with...Chiba-263-8555, Japan 2 Hiroshima University...Photonics K.K., Japan) connected with...evaluation of a radiation detector because...be used to detect radiation in place of the...Chemicals Inc., Japan). Since the PET...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 32, JANUARY 2015, 3263 On the Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds: Light Scattering, Remote Sensing,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the radiative properties of ice clouds from three perspectives: light scattering simulations, remote sensingADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 32, JANUARY 2015, 32­63 On the Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds: Light Scattering, Remote Sensing, and Radiation Parameterization Ping YANG1, Kuo-Nan LIOU2, Lei

Baum, Bryan A.

131

Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive ComponentEmissionsEmissionsEmissions Todd Hubing Mi h li P f f V hi l El t iMichelin Professor of Vehicular Electronics Clemson University

Stuart, Steven J.

132

A new one-dimensional radiative equilibrium model for investigating atmospheric radiation entropy flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solar constant Q 0, TOA SW albedo alpha TOA, Sun's temperature T Sun, the empirical constant a 0 and the overall...the relationship between radiative entropy and temperature distributions. J. Atmos. Sci. 47, 795-803. ( doi...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility - annual report 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ER-ARM-0403 ER-ARM-0403 3 Table of Contents Program Overview ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 The Role of Clouds in Climate .................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Science Goals ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Climate Research Facility: Successful Science Program Leads to User Facility Designation ................................ 5 Sites Around the World Enable Real Observations .......................................................................................................

134

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Plots and Figures  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ARM Program data is available in daily diagnostic plots that can be easily grouped into daily, weekly, monthly, and even yearly increments. By visualizing ARM data in thumbnail-sized data plots, users experience highly-browsable subsets of data available at the Data Archive including complimentary data products derived from data processed by ARM. These thumbnails allow users to quickly scan for a particular type of condition, like a clear day or a day with persistent cirrus. From a diagnostics perspective, the data plots assist in looking for missing data, for data exceeding a particular range, or for loading multiple variables (e.g., shortwave fluxes and precipitation), and to determine whether a certain science or data quality condition is associated with some other parameter (e.g., high wind or rain).[taken from http://www.arm.gov/data/data_plots.stm] Several interfaces and tools have been developed to make data plots easy to generate and manipulate. For example, the NCVWeb is an interactive NetCDF data plotting tool that ARM users can use to plot data as they order it or to plot regular standing data orders. It allows production of detailed tables, extraction of data, statistics output, comparison plotting, etc. without the need for separate visualization software. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data plots are free for viewing and downloading.

135

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Products from Principal Investigators  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pressure measurements Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- School of Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University Collection: Engineering ; Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 8 CHAPTER 2. ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE 2.1 MEASURING...

137

SURFRAD—A National Surface Radiation Budget Network for Atmospheric Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A surface radiation budget observing network (SURFRAD) has been established for the United States to support satellite retrieval validation, modeling, and climate, hydrology, and weather research. The primary measurements are the downwelling ...

John A. Augustine; John J. DeLuisi; Charles N. Long

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Measurement of Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations with IceCube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the first statistically significant detection of neutrino oscillations in the high-energy regime (>20??GeV) from an analysis of IceCube Neutrino Observatory data collected in 2010 and 2011. This measurement is made possible by the low-energy threshold of the DeepCore detector (?20??GeV) and benefits from the use of the IceCube detector as a veto against cosmic-ray-induced muon background. The oscillation signal was detected within a low-energy muon neutrino sample (20–100 GeV) extracted from data collected by DeepCore. A high-energy muon neutrino sample (100 GeV–10 TeV) was extracted from IceCube data to constrain systematic uncertainties. The disappearance of low-energy upward-going muon neutrinos was observed, and the nonoscillation hypothesis is rejected with more than 5? significance. In a two-neutrino flavor formalism, our data are best described by the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters |?m322|=(2.3-0.5+0.6)×10-3??eV2 and sin?2(2?23)>0.93, and maximum mixing is favored.

M. G. Aartsen et al. (IceCube Collaboration)

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

Measurements - Ion Beams - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion Beams Available Beams Beam Change Times Measurements Useful Graphs Measurements The beam uniformity and flux are determined using an array of five detectors. Each...

140

Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

Smith, D. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sound radiation measurement with nearfield holography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With holography an entire 3D wave field can be reconstructed from data obtained on a single 2D surface. Such high information content has made holography a powerful research tool and useful extensions from its original optical domain to other wave fields such as sound have naturally been pursued. However it has usually been assumed that the resolution of a holographicreconstruction is limited by the wavelength of the radiation; this limitation severely diminishes the usefulness of holography for sound fields when the wavelengths are many times larger than the objects to be imaged. We have developed a new technique called nearfield holography which eliminates the wavelength resolution limit and in addition permits a determination of: (1) the complete sound pressure and particle velocity fields produced by the source; (2) the mode of vibration of the surfaces of the source; (3) the vector intensity field (showing flow of acoustic energy) around the source; (4) the farfield directivity pattern; (5) the total power radiated into a half?space. A particularly interesting application of nearfield holography occurs in the study of sound radiation from musical instruments. [Work supported by ONR.

J. D. Maynard; E. G. Williams

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

143

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

144

Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The OH- and O3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven pressures at each temperature.

Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

145

Using radiative transfer models to study the atmospheric water vapor content and to eliminate telluric lines from high-resolution optical spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) and the retrieval algorithm, incorporated in the SCIATRAN 2.2 software package developed at the Institute of Remote Sensing/Institute of Enviromental Physics of Bremen University (Germany), allows to simulate, among other things, radiance/irradiance spectra in the 2400-24 000 {\\AA} range. In this work we present applications of RTM to two case studies. In the first case the RTM was used to simulate direct solar irradiance spectra, with different water vapor amounts, for the study of the water vapor content in the atmosphere above Sierra Nevada Observatory. Simulated spectra were compared with those measured with a spectrometer operating in the 8000-10 000 {\\AA} range. In the second case the RTM was used to generate telluric model spectra to subtract the atmospheric contribution and correct high-resolution stellar spectra from atmospheric water vapor and oxygen lines. The results of both studies are discussed.

Gardini, A; Pérez, E; Quesada, J A; Funke, B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Measurements of atmospheric water vapor above Mauna Kea using an infrared radiometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of atmospheric water vapor above Mauna Kea using an infrared radiometer David A in atmospheric water vapor that distort the phase coherence of incoming celestial signals. The signal received water vapor, this paper presents results obtained with a second generation IRMA operating at the James

Naylor, David A.

147

Techniques for radiation measurements: microdosimetry and dosimetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......neutron capture therapy(25) using a pair of matched miniature TEPCs where the wall of one of the counters is loaded with Boron-10. Subtraction of the two measured microdosimetric spectra reveals the enhanced dose achieved by boron capture. In this......

A. J. Waker

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Cosmic Radiation Measurements in Airline Service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of 38.9 µSv whereas the CARI 3Q programme gives a route dose of 32.5 µSv. Measurements have also been performed on the Boeing 747-400 aircraft on the high latitude ultralonghaul direct London-Tokyo flight and these give values in the region of 6......

M. Bagshaw

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Measurement of radiation dose in dental radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......product to effective dose and energy imparted to the patient. Phys...C. A. and Persliden, J. Energy imparted to the patient in diagnostic...factors for determining the energy imparted from measurements of...dental radiology. | Patient dose audit is an important tool for quality......

Ebba Helmrot; Gudrun Alm Carlsson

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method and apparatus for measuring spatial uniformity of radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for measuring the spatial uniformity of the intensity of a radiation beam from a radiation source based on a single sampling time and/or a single pulse of radiation. The measuring apparatus includes a plurality of radiation detectors positioned on planar mounting plate to form a radiation receiving area that has a shape and size approximating the size and shape of the cross section of the radiation beam. The detectors concurrently receive portions of the radiation beam and transmit electrical signals representative of the intensity of impinging radiation to a signal processor circuit connected to each of the detectors and adapted to concurrently receive the electrical signals from the detectors and process with a central processing unit (CPU) the signals to determine intensities of the radiation impinging at each detector location. The CPU displays the determined intensities and relative intensity values corresponding to each detector location to an operator of the measuring apparatus on an included data display device. Concurrent sampling of each detector is achieved by connecting to each detector a sample and hold circuit that is configured to track the signal and store it upon receipt of a "capture" signal. A switching device then selectively retrieves the signals and transmits the signals to the CPU through a single analog to digital (A/D) converter. The "capture" signal. is then removed from the sample-and-hold circuits. Alternatively, concurrent sampling is achieved by providing an A/D converter for each detector, each of which transmits a corresponding digital signal to the CPU. The sampling or reading of the detector signals can be controlled by the CPU or level-detection and timing circuit.

Field, Halden (Boulder, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

Fu, Tairan, E-mail: trfu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Development of Measurement Techniques to Identify and Characterize Dusts and Ice Nuclei in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nucleation mechanisms. The work presented here discusses new instrumentation and methods to measure and identify both the optical scattering properties and ice nucleation properties of atmospherically relevant dusts. The Texas A&M University Continuous Flow...

Glen, Andrew

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Measurement of parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents the measurement of optics parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source, which include betatron tune, beta function, dispersion function, natural chromaticity, corrected chromaticity, central RF frequency, momentum compaction factor, and linear betatron coupling. Two methods were used for beta function measurement; a conventional quadrupole scan method and a method using the fitting of the orbit response matrix. A robust Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used for nonlinear least square fitting of the orbit response matrix. In this paper, detailed methods for the parameter measurements are described. The measured results are discussed and compared with the theoretical values obtained using accelerator simulation code Accelerator Toolbox in MATLAB.

Ghodke, A. D.; Husain, Riyasat; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Surendra; Puntambekar, T. A. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, 452013, Indore (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Lens transmission measurement for an absolute radiation thermometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lens transmission for the National Institute of Metrology of China absolute radiation thermometer is measured by a hybrid method. The results of the lens transmission measurements are 99.002% and 86.792% for filter radiometers with center wavelengths 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively. These results, after correcting for diffraction factors and the size-of-source effect when the lens is incorporated within the radiometer, can be used for measurement of thermodynamic temperature. The expanded uncertainty of the lens transmission measurement system has been evaluated. It is 1.3×10{sup ?3} at 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively.

Hao, X.; Yuan, Z.; Lu, X. [Division of Thermometry and Materials Evaluation, National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)] [Division of Thermometry and Materials Evaluation, National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

155

Venus: Mass, Gravity Field, Atmosphere, and Ionosphere as Measured by the Mariner 10 Dual-Frequency Radio System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...KLIORE, A.J., ATMOSPHERE OF MARS FROM MARINER-9...MEASUREMENTS OF PULSED PLASMA STREAMS FROM SUN...C., VENUS - ATMOSPHERIC MOTION AND STRUCTURE...measurements of planetary atmospheres and ionospheres...range-modu-lated 2115-Mhz signal is transmitted...are available in printed and plotted form...

H. T. Howard; G. L. Tyler; G. Fjeldbo; A. J. Kliore; G. S. Levy; D. L. Brunn; R. Dickinson; R. E. Edelson; W. L. Martin; R. B. Postal; B. Seidel; T. T. Sesplaukis; D. L. Shirley; C. T. Stelzried; D. N. Sweetnam; A. I. Zygielbaum; P. B. Esposito; J. D. Anderson; I. I. Shapiro; R. D. Reasenberg

1974-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

156

Estimating the Atmospheric Water Vapor Content from Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differential absorption technique for estimating columnar water vapor values from the analysis of sunphotometric measurements with wide- and narrowband interferential filters centered near 0.94 ?m is discussed and adapted. Water vapor line ...

Artemio Plana-Fattori; Michel Legrand; Didier Tanré; Claude Devaux; Anne Vermeulen; Philippe Dubuisson

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

158

Seasonal measurements of acetone and methanol: Abundances and implications for atmospheric budgets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2002] and photochemical produc- tion from hydrocarbon precursors. Methanol is often the most abundantSeasonal measurements of acetone and methanol: Abundances and implications for atmospheric budgets December 2005; published 21 February 2006. [1] Acetone and methanol have been measured hourly at a rural

Cohen, Ronald C.

159

Comparing radial velocities of atmospheric lines with radiosonde measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......30km u m1 0.01 E-W wind component, east positive v m1 0.01 N-S wind component, north positive...mesoscale models [MM5 (4), WRF (5), MesoNH (6...model augmented by some local weather stations. Details...KAMM) and compare with wind measurements taken at......

P. Figueira; F. Kerber; A Chacon; C. Lovis; N. C. Santos; G. Lo Curto; M. Sarazin; F. Pepe

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

Stoffel, T

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radio Frequency Signals in Jupiter's Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...IMAGE OF A LARGE UPWARD ELECTRICAL-DISCHARGE...RINNERT K , HDB ATMOSPHERIC ELEC 27 ( 1995...MEASUREMENTS OF THE RF CHARACTERISTICS...JUPITER PLASMA-WAVE OBSERVATIONS...OBSERVATIONS OF UPPER ATMOSPHERIC OPTICAL FLASHES...Solar and thermal radiation...relatively large at the beginning...and about non-radiative...sensitive area of 6...

L. J. Lanzerotti; K. Rinnert; G. Dehmel; F. O. Gliem; E. P. Krider; M. A. Uman; J. Bach

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

Lightweight Integrated Optical Sensor for Atmospheric Measurements on Mobile Platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Phase I program was to develop a novel open path sensor platform technology based on integration of semiconductor waveguides with efficient optoelectronic components on a monolithic platform. The successful Phase I effort resulted in demonstration of a novel optical resonator structure based on semiconductor high contrast gratings (HCGs) that will enable implementation of an ultra-compact, low-power gas sensor suitable for use on mobile platforms. Extensive numerical modeling was performed to design a device optimized for measuring CO2 at a wavelength for which a laser was available for proof of concept. Devices were fabricated and tested to match the target wavelength, angle, and operating temperature. This demonstration is the first implementation of HCGs at the wavelengths of interest and shows the flexibility of the proposed architecture for gas sensing applications. The measured cavity Q was lower than anticipated due to fabrication process challenges. The PSI and UC Berkeley team has identified solutions to these challenges and will produce optimized devices in a Phase II program where a prototype sensor will be fabricated and tested.

Parameswaran, Krishnan R. [Physical Sciences Inc.

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

163

Borehole logging for uranium by measurement of natural ?-radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-Ray measurements have been made in boreholes since 1939, for the purpose of detecting the radiation from naturally occuring radioelements in rocks. Logs of the ?-radiation in boreholes have evolved to their present acceptance as a quantitative measurement of uranium concentration for uranium exploration and mining development projects. Many factors influence these ?-ray measurements and consequently new methods of overcoming previous problems have had to be developed. Calibration facilities with model holes have been established in several countries to support quantitative borehole measurements. New high density detector materials have been evaluated and have shown to yield considerable improvements for operation in the restricted environment of the borehole. ?-Ray spectral logging has become available partially as a result of spin-off from parallel developments in surface and airborne ?-ray spectrometric survey equipment. The use of the high resolution solid state detector has proceeded through a series of developments to its present availability as a commercial borehole logging service in spite of the inherent detector cooling problems. Digital measurements are replacing the earlier analog measurements, and minicomputer- or micro processor-based logging systems have enabled new data processing techniques such as inverse filtering, to be implemented in real time at the site of the borehole.

P.G. Killeen

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Atmospheric Pressure Humid Argon DBD Plasma for the Application of Sterilization -Measurement and Simulation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Pressure Humid Argon DBD Plasma for the Application of Sterilization - Measurement, sterilization I. INTRODUCTION Non-thermal plasma technology at atmospheric pressure using oxygen of atmospheric pressure non-thermal argon plasma produced by a variety of techniques has recently begun

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

165

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

Preston, Eric F. (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO); Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Measurements and modelling of atmospheric pollution over the Paris area: an overview of the ESQUIF Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dedicated to the study of the processes leading to air pollution events over the Paris area. The project, pollution levels in the Paris area due to concentrated activity have become a major health issue. CurrentMeasurements and modelling of atmospheric pollution over the Paris area: an overview of the ESQUIF

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS AT WASTE TREATMENT LAGOON-ATMOSPHERIC INTERFACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- izers, emission from soils, biomass burning, and domestic animal waste (Bouwman et al., 1997MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS AT WASTE TREATMENT LAGOON-ATMOSPHERIC INTERFACE animals ( 32 Tg N -1yr-1). Waste storage and treatment lagoons are used to treat the excreta of hogs

Aneja, Viney P.

168

Cloud features and zonal wind measurements of Saturn's atmosphere as observed by Cassini/VIMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud features and zonal wind measurements of Saturn's atmosphere as observed by Cassini/VIMS D. S Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), focusing on the meteorology of the features seen in the 5 mm spectral window. We present VIMS mosaics and discuss the morphology and general

Choi, David S.

169

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 14171423 Measurements of ion concentration in gasoline and diesel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 1417­1423 Measurements of ion concentration in gasoline of a gasoline engine (K-car) and a diesel engine (diesel generator). Under the experimental set-up reported all of the ions smaller than 3 nm in the gasoline engine exhaust, and is above 2.7 � 108 cm�3

Yu, Fangqun

170

SATELLITE MEASUREMENTS OF MIDDLE ATMOSPHERIC IMPACTS BY SOLAR PROTON EVENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 23  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SATELLITE MEASUREMENTS OF MIDDLE ATMOSPHERIC IMPACTS BY SOLAR PROTON EVENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 23 C. H) Abstract. Solar cycle 23 was extremely active with seven of the largest twelve solar proton events (SPEs for several months past the solar events in the winter polar regions because of the enhanced NOy. Keywords

Jackman, Charles H.

171

The Multiply Scattering Effect on the Energy Measurement of UHE Cosmic Rays using Atmospheric Fluorescence Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Point sources in the atmosphere are surrounded by aureole because of atmospheric scattering. The properties of the time-dependent aureole radiance are calculated by use of a Monte Carlo approach and an iterative method. Since the aureole is particularly important in the ultraviolet, which is the region the Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic ray experiment using the air fluorescence technique like Fly's Eye or High-Resolution-Fly's-Eye(HiRes) are set in. The effect of the multiply scatteing on the energy measurement is studied.

Xingzhi Zhang

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

Kurzeja, R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

173

Atmospheric CO2> Record from In Situ Measurements at K-Puszta, Hungary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K-Puszta, Hungary K-Puszta, Hungary Atmospheric CO2 Record from In Situ Measurements at K-Puszta, Hungary graphics Graphics data Data Investigator László Haszpra Hungarian Meteorological Service, Institute for Atmospheric Physics, Department for Analysis of Atmospheric Environment, H-1675, P.O. Box 39, Budapest, Hungary Period of Record 1981-1997 Location The K-puszta regional background air pollution monitoring station was established in a clearing in a mixed forest on the Hungarian Great Plain in the middle of the Carpathian Basin. K-puszta is as free from direct pollution as possible in the highly industrialized, densely populated central Europe. Because of the growing vegetation, the station was moved in September 1993 to a larger clearing, also at the same elevation,

174

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baring Head Baring Head Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, A.J. Gomez, K.P. Pohl National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1970-93 Methods Determinations of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios are made using a Siemens Ultramat-3 nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer. The NDIR CO2 analyzer is connected via a gas manifold consisting of stainless steel tubing and computer-controlled solenoid switches to 12 gas cylinders and 2 sample air lines. The NDIR analyzer compares ambient air CO2 mixing ratios relative to known CO2 mixing ratios in tanks of compressed reference gases.

175

Analysis of spectra of acoustic signals generated by high-power pulsed laser radiation propagating in the atmosphere. I. Spectra of local plasma formations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the spectra of acoustic signals generated by high-power pulsed laser radiation propagating in the atmosphere in the breakdown mode are given in ... of a...

S. V. Shamanaev; L. G. Shamanaeva

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Space station: Infrastructure for radiation measurements in low Earth orbit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has recently begun the design and development phase of the Space Station Program. International negotiations with the Europeans Japanese and Canadians are progressing and they will soon join the United States in the development to complete plans for a cooperative international space endeavor. The Space Station will prove a permanently manned facility in low earth orbit to support scientific research technology development and commercial activities. In addition free?flying platforms will be developed to carry a variety of user payloads in polar orbit in co?orbit with the station and eventually into geosynchronous orbit. The Station and platforms represent an infrastructure of research facilities in space which could be utilized for measurements of naturally occurring radiation and secondary emissions over extended periods of time. High energy radiation experiments at the Station/platforms might vary in objective from scientific purpose of characterizing the radiation evironment for improved model accuracy. This paper describes the Space Station Program content schedule and approach for inputting user requirements into the design process. Conference participants can then assess to what extent this future capability in space matches their future research initiatives.

B. D. Meredith

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere radiation budget Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the solar constant albedo Changes in atmospheric infrared opacity The "greenhouse effect" Time constants Source: Sherwood, Steven - Climate Change Research Centre,...

178

Development of a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Satellite-observed radiance is a nonlinear functional of surface properties and atmospheric temperature and absorbing gas profiles as described by the radiative transfer equation (RTE). In the era of hyperspectral sounders with thousands of high-resolution channels, the computation of the radiative transfer model becomes more time-consuming. The radiative transfer model performance in operational numerical weather prediction systems still limits the number of channels we can use in hyperspectral sounders to only a few hundreds. To take the full advantage of such high-resolution infrared observations, a computationally efficient radiative transfer model is needed to facilitate satellite data assimilation. In recent years the programmable commodity graphics processing unit (GPU) has evolved into a highly parallel, multi-threaded, many-core processor with tremendous computational speed and very high memory bandwidth. The radiative transfer model is very suitable for the GPU implementation to take advantage of the hardware's efficiency and parallelism where radiances of many channels can be calculated in parallel in GPUs. In this paper, we develop a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched in 2006 onboard the first European meteorological polar-orbiting satellites, METOP-A. Each IASI spectrum has 8461 spectral channels. The IASI radiative transfer model consists of three modules. The first module for computing the regression predictors takes less than 0.004% of CPU time, while the second module for transmittance computation and the third module for radiance computation take approximately 92.5% and 7.5%, respectively. Our GPU-based IASI radiative transfer model is developed to run on a low-cost personal supercomputer with four GPUs with total 960 compute cores, delivering near 4 TFlops theoretical peak performance. By massively parallelizing the second and third modules, we reached 364x speedup for 1 GPU and 1455x speedup for all 4 GPUs, both with respect to the original CPU-based single-threaded Fortran code with the -O{sub 2} compiling optimization. The significant 1455x speedup using a computer with four GPUs means that the proposed GPU-based high-performance forward model is able to compute one day's amount of 1,296,000 IASI spectra within nearly 10 min, whereas the original single CPU-based version will impractically take more than 10 days. This model runs over 80% of the theoretical memory bandwidth with asynchronous data transfer. A novel CPU-GPU pipeline implementation of the IASI radiative transfer model is proposed. The GPU-based high-performance IASI radiative transfer model is suitable for the assimilation of the IASI radiance observations into the operational numerical weather forecast model.

Huang Bormin, E-mail: bormin@ssec.wisc.ed [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Mielikainen, Jarno [Department of Computer Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Oh, Hyunjong; Allen Huang, Hung-Lung [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

Howard Barker; Jason Cole

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

180

ESA SP-587 -2nd International Workshop on Radiation of High Temperature Gases in Atmospheric Entry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1, is presented in this paper. An inductively coupled plasma torch, work- ing at atmospheric are 64 MHz and 3 kW respectively. This kind of apparatus allows obtaining plasma in chem- ical and quasi level of test case 1 proposes a spectroscopic study of plasma formed with a Martian-like atmosphere gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mt. Cimone Mt. Cimone Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone graphics Graphics data Data Investigators Tiziano Colombo and Riccardo Santaguida Italian Meteorological Service, Via delle Ville, 100-41029 Sestola (MO), Italy Period of Record 1979-1997 Methods Continuous atmospheric CO2 measurements have been carried out at Mt. Cimone since 1979. Since December 1988, air samples have also been collected approximately once per week in a pair of 2-L, electropolished, stainless steel cylindrical flasks. From 1979 until December 1988, a Hartmann and Braun URAS-2T NDIR gas analyzer was used for CO2 determinations. Currently, CO2 determinations are made through the use of a Siemens Ultramat-5E NDIR gas analyzer. Water vapor is eliminated by passing the air through a U-tube

182

Radiocarbon Measurements of Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds:? Quantifying the Biogenic Contribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability to obtain quality (interpretable) [14C]VOC measurements however relies on additional factors:? (1) transferring individual VOCs to the measurement system in a manner that preserves their original relative concentrations in the atmosphere (recovery), (2) quantifying limitations in the VOC isolation process (bias), and 3) quantifying chemical and isotopic contamination (blanks). ... The fM results for the VOC fractions from calibration mixtures and ambient samples are corrected for CO2 contamination using eq 2, where ?BLK in this case is defined as in which mCO2 is the carbon mass of residual atmospheric CO2 following LiOH treatment plus the carbon mass of CO2 contamination from the O2 used for VOC oxidation, and mREC is the total recovered carbon (Table 3). ... During pressurized sampling of humid air, water will be condensed in the canisters. ...

George A. Klouda; Charles W. Lewis; Reinhold A. Rasmussen; George C. Rhoderick; Robert L. Sams; Robert K. Stevens; Lloyd A. Currie; Douglas J. Donahue; A. J. Timothy Jull; Robert L. Seila

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

Improvement of Moist and Radiative Processes in Highly Parallel Atmospheric General Circulation Models: Validation and Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research on designing an integrated moist process parameterization package was carried. This work began with a study that coupled an ensemble of cloud models to a boundary layer model to examine the feasibility of such a methodology for linking boundary layer and cumulus parameterization schemes. The approach proved feasible, prompting research to design and evaluate a coupled parameterization package for GCMS. This research contributed to the development of an Integrated Cumulus Ensemble-Turbulence (ICET) parameterization package. This package incorporates a higher-order turbulence boundary layer that feeds information concerning updraft properties and the variances of temperature and water vapor to the cloud parameterizations. The cumulus ensemble model has been developed, and initial sensitivity tests have been performed in the single column model (SCM) version of CCM2. It is currently being coupled to a convective wake/gust front model. The major function of the convective wake/gust front model is to simulate the partitioning of the boundary layer into disturbed and undisturbed regions. A second function of this model is to predict the nonlinear enhancement of surface to air sensible heat and moisture fluxes that occur in convective regimes due to correlations between winds and anomalously cold, dry air from downdrafts in the gust front region. The third function of the convective wake/gust front model is to predict the amount of undisturbed boundary layer air lifted by the leading edge of the wake and the height to which this air is lifted. The development of the wake/gust front model has been completed, and it has done well in initial testing as a stand-alone component. The current task, to be completed by the end of the funding period, is to tie the wake model to a cumulus ensemble model and to install both components into the single column model version of CCM3 for evaluation. Another area of parametrization research has been focused on the representation of cloud radiative properties. An examination of the CCM2 simulation characteristics indicated that many surface temperature and warm land precipitation problems were linked to deficiencies in the specification of cloud optical properties, which allowed too much shortwave radiation to reach the surface. In-cloud liquid water path was statically specified in the CCM2 using a "prescribed, meridionally and height varying, but time independent, cloud liquid water density profile, which was analytically determined from a meridionally specified liquid water scale height. Single-column model integrations were conducted to explore alternative formulations for the cloud liquid water path diagnostic, converging on an approach that employs a similar, but state-dependent technique for determining in-cloud liquid water concentration. The new formulation, results in significant improvements to both the top-of- atmosphere and surface energy budgets. In particular, when this scheme is incorporated in the three-dimensional GCM, simulated July surface temperature biases are substantially reduced, where summer precipitation over the northern hemisphere continents, as well as precipitation rates over most all warm land areas, is more consistent with observations". This improved parameterization has been incorporated in the CCM3.

Frank, William M.; Hack, James J.; Kiehl, Jeffrey T.

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

184

Radiative and Dynamical Feedbacks Over the Equatorial Cold-Tongue: Results from Seven Atmospheric GCMs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The equatorial Pacific is a region with strong negative feedbacks. Yet coupled GCMs have exhibited a propensity to develop a significant SST bias in that region, suggesting an unrealistic sensitivity in the coupled models to small energy flux errors that inevitably occur in the individual model components. Could this 'hypersensitivity' exhibited in a coupled model be due to an underestimate of the strength of the negative feedbacks in this region? With this suspicion, the feedbacks in the equatorial Pacific in seven atmospheric GCMs (AGCMs) have been quantified using the interannual variations in that region and compared with the corresponding calculations from the observations. The seven AGCMs are: the NCAR CAM1, the NCAR CAM2,the NCAR CAM3, the NASA/NSIPP Atmospheric Model, the Hadley Center Model, the GFDL AM2p10, and the GFDL AM2p12. All the corresponding coupled runs of these seven AGCMs have an excessive cold-tongue in the equatorial Pacific. The net atmospheric feedback over the equatorial Pacific in the two GFDL models is found to be comparable to the observed value. All other models are found to have a weaker negative net feedback from the atmosphere--a weaker regulating effect on the underlying SST than the real atmosphere. A weaker negative feedback from the cloud albedo and a weaker negative feedback from the atmospheric transport are the two leading contributors to the weaker regulating effect from the model atmosphere. All models overestimate somewhat the positive feedback from water vapor. These results confirm the suspicion that an underestimate of negative feedbacks from the atmosphere over the equatorial Pacific region is a prevalent problem. The results also suggest, however, that a weaker regulatory effect from the atmosphere is unlikely solely responsible for the 'hypersensitivity' in all models. The need to validate the feedbacks from the ocean transport is therefore highlighted.

Sun, D; Zhang, T; Covey, C; Klein, S; Collins, W; Kiehl, J; Meehl, J; Held, I; Suarez, M

2005-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

Measurement of the radiation field surrounding the Collider Detector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present here the first direct and detailed measurements of the spatial distribution of the ionizing radiation surrounding a hadron collider experiment. Using data from two different exposures we measure the effect of additional shielding on the radiation field around the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Employing a simple model we parameterize the ionizing radiation field surrounding the detector.

K. Kordas et al.

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

Radiation Hard Hybrid Pixel Detectors, and a bbbar Cross Section Measurement at the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is placed on the effects of the high radiation environment on the detector operation. Measurements of the charge collection efficiency, interpixel capacitance, and other properties of the pixel sensors as a function of the radiation damage are presented...

Sibille, Jennifer Ann

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The global model that I used was GATOR-GCMM, which treated gas, aerosol, radiative, meteorological and transport processes (see Supplementary ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Aerosol Radiative Forcing During Spring-Summer 2002 from Measurements...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A. M. Obukohov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Science Moscow, Russia A. N. Rublev Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russia Introduction...

189

High Accuracy 14C Measurements for Atmospheric CO2 Samples from the South  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » CIO 14C Measurements Carbon Isotopes » CIO 14C Measurements High Accuracy 14C Measurements for Atmospheric CO2 Samples from the South Pole and Point Barrow, Alaska by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry graphics South Pole Graphics graphics Pt. Barrow Graphics data South Pole Digital Data - Trends Only data South Pole Digital Data - Complete Data data Pt. Barrow Digital Data - Trends Only data Pt. Barrow Digital Data - Complete Data Investigators H. A. J. Meijer, M. H. Pertuisot and J. van der Plicht Centrum voor Isotopen Onderzook (Center for Isotope Research, CIO) University of Groningen The Netherlands http://www.rug.nl/ees/onderzoek/cio/index Period of Record: 1984-1992 Methods Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to obtain 14CO2 measurements from flasks collected at the South Pole and Point Barrow, Alaska, USA, at

190

Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766 \\pm 0.0032(stat.) \\pm 0.0032 (syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

XAFS Measurements under Atmospheric Pressure in the Soft X-ray Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a compact experimental set-up for X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements in He at atmospheric pressure (AP) in the soft X-ray region and used it for Mg and Cl K-edge XAFS measurements of MgCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2{center_dot}}6H{sub 2}O. The spectra of MgCl{sub 2{center_dot}}6H{sub 2}O measured in He at AP were significantly different from those measured in vacuum. This suggests the importance of performing soft X-ray XAFS experiments under AP to obtain reliable spectra from hydrated compounds.

Nakanishi, Koji; Ohta, Toshiaki [SR center, Ritsumeikan University, Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan); Yagi, Shinya [School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

192

Final report for the project "Improving the understanding of surface-atmosphere radiative interactions by mapping surface reflectance over the ARM CART site" (award DE-FG02-02ER63351)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface spectral reflectance (albedo) is a fundamental variable affecting the transfer of solar radiation and the Earth’s climate. It determines the proportion of solar energy absorbed by the surface and reflected back to the atmosphere. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified surface albedo among key factors influencing climate radiative forcing. Accurate knowledge of surface reflective properties is important for advancing weather forecasting and climate change impact studies. It is also important for determining radiative impact and acceptable levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which makes this work strongly linked to major scientific objectives of the Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Most significant accomplishments of eth project are listed below. I) Surface albedo/BRDF datasets from 1995 to the end of 2004 have been produced. They were made available to the ARM community and other interested users through the CCRS public ftp site ftp://ftp.ccrs.nrcan.gc.ca/ad/CCRS_ARM/ and ARM IOP data archive under “PI data Trishchenko”. II) Surface albedo properties over the ARM SGP area have been described for 10-year period. Comparison with ECMWF data product showed some deficiencies in the ECMWF surface scheme, such as missing some seasonal variability and no dependence on sky-conditions which biases surface energy budget and has some influence of the diurnal cycle of upward radiation and atmospheric absorption. III) Four surface albedo Intensive Observation Period (IOP) Field Campaigns have been conducted for every season (August, 2002, May 2003, February 2004 and October 2004). Data have been prepared, documented and transferred to ARM IOP archive. Nine peer-reviewed journal papers and 26 conference papers have been published.

Alexander P. Trishchenko; Yi Luo; Konstantin V. Khlopenkov, William M. Park; Zhanqing Li; Maureen Cribb

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Skill of Direct Solar Radiation Predicted by the ECMWF Global Atmospheric Model over Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of direct solar radiation is key in sectors such as solar power and agriculture; for instance, it can enable more efficient production of energy from concentrating solar power plants. An assessment of the quality of the direct solar ...

Alberto Troccoli; Jean-Jacques Morcrette

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hadley Circulations in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium in an Axially Symmetric Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hadley circulations in radiative–convective equilibrium are investigated using an idealistic axially symmetric model. Calculations show that the distribution of temperature in the Hadley cell is controlled by the moist process; the vertical ...

Masaki Satoh

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ten Years of Development of Equipment for Measurement of Atmospheric Radioactive Xenon for the Verification of the CTBT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric measurement of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) plays ... is one of the key components of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban ... method is largely based on a well-dev...

Matthias Auer; Timo Kumberg; Hartmut Sartorius…

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Throughput Measurement of a Multilayer-Coated Schwarzschild Objective Using Synchrotron Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The throughput of a Schwarzschild objective using undulator synchrotron radiation was measured. ... estimated from the squared reflectivity of one multilayer mirror and from the obstruction ratio. However,...

Takanori Kiyokura; Fumihiko MAEDA; Yoshio Watanabe; Yoshinori Iketaki…

197

Net radiative effect of dust aerosols from satellite measurements over Sahara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Radiant Energy System (CERES) to calculate the top-of-atmosphere SW and LW flux radiative effect due to oceans where the shortwave effect dominates. Citation: Yang, E.-S., P. Gupta, and S. A. Christopher (2009 of aerosols, space-borne sensors use information from the ultraviolet (UV) to the visible and thermal infrared

Christopher, Sundar A.

198

MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH GAMMA RADIATION DOSE USING THE MEMS BASED DOSIMETER AND RADIOLISYS EFFECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation dose. If we consider, that the average time of exploitation is estimated to be 40 years and veryMEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH GAMMA RADIATION DOSE USING THE MEMS BASED DOSIMETER AND RADIOLISYS EFFECT M of high and very high doses of ionizing radiation is crucial for the monitoring of the existing Nuclear

Boyer, Edmond

199

76Radiation Dose and Dose Rate Radiation is measured in two  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seiverts per year. Hasty reports about the devastating Japan 2011 nuclear power plant radiation leakages have by Concorde, what are the total radiation doses for a passenger in each case? Problem 3 - The Japan 2011 earthquake damaged several nuclear reactors, causing radiation leakage across northern Japan. On March 22

200

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Observational bounds on atmospheric heating by aerosol absorption: Radiative signature of transatlantic dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transatlantic dust Amit Davidi,1 Alex B. Kostinski,2 Ilan Koren,1 and Yoav Lehahn1,3 Received 14 November 2011: Radiative signature of transatlantic dust, Geo- phys. Res. Lett., 39, L04803, doi:10.1029/2011GL050358. 1

Kostinski, Alex

202

Measurements of Dust Oscillations with Laser Heterodyne Receiver of Scattered Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed the experiments on measurement of vibration amplitudes for microparticles in gas and water with laser heterodyne receiver of scattered radiation. The measured vibration amplitude values are about 20 nm.

Serozhkin, Yuriy; Venger, Yevgen [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 41 Nauky Prospect, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

203

Accuracy of Humidity Measurement on Ships: Consideration of Solar Radiation Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of heating due to solar radiation on measurements of humidity obtained from ships is examined. Variations in wet- and dry-bulb temperature measured on each side of a research ship are shown to correlate with solar radiation. However, ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A Sensitivity Study of Radiative Fluxes at the Top of Atmosphere to Cloud-Microphysics and Aerosol Parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of net radiative fluxes (FNET) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) to 16 selected uncertain parameters mainly related to the cloud microphysics and aerosol schemes in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). We adopted a quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) sampling approach to effectively explore the high dimensional parameter space. The output response variables (e.g., FNET) were simulated using CAM5 for each parameter set, and then evaluated using generalized linear model analysis. In response to the perturbations of these 16 parameters, the CAM5-simulated global annual mean FNET ranges from -9.8 to 3.5 W m-2 compared to the CAM5-simulated FNET of 1.9 W m-2 with the default parameter values. Variance-based sensitivity analysis was conducted to show the relative contributions of individual parameter perturbation to the global FNET variance. The results indicate that the changes in the global mean FNET are dominated by those of cloud forcing (CF) within the parameter ranges being investigated. The size threshold parameter related to auto-conversion of cloud ice to snow is confirmed as one of the most influential parameters for FNET in the CAM5 simulation. The strong heterogeneous geographic distribution of FNET variation shows parameters have a clear localized effect over regions where they are acting. However, some parameters also have non-local impacts on FNET variance. Although external factors, such as perturbations of anthropogenic and natural emissions, largely affect FNET variations at the regional scale, their impact is weaker than that of model internal parameters in terms of simulating global mean FNET in this study. The interactions among the 16 selected parameters contribute a relatively small portion of the total FNET variations over most regions of the globe. This study helps us better understand the CAM5 model behavior associated with parameter uncertainties, which will aid the next step of reducing model uncertainty via calibration of uncertain model parameters with the largest sensitivity.

Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; McFarlane, Sally A.; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Ben; Ma, Po-Lun; Yan, Huiping; Bao, Jie

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

An atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance measurement with the MINOS far detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is now widely accepted that the Standard Model assumption of massless neutrinos is wrong, due primarily to the observation of solar and atmospheric neutrino flavor oscillations by a small number of convincing experiments. The MINOS Far Detector, capable of observing both the outgoing lepton and associated showering products of a neutrino interaction, provides an excellent opportunity to independently search for an oscillation signature in atmospheric neutrinos. To this end, a MINOS data set from an 883 live day, 13.1 kt-yr exposure collected between July, 2003 and April, 2007 has been analyzed. 105 candidate charged current muon neutrino interactions were observed, with 120.5 {+-} 1.3 (statistical error only) expected in the absence of oscillation. A maximum likelihood analysis of the observed log(L/E) spectrum shows that the null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at over 96% confidence and that the best fit oscillation parameters are sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} = 0.95{sub -0.32} and {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = 0.93{sub -0.44}{sup +3.94} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}. This measurement of oscillation parameters is consistent with the best fit values from the Super-Kamiokande experiment at 68% confidence.

Gogos, Jeremy Peter; /Minnesota U.; ,

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Gas temperature and electron temperature measurements by emission spectroscopy for an atmospheric microplasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microplasma suitable for material processing at atmospheric pressure in argon and argon-oxygen mixtures is being studied here. The microplasma is ignited by a high voltage dc pulse and sustained by low power (1-5 W) at 450 MHz. the mechanisms responsible for sustaining the microplasma require a more detailed analysis, which will be the subject of further study. Here it is shown that the microplasma is in nonequilibrium and appears to be in glow mode. The effect of power and oxygen content is also analyzed in terms of gas temperature and electron temperature. Both the gas temperature and the electron temperature have been determined by spectral emission and for the latter a very simple method has been used based on a collisional-radiative model. It is observed that power coupling is affected by a combination of factors and that prediction and control of the energy flow are not always straightforward even for simple argon plasmas. Varying gas content concentration has shown that oxygen creates a preferential energy channel towards increasing the gas temperature. Overall the results have shown that combined multiple diagnostics are necessary to understand plasma characteristics and that spectral emission can represent a valuable tool for tailoring microplasma to specific processing requirements.

Mariotti, Davide; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto [Nanoarchtectonics Research Center (NARC), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Parametric Channeling Radiation and its Application to the Measurement of Electron Beam Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have proposed a method for observing parametric channeling radiation (PCR) and of applying it to the measurement of electron beam energy. The PCR process occurs if the energy of the channeling radiation coincides with the energy of the parametric X-ray radiation (PXR). The PCR process can be regarded as the diffraction of 'virtual channeling radiation'. We developed a scheme for beam energy measurement and designed an experimental setup. We also estimated the beam parameters, and calculated the angular distributions of PXR and PCR. These considerations indicate that the observation of PCR is promising.

Takabayashi, Y. [SAGA Light Source, 8-7 Yayoigaoka, Tosu, Saga 841-0005 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

An inversion technique for the retrieval of single-point emissions from atmospheric concentration measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...retrieval of single-point emissions from atmospheric...Atmospheric Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology...for the retrieval of point sources of atmospheric...the seven runs of the Indian Institute of Technology...of identification of point sources has raised much...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Atmosphere and Ionosphere of Venus from the Mariner V S-Band Radio Occultation Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...georef;1968059704 atmosphere ionosphere Mariner 5...English United States 1968 Atmosphere and ionosphere of venus...com-parison (between 423.3 Mhz and S-band, for example...the superrefractive atmosphere, are fea-tures of...magnetopause, and plasma-pause due to the solar...

Arvydas Kliore; Gerald S. Levy; Dan L. Cain; Gunnar Fjeldbo; S. I. Rasool

1967-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

Experimental Measurement of Radiation Heat Transfer from Complex Fenestration Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A well instrumented facility for the measurement of heat transfer from complex fenestration systems was built and validated. The facility provided very accurate measurements based… (more)

Wilson, Barry Allan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Toward a Diurnal Climatology of Cold-Season Turbulence Statistics in Continental Stratocumulus as Observed by the Atmospheric Radiation Millimeter- Wavelength Cloud Radars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous observational studies of marine stratocumulus have demonstrated a pronounced diurnal cycle. At night, longwave flux divergence at the top of the cloud drives negatively buoyant eddies that tend to keep the boundary layer well mixed. During the day, solar absorption by the cloud tends to reduce the turbulent intensity and often decouples the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into cloud- and sub-cloud circulations. The delicate balance between turbulent intensity, entrainment, and fluxes dictates cloud geometry and persistence, which can significantly impact the shortwave radiation budget. Millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) have been used to study the turbulent structure of boundary layer stratocumulus (e.g. Frisch et al. 1995; Kollias and Albrecht 2000). Analysis is confined to nondrizzling or lightly drizzling cloud systems for which precipitation contamination is negligible. Under such assumptions the Doppler velocity field becomes a proxy for vertical velocity. Prior research has mainly consisted of a few case studies of specific cloud systems using radar scan strategies optimized for this particular cloud type. The MMCR operating at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility is broadly configured to be able to detect many different cloud types over a broad range of reflectivities and altitudes, so it is not specifically optimized for PBL clouds. Being in more-or-less continuous operation since the end of 1996, it does, however, have the advantage of long data coverage, which suggests that statistically significant measures of the diurnal cycle of turbulence should be attainable. This abstract summarizes the first few steps toward this goal, using 7 months of cold season MMCR data.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.; Childers, M.E.; Donner, K.M.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

212

Clouds in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. IV. On the scattering greenhouse effect of CO2 ice particles: Numerical radiative transfer studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Owing to their wavelengths dependent absorption and scattering properties, clouds have a strong impact on the climate of planetary atmospheres. Especially, the potential greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds in the atmospheres of terrestrial extrasolar planets is of particular interest because it might influence the position and thus the extension of the outer boundary of the classic habitable zone around main sequence stars. We study the radiative effects of CO2 ice particles obtained by different numerical treatments to solve the radiative transfer equation. The comparison between the results of a high-order discrete ordinate method and simpler two-stream approaches reveals large deviations in terms of a potential scattering efficiency of the greenhouse effect. The two-stream methods overestimate the transmitted and reflected radiation, thereby yielding a higher scattering greenhouse effect. For the particular case of a cool M-type dwarf the CO2 ice particles show no strong effective scattering greenhouse eff...

Kitzmann, D; Rauer, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

SOAR Data: Data from Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR)1999 through 2001  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Click on the DATA menu button and then click on a specific ship to find instructions on accessing data from that particular cruise. Instructions will lead you to an FTP site from which data can be downloaded. SOAR data for 1999 through 2001 is reported. SOAR is a global network of research and volunteer ships that carry global change instrumentation. The primary emphasis for SOAR is solar and IR radiation but some ships cary ceilometers, meteorological instruments, and related equipment. All data are collected in a central data collection computer and the flexible data collection software can be adapted to any other user instrumentation. Currently SOAR is installed pas permanent instrumentation on four ships operating in the western Pacific, eastern tropical Pacific, West Indies, and an oceanographic ship that operates around the world. In addition, six other system are used on cruises of opportunity. [Taken from SOAR homepage at http://www.gim.bnl.gov/soar/index.html

214

Improving the reliability and accuracy of a multipyranometer array measuring solar radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of solar radiation is crucial for the use of solar energy in fields including power generation, agriculture and meteorology. In the building sciences, It is essential for daylighting studies, energy use calculations, and thermal...

Klima, Peter Miloslaw

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Spacecraft Habitation Systems, Water Recovery and Waste Active Charged Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-PMWC) Orbital Technologies Corporation Technical Abstract Model calculations and risk assessment estimates Particle and Neutron Radiation Measurement Technologies Technical Abstract The innovative High Efficiency the resultant plastic tiles. This system requires access to power, data, and cooling interfaces. The system

216

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux by Actinometer and of Maximal Polarization of Sky Brightness in the Solar Almucantar A. Kh. Shukurov, K. A....

217

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic energy are consistent with independent measurements, where available. We find no dependence in individual seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment, J. Geophys

Prieto, Germán A.

218

Measurements of forbidden line radiation of Ar II (6. 99. mu. m) in W3 IRS 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of the (Ar II) (6.99 ..mu..m) line flux in W3 IRS 1 are combined with previously obtained measurements of the (Ar III) (8.99 ..mu..m) line flux. The observed ratio of (Ar II)/(Ar III) is inconsistent with the calculated ratio for an H II region with the densities required by radio observations and with a central 40,000--45,000 K star with atmosphere as described by a Mihalas model. A solar effective UV radiation field is required; a dusty model we had previously invoked fits the observations. In addition we determine that the argon abundance is n(Ar)/n(H)roughly-equal8 x 10/sup -6/, a value about twice that usually adopted for normal solar abundance; however, there are uncertainties in the extinction and the model which do not allow us to preclude solar abundance.

Herter, T.; Pipher, J.L.; Helfer, H.L.; Willner, S.P.; Puetter, R.C.; Rudy, R.J.; Soifer, B.T.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Impact of Closing Canada’s Largest Point-Source of Mercury Emissions on Local Atmospheric Mercury Concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(29) Solar radiation measurements at the airport were initiated in August 2010. ... Steffen, A.; Schroeder, W. Standard Operating Procedures for Total Gaseous Mercury Measurements—Canadian Atmospheric Mercury Measurement Network (CAMNet); Environment Canada: Toronto, Canada, 1999. ...

Chris S. Eckley; Matthew T. Parsons; Rachel Mintz; Monique Lapalme; Maxwell Mazur; Robert Tordon; Robert Elleman; Jennifer A. Graydon; Pierrette Blanchard; Vincent St Louis

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Portable Eddy Covariance System for the Measurement of Ecosystem–Atmosphere Exchange of CO2, Water Vapor, and Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To facilitate the study of flux heterogeneity within a region, the authors have designed and field-tested a portable eddy covariance system to measure exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere. The ...

D. P. Billesbach; M. L. Fischer; M. S. Torn; J. A. Berry

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Organic and Elemental Carbon Measurements during ACE-Asia Suggest a Longer Atmospheric Lifetime for Elemental Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additional measurements made aboard the ship and used in this analysis include concentrations of SO2 and total particle number (27), O3 (28), CO (29), and radon (30). ... This research is a contribution to the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program (IGBP) and is part of the IGAC Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE). ...

H.-J. Lim; B. J. Turpin; L. M. Russell; T. S. Bates

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

Venus: Ionosphere and Atmosphere as Measured by Dual-Frequency Radio Occultation of Mariner V  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the upper atmosphere. In addition...and 423.3 Mhz were trans-mitted...interplanetary plasma meas-urements...the amount of plasma along the path...and values larger or smaller than...its neutral atmosphere; (iii) possible...140 , and this area had been out...defocusing at 423.3 Mhz due to the dense...

Mariner Stanford Group

1967-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

223

First Wideband Measurement (100-1400 cm-1) of the Atmospheric Emission Spectrum with an Uncooled FT Instrument (Including the Detector Unit) Operating at Stratospheric Balloon Altitude  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Earth radiation budget experiments, one missing measurement is the spectrally resolved OLR below 400cm-1. The first spectral measurement down to 100cm-1,...

Palchetti, Luca

224

Atmospheric CO2 Record from In Situ Measurements at Amsterdam Island  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Amsterdam Island Amsterdam Island Atmospheric CO2 Record from In Situ Measurements at Amsterdam Island graphics Graphics data Data Investigators A. Gaudry, V. Kazan, and P. Monfray Centre des Faibles Radioactivités, Laboratoire de Modélisation du Climat et de l'Environnement, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, Bâtiment 709, Orme des Merisiers, 91191-Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France Period of Record 1980-95 Methods Until 1993 air samples were collected continuously through an air intake located at the top of a tower, 9 m above ground and 65 m above mean sea level. Since 1994, the intake has been situated 20 m above ground and 76 m above mean sea level. The tower is located at the north-northwest end of the island on the edge of a 55 m cliff. The air is dried by means of a cryogenic water trap at -60°C. Until 1990, determinations of CO2 were made

225

Measurement of Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations with a High-Density Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an experiment to test the hypothesis that the reported anomaly on atmospheric neutrino fluxes is due to nu_mu nu_x oscillations. It will rely both on a disappearance technique, exploiting the method of the dependence of the event rate on L/E, which was recently shown to be effective for detection of neutrino oscillation and measurement of the oscillation parameters, and on an appearance technique, looking for an excess of muon-less events at high energy produced by upward-going tau neutrinos. The detector will consist of iron planes interleaved by limited streamer tubes. The total mass will be about 30 kt. The possibility of recuperating most of the instrumentation from existing detectors allows to avoid R&D phases and to reduce construction time. In four years of data taking, this experiment will be sensitive to oscillations nu_mu nu_x with Delta m^2 > 10^-4 eV^2 and a mixing near to maximal, and answer the question whether nu_x is a sterile or a tau neutrino.

A. Curioni; G. Mannocchi; L. Periale; P. Picchi; F. Pietropaolo; S. Ragazzi

1998-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

INVESTIGATING THE RELIABILITY OF CORONAL EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION DIAGNOSTICS USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determining the temperature distribution of coronal plasmas can provide stringent constraints on coronal heating. Current observations with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on board Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide diagnostics of the emission measure distribution (EMD) of the coronal plasma. Here we test the reliability of temperature diagnostics using three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations. We produce synthetic observables from the models and apply the Monte Carlo Markov chain EMD diagnostic. By comparing the derived EMDs with the 'true' distributions from the model, we assess the limitations of the diagnostics as a function of the plasma parameters and the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We find that EMDs derived from EIS synthetic data reproduce some general characteristics of the true distributions, but usually show differences from the true EMDs that are much larger than the estimated uncertainties suggest, especially when structures with significantly different density overlap along the line of sight. When using AIA synthetic data the derived EMDs reproduce the true EMDs much less accurately, especially for broad EMDs. The differences between the two instruments are due to the: (1) smaller number of constraints provided by AIA data and (2) broad temperature response function of the AIA channels which provide looser constraints to the temperature distribution. Our results suggest that EMDs derived from current observatories may often show significant discrepancies from the true EMDs, rendering their interpretation fraught with uncertainty. These inherent limitations to the method should be carefully considered when using these distributions to constrain coronal heating.

Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

228

Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cm2 sh keV c Speed of light 2:99 102 cmsh D Di usion coe cient ( 13 t ) cm F Radiation ux jkcm2 sh k Time iteration t Di erence between consecutive time steps shakes(sh) hi Size of spatial cell, i cm ! Direction of photon propagation ster... backward Euler implicit di erencing in time and lumped LD in space to (5.5), we get 1 c t (k+ 12) i;L (k 12) i;L hi 2 + F (k+ 12) i F (k+ 12) i 12 + hi 2 a (k+ 12) i;L = QL hi 2 ; (8.2a) 1 c t (k+ 12) i;R (k...

Kumar, Akansha

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation, respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

Ian MacDonald

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Ch4. Atmosphere and Surface Energy Balances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than red light. #12;The Electromagnetic Spectrum 8% 47% 45% 100% solar radiation #12;Blue Sky, Red;Energy Pathways #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Atmosphere or performing any work. #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Transmission

Pan, Feifei

231

Design Specifications for a Radiation Tolerant Beam Loss Measurement ASIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel radiation-hardened current digitizer ASIC is in planning stage, aimed at the acquisition of the current signals from the ionization chambers employed in the Beam Loss Monitoring system at CERN. The purpose is to match and exceed the performance of the existing discrete component design, currently in operation in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The specifications include: a dynamic range of nine decades, defaulting to the 1 pA-1mA range but adjustable by the user, ability to withstand a total integrated dose of 10 kGy at least in 20 years of operation and user selectable integrating windows, as low as 500 ns. Moreover, the integrated circuit should be able to digitize currents of both polarity with a minimum number of external components and without needing any configuration. The target technology is the IBM 130nm CMOS process. The specifications, the architecture choices and the reasons on which they are based upon are discussed in this paper.

Venturini, G G; Effinger, E; Zamantzas, C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

DOE/SC-ARM-14-025 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the continental U.S. megasite. The Manus TWP facility has been decommissioned and all instrumentation from that site is in transit to the SGP site for reconfiguration. The...

233

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Eastern North Atlantic Site (ENA), Graciosa Island, Azores  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

From May 2009 through December 2010, the ARM Mobile Facility obtained data from a location near the airport on Graciosa Island to support the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field campaign. The campaign was led by principal investigator Robert Wood. Results from this campaign confirmed that the Azores have the ideal mix of conditions to study how clouds, aerosols, and precipitation interact. This new observation site will have significant enhancements to instruments previously deployed to the Azores, including a Ka-/W-band scanning cloud radar, precipitation radar, and Doppler lidar. It has the full support of the Azorean government and collaborators at the University of the Azores. Los Alamos National Laboratory will operate the site for the ARM Facility.

Wood, Robert

234

Proceedings of the Sixteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM Program holds an annual science team meeting each spring. ARM Science Team members, members of the infrastructure, and selected individuals outside the ARM Program are invited to attend the meeting and present posters and formal presentations to share research results. These results are published electronically in the meeting proceedings.

JW Voyles

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Final Technical Report for Chief Scientist for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major responsibilities of the PI were identified as 1) the formulation of campaign plans, 2) the representation of AVP in various scientific communities inside and outside of ARM and the associated working groups, 3) the coordination and selection of the relative importance of the three different focus areas (routine observations, IOPs, instrument development program), 4) the examination and quality control of the data collected by AVP, and 5) providing field support for flight series. This report documents the accomplishments in each of these focus areas for the 3 years of funding for the grant that were provided.

Greg M. McFarquhar

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Field Campaigns or Intensive Operational Periods (IOP)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

237

FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lasting from 6 to 12 months in any environment, from the cold of the poles to the heat of the tropics. * The ARM Aerial Facility uses aerial platforms to obtain key in situ...

238

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program North Slope, Alaska Bringing Climate Change Into The Classroom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the concentrations of these gases since the start of the industrial revolution, around 1850. #12;Causes of Climate Change Since the start of the industrial revolution, human activities have caused a steady increase fuels (e.g., oil, gas and coal) from industrial activities, landfills, agricultural practices, and many

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

239

The influence of clouds and diffuse radiation on ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 and CO18O exhanges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the potential impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} isotope fluxes ('isofluxes') in two contrasting ecosystems (a broadleaf deciduous forest and a C{sub 4} grassland), in a region for which cloud cover, meteorological, and isotope data are available for driving the isotope-enabled land surface model, ISOLSM. Our model results indicate a large impact of clouds on ecosystem CO{sub 2} fluxes and isofluxes. Despite lower irradiance on partly cloudy and cloudy days, predicted forest canopy photosynthesis was substantially higher than on clear, sunny days, and the highest carbon uptake was achieved on the cloudiest day. This effect was driven by a large increase in light-limited shade leaf photosynthesis following an increase in the diffuse fraction of irradiance. Photosynthetic isofluxes, by contrast, were largest on partly cloudy days, as leaf water isotopic composition was only slightly depleted and photosynthesis was enhanced, as compared to adjacent clear sky days. On the cloudiest day, the forest exhibited intermediate isofluxes: although photosynthesis was highest on this day, leaf-to-atmosphere isofluxes were reduced from a feedback of transpiration on canopy relative humidity and leaf water. Photosynthesis and isofluxes were both reduced in the C{sub 4} grass canopy with increasing cloud cover and diffuse fraction as a result of near-constant light limitation of photosynthesis. These results suggest that some of the unexplained variation in global mean {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2} may be driven by large-scale changes in clouds and aerosols and their impacts on diffuse radiation, photosynthesis, and relative humidity.

Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Biraud, S.C.; Noone, D.C.; Buenning, N.H.; Randerson, J.T.; Torn, M.S.; Welker, J.; White, J.W.C.; Vachon, R.; Farquhar, G.D.; Berry, J.A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Location and prediction of storms from measurement of atmospherics at different frequencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Earth?, Proc. I.R.E., vol. 19, p. 145;: January, 1931. 75. L. W. Austin, "Radio Atmospheric Disturbances and Solar Ac? tivity?, Proc. I.R.E., vol. 15, pp. 837-842; October, 1927. 76. J. K. McNeely and P. J. Konkle, ?Locating Radio Interference... atmospherics from a distant thun? derstorm, with his receiver tuned to 14*6 meters* Many investiga? tions2' C A 8# 9* n * 20* 26' 27* 28 have shown that the atmospher- 29 30ics increase as the frequency is decreased* Mr. Harold Norinder* * and Messers* B* V...

Canterbury, Samuel Luther

1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and Xe-133 data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of Xe-133 from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8×1014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 1.2×1016 to 2.5×1016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 6.1×1013 to 3.6×1014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schrom, Brian T.

2014-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

242

Radiation hydrodynamic instability in a plane-parallel, super-Eddington atmosphere: A mechanism for clump formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reason is found in the anti-correlation diagram between the gas pressure and the radiation...performed two-dimensional global radiation-MHD simulations of supercritical accretion...fact, neither our RHD nor radiation-MHD simulations found an anti-correlation......

Shun Takeuchi; Ken Ohsuga; Shin Mineshige

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Atmospheric Environment 36 (2002) 51855196 FTIR measurements of functional groups and organic mass in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 aircraft during the passing efficiency of a low, with higher Al/Ca ratios in the boundary layer. Organic compounds were present in high and low dust conditions or may condense onto pre- existing particles. Partly as a result of this vapor-to- particle conversion

Russell, Lynn

244

Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV was performed using a data sample of about 18?000 up-going atmospheric muon neutrino events in IceCube. Boosted decision trees were used for event selection to reject misreconstructed atmospheric muons and obtain a sample of up-going muon neutrino events. Background contamination in the final event sample is less than 1%. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos up to 400 TeV, and is fundamental to understanding the impact of this neutrino background on astrophysical neutrino observations with IceCube. The measured spectrum is consistent with predictions for the atmospheric ??+?Ż? flux.

R. Abbasi et al. (IceCube Collaboration)

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST...

Baugher, Elizabeth

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS’ high sampling resolution to study the “twilight zone” around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM’s 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM’s operational data processing.

Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine [University of Reading] [University of Reading

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

array (MPA). The earliest work on an MPA related device for measuring diffuse sky radiation was performed in Finland by M. H2milllien et al. (1985). Further development on the MPA was performed in several countries including the United States where...

Munger, B.; Haberl, J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Diurnal Variations of Albedo Retrieved from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five years of measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) have been analyzed to define the diurnal cycle of albedo from 55°N to 55°S. The ERBS precesses through all local times every 72 days so as to provide data regarding the ...

David A. Rutan; G. Louis Smith; Takmeng Wong

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ON THE SUITABILITY OF LONGITUDINAL PROFILE MEASUREMENTS USING COHERENT SMITH-PURCELL RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kittelmann, C. Thomas, ESS, Lund, Sweden Abstract The use of Smith-Purcell radiation to measure electrons power, it is mandatory to understand the beam dynamics and to determine the beam size and profile with precision. In high power proton Linacs, such under- standing would allow a full characterization of the beam

Boyer, Edmond

250

Low Frequency Measurement of the Spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

Smoot, G. F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S. D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

1983-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

251

Atmospheric Measurements of Submicron Aerosols at the California-Mexico Border and in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory POAs Primary Organic Aerosols SEMARNAT Secretaria del Medio Ambiente Recursos Naturales SHARP Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors SSA Single Scattering Albedo SOAs Secondary Organic Aerosols... quality and climate. Historically, the region has exceeded both the US EPA National Ambient Air Quality (NAAQS) and Mexico?s Secretaria del Medio Ambiente Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT) air standards, stimulating a united interest. When comparing...

Levy, Misti E

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

252

Diode laser-based sensor system for long-path absorption measurements of atmospheric concentration and near-IR molecular spectral parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Line-locked near-IR diode lasers and a simple retroreflector/telescope system were used for remote sensing of atmospheric constituents over long atmospheric paths. The experimental configuration used in preliminary measurements of atmospheric water vapor and oxygen with AlGaAs diode lasers is presented. A prototype field sensor system currently under development shares the same basic configuration but incorporates interchangeable AlGaAs and InGaAsP diode-laser modules for monitoring a variety of atmospheric gases.

Goldstein, N.; Lee, J.; Adler-Golden, S.M.; Bien, F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and Molecular Composition of Laboratory Proxies of Atmospheric Brown Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and Molecular Composition of Laboratory Proxies A. Nizkorodov*, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, United

Nizkorodov, Sergey

254

5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) measured the daily  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation for astronauts orbiting Mars. The biggest uncertainty is in the SPE dose estimate. We had important than GCRs as a source of radiation? Explain why or why not in terms of estimation uncertainties5Calculating Total Radiation Dosages at Mars The NASA, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE

255

Measuring Hawking Radiation of a Kerr-Newman Black Hole in a Superconducting Transmission Line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying a dimensional reduction technique and a coordinates transformation approach, we deduce the Kerr-Newman space-time into a Painlev\\'{e}-like form, and obtain its corresponding event horizon and the Hawking radiation temperature. We find that, the event horizon of a Kerr-Newman black hole can be simulated in a superconducting transmission line. Moreover, by running some numerical simulation, we confirm that the Hawking radiation of a Kerr-Newman Black Hole can be experimentally measured in a superconducting transmission line.

X. G. Lan; D. Y. Chen; L. F. Wei

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Measurement of Reactive Hydroxyl Radical Species Inside the Biosolutions During Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Bombardment onto the Solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet could generate various kinds of radicals ... The electron temperature and ion density for this non-thermal plasma jet have been measured to be about...13 cm?3 in this e...

Yong Hee Kim; Young June Hong; Ku Youn Baik…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Long Range Weather Prediction III: Miniaturized Distributed Sensors for Global Atmospheric Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We continue consideration of ways-and-means for creating, in an evolutionary, ever-more-powerful manner, a continually-updated data-base of salient atmospheric properties sufficient for finite differenced integration-based, high-fidelity weather prediction over intervals of 2-3 weeks, leveraging the 10{sup 14} FLOPS digital computing systems now coming into existence. A constellation comprised of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 9} small atmospheric sampling systems--high-tech superpressure balloons carrying early 21st century semiconductor devices, drifting with the local winds over the meteorological spectrum of pressure-altitudes--that assays all portions of the troposphere and lower stratosphere remains the central feature of the proposed system. We suggest that these devices should be active-signaling, rather than passive-transponding, as we had previously proposed only for the ground- and aquatic-situated sensors of this system. Instead of periodic interrogation of the intra-atmospheric transponder population by a constellation of sophisticated small satellites in low Earth orbit, we now propose to retrieve information from the instrumented balloon constellation by existing satellite telephony systems, acting as cellular tower-nodes in a global cellular telephony system whose ''user-set'' is the atmospheric-sampling and surface-level monitoring constellations. We thereby leverage the huge investment in cellular (satellite) telephony and GPS technologies, with large technical and economic gains. This proposal minimizes sponsor forward commitment along its entire programmatic trajectory, and moreover may return data of weather-predictive value soon after field activities commence. We emphasize its high near-term value for making better mesoscale, relatively short-term weather predictions with computing-intensive means, and its great long-term utility in enhancing the meteorological basis for global change predictive studies. We again note that adverse impacts of weather involve continuing costs of the order of 1% of GDP, a large fraction of which could be retrieved if high-fidelity predictions of two weeks forward applicability were available. These {approx}$10{sup 2} B annual savings dwarf the <$1 B costs of operating a rational, long-range weather prediction system of the type proposed.

Teller, E; Leith, C; Canavan, G; Wood, L

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

258

Long Range Weather Prediction III: Miniaturized Distributed Sensors for Global Atmospheric Measurements  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

We continue consideration of ways-and-means for creating, in an evolutionary, ever-more-powerful manner, a continually-updated data-base of salient atmospheric properties sufficient for finite differenced integration-based, high-fidelity weather prediction over intervals of 2-3 weeks, leveraging the 10{sup 14} FLOPS digital computing systems now coming into existence. A constellation comprised of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 9} small atmospheric sampling systems--high-tech superpressure balloons carrying early 21st century semiconductor devices, drifting with the local winds over the meteorological spectrum of pressure-altitudes--that assays all portions of the troposphere and lower stratosphere remains the central feature of the proposed system. We suggest that these devices should be active-signaling, rather than passive-transponding, as we had previously proposed only for the ground- and aquatic-situated sensors of this system. Instead of periodic interrogation of the intra-atmospheric transponder population by a constellation of sophisticated small satellites in low Earth orbit, we now propose to retrieve information from the instrumented balloon constellation by existing satellite telephony systems, acting as cellular tower-nodes in a global cellular telephony system whose ''user-set'' is the atmospheric-sampling and surface-level monitoring constellations. We thereby leverage the huge investment in cellular (satellite) telephony and GPS technologies, with large technical and economic gains. This proposal minimizes sponsor forward commitment along its entire programmatic trajectory, and moreover may return data of weather-predictive value soon after field activities commence. We emphasize its high near-term value for making better mesoscale, relatively short-term weather predictions with computing-intensive means, and its great long-term utility in enhancing the meteorological basis for global change predictive studies. We again note that adverse impacts of weather involve continuing costs of the order of 1% of GDP, a large fraction of which could be retrieved if high-fidelity predictions of two weeks forward applicability were available. These{approx}$10{sup 2} B annual savings dwarf the<$1 B costs of operating a rational, long-range weather prediction system of the type proposed.

Teller, E.; Leith, C.; Canavan, G.; Wood, L.

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Leakage Current-based Measurement of the Radiation Damage in the ATLAS Pixel Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module measurement of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

Gorelov, Igor V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Blast wave radiation source measurement experiments on the Z Z-pinch facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dynamic Hohlraum (DH) radiation on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories [R. B. Spielman, W. A. Stygar, J. F. Seamen et al., Proceeding of the 11th International Pulsed Power Conference, Baltimore, 1997, edited by G. Cooperstein and I. Vitkovitsky (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1997), Vol. 1, p. 709] is a bright source of radiant energy that has proven useful for high energy density physics experiments. But the radiation output from a DH on Z needs to be well known. In this paper, a new method is presented for measuring the radiation fluence deposited in an experiment, specifically, an experiment driven by a Z DH. This technique uses a blast wave produced in a SiO{sub 2} foam, which starts as supersonic but transitions to subsonic, producing a shock at the transition point that is observable via radiography. The position of this shock is a sensitive measure of the radiation drive energy from the Z DH. Computer simulations have been used to design and analyze a Z foam blast wave experiment.

Peterson, R.R.; Peterson, D.L.; Watt, R.G.; Idzorek, G.; Tierney, T.; Lopez, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

EXPLORING IO'S ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION WITH APEX: FIRST MEASUREMENT OF {sup 34}SO{sub 2} AND TENTATIVE DETECTION OF KCl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The composition of Io's tenuous atmosphere is poorly constrained. Only the major species SO{sub 2} and a handful of minor species have been positively identified, but a variety of other molecular species should be present, based on thermochemical equilibrium models of volcanic gas chemistry and the composition of Io's environment. This paper focuses on the spectral search for expected yet undetected molecular species (KCl, SiO, S{sub 2}O) and isotopes ({sup 34}SO{sub 2}). We analyze a disk-averaged spectrum of a potentially line-rich spectral window around 345 GHz, obtained in 2010 at the APEX 12 m antenna. Using different models assuming either extended atmospheric distributions or a purely volcanically sustained atmosphere, we tentatively measure the KCl relative abundance with respect to SO{sub 2} and derive a range of 4 × 10{sup –4}-8 × 10{sup –3}. We do not detect SiO or S{sub 2}O and present new upper limits on their abundances. We also present the first measurement of the {sup 34}S/{sup 32}S isotopic ratio in gas phase on Io, which appears to be twice as high as the Earth and interstellar medium reference values. Strong lines of SO{sub 2} and SO are also analyzed to check for longitudinal variations of column density and relative abundance. Our models show that, based on their predicted relative abundance with respect to SO{sub 2} in volcanic plumes, both the tentative KCl detection and SiO upper limit are compatible with a purely volcanic origin for these species.

Moullet, A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA-22902 (United States); Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R. [LESIA-Observatoire de Paris, 5 place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon CEDEX (France); Gurwell, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA-02138 (United States); Black, J. H [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden); Butler, B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM-87801 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Cloud Features and Zonal Wind Measurements of Saturn's Atmosphere as Observed by Cassini/VIMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of data about Saturn's atmosphere from Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), focusing on the meteorology of the features seen in the 5-micron spectral window. We present VIMS mosaics and discuss the morphology and general characteristics of the features backlit by Saturn's thermal emission. We have also constructed a zonal wind profile from VIMS feature tracking observation sequences using an automated cloud feature tracker. Comparison with previously constructed profiles from Voyager and Cassini imaging data reveals broad similarities, suggesting minimal vertical shear of the zonal wind. However, areas of apparent wind shear are present in the VIMS zonal wind profile at jet stream cores. In particular, our analysis shows that the equatorial jet reaches speeds exceeding 450 m/s, similar to speeds obtained during the Voyager era. This suggests that recent inferences of relatively slower jet speeds of ~275-375 m/s are confined to the upper troposphere and that the dee...

Choi, David S; Brown, Robert H; 10.1029/2008JE003254

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and south sensors and one for the east and west sensors. The solution for the east and west sensors is expanded to two new solutions by mirroring their readings according to the solar noon; each real measurement and its mirrored values generate a solution..., which was originally developed approximately 30 years back, Hämäläinen et al. [1] developed an instrument, which included 25 solar radiation sensors mounted on a metal hemisphere. Since then, many other have further studied how to simplify...

Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Haberl, Jeff; Sun, Yifu

266

Lowering the Light Speed Isotropy Limit: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of the Compton edge of the scattered electrons in GRAAL facility in European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole reveals up to 10 sigma variations larger than the statistical errors. We now show that the variations are not due to the frequency variations of the accelerator. The nature of Compton edge variations remains unclear, thus outlining the imperative of dedicated studies of light speed anisotropy.

V. G. Gurzadyan; J. -P. Bocquet; A. Kashin; A. Margarian; O. Bartalini; V. Bellini; M. Castoldi; A. D'Angelo; J. -P. Didelez; R. Di Salvo; A. Fantini; G. Gervino; F. Ghio; B. Girolami; A. Giusa; M. Guidal; E. Hourany; S. Knyazyan; V. Kouznetsov; R. Kunne; A. Lapik; P. Levi Sandri; A. Lleres; S. Mehrabyan; D. Moricciani; V. Nedorezov; C. Perrin; D. Rebreyend; G. Russo; N. Rudnev; C. Schaerf; M. -L. Sperduto; M. -C. Sutera; A. Turinge

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT TRANSFER TO HELIUM II AT ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE IN A CONFINED GEOMETRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groove and a thermometer (Lake Shore Cryotronics "carbonis measured with a thermometer (of the same type as on thethe heated surface. Thermometer read out and heater control

Warren, R.P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Atmospheric Environment 42 (2008) 33153331 Measurement and analysis of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Hydrogen sulfide; Swine barns; CAFOs 1. Introduction Changes in livestock production methods in the USAtmospheric Environment 42 (2008) 3315­3331 Measurement and analysis of ammonia and hydrogen, where NH3­N ¼ (14 17)NH3) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were measured from a finishing swine confinement

Aneja, Viney P.

269

Gamma spectroscopic measurements using the PID350 pixelated CdTe radiation detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopic measurements are presented using the PID350 pixelated gamma radiation detectors. A high-speed data acquisition system has been developed in order to reduce the data loss during the data reading in case of a high flux of photons. A data analysis framework has been developed in order to improve the resolution of the acquired energy spectra, using specific calibration parameters for each PID350's pixel. Three PID350 detectors have been used to construct a stacked prototype system and spectroscopic measurements have been performed in order to test the ability of the prototype to localize radioactive sources.

Karafasoulis, K; Seferlis, S; Papadakis, I; Loukas, D; Lambropoulos, C; Potiriadis, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Characteristic measurements of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas generated in a Planckian radiation environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temporally and spatially resolved characteristics of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas were studied using x-ray spectroscopy. The plasma was generated in the near-Planckian radiation environment within gold hohlraum targets irradiated by laser pulses with a total energy of 2.4 kJ in 1 ns. The contributions of silicon ions at different charge states to the specific components of the measured absorption spectra were also investigated. It was found that each main feature in the absorption spectra of the measured silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas was contributed by two neighboring silicon ionic species.

Dong Quanli; Wang Shoujun; Li Yutong; Zhang Yi; Zhao Jing [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei Huigang; Shi Jianrong; Zhao Gang [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang Jiyan; Gu Yuqiu; Ding Yongkun; Wen Tianshu; Zhang Wenhai; Hu Xin; Liu Shenye; Zhang Lin; Tang Yongjian; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center for Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Clear Skies S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S. A. Clough S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 The objective of this research effort is to develop radiative transfer models that are consistent with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program spectral radiance measurements for clear and cloudy atmospheres. Our approach is to develop the model physics and related databases with a line-by-line model in the context of available spectral radiance measurements. The line-by- line mode! then functions as an intermediate standard to both develop and validate rapid radiative transfer models appropriate to GCM applications. consistent with downlooking data taken with the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) (Smith et al. 1983) from 20 km and with simultaneous data taken

272

Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

Tooman, T.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Exploratory Systems Technology Dept.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flux and oscillation parameters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through-going muon events are analyzed as a function of their direction of travel through the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Based on simulations and previous measurements, muons with a zenith angle of 1 < cos([theta]zenith) ...

Sonley, Thomas John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Development of All-fiber Coherent Doppler Lidar to Measure Atmosphere Wind Speed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An all-fiber pulsed coherent Doppler lidar is developed to measure wind profiles. The maximum horizontal and vertical range for wind speed is 4.2km and 2km with speed accuracy of...

Liu, Jiqiao; Chen, Weibiao; Zhu, Xiaopeng

275

Radiation from a uniformly accelerated particle detector: Energy, particles, and the quantum measurement process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We comment on the controversy whether a uniformly accelerated particle detector radiates. We stress the particular importance of the built-up correlations and of the quantum measurement process in this connection. We give the question the following form: We assume that the initial state of the quantum field is the Minkowski vacuum and that there is a uniformly accelerated two-level system which is initially in its ground state. What will in this case be found in the different regions of asymptotic future null infinity for the mean value of the field energy density on one hand and of the Minkowski particle number on the other if in the out region (a) no measurement is made on the two-level system, (b) the measurement finds the two-level system in its upper state, or (c) in its lower state? To obtain localized statements, we base the calculations on wave packet states. The different cases show essential differences.

Jürgen Audretsch and Rainer Müller

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

O{sub 2} rotational temperature measurements in an atmospheric air microdischarge by radar resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonintrusive spatially resolved rotational temperature measurements in an atmospheric air microdischarge are presented. The measurements were based on coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of molecular oxygen. The open air DC microdischarge source operated in a stable 'normal-glow' mode and pin-to-pin electrodes spaced 1.3 mm apart. The second harmonic of a tunable dye laser beam was focused between the two electrodes and scanned between 286 and 288 nm. Coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering was used to collect the two-photon rotational spectra of O{sub 2} at C{sup 3}{Pi}(v = 2) Leftwards-Arrow X{sup 3}{Sigma}(v Prime = 0) transitions. The Boltzmann plots from analyses of the O{sub 2} rotational lines determined local rotational temperatures at various axial locations between the electrodes. The molecular oxygen rotational temperature varied from {approx}1150 K to {approx}1350 K within the discharge area. The measurements had an accuracy of {approx}{+-}50 K.

Sawyer, Jordan; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Tennessee 37996 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Tennessee 37996 (United States); Adams, Steven F. [Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RQQE), Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433-7919 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RQQE), Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433-7919 (United States)

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Alpha Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

278

Measurement of radiative widths of $a_2(1320)$ and $?_2(1670)$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The COMPASS Collaboration at CERN has investigated the reaction $\\pi^- \\gamma \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ embedded in the Primakoff reaction of $190~\\textrm{GeV}$ pions scattering in the Coulomb field of a lead target, $\\pi^- \\text{Pb} \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+ \\text{Pb}$. Exchange of quasi-real photons is selected by isolating the sharp Coulomb peak observed at momentum transfer below $0.001~(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. Using a partial-wave analysis the amplitudes and relative phases of the $a_2(1320)$ and $\\pi_2(1670)$ mesons have been extracted, and the Coulomb and the diffractive contributions have been disentangled. Measuring absolute production cross sections we have determined the radiative width of the $a_2(1320)$ to be $\\Gamma_0(a_2(1320) \\rightarrow \\pi\\gamma) = (358 \\pm 6_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 42_{\\textrm{syst}})~\\textrm{keV}$. As the first measurement, $\\Gamma_0(\\pi_2(1670) \\rightarrow \\pi\\gamma) = (181 \\pm 11_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 27_{\\textrm{syst}})~\\textrm{keV} \\cdot (\\textrm{BR}^{\\textrm{PDG}}_{f_2 \\pi}/\\textrm{BR}_{f_2 \\pi})$ is obtained for the radiative width of the $\\pi_2(1670)$, where in this analysis the branching ratio $\\textrm{BR}^{\\textrm{PDG}}_{f_2 \\pi}=0.56$ has been used. We compare these values to previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

C. Adolph; R. Akhunzyanov; M. G. Alekseev; G. D. Alexeev; A. Amoroso; V. Andrieux; V. Anosov; A. Austregesilo; B. Badelek; F. Balestra; J. Barth; G. Baum; R. Beck; Y. Bedfer; A. Berlin; J. Bernhard; K. Bicker; J. Bieling; R. Birsa; J. Bisplinghoff; M. Bodlak; M. Boer; P. Bordalo; F. Bradamante; C. Braun; A. Bressan; M. Buechele; E. Burtin; L. Capozza; M. Chiosso; S. U. Chung; A. Cicuttin; M. L. Crespo; Q. Curiel; S. Dalla Torre; S. S. Dasgupta; S. Dasgupta; O. Yu. Denisov; S. V. Donskov; N. Doshita; V. Duic; W. Duennweber; M. Dziewiecki; A. Efremov; C. Elia; P. D. Eversheim; W. Eyrich; M. Faessler; A. Ferrero; A. Filin; M. Finger; M. Finger~jr.; H. Fischer; C. Franco; N. du~Fresne~von~Hohenesche; J. M. Friedrich; V. Frolov; F. Gautheron; O. P. Gavrichtchouk; S. Gerassimov; R. Geyer; I. Gnesi; B. Gobbo; S. Goertz; M. Gorzellik; S. Grabmueller; A. Grasso; B. Grube; A. Guskov; T. Guthoerl; F. Haas; D. von Harrach; D. Hahne; R. Hashimoto; F. H. Heinsius; F. Herrmann; F. Hinterberger; Ch. Hoeppner; N. Horikawa; N. d'Hose; S. Huber; S. Ishimoto; A. Ivanov; Yu. Ivanshin; T. Iwata; R. Jahn; V. Jary; P. Jasinski; P. Joerg; R. Joosten; E. Kabuss; B. Ketzer; G. V. Khaustov; Yu. A. Khokhlov; Yu. Kisselev; F. Klein; K. Klimaszewski; J. H. Koivuniemi; V. N. Kolosov; K. Kondo; K. Koenigsmann; I. Konorov; V. F. Konstantinov; A. M. Kotzinian; O. Kouznetsov; Z. Kral; M. Kraemer; Z. V. Kroumchtein; N. Kuchinski; F. Kunne; K. Kurek; R. P. Kurjata; A. A. Lednev; A. Lehmann; S. Levorato; J. Lichtenstadt; A. Maggiora; A. Magnon; N. Makke; G. K. Mallot; C. Marchand; A. Martin; J. Marzec; J. Matousek; H. Matsuda; T. Matsuda; G. Meshcheryakov; W. Meyer; T. Michigami; Yu. V. Mikhailov; Y. Miyachi; A. Nagaytsev; T. Nagel; F. Nerling; S. Neubert; D. Neyret; V. I. Nikolaenko; J. Novy; W. -D. Nowak; A. S. Nunes; I. Orlov; A. G. Olshevsky; M. Ostrick; R. Panknin; D. Panzieri; B. Parsamyan; S. Paul; M. Pesek; S. Platchkov; J. Pochodzalla; V. A. Polyakov; J. Pretz; M. Quaresma; C. Quintans; S. Ramos; G. Reicherz; E. Rocco; A. Rychter; N. S. Rossiyskaya; D. I. Ryabchikov; V. D. Samoylenko; A. Sandacz; S. Sarkar; I. A. Savin; G. Sbrizzai; P. Schiavon; C. Schill; T. Schlueter; A. Schmidt; K. Schmidt; H. Schmieden; K. Schoenning; S. Schopferer; M. Schott; O. Yu. Shevchenko; L. Silva; L. Sinha; S. Sirtl; M. Slunecka; S. Sosio; F. Sozzi; A. Srnka; L. Steiger; M. Stolarski; M. Sulc; R. Sulej; H. Suzuki; A. Szabelski; T. Szameitat; P. Sznajder; S. Takekawa; J. ter~Wolbeek; S. Tessaro; F. Tessarotto; F. Thibaud; S. Uhl; I. Uman; M. Vandenbroucke; M. Virius; J. Vondra; L. Wang; T. Weisrock; M. Wilfert; R. Windmolders; H. Wollny; K. Zaremba; M. Zavertyaev; E. Zemlyanichkina; M. Ziembicki.

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

Measurement of Atmospheric Sea Salt Concentration in the Dry Storage Facility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel coming from a Japanese nuclear power plant is stored in the interim storage facility before reprocessing. There are two types of the storage methods which are wet and dry type. In Japan, it is anticipated that the dry storage facility will increase compared with the wet type facility. The dry interim storage facility using the metal cask has been operated in Japan. In another dry storage technology, there is a concrete overpack. Especially in USA, a lot of concrete overpacks are used for the dry interim storage. In Japan, for the concrete cask, the codes of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and the governmental technical guidelines are prepared for the realization of the interim storage as well as the code for the metal cask. But the interim storage using the concrete overpack has not been in progress because the evaluation on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the canister is not sufficient. Japanese interim storage facilities would be constructed near the seashore. The metal casks and concrete overpacks are stored in the storage building in Japan. On the other hand, in USA they are stored outside. It is necessary to remove the decay heat of the spent nuclear fuel in the cask from the storage building. Generally, the heat is removed by natural cooling in the dry storage facility. Air including the sea salt particles goes into the dry storage facility. Concerning the concrete overpack, air goes into the cask body and cools the canister. Air goes along the canister surface and is in contact with the surface directly. In this case, the sea salt in the air attaches to the surface and then there is the concern about the occurrence of the SCC. For the concrete overpack, the canister including the spent fuel is sealed by the welding. The loss of sealability caused by the SCC has to be avoided. To evaluate the SCC for the canister, it is necessary to make clear the amount of the sea salt particles coming into the storage building and the concentration on the canister. In present, the evaluation on that point is not sufficient. In this study, the concentration of the sea salt particles in the air and on the surface of the storage facility are measured inside and outside of the building. For the measurement, two sites of the dry storage facility using the metal cask are chosen. This data is applicable for the evaluation on the SCC of the canister to realize the interim storage using the concrete overpack. (authors)

Masumi Wataru; Hisashi Kato; Satoshi Kudo; Naoko Oshima; Koji Wada [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry - CRIEPI (Japan); Hirofumi Narutaki [Electric Power Engineering Systems Co. Ltd. (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Radiation Dose Metrics in CT: Assessing Dose Using the National Quality Forum CT Patient Safety Measure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The National Quality Forum (NQF) is a nonprofit consensus organization that recently endorsed a measure focused on CT radiation doses. To comply, facilities must summarize the doses from consecutive scans within age and anatomic area strata and report the data in the medical record. Our purpose was to assess the time needed to assemble the data and to demonstrate how review of such data permits a facility to understand doses. Methods and Materials To assemble the data we used for analysis, we used the dose monitoring software eXposure to automatically export dose metrics from consecutive scans in 2010 and 2012. For a subset of 50 exams, we also collected dose metrics manually, copying data directly from the PACS into an excel spreadsheet. Results Manual data collection for 50 scans required 2 hours and 15 minutes. eXposure compiled the data in under an hour. All dose metrics demonstrated a 30% to 50% reduction between 2010 and 2012. There was also a significant decline and a reduction in the variability of the doses over time. Conclusion The NQF measure facilitates an institution's capacity to assess the doses they are using for CT as part of routine practice. The necessary data can be collected within a reasonable amount of time either with automatic software or manually. The collection and review of these data will allow facilities to compare their radiation dose distributions with national distributions and allow assessment of temporal trends in the doses they are using.

Jillian Keegan; Diana L. Miglioretti; Robert Gould; Lane F. Donnelly; Nicole D. Wilson; Rebecca Smith-Bindman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Atmospheric Amines and Ammonia Measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report ambient measurements of amines and ammonia with a fast response chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) in a Southeastern U.S. forest in Alabama and a moderately polluted Midwestern site during the summer. In the Alabama forest, mostly C3-amines (from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 2 ppbv) were detected on a daily basis. C3-amines and ammonia showed similar diurnal trends and temperature and wind direction dependences, and were not associated with transported CO and SO2 plumes. Consistent with temperature dependences, amine and ammonia in the gas and aerosol phases showed opposite diurnal trends, indicating gas-to-particle partitioning of amines and ammonia. Temperature dependences also imply reversible processes of amines and ammonia evaporation from soil surfaces in daytime and deposition of amines and ammonia to soil surfaces at nighttime. Various amines (C1-C6) at the pptv level were observed in the transported biomass burning plumes, showing that biomass burning can be a substantial source of amines in the Southeast U.S. At the moderately polluted Kent site, higher concentrations of amines (C1-C6, from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 6 ppbv) were detected. Diurnal variations of C1- to C3-amines and ammonia were correlated with the ambient temperature. C4- to C6-amines showed abrupt increases during the nighttime, suggesting that they were emitted from local sources. These abundant amines and ammonia may in part explain the frequent new particle formation events reported from Kent. Lower amine concentrations at the rural forested site highlight the importance of constraining anthropogenic sources of amines.

You, Y.; Kanawade, V. P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Madronich, Sasha; Sierra-Hernandez, M. R.; Lawler, M.; Smith, James N.; Takahama, S.; Ruggeri, G.; Koss, A.; Olson, K.; Baumann, K.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.; Guo, H.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Porcelli, L.; Brune, W. H.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Lee, S.-H

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric models testing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Tectonics (COMET) Collection: Geosciences 7 BTRAM: An Interactive Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Model I.M. Chapman1 Summary: BTRAM: An Interactive Atmospheric Radiative...

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric test models Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Tectonics (COMET) Collection: Geosciences 7 BTRAM: An Interactive Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Model I.M. Chapman1 Summary: BTRAM: An Interactive Atmospheric Radiative...

285

Atmospheric Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

competencies Atmospheric Chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry is the study of the composition of the atmosphere, the sources and fates of gases and particles in air, and changes induced...

286

Workshop review: Management of data collected in GRAMP (Gulf Region Atmospheric Measurement Program). Held in Boulder, Colorado on July 22-24, 1991. Technical note  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demolition and subsequent burning of the Kuwait oil fires was a senseless act of destruction that has threatened public health, damaged the environment, and may possibly cause short or longer term changes in regional and global climate. Many nations responded to this disaster by offering aid and by rushing teams into the affected area to make measurements that would assess the impact of the fires. The following report summarizes a workshop that was held July 24-26, 1991 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to discuss a plan to gather all the atmospheric measurements that are being made in the Gulf region and make them available for general dissemination. The workshop was initiated by the World Meteorological Organization and co-sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Organization.

Baumgardner, D.; Friesen, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Assimilation of observations of radiation level into an atmospheric transport model: A case study with the particle filter and the ETEX tracer dataset  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric transport models and observations from monitoring networks are commonly used aids for forecasting spatial distribution of contamination in case of a radiological incident. In this study, we assessed the particle filter data-assimilation technique as a tool for ensemble forecasting the spread of radioactivity. We used measurements from the ETEX-1 tracer experiment and model results from the NPK-Puff atmospheric dispersion model. We showed that assimilation of observations improves the ensemble forecast compared to runs without data assimilation. The improvement is most prominent for nowcasting: the mean squared error was reduced by a factor of 7. For forecasting, the improvement of the mean squared error resulting from assimilation of observations was found to dissipate within a few hours. We ranked absolute model values and observations and calculated the mean squared error of the ranked values. This measure of the correctness of the pattern of high and low values showed an improvement for forecasting up to 48 h. We conclude that the particle filter is an effective tool in better modeling the spread of radioactivity following a release.

Paul H. Hiemstra; Derek Karssenberg; Arjan van Dijk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Measurement of the Betatron Radiation Spectrum Coming From a Laser Wakefield Accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) is under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to produce electron bunches with GeV class energy and energy spreads of a few-percent. The ultimate goal is to provide a bright and compact photon source for high energy density physics. The interaction of a high power (200 TW), short pulse (50 fs) laser with neutral He gas can generate quasi-monoenergetic electron beams at energies up to 1 GeV. The laser pulse can be self-guided over a dephasing length of 1 cm (for a plasma density of 1.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) overcoming the limitation of vacuum diffraction. Betatron radiation is emitted while the accelerated electrons undergo oscillations in the wakefield electrostatic field. Here we present electron spectra measurements with a two screen spectrometer allowing to fix the ambiguities due to electron deflections at the plasma exit. They have measured monoenergetic electron beams above 300 MeV. Furthermore a forward directed x-ray beam is observed. The measured betatron spectrum agrees well with the calculated spectrum in the synchrotron asymptotic limit (SAL) using the measured electron beam parameters.

Leurent, V; Michel, P; Clayton, C E; Pollock, B; Doeppner, T; Wang, T L; Ralph, J; Pak, A; Marsh, K; Joshi, C; Tynan, G R; Divol, L; Palastro, J P; Glenzer, S H; Froula, D H

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

289

New portable hand-held radiation instruments for measurements and monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hand-held radiation monitors are often used to search pedestrians and motor vehicles for special nuclear material (SNM) as part of a physical protection plan for nuclear materials. Recently, the Los Alamos Advanced Nuclear Technology group has commercialized an improved hand-held monitor that can be used for both physical-protection monitoring and verification measurements in nuclear material control and waste management. The new monitoring instruments are smaller and lighter; operate much longer on a battery charge; are available with NaI(Tl) or neutron and gamma-ray sensitive plastic scintillation detectors; and are less expensive than other comparable instruments. They also have a second operating mode for making precise measurements over counting times as long as 99 s. This mode permits making basic verification measurements that may be needed before transporting nuclear material or waste outside protected areas. Improved verification measurements can be made with a second new hand-held instrument that has a stabilized detector and three separate gamma-ray energy windows to obtain spectral information for SNM quantity, enrichment, or material-type verification.

Fehlau, P.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

291

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results H. E. Revercomb, R. O. Knuteson, W. L. Smith, F. A. Best, and R. G. Dedecker University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin H. B. Howell National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Systems Design and Applications Branch Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Accurate and spectrally detailed observations of the thermal emission from radiatively important atmospheric gases, aerosols, and clouds are now being provided to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data base by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) prototype at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. Spectra over the range from 520 to 3000 cm -1 (3 to 19 microns) with a resolution of 0.5 cm

292

Indoor and Outdoor in Situ High-Resolution Gamma Radiation Measurements in Urban Areas of Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of Th-232 and U-238 series, and K-40 are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +- 0.5.

E. Svoukis; H. Tsertos

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

Myers, D. R.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A new approach for simultaneously retrieving cloud albedo and cloud fraction from surface-based shortwave radiation measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 8 (2013) 044023 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/4/044023 A new approach for simultaneously retrieving cloud albedo and cloud fraction from surface-based shortwave radiation measurements Yu Xie and Yangang Liu Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA E-mail: yxie@bnl.gov Received 27 June 2013 Accepted for publication 8 October 2013 Published 30 October 2013 Online at stacks.iop.org/ERL/8/044023 Abstract Surface-based measurements of shortwave (SW) radiative fluxes contain valuable information on cloud properties, but have not been fully used to infer those properties. Here a new analytical approach is presented that simultaneously infers cloud albedo and cloud fraction from surface-based measurements of total and direct radiative fluxes. An inspection of the

295

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cloud Radiative Forcing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Vertical Redistribution of Radiant Energy by Clouds. Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Kato, Seiji Hampton University/NASA Langley Research Center Documentation with data of the effects of clouds on the radiant energy balance of the surface and atmosphere represent a critical shortcoming in the set of observations that are needed to ascertain the validity of model simulations of the earth's climate. While clouds are known to cool the climate system from TOA radiation budget studies, the redistribution of energy between the surface and atmosphere and within the atmosphere by clouds has not been examined in detail. Using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP)

296

DEFINITION OF A NEW LEVEL ONE TEST CASE MEASUREMENTS OF EQUILIBRIUM RADIATION FROM AN INDUCTIVELY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at atmospheric pressure, is used to create N2-CH4 Titan-like plasma (98%N2 - 2%CH4). The operating frequency and power are 64 MHz and 3 kW respectively. This kind of apparatus allows obtaining plasma in chemical case 1 proposes a spectroscopic study of plasma formed with a Titan-like atmosphere gas mixture, which

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

297

Large horizontal gradients in atmospheric CO at the synoptic scale as seen by spaceborne Measurements of Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis, parcel trajectory modeling, and global three- dimensional by the warm conveyor belt ahead of the cold front and the clean air transported from the Atlantic

Jones, Dylan

298

Source Term Estimation of Radioxenon Released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Reactors Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systems designed to monitor airborne radionuclides released from underground nuclear explosions detected radioactive fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in March 2011. Atmospheric transport modeling (ATM) of plumes of noble gases and particulates were performed soon after the accident to determine plausible detection locations of any radioactive releases to the atmosphere. We combine sampling data from multiple International Modeling System (IMS) locations in a new way to estimate the magnitude and time sequence of the releases. Dilution factors from the modeled plume at five different detection locations were combined with 57 atmospheric concentration measurements of 133-Xe taken from March 18 to March 23 to estimate the source term. This approach estimates that 59% of the 1.24×1019 Bq of 133-Xe present in the reactors at the time of the earthquake was released to the atmosphere over a three day period. Source term estimates from combinations of detection sites have lower spread than estimates based on measurements at single detection sites. Sensitivity cases based on data from four or more detection locations bound the source term between 35% and 255% of available xenon inventory.

Eslinger, Paul W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Biegalski, S. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooper, Matthew W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haas, Derek A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hoffman, Ian [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Korpach, E. [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Yi, Jing [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Miley, Harry S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rishel, Jeremy P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ungar, R. Kurt [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); White, Brian [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Woods, Vincent T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Introduction A single-column model (SCM) is used to examine the sensitivity of basic quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameter- izations of clouds and cloud microphysics. The SCM was run at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites using forcing data derived from forecast products. The forecast

300

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Standard Test Method for Measuring Dose for Use in Linear Accelerator Pulsed Radiation Effects Tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers a calorimetric measurement of the total dose delivered in a single pulse of electrons from an electron linear accelerator or a flash X-ray machine (FXR, e-beam mode) used as an ionizing source in radiation-effects testing. The test method is designed for use with pulses of electrons in the energy range from 10 to 50 MeV and is only valid for cases in which both the calorimeter and the test specimen to be irradiated are“thin” compared to the range of these electrons in the materials of which they are constructed. 1.2 The procedure described can be used in those cases in which (1) the dose delivered in a single pulse is 5 Gy (matl) (500 rd (matl)) or greater, or (2) multiple pulses of a lower dose can be delivered in a short time compared to the thermal time constant of the calorimeter. Matl refers to the material of the calorimeter. The minimum dose per pulse that can be acceptably monitored depends on the variables of the particular test, including pulse rate, pulse uniformity...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Determination of neutral beam energy fractions from collisional radiative measurements on DIII-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutral beams based on positive ion source technology are a key component of contemporary fusion research. An accurate assessment of the injected beam species mix is important for determining the actual plasma heating and momentum input as well as proper interpretation of beam-based diagnostics. On DIII-D, the main ion charge-exchange spectroscopy system is used to extract well-resolved intensity ratios of the Doppler-shifted D{sub {alpha}} emission from the full, half, and third energy beam components for a variety of beam operational parameters. In conjunction with accurate collisional-radiative modeling, these measurements indicate the assumed species mix and power fractions can vary significantly and should be regularly monitored and updated for the most accurate interpretation of plasma performance. In addition, if stable active control of the power fractions can be achieved through appropriate source tuning, the resulting control over the deposition profile can serve as an additional experimental knob for advanced tokamak studies, e.g., varying the off axis beam current drive without altering the beam trajectory.

Thomas, D. M.; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Meson cascade in the atmosphere, uncertainties in calculating the fluxes of high-energy muons, and data of direct measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new calculation of the atmospheric fluxes of cosmic-ray hadrons and muons in the energy range 10–104...GeV is performed on the basis of the method for solving nuclear-cascade equations with allowance for a nons...

A. A. Kochanov; T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

High-resolution tangential absolute extreme ultraviolet arrays for radiated power density measurements on NSTX-U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiated-power-density diagnostic on the equatorial midplane for the NSTX-U tokamak will be upgraded to measure the radial structure of the photon emissivity profile with an improved radial resolution. This diagnostic will enhance the characterization and studies of power balance, impurity transport, and MHD. The layout and response expected of the new system is shown for different plasma conditions and impurity concentrations. The effect of toroidal rotation driving poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities is also addressed.

Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kozub, T. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Faust, I. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Tritz, K. [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21209 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Use of the Tetrazolium Assay in Measuring the Response of Human Tumor Cells to Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...irradiation dose rate was...demonstrated a range of absorbance...RESPONSE TO IONIZING RADIATION with 1 mg...with graded doses of irradiation...each with a range of seeded...MGHU1 0 5 10 DOSE (Gy) RT112...RESPONSE TO IONIZING RADIATION 150000 FF...

Patricia Price and Trevor J. McMillan

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Implications of the In?Situ Measured Mass Absorption Cross Section of Organic Aerosols in Mexico City on the Atmospheric Energy Balance, Satellite Retrievals, and Photochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The absorption of short wave incoming solar radiation by the organic component of aerosols has been examined by using data from the MCMA?2003 and the 2006 MILAGRO field campaigns. Both field efforts took place in and around Mexico City. Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) was derived as a function of wavelength (300–870 nm) by combining irradiance measurements from a Multi?Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and spectrally resolved actinic flux measurements by spectroradiometry with a radiative transfer model (TUV). In addition organic aerosol mass measured by a surface deployed aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer was used to estimate the Mass Absorption Cross?section (MAC) of Organic Carbon (OC). It was found that the MAC for OC is about 10.5? m 2 / g at 300 nm and falls close to zero at about 500 nm; these values are roughly consistent with previous MAC estimates of OC and present first in?situ observations of this quantity.

B. Dix; J. C. Barnard; R. Volkamer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

76 76 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 100 150 200 250 Direct Normal Irradiance (W/m 2 ) Eugene Hermiston Burns 3. All-sky direct normal irradiance increases 5% per decade Eppley NIP Conclusions Annual average all-sky total and direct normal irradiance measurements show an overall increase in Oregon between 1980 and 2007. Two measurement sites show statistically significant increases in clear- sky direct normal irradiance in background periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo [6] (1987- 2008), consistent with the hypothesis that a reduction in anthropogenic aerosols may contribute to the increase in surface irradiance. References 1. Long, C.N. and T. P. Ackerman, 2000: J. Geophys. Res., 105(D12), 15,609-15,626. 2. Long, C.N., and K.L. Gaustad, 2004: Atmospheric Radiation

308

Cross-calibration of the Transition Radiation Detector of AMS-02 for an Energy Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since May 2011 the AMS-02 experiment is installed on the International Space Station and is observing cosmic radiation. It consists of several state-of-the-art sub-detectors, which redundantly measure charge and energy of traversing particles. Due to the long exposure time of AMS-02 of many years the measurement of momentum for protons and ions is limited systematically by the spatial resolution and magnetic field strength of the silicon tracker. The maximum detectable rigidity for protons is about 1.8~TV, for helium about 3.6~TV. We investigate the possibility to extend the range of the energy measurement for heavy nuclei ($Z\\geq2$) with the transition radiation detector (TRD). The response function of the TRD shows a steep increase in signal from the level of ionization at a Lorentz factor $\\gamma$ of about 500 to $\\gamma\\approx20000$, where the transition radiation signal saturates. For heavy ions the signal fluctuations in the TRD are sufficiently small to allow an energy measurement with the TRD beyond t...

Obermeier, Andreas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Solar Radiation, its Measurement and Application in Solar Energy Utilization Programme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electromagnetic radiation emitted by the sun, covers a very large range of wavelengths, from radiowaves through the visible to X-rays and gamma rays. But 99 percent of this energy is contained in the region 0...

A. Mani

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Measuring short electron bunch lengths using coherent smith-purcell radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for directly determining the length of sub-picosecond electron bunches. A metallic grating is formed with a groove spacing greater than a length expected for the electron bunches. The electron bunches are passed over the metallic grating to generate coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. The angular distribution of the coherent Smith-Purcell radiation is then mapped to directly deduce the length of the electron bunches.

Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Radiative lifetime measurements of highly excited even-parity levels of Eu I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in a laser-produced plasma. This work is the largest-scale...nucleosynthesis and stellar atmospheric processes (Bergstrom...in a laser-induced plasma. 2 EXPERIMENTAL SETUP...flight-out-of-view effect. A 500-MHz digital oscilloscope...recombination background from the plasma (Berzinsh et al. 1997......

Wei Zhang; Shan Du; Yanyan Feng; Liyun Jiang; Zhankui Jiang; Zhenwen Dai

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Supplementary Material for: Application of Synchrotron Radiation for Measurement of Iron Red-ox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@engr.wisc.edu #12;Incandescent Light Bulb Spectrum Figure 1 Visible Light Fluorescent Light Bulb Spectrum #12;Figure 2 Visible Light Incandescent Light Bulb Spectrum #12;Figure 3 Unmodified XANES Spectrum February 14 of the incandescent lights used for aging the atmospheric aerosols. The units are in m / S / m2 / nm. Figure 3

Meskhidze, Nicholas

313

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate at the carbon cycle #12;However, #12;Greenhouse Effect is Complex #12;PLANETARY ENERGY BALANCE G+W fig 3-5

Johnson, Robert E.

314

09/02/2011 16:08Ground-based estimates of outer radiation belt energetic electron precipitation fluxes into the atmosphere Page 1 of 2http://www.agu.org/cgi-bin/SFgate/SFgate?language=English&verbo...2%2054369834%20%2fdata2%2fepubs%2fwais%2fdata%2ffm10%2f  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%2054369834%20%2fdata2%2fepubs%2fwais%2fdata%2ffm10%2ffm10.txt 2010 Fall Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author is termed AARDDVARK (Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-belt (Dynamic) Deposition - VLF Atmospheric Research fluxes from the observations of this network, which is termed AARDDVARK (Antarctic-Arctic Radiation

Ulich, Thomas

315

SIO 217a Atmospheric and Climate Sciences I: Atmospheric Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Radiant Energy. Radiative Transfer. Transport.) 10-Oct W 3 More Transfer Processes 15-Oct M 4 4 Gas. Equation of State. Hydrostatic Equilibrium.) 3-Oct W 2 2.11 First and Second Laws and Characteristics. Precipitation Processes. Radiative Transfer in a Cloudy Atmosphere. Fogs, Stratus

Russell, Lynn

316

The atmosphere of Venus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations of Venus take a special position in planetary researches. It was just the atmosphere of Venus where first measurements in situ were carried out by means of the equipment delivered by a space pr...

V. I. Moroz

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and The ARM Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): Status and Preliminary Assessments of Instrument Deployments in 2006 Dedecker, Ralph University of Wisconsin Demirgian, Jack Argonne National Laboratory Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Revercomb, Henry University of Wisconsin-Madison Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Instruments One of the key operational instruments at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) is the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). This instrument provides the ARM program with surface-based observations of infrared spectrally resolved radiance from a vertically directed cone with better than 1% accuracy. The data from

318

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Data Analysis Methods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Data Analysis Methods R. O. Knuteson, W. L. Smith, S. A. Ackerman, H. E. Revercomb, H. Woolf, and H. Howell Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Inter- ferometer (AERI) have been analyzed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Fourier Transform Data Analysis Tools science team project under the direction of William L. Smith of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The data consist of observations of the downwelling infrared emission at the surface from gaseous atmospheric constituents and from cloud and particulate aerosols. The observations are at 0.5 cm-1 spectral resolution over the

319

Musical Atmospherics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE characteristics of audio musical atmospherics which are obtained when an ... musical atmospherics which are obtained when an audio amplifier is placed in a long line or aerial have been discussed from time to ...

T. L. ECKERSLEY

1935-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Radiation exposure during liver surgery after treatment with 90Y microspheres, evaluated with computer simulations and dosimeter measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose. Two patients with liver tumours were planned for a combined treatment, including surgery with preceding injections of ?? radiation emitting 90Y microspheres (SIRTEX®). The aim of this paper is to present a method of pre-surgical computer simulations of the absorbed dose rate on the surface of tumour tissue, combined with measurements of the actual absorbed dose rate on resected tissue, in order to estimate the absorbed dose to a surgeon's fingers during such surgery procedures. Methods and Materials. The dose rates from ?? radiation on the surface of tumour tissue were simulated with the software VARSKIN® Mod 2. The activity concentrations in tumours were estimated, based on SPECT/CT distribution studies of 99mTc-MAA and confirmed by SPECT/CT bremsstrahlung studies of 90Y microspheres. The activity distributions were considered as homogeneous within the tumour regions. The absorbed dose rates at different tumour tissue spots were calculated based on measurements with thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD) fastened on resected tissue. Results. The simulations showed a good agreement with the averaged absorbed dose rates based on TLD measurements performed on resected tissue, differing by 13% and 4% respectively. The absorbed dose rates at the measured maximum hotspots were twice as high as the average dose rates for both patients. Conclusion. The data is not sufficient in order to draw any general conclusions about dose rates on tumour tissue during similar surgeries, neither about the influence of dose rate heterogeneities nor about average dose rates. However, the agreement between simulations and measurements on these limited data indicate that this approach is a promising method for estimations of the radiation exposure to the surgeons' fingers during this kind of surgery procedure. More data from similar surgeries are necessary in order to validate the method.

Jonas Högberg; Magnus Rizell; Ragnar Hultborn; Johanna Svensson; Olof Henrikson; Peter Gjertsson; Peter Bernhardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Glass transition in thaumatin crystals revealed through temperature-dependent radiation-sensitivity measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation damage to protein crystals exhibits two regimes of temperature-activated behavior between T = 300 and 100 K, with a crossover at the protein glass transition near 200 K. These results have implications for mechanistic studies of proteins and for structure determination when cooling to T = 100 K creates excessive disorder.

Warkentin, M.

2010-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Climate Impact of Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...RADIATIVE-TRANSFER DUE TO ATMOSPHERIC WATER-VAPOR - GLOBAL...giving rise to atmospheric mo-tions that...heat release by condensation as moist air...and because the atmospheric motions that...to thE1tfrof water in a leaky bucket...

J. Hansen; D. Johnson; A. Lacis; S. Lebedeff; P. Lee; D. Rind; G. Russell

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Proof of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A recently advanced argument against the atmospheric greenhouse effect is refuted. A planet without an infrared absorbing atmosphere is mathematically constrained to have an average temperature less than or equal to the effective radiating temperature. Observed parameters for Earth prove that without infrared absorption by the atmosphere, the average temperature of Earth's surface would be at least 33 K lower than what is observed.

Smith, Arthur P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Light extinction in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

Laulainen, N.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Isotopic Ratio Measurements of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using a 4.3 ?m Pulsed Quantum Cascade Laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report CO2 isotopic ratios (13C, 18O) measured in air using a pulsed quantum cascade laser at 2310 cm-1. Performance is...

Nelson, David; McManus, John B; Zahniser, Mark S; Tuzson, Bela; Emmenegger, Lukas

326

A New Microwave Temperature Profiler Â… First Measurements in Polar Regions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microwave Temperature Profiler - First Microwave Temperature Profiler - First Measurements in Polar Regions E. N. Kadygrov, A. V. Koldaev, and A. S. Viazankin Central Aerological Observatory Moscow, Russia A. Argentini, and A. Conidi Institute of Atmospheric Physics CNR, Italy Introduction Temperature inversions are a ubiquitous feature of the high latitude atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In Polar Regions, the temperature inversion is a complicated phenomenon involving interactions between surface radiative cooling, subsidence and warm air advection. In the period 1997-2002, several microwave temperature profilers were used to measure temperature inversion parameters at one of the three sites of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

327

Radiation Measurements 41 (2006) 101107 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dosimetry 1. Introduction Methods for long-term passive radon measurements based on nuclear track detectors- tive dosimetry based on measurements of 210Po activity in objects was proposed. Atoms of short

Yu, K.N.

328

Estimation of the contribution of photon radiation for measurement of the exposure dose rate of neutron sources based on 252Cf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for the estimation of the contribution of photon radiation to the detector readings for measurement of the exposure dose rate and the equivalent activity of neutron ... screens and filters is considered....

N. F. Demchenko; R. N. Minvaliev; V. I. Shipilov…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

ARM - Field Campaign - ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology 2008.07.08 - 2008.07.18 Lead Scientist : Michael Howard For data sets, see below. Description Goals of assist were to intercompare radiance spectra and profile retrievals from a new AERI-like instrument, called "ASSIST" with the SGP site AERI(s) and calculations from Radiosondes measurements. * To bring the ASSIST instrument to the SGP ACRF and perform simultaneous measurements of the sky radiation with those from the AERI. * On relatively cloud-free days, release a special radiosonde at the

330

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric emissions modeling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

well as "back radiation" downward to the surface. The atmosphere also... .e., the greenhouse effect, is included via the atmospheric ... Source: Noone, David - Program in...

331

Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.

Famiano, M.A.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

PIV Measurements in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer within and above a Mature Corn Canopy. Part I: Statistics and Energy Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements just within and above a mature corn canopy have been performed to clarify the small-scale spatial structure of the turbulence. The smallest resolved scales are about 15 times the Kolmogorov length ...

R. van Hout; W. Zhu; L. Luznik; J. Katz; J. Kleissl; M. B. Parlange

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Preliminary Results from Long-Term Measurements of Atmospheric Moisture in the Marine Boundary Layer in the Gulf of Mexico*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of boundary layer moisture have been acquired from Rotronic MP-100 sensors deployed on two National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico from June through November 1993. For one sensor that was retrieved ...

Laurence C. Breaker; David B. Gilhousen; Lawrence D. Burroughs

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Measurement of the (n, H3) Cross Section in Nitrogen and Its Relationship to the Tritium Production in the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen gas is irradiated by fast neutrons from a U235 fission plate and tritium is produced. The tritium is identified and counted by two different methods: (1) The gas is put into a cloud chamber where the H3 electrons are identified by their range and counted; (2) hydrogen is separated from nitrogen by its passage through palladium and is then counted in a Geiger counter. The average cross section for fission neutrons with energy sufficient to make the reaction proceed [4.4 Mev is (11±2)×10-27 cm2].This cross section combined with cosmic-ray neutron data gives an H3 production rate of between 0.10/cm2 sec and 0.20/cm2 sec averaged over the earth. Cosmic-ray stars eject H3 at a rate estimated between 0.30/cm2 sec and 0.70/cm2 sec. These two processes maintain a world reservoir of 50 to 110 million curies of H3. This H3 production leads to a mean escape time of He3 from the atmosphere of about 5 million years. This is consistent with a temperature at the base of the exosphere of 1500°K.

E. L. Fireman

1953-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Radiation source rate estimation through data assimilation of gamma dose rate measurements for operational nuclear emergency response systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of an innovative data assimilation method that has been recently developed in NCSR Demokritos for estimating an unknown emission rate of radionuclides in the atmosphere, with real-scale experimental data. The efficient algorithm is based on the assimilation of gamma dose rate measured data in the Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model DIPCOT and uses variational principles. The DIPCOT model is used in the framework of the nuclear emergency response system (ERS) RODOS. The evaluation is performed by computational simulations of dispersion of Ar-41 that was emitted routinely by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) previous research reactor, HIFAR, located in Sydney, Australia. In this paper the algorithm is evaluated against a more complicated case than the others used in previous studies: there was only one monitoring station available each day and the site topography is characterised as moderately complex. Overall the estimated release rate approaches the real one to a very satisfactory degree as revealed by the statistical indicators of errors.

Vasiliki Tsiouri; Spyros Andronopoulos; Ivan Kovalets; Leisa L. Dyer; John G. Bartzis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The atmospheric chemistry of trace gases and particulate matter emitted by different land uses in Borneo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photochemistry and land-system change using measurements...Coupling in the Earth System (OP3/ACES) campaign...guineensis Elaeis oleifera hybrids of the progeny...East Asian land-system change on atmospheric...and land cover: solar radiation is efficiently...based on the vertical wind. There is no consensus...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Technical Sessions Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 Introduction The availability of a rapid highly accurate multiple scattering radiative transfer model is essential to meet the objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The model must be capable of computing radiance at spectral intervals consistent with the monochromatic spectral variation of the atmospheric molecular absorption. The resolution of the spectrometers to be deployed at the ARM sites, 0.1 cm-1 and less, will provide an important assessment of our capability to perform radiative transfer calculations in the multiply scattered environment. A second important application forthe high-accuracy high-resolution model is to provide parameterizations and validations for

338

The influence of laser clipped by the laser entrance hole on hohlraum radiation measurement on Shenguang-III prototype  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measuring the x-ray flux exiting the target's laser entrance hole (LEH) is the most common diagnostic that quantifies the x-ray intensity inside the laser-driven hohlraum. However, this signal accounts for only a small portion of the incident laser power and thus is likely to be affected by unwanted x-ray background from non-target area, leading to an overestimation of the hohlraum drive. Unwanted emission might be produced when the laser light is clipped by the LEH (LEH clipping) because of a lack of clearance for laser spot, or with a laser spot comprising of discrete structure, or even with a poor pointing accuracy. Its influence on the hohlraum radiation diagnostic is investigated on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility with the typical 1 ns square pulse. The experiment employed three types of targets to excite the unwanted x-ray background from LEH clipping, unconverted light, and both effects, respectively. This work gives an absolute evaluation of x-ray produced by the LEH clipping, which is measured by flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRD) at multiple view angles. The result indicates that there is little variation in measured emission to various view angles, because the unwanted x-rays are mainly generated at the side face of the LEH lip when laser is obliquely incident. Therefore, the LEH clipping brings more overestimation in hohlraum radiation measurement at larger view angle since the hohlraum LEH as an emitting source viewed by FXRD is decreased as the view angle increases. In our condition, the LEH clipping contributes 2%–3.5% overestimation to the hohlraum flux measurement.

Yang, Dong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China) [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Measurement of natural radioactivity and dose rate assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation in the soil of southern Punjab, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......terrestrial background radiation mainly due to these...assess the population radiation doses(4-9). However...data are available on naturally occuring and artificial radionulides...order to assess the radiation doses for the general......

I. Fatima; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; M. Daud; S. A. Ahmad; S. N. A. Tahir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Quality Control Quantification (QCQ): A Tool to Measure the Value of Quality Control Checks in Radiation Oncology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify the error-detection effectiveness of commonly used quality control (QC) measures. Methods: We analyzed incidents from 2007-2010 logged into a voluntary in-house, electronic incident learning systems at 2 academic radiation oncology clinics. None of the incidents resulted in patient harm. Each incident was graded for potential severity using the French Nuclear Safety Authority scoring scale; high potential severity incidents (score >3) were considered, along with a subset of 30 randomly chosen low severity incidents. Each report was evaluated to identify which of 15 common QC checks could have detected it. The effectiveness was calculated, defined as the percentage of incidents that each QC measure could detect, both for individual QC checks and for combinations of checks. Results: In total, 4407 incidents were reported, 292 of which had high-potential severity. High- and low-severity incidents were detectable by 4.0 {+-} 2.3 (mean {+-} SD) and 2.6 {+-} 1.4 QC checks, respectively (P<.001). All individual checks were less than 50% sensitive with the exception of pretreatment plan review by a physicist (63%). An effectiveness of 97% was achieved with 7 checks used in combination and was not further improved with more checks. The combination of checks with the highest effectiveness includes physics plan review, physician plan review, Electronic Portal Imaging Device-based in vivo portal dosimetry, radiation therapist timeout, weekly physics chart check, the use of checklists, port films, and source-to-skin distance checks. Some commonly used QC checks such as pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy QA do not substantially add to the ability to detect errors in these data. Conclusions: The effectiveness of QC measures in radiation oncology depends sensitively on which checks are used and in which combinations. A small percentage of errors cannot be detected by any of the standard formal QC checks currently in broad use, suggesting that further improvements are needed. These data require confirmation with a broader incident-reporting database.

Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Terezakis, Stephanie; Souranis, Annette; Harris, Kendra [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

343

Fusing ground measurements and satellite-derived products for the construction of climatological maps in atmosphere optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusing ground measurements and satellite-derived products for the construction of climatological turbidity factor, remote sensing, resampling ABSTRACT: Climatological maps (gridded data) of optical). The problem is that such climatological maps only exist at low spatial resolution. A resampling of the maps

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

344

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Continuous Measurements of Atmospheric Ar/N2 as a Tracer of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................... 31 2.3 Results ................................................. 34 2.3.1 Comparison of station measurements and model predictions ....................... 34 2.3.2 Station-station comparisons ........................................... 74 #12;v 3.2 The seasonal cycle in (Ar/N2): A transient model of air-sea gas flux

Keeling, Ralph

345

Introduction Radiation is the primary energy source and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Introduction Radiation is the primary energy source and the ultimate energy sink for the Earth in the Earth's atmosphere and can be used for the evaluation and improvement of models designed for weather. Also, an example of measurement quality control is given. Then it is shown how the calibration

Haak, Hein

346

Design of a New Recoil Separator for Measurements of Radiative Capture Reactions in Astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rates of proton- and alpha-capture reactions on unstable proton-rich nuclei are needed to understand the energy generation and element synthesis occurring in novae, X-ray bursts, and other explosions. Direct measurements of the cross sections of some of these reactions are now possible with radioactive beams and a recoil separator. A new device for such measurements, the Separator for CApture Reactions [SECAR], is being designed for use at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The specifications and preliminary conceptual design will be discussed along with plans for the first set of measurements.

Berg, Georg P. A.; Couder, Manoel; Wiescher, Michael [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, 46556-5670 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Blackmon, Jeff C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70803-4001 (United States); Greife, U. [Dept. of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Montes, F.; Schatz, Hendrik [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Rehm, K. Ernst [Physics Division, Argonne National Lab, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) (United States); Smith, Michael S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831-6354 (United States); Zeller, Al [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States)

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

347

Radiative transfer effects on Doppler measurements as sources of surface effects in sunspot seismology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the use of Doppler shifts of Zeeman sensitive spectral lines to observe wavesn in sunspots is subject to measurement specific phase shifts arising from, (i) altered height range of spectral line formation and the propagating character of p mode waves in penumbrae, and (ii) Zeeman broadening and splitting. We also show that these phase shifts depend on wave frequencies, strengths and line of sight inclination of magnetic field, and the polarization state used for Doppler measurements. We discuss how these phase shifts could contribute to local helioseismic measurements of 'surface effects' in sunspot seismology.

S. P. Rajaguru; K. Sankarasubramanian; R. Wachter; P. H. Scherrer

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

A proposed measurement of the reverse Cherenkov radiation effect in a metamaterial-loaded circular waveguide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have recently proposed an experiment on verification of the Reverse Cherenkov Radiation (RCR) effect in a Left-Handed-Material-loaded waveguide. Applications of the RCR effect may range from novel higher-order-mode suppressors in microwave and millimeter-wave sources to improved particle detectors for satellite non-proliferation missions. The experimental configuration includes a circular waveguide filled with an artificial metamaterial with simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability, in which the electromagnetic wave with a frequency of 95 GHz will interact with an electron beam. They have demonstrated that for certain values of effective permittivity and permeability only the backward-propagating mode can be exited by the electron beam. At the conference they will present some newly developed metamaterial designs, which they plan to employ for producing the proper effective medium parameters for this experiment.

Shchegolkov, Dmitry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Azad, Abul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smirnova, Evgenya I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

U.S. Natural Gas System Methane Emissions: State of Knowledge from LCAs, Inventories, and Atmospheric Measurements (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas (NG) is a potential "bridge fuel" during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage have challenged the benefits of switching from coal to NG, a large near-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunity. During this presentation, Garvin will review evidence from multiple perspectives - life cycle assessments (LCAs), inventories and measurements - about NG leakage in the US. Particular attention will be paid to a recent article in Science magazine which reviewed over 20 years of published measurements to better understand what we know about total methane emissions and those from the oil and gas sectors. Scientific and policy implications of the state of knowledge will be discussed.

Heath, G.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Atmospheric Science The Earth's atmosphere, a layered sphere of gas extending  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

division study the composition, structure, chemical, and physical processes of the Earth's atmosphere. The division's four interrelated groups focus on satellite, airborne, and ground-based observations processes such as atmospheric dynamics, chemistry, and radiation on Earth and other planets. Our atmospheric

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

351

Radiative Importance of ÂŤThinÂŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Accomplishments of the Cloud Properties Working Group (CPWG) August 2006 Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Using ARM Data to Establish Testable Metrics for GCM Predictions of Cloud Feedback Gerald Mace University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah The scientific underpinning of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is largely based on the premise that long term ground-based measurements of certain quantities provide information sufficient to test the skill of general circulation models (GCMs) to predict radiative heating and cloud feedbacks (Stokes and Schwartz, 1994; Ackerman and Stokes, 2003). This hypothesis is based on the assumption that some set of long-term ground-based measurements provide sufficient information to characterize the physical state of the atmospheric

352

MET 600: Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics Air-sea interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;Upper-Ocean Currents How the atmosphere-ocean-land system/Salinity/Mass/Momentum Conservations #12; How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? It is the sun that sustains all living beings on earth #12;Energy Conservation: Global Radiation Balance How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven

Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

353

Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Signal in Solar Domain: Impact of Improved Molecular Spectroscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Signal in Solar Atmospheric Correction of Satellite Signal in Solar Domain: Impact of Improved Molecular Spectroscopy A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada B. Hwang Intermap Technologies Corp. Calgary, Canada Z. Li University of Maryland and The Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center College Park, Maryland Introduction Atmospheric correction of satellite measurements is a major step in the retrieval of surface reflective properties. It involves removing the effect of gaseous absorption as well as correcting for the effect of an atmospheric molecular and particulate scattering. In the past few years, there has been significant advancement in our knowledge of the absorbing properties of various atmospheric radiatively active

354

THE RADIATION SAFETY INFORMATION COMPUTATIONAL CENTER (RSICC) - A RESOURCE FOR COMPUTATIONAL TOOLS FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC), which has been in existence since 1963, is the principal source and repository in the United States for computational tools for nuclear applications. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and distributes nuclear software and data involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from 94 countries. RSICC software provides in-depth coverage of radiation related topics: the physics of the interaction of radiation with matter, radiation production and sources, criticality safety, radiation protection and shielding, radiation detectors and measurements, shielding materials properties, radiation waste management, atmospheric dispersion and environmental dose, medical applications, macro- and micro-dosimetry calculations.

Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL] [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Alanine-EPR dosimetry for measurements of ionizing radiation absorbed doses in the range 0.5-10 kGy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The usefulness of two, easy accessible alanine dosimeters (ALANPOL from IChTJ and foil dosimeter from Gamma Service, Radeberg, Germany) to radiation dose measurement in the range of 0.5-10 kGy, were investigated. In both cases, the result of the test was positive. The foil dosemeter from Gamma Service is recommended for dose distribution measurements in fantoms or products, ALANPOL - for routine measurements. The EPR-alanine method based on the described dosimeters can be successfully used, among others, in the technology of radiation protection of food.

Peimel-Stuglik, Z

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Radiation Measurements 36 (2003) 161164  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 Abstract Solid state nuclear track detectors are commonly used for measurements of concentrations methodologies regarding short-lived radon progeny has attracted much attention in the Ăżeld of radon dosimetry. There are a few di erent approaches to this problem, all of them being based on the usage of solid state nuclear

Yu, K.N.

357

Radiation Measurements 43 (2008) 14171422 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.40 Keywords: PADC; Tracks; Etching; Light; Simulation 1. Introduction Solid-state nuclear track detectors, scattered light was used to measure track densities from exper- iments related to neutron dosimetry (Harvey) developed a model for laser light scattering by nuclear tracks in CR-39 detectors. The model was based

Yu, K.N.

358

Radiation Measurements 43 (2008) S427S430 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly with the building age. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Retrospective dosimetry based on nuclear track detectors have been very well established and widely used. Surveys of existing- tion to this problem, retrospective dosimetry based on measure- ments of 210Po activity in objects

Yu, K.N.

359

Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

Guss, P. P.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Technical Sessions B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B. E. Manner B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Wave Propagation Laboratory 130ulder, CO 80303 The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) pirog ram goals are ambitious, and its schedule is demanding. Many of the instruments, proposed for operations at the first Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site as early alS 1992 represent emerging technology and exist only as :special research prototypes. Therefore, an important preparatory step for ARM was an intensive field project in Colorado in 1991 to assess the suitability of instruments an(j tech- niques for profiling the thermodynamic and kinematic structure of the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The field work was designed to provide ARM with a head start by gathering practical information for the desigln and

362

Sensitive multi-photon nonlinear laser spectroscopic methods for isotope analysis in atmospheric and environmental applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements in atmospheric pressure plasma. However, nonean atmospheric radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma (atmospheric atomizer. Also, the inductively coupled plasma

Lyons, Wendy Jean

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Atmospheric Dynamics of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres has come of age in the last decade, as astronomical techniques now allow for albedos, chemical abundances, temperature profiles and maps, rotation periods and even wind speeds to be measured. Atmospheric dynamics sets the background state of density, temperature and velocity that determines or influences the spectral and temporal appearance of an exoplanetary atmosphere. Hot exoplanets are most amenable to these characterization techniques; in the present review, we focus on highly-irradiated, large exoplanets (the "hot Jupiters"), as astronomical data begin to confront theoretical questions. We summarize the basic atmospheric quantities inferred from the astronomical observations. We review the state of the art by addressing a series of current questions and look towards the future by considering a separate set of exploratory questions. Attaining the next level of understanding will require a concerted effort of constructing multi-faceted, multi-wavelength dat...

Heng, Kevin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Aerosol Radiative Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions.in Winter ZCAREX-2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions in Winter ZCAREX-2001 G. S. Golitsyn, I. A. Gorchakova, and I. I. Mokhov Institute of Atmospheric Physic Moscow, Russia Introduction Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) is estimated for winter clear-sky conditions from measurements during ZCAREX-2001-Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment in February-March, 2001 at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS) of the A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS. ARF in the shortwave range is determined by the difference between the net fluxes of the solar radiation, calculated with and without the aerosol component of the atmosphere. The estimates of ARF are made for conditions with high surface albedo. Data Used The following data of atmospheric characteristics observed during winter are used for the

365

Radiation environment simulations at the Tevatron, studies of the beam profile and measurement of the Bc meson mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The description of a computer simulation of the CDF detector at Fermilab and the adjacent accelerator parts is detailed, with MARS calculations of the radiation background in various elements of the model due to the collision of beams and machine-related losses. Three components of beam halo formation are simulated for the determination of the principal source of radiation background in CDF due to beam losses. The effect of a collimator as a protection for the detector is studied. The simulation results are compared with data taken by a CDF group. Studies of a 150 GeV Tevatron proton beam are performed to investigate the transverse diffusion growth and distribution. A technique of collimator scan is used to scrape the beam under various experimental conditions, and computer programs are written for the beam reconstruction. An average beam halo growth speed is given and the potential of beam tail reconstruction using the collimator scan is evaluated. A particle physics analysis is conducted in order to detect the B{sub c} {yields} J/{psi}{pi} decay signal with the CDF Run II detector in 360 pb{sup -1} of data. The cut variables and an optimization method to determine their values are presented along with a criterion for the detection threshold of the signal. The mass of the B{sub c} meson is measured with an evaluation of the significance of the signal.

Nicolas, Ludovic Y.; /Glasgow U.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Betatron radiation based measurement of the electron-beam size in a wakefield accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a spatial and spectral characterization of a laser-plasma based betatron source which allows us to determine the betatron oscillation amplitude of the electrons which decreases with increasing electron energies. Due to the observed oscillation amplitude and the independently measured x-ray source size of (1.8{+-}0.3){mu}m we are able to estimate the electron bunch diameter to be (1.6{+-}0.3){mu}m.

Schnell, Michael; Saevert, Alexander; Reuter, Maria [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich- Schiller- Universitaet, Jena (Germany); and others

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

368

Contrasting the direct radiative effect and direct radiative forcing of aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols, which is the instantaneous radiative impact of all atmospheric particles on the Earth's energy balance, is sometimes confused with the direct radiative forcing (DRF), which ...

Heald, Colette L.

369

Measurements and modeling of coherent synchrotron radiation and its impact on the Linac Coherent Light Source electron beam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to reach the high peak current required for an x-ray free electron laser, two separate magnetic dipole chicanes are used in the Linac Coherent Light Source accelerator to compress the electron bunch length in stages. In these bunch compressors, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can be emitted either by a short electron bunch or by any longitudinal density modulation that may be on the bunch. In this paper, we report detailed measurements of the CSR-induced energy loss and transverse emittance growth in these compressors. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and multiparticle tracking studies. We also describe direct observations of CSR at optical wavelengths and compare with analytical models based on beam microbunching.

K. L. F. Bane; F.-J. Decker; Y. Ding; D. Dowell; P. Emma; J. Frisch; Z. Huang; R. Iverson; C. Limborg-Deprey; H. Loos; H.-D. Nuhn; D. Ratner; G. Stupakov; J. Turner; J. Welch; J. Wu

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric greenhouse gases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to longwave radiation 12;Greenhouse Gases Polyatomic molecules... the greenhouse effect ... Source: Frierson, Dargan - Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of...

371

Atmospheric tritium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research progress for the year 1979 to 1980 are reported. Concentrations of tritiated water vapor, tritium gas and tritiated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere at selected sampling points are presented. (ACR)

Oestlund, H.G.; Mason, A.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Instrumental Requirements for Global Atmospheric Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC CH2O, O3, AND NO2...AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC OH, JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL...HYDROGEN-CHLORIDE AND WATER AT ANTARCTIC STRATOSPHERIC...TOON, O.B., CONDENSATION OF HNO3 AND HCL IN...requirements for global atmospheric chemistry. | The field...

D. L. Albritton; F. C. Fehsenfeld; A. F. Tuck

1990-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections C. Hannay and R. Pincus National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Diagnostics Center Boulder, Colorado K. F. Evans Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds in the atmosphere are finite in extent and variable in every direction and in time. Long data sets from ground-based profilers, such as lidars or cloud radars, could provide a very valuable set of observations to characterize this variability. We may ask how well such profiling instruments can represent the cloud structure as measured by the magnitude of the three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer effect. The 3D radiative transfer effect is the difference between the domain average broadband solar surface

374

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements and Radiosonde Comparisons During the WVIOP2000 Field Experiment D. Cimini University of L'Aquila L'Aquil, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Y. Han Science System Applications National Aeronautics Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland S. Keihm Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California Introduction During September to October 2000, a water vapor intensive operational period (WVIOP) was conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and

375

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

376

Measurements of net radiation, ground heat flux and surface temperature in an urban canyon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect data to increase our knowledge of dispersion in urban areas. Air motions in and around urban areas are very complicated due to the influence of urban structures on both mechanical and thermal forcing. During JU2003, meteorological instruments were deployed at various locations throughout the urban area to characterize the processes that influence dispersion. Some of the instruments were deployed to characterize urban phenomena, such as boundary layer development. In addition, particular sites were chosen for more concentrated measurements to investigate physical processes in more detail. One such site was an urban street canyon on Park Avenue between Broadway and Robinson Avenues in downtown Oklahoma City. The urban canyon study was designed to examine the processes that control dispersion within, into and out of the urban canyon. Several towers were deployed in the Park Avenue block, with multiple levels on each tower for observing the wind using sonic anemometers. Infrared thermometers, net radiometers and ground heat flux plates were deployed on two of the towers midway in the canyon to study the thermodynamic effects and to estimate the surface energy balance. We present results from the surface energy balance observations.

Gouveia, F J; Leach, M J; Shinn, J H

2003-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

377

Time dependence of FEL-induced surface photovoltage on semiconductor interfaces measured with synchroton radiation photoemission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last year, the first surface science experiments simultaneously using a Free Electron Laser (FEL) and Synchrotron Radiation (SR) have been performed on SuperACO at LURE (Orsay, France). These {open_quotes}two color{close_quotes} experiments studied the surface photovoltage (SPV) induced on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces by the SuperACO FEL, a storage ring FEL delivering 350 nm photons which am naturally synchronized with the SR; the SPV was measured by synchrotron radiation core-level photoemission spectroscopy on the high-resolution SU3 undulator beamline. We will describe the experimental setup, which allowed us to convey the FEL light onto the samples sitting in the SU3 experimental station by means of a series of mirrors, and show the results we obtained for prototypical systems such as Ag/GaAs(110) and Si(111) 2 x 1. The dependence of the SPV was studied in function of various parameters, changing sample doping and photon flux; but our efforts were mainly devoted to studying its dependence on the time delay between the FEL pump and the SR probe. On SuperACO, such delay can be varied between 1 and 120 ns, the limits being given by the time duration of a SR pulse and by the interval between two consecutive positron bunches, respectively. The results show a clear temporal dependence of the amount of SPV on cleaved Si surfaces, where as the Ag/GaAs(110) does not show any difference on the ns time scale. We will discuss these results in terms of the role of surface recombination in the dynamics of the photoinduced electron-hole pairs. These studies follow the evolution of the density of electrostatic charge at surfaces and interfaces on a nanosecond time scale, and might pave the way for a new series of experiments: for example, one might explore what are the physical mechanisms limiting the time response of Schottky diodes.

Marsi, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Delboulbe, A.; Garzella, D. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

The propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methods to map artificial night sky brightness and stellar visibility across large territories or their distribution over the entire sky at any site are based on the computation of the propagation of light pollution with Garstang models, a simplified solution of the radiative transfer problem in the atmosphere which allows a fast computation by reducing it to a ray-tracing approach. We present here up-to-date Extended Garstang Models (EGM) which provide a more general numerical solution for the radiative transfer problem applied to the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere. We also present the LPTRAN software package, an application of EGM to high-resolution DMSP-OLS satellite measurements of artificial light emissions and to GTOPO30 digital elevation data, which provides an up-to-date method to predict the artificial brightness distribution of the night sky at any site in the World at any visible wavelength for a broad range of atmospheric situations and the artificial radiation density in the atm...

Cinzano, Pierantonio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-LINE, REAL-TIME ALPHA RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR LIQUID STREAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has expressed a need for an on-line, real-time instrument for assaying alpha-emitting radionuclides (uranium and the transuranics) in effluent waters leaving DOE sites to ensure compliance with regulatory limits. Due to the short range of alpha particles in water ({approximately}40 Im), it is necessary now to intermittently collect samples of water and send them to a central laboratory for analysis. A lengthy and costly procedure is used to separate and measure the radionuclides from each sample. Large variations in radionuclide concentrations in the water may go undetected due to the sporadic sampling. Even when detected, the reading may not be representative of the actual stream concentration. To address these issues, the Advanced Technologies Group of Thermo Power Corporation (a Thermo Electron company) is developing a real-time, field-deployable alpha monitor based on a solid-state silicon wafer semiconductor (US Patent 5,652,013 and pending, assigned to the US Department of Energy). The Thermo Water Alpha Monitor will serve to monitor effluent water streams (Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area) and will be suitable for process control of remediation as well as decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations, such as monitoring scrubber or rinse water radioactivity levels (Mixed Waste, Plutonium, and D and D Focus Area). It would be applicable for assaying other liquids, such as oil, or solids after proper preconditioning. Rapid isotopic alpha air monitoring is also possible using this technology. This report details the program's accomplishments to date. Most significantly, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was successfully field demonstrated on water 100X below the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed safe drinking water limit--down to under 1 pCi/1. During the Field Test, the Alpha Monitoring Instrument successfully analyzed isotopic uranium levels on a total of five different surface water, process water, and ground water streams (the primary water types of interest to the DOE). As an example of the user demand for such an analytical instrument, a portion of the Field Test for the Alpha Monitoring Instrument was on the DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation, at two test locations in the Y-12 Site's Bear Creek Valley.

Unknown

1999-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

380

INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the impact of ionizing radiation on several types of ecosystems, atmospheric aerosol, and heavy metal. Stubos Computer Simulation of Atmospheric Pollution S. Andronopoulos Analyses & Assessment of Environmental Pollutants S. Andronopoulos ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY A. Stubos Diagnostics of Boundary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Initial optical-transition radiation measurements of the electron beam for the Boeing free-electron-laser experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential for characterization of electron beams at ? 100 MeV at the Boeing Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility by optical-transition radiation (OTR) techniques has been demonstrated as an important complement to other diagnostic means. Electron beam properties such as spatial profile and position, current intensity, emittance and energy were studied using OTR. Initial examples including transport through the 5 m wiggler and the resolution of Cherenkov radiation and spontaneous-emission radiation competitive sources are discussed.

A.H. Lumpkin; R.B. Fiorito; D.W. Rule; D.H. Dowell; W.C. Sellyey; A.R. Lowrey

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

On the Features of Radiative and Convective Regimes Under the Cumulus Cloudiness  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On the Features of Radiative and Convective Regimes On the Features of Radiative and Convective Regimes Under the Cumulus Cloudiness B. M. Koprov, V. M. Koprov, G. S. Golitsyn A.M. Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Moscow, Russia E. N. Kadygrov, A. V. Koldaev Central Aerological Observatory Dolgoprudny, Russia Introduction The study of instant temperature field transformation, convective and radiative regime perturbation within the layer of 0 to 650 m was fulfilled as caused by cloud modulation of solar radiation flux. It was made within the scope of Zvenigorod Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) experiments in 2001 and 2002. Instrumentation The equipment used: 1. Microwave temperature profiler designed in Central Aerological Observatory (CAO) and manufactured by Russian company ATTEX (Kadygrov and Pick 1998).

383

A compact pyrodetector for measuring the radiation energy of pulsed plasma light sources in the vacuum ultraviolet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A compact noise-resistant pyroelectric calorimeter has been developed in which radiation is spectrally selected by quartz and inert-gas filters. The calorimeter is ...

Bedrin, A G; Vorypaev, G G; Golubev, E M; Zhilin, A N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Measurement of DDT Fluxes from a Historically Treated Agricultural Soil in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of DDT Fluxes from a Historically Treated Agricultural Soil in Canada ... a?Data from the 10-m meteorological tower at MCRS.b?Estimated value using average solar radiation data during study period. ... Background air concentrations were measured at the Canadian Atmospheric Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) site at the Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE), approximately 30 km NW of MCRS. ...

Perihan Binnur Kurt-Karakus; Terry F. Bidleman; Ralf M. Staebler; Kevin C. Jones

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and Geometric Association Over the Tropical Western Pacific Warm Pool X. Wu National Center for Atmospheric Research (a) Boulder, Colorado...

386

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or to other data-validated radiation models. This work extends the clear-sky shortwave (SW) GCM evaluation presented by Iacono et al. (2001) to computations including clouds. The rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) SW radiation model accurately reproduces clear-sky direct beam fluxes from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer

387

Effects of oxygen concentration on radiative loss from normal-gravity and microgravity methane diffusion flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laminar diffusion flames of methane, burning in quiescent oxidizing environments at atmospheric pressure, have been studied under both normal-gravity and microgravity conditions. Radiation from these flames is measured using a wide-view-angle, thermopile detector radiometer. The oxidizer was 18, 21, and 30 percent oxygen in nitrogen. 17 refs.

Bahadori, M.Y.; Edelman, R.B.; Stocker, D.P.; Sotos, R.G.; Vaughan, D.F. (Science Applications International Corp., Torrance, CA (United States) Rockwell International Corp., Rocketdyne Div., Canoga Park, CA (United States) NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The measurement and verification of parameters of pulse electromagnetic radiation generated by a large-radius ring current  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental and analytic studies of the generation and propagation of electromagnetic radiation due to repetitive current pulses of a nanosecond duration (peak power to 1 MW, current slew rate of 3.5 A/ns) ar...

V. M. Fedorov; E. F. Lebedev; V. E. Ostashev; V. P. Tarakanov…

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The changing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing, in large measure because of gases emitted by such human activities as farming, manufacturing, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The deleterious effects are increasingly evident; they may well become worse in the years ahead. This paper discusses the pollutants and the environmental perturbations with which they are associated. The authors believe the solution to the earth's environmental problems lies in a truly global effort.

Graedel, T.E.; Crutzen, P.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Optical depth measurements by shadow-band radiometers and their uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Atmospheric Administration Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) Network, and NASA Solar Irradiance Research Network important product of Sun-photometric measurements. [According to the American Meteoro- logical Society (AMS Measurement (ARM) Program [7]. This network con- sists of 21 instruments located at the SGP Central (CF

391

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust Emissions and Measurements of Trace gas and Aerosol properties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust exhaust experiment It has previously been difficult to identify the emissions of diesel exhaust until reactive with organic compounds such as alkanes which are present in diesel exhaust emissions. The reaction

Collins, Gary S.

392

A TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF TITAN'S NORTH POLAR ATMOSPHERE FROM A SPECULAR REFLECTION OF THE SUN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cassini/VIMS T85 observations of a solar specular reflection off of Kivu Lacus (87.°4N 241.°1E) provide an empirical transmission spectrum of Titan's atmosphere. Because this observation was acquired from short range (33,000 km), its intensity makes it visible within the 2.0, 2.7, and 2.8 ?m atmospheric windows in addition to the 5 ?m window where all previous specular reflections have been seen. The resulting measurement of the total one-way normal atmospheric optical depth (corresponding to haze scattering plus haze and gas absorption) provides strong empirical constraints on radiative transfer models. Using those models, we find that the total haze column abundance in our observation is 20% higher than the Huygens equatorial value. Ours is the first measurement in the 2-5 ?m wavelength range that probes all the way to the surface in Titan's arctic, where the vast majority of surface liquids are located. The specular technique complements other probes of atmospheric properties such as solar occultations and the direct measurements from Huygens. In breaking the degeneracy between surface and atmospheric absorptions, our measured optical depths will help to drive future calculations of deconvolved surface albedo spectra.

Barnes, Jason W. [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States); Clark, Roger N. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Sotin, Christophe; Buratti, Bonnie J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ádámkovics, Máté [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Appéré, Thomas; Rodriguez, Sebastien [Laboratoire AIM, Université Paris Diderot, Paris 7/CNRS/CEA-Saclay, DSM-IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Soderblom, Jason M. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Brown, Robert H. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Baines, Kevin H. [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States); Le Mouélic, Stéphane [Laboratoire de Planétologie et Géodynamique, Université de Nantes, F-44322 Nantes (France); Nicholson, Philip D., E-mail: jwbarnes@uidaho.edu [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Ly?. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (?) has increased slightly from ? = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to ? = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Saul, L.; Wurz, P. [University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Frisch, P. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gruntman, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mueller, H. R. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Characterization of atmospheric aerosols using Synchroton radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence and Fe K-edge total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near-edge structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study a new procedure using Synchrotron total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) to characterize elemental amounts in atmospheric aerosols down to particle sizes of 0.015 um is presented. The procedure was thoroughly evaluated regarding bounce off effects and blank values. Additionally the potential of total reflection X-ray fluorescence–X-ray absorption near edge structure (SR-TXRF-XANES) for speciation of FeII/III down to amounts of 34 pg in aerosols which were collected for 1 h is shown. The aerosols were collected in the city of Hamburg with a low pressure Berner impactor on Si carriers covered with silicone over time periods of 60 and 20 min each. The particles were collected in four and ten size fractions of 10.0–8.0 ?m, 8.0–2.0 ?m, 2.0–0.13 ?m 0.13–0.015 ?m (aerodynamic particle size) and 15–30 nm, 30–60 nm, 60–130 nm, 130–250 nm, 250–500 nm, 0.5–1 ?m, 1–2 ?m, 2–4 ?m, 4–8 ?m, 8–16 ?m. Prior to the sampling “bounce off” effects on Silicone and Vaseline coated Si carriers were studied with total reflection X-ray fluorescence. According to the results silicone coated carriers were chosen for the analysis. Additionally, blank levels originating from the sampling device and the calibration procedure were studied. Blank levels of Fe corresponded to 1–10% of Fe in the aerosol samples. Blank levels stemming from the internal standard were found to be negligible. The results from the Synchroton radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of the aerosols showed that 20 min of sampling time gave still enough sample material for elemental determination of most elements. For the determination of the oxidation state of Fe in the aerosols different Fe salts were prepared as a reference from suspensions in isopropanol. The results from the Fe K-edge Synchroton radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis of the aerosol samples showed that mainly Fe(III) was present in all particle size fractions.

U.E.A. Fittschen; F. Meirer; C. Streli; P. Wobrauschek; J. Thiele; G. Falkenberg; G. Pepponi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurement and Modeling Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP B. Schmid and J. Redemann Bay Area Environmental Research Institute National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California W. P. Arnott Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada A. Bucholtz and J. Reid Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, California P. Colarco Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. Covert and R. Elleman University of Washington Seattle, Washington J. Eilers, P. Pilewskie, and A. Strawa National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames, Research Center Moffett Field, California R. A. Ferrare

396

Evaluation of Radiometric Measurements from the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR): Two- and Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Modeling of an Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Cloud Deck  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1999, NASA launched the Terra satellite. This platform carries five instruments that measure important properties of the Earth climate system. One of these instruments is the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MISR. This instrument measures light reflected from the Earth at a spatial resolution of 275-1100 m, at four wavelengths (446, 558, 672, and 866 nm), and at nine different viewing angles that vary from +70 to -70 degrees along the direction of flight [Diner et al., 2002]. These multiangle data have the potential to provide information on aerosols, surface, and cloud characteristics that compliments traditional single-view-direction satellite measurements. Before this potential can be realized, the accuracy of the satellite radiance measurements must be carefully assessed, and the implications of the radiometric accuracy on remote-sensing algorithms must be evaluated. In this article, we compare MISR multiangle measurements against two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D radiative transfer calculations from an inhomogeneous cloud scene. Inputs to the radiative transfer code are based entirely on independently gathered data (ground-based radar, lidar, microwave radiometer, in situ aircraft data, etc.). The 2-D radiative transfer calculations compare favorably near nadir and in most of the forward scattering directions, but differ by as much as 10% in the backscattering directions. Using 3-D radiative transfer modeling, we show that this difference is due to the 3-D structure of the cloud deck, including variations in the cloud top height on scales less than 275 m, which are not resolved in the 2-D simulations. Comparison of the 2-D calculations to the MISR measurements, after accounting for the 3-D structure, show residual differences that are less than 4% at all angles at the MISR blue and green wavelengths. The comparison also reveals that the MISR measurements at the red and near-infrared wavelengths are too bright relative to measurements in the blue and green bands. On the basis of the results of this study, along with results from five other comparisons, the MISR calibration is being adjusted to reduce the red and nearinfrared Radiances.

Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire-KrF laser. Part 2. Accumulation of plasma electrons and electric discharge control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of the production of extended ({approx}1 m) plasma channels is studied in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated laser pulses of UV radiation, which are a superposition of a subpicosecond USP train amplified in a regenerative KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator and a quasi-stationary lasing pulse. The USPs possess a high (0.2-0.3 TW) peak power and efficiently ionise oxygen molecules due to multiphoton ionisation, and the quasi-stationary lasing pulse, which has a relatively long duration ({approx}100 ns), maintains the electron density at a level n{sub e} = (3-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} by suppressing electron attachment to oxygen. Experiments in laser triggering of high-voltage electric discharges suggest that the use of combined pulses results in a significant lowering of the breakdown threshold and enables controlling the discharge trajectory with a higher efficiency in comparison with smooth pulses. It was shown that controlled breakdowns may develop with a delay of tens of microseconds relative to the laser pulse, which is many orders of magnitude greater than the lifetime of free electrons in the laser-induced plasma. We propose a mechanism for this breakdown, which involves speeding-up of the avalanche ionisation of the air by negative molecular oxygen ions with a low electron binding energy ({approx}0.5 eV) and a long lifetime ({approx}1 ms), which are produced upon cessation of the laser pulse. (extreme light fields and their applications)

Zvorykin, V D; Ionin, Andrei A; Levchenko, A O; Mesyats, Gennadii A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Smetanin, Igor V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Ustinovskii, N N; Shutov, A V [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Doubling of atmospheric methane supported  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric methane over the past 27,000 years was measured by analyzing air trapped in glacial ice in Greenland and Antarctica. Atmospheric concentrations were stable over that period until about 200 years b.p. In the last 200 years they have more than doubled. This change in concentration is correlated with the increase in human population; the implications for climate modification are discussed. 1 figure, 3 references.

Kerr, R.A.

1984-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

399

ARM - Measurement - Longwave spectral radiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectral radiance spectral radiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave spectral radiance The rate at which the spectrally resolved radiant energy in the longwave portion of the spectrum is emitted in a particular direction per unit area perpendicular to the direction of radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer ASSIST : Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral

400

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: â?˘ Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. â?˘ Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. â?˘ Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, a Shortwave Radiative Transfer Model for GCM Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, a Shortwave Radiative Transfer Model for General Circulation Model Applications M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Y.-T. Hou National Centers for Environmental Prediction Camp Springs, Maryland Introduction The k-distribution shortwave radiation model developed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, RRTM_SW_V2.4 (Clough et al. 2004), utilizes the discrete ordinates radiative transfer model, DISORT, for scattering calculations and 16 g-points in each of its 16 spectral bands. DISORT provides agreement with line-by-line flux calculations to within 1 Wm

403

A 3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties Derived from GOES-8 Data Over the Southern Great Plains  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties 3-Year Climatology of Cloud and Radiative Properties Derived from GOES-8 Data Over the Southern Great Plains M. M. Khaiyer, A. D. Rapp, D. R. Doelling, and M. L. Nordeen Analytical Service and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis, W. L. Smith, Jr., and L. Nguyen Atmospheric Sciences Division National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction While the various instruments maintained at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) provide detailed cloud and radiation measurements for a small area, satellite cloud property retrievals provide a means of examining the large-scale properties of the surrounding region over an extended period of time. Seasonal and inter-annual

404

Developing Model Constraints on Northern Extra-Tropical Carbon Cycling Based on measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to perform CO2 data syntheses and modeling activities to address two central questions: 1) how much has the seasonal cycle in atmospheric CO2 at northern high latitudes changed since the 1960s, and 2) how well do prognostic biospheric models represent these changes. This project also supported the continuation of the Scripps time series of CO2 isotopes and concentration at ten baseline stations distributed globally.

Keeling, Ralph [UCSD-SIO

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

The atmosphere absorbs part of the outgoing longwave energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intersecting Earth is S0 R2 · The global surface area of Earth is 4R2 · Divide the total energy rate, where R is the radius of the Earth Solar Radiation · The total energy rate for solar radiation7/20/10 1 The atmosphere absorbs part of the outgoing longwave energy Incoming solar radiation

Russell, Lynn

406

Shortwave and longwave radiative contributions to global warming under increasing CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology...Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge...enhancement of net absorbed solar radiation (ASR). A simple...balances the net absorbed solar radiation (ASR). In this...

Aaron Donohoe; Kyle C. Armour; Angeline G. Pendergrass; David S. Battisti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Research Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff NREL's resource assessment and forecasting research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation through NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center. Photo of Mary Anderberg Mary Anderberg - Scientist M.S. Physics, University of Denver B.S. Physics, Auburn University Mary performs solar radiometric data quality analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and provides programming support for the resource integration section. She also contributed to the National Solar Radiation Database update. In addition, Mary is the Web administrator of the Renewable Resource Data Center, for which she provides UNIX, C, Perl, and HTML support. Photo of AfshĂ­n Andreas AfshĂ­n Andreas - Senior Scientist

408

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Finland by M. HW1'aien et al. (1985). Further development on the MPA was performed in several countries ineluding the United States where Perez (1986) presented a method for deriving beam radiation from a series of vertically mounted pyranometers...

Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

412

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric layers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

layer model Summary: an atmosphere, using the layer model, which incorporates the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere. For now... ,atm + Idown,atm Iup, ground If radiation up and...

413

Toward the Development of Multi-Year Total and Special Solar Radiation Budgets at the Three ARM Locales  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Development of Multi-Year Total and Special the Development of Multi-Year Total and Special Solar Radiation Budgets at the Three ARM Locales Z. Li and M. C. Cribb Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Over the past decade, an unprecedented amount of high-quality observational data pertaining to atmospheric and surface parameters has been collected at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) locales around the globe. These data have been critical in the development and validation of models used to study the complex interaction of cloud, aerosols, and the surface on the solar radiative budget (SRB), the primary force driving atmospheric circulation. As the next step forward, the challenge of

414

Perception of risk: proceedings of the XVth annual meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book is a conglomerate of formal papers, discussions, and the textual minutes of a round table discussion with audience participation. The first part, and most interesting from my view-point, deals with the perception of risk or harm and societal attitudes. The second part contains papers that seem to be historical primers concerning radiobiology. This subject is surrounded by controversy, and it seems in part to be approached as an elephant would be by a tribe of blind zoologists. They poke and pinch, sometimes describe small parts in great detail, but never exactly circumscribe the object of the study. The purpose is to present a discussion of the harm due to radiation, specifically radiation from power sources. Closely related to this is the question of the regulatory agencies' role.

Goris, M.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

416

Electron density measurements of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N2 plasma jet by Stark broadening and irradiance intensity methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet excited by high frequency alternating current using nitrogen is developed and the electron density in the active region of this plasma jet is investigated by two different methods using optical emission spectroscopy Stark broadening and irradiance intensity method. The irradiance intensity method shows that the average electron density is about 1020/m3 which is slightly smaller than that by the Stark broadening method. However the trend of the change in the electron density with input power obtained by these two methods is consistent.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Summary of Breakout Sessions D. A. Randall National Center for Atmospheric Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Breakout Sessions Breakout Sessions D. A. Randall National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder CO 80307-3000 J. T. Kiehl Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Ft. Collins, CO 80523 M. Bradley Lawrence Livermore National. Laboratory Livermore, CA 94550 Discussion of Intensive Operation Periods (lOPs) The group made several recommendations for lOPs in general. One of the main points was that members of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team should be given as much advance notification as possible of planned or potential lOPs. The group also recommended that a lead scientist be appointed for each lOP. This scientist should have expertise in the topic of primary focus of the lOP. The lead scientist's main responsibility would be to make sure that the operations carried out in the lOP

418

Towards Space Solar Power - Examining Atmospheric Interactions of Power Beams with the HAARP Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the most common space solar power (SSP) system architectures, solar energy harvested by large satellites in geostationary orbit is transmitted to Earth via microwave radiation. Currently, only limited information about the interactions of microwave beams with energy densities of several tens to hundreds of W/m$^2$ with the different layers of the atmosphere is available. Governmental bodies will likely require detailed investigations of safety and atmospheric effects of microwave power beams before issuing launch licenses for SSP satellite systems. This paper proposes to collect representative and comprehensive data of the interaction of power beams with the atmosphere by extending the infrastructure of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. Estimates of the transmission infrastructure performance as well as measurement devices and scientific capabilities of possible upgrade scenarios will be discussed. The proposed upgrade of the HAARP facility is expected to d...

Leitgab, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Calibrations of filter radiometers for determination of atmospheric optical depth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric optical depths are determined by relating ground-based measurements of direct solar radiation to the extraterrestrial value, I0, that a filter radiometer would read outside the atmosphere. Usually I0 is determined by the Langley extrapolation technique from a high-altitude site, where clear and highly stable atmospheric conditions may be found. Alternatively, I0 can be measured in situ from a stratospheric balloon experiment. We have employed both methods and found agreement to better than 1 %. Filter radiometers tend to change over time, especially when used operationally outdoors. Absolute calibrations in the laboratory are used to monitor the radiometric stability of filter radiometers at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD/WRC, Switzerland). A spectral calibration facility based on a calibrated trap detector from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany) is used to relate the filter radiometer to an accurate and long-term traceable standard. An FEL-lamp-based standard, previously used for several years, was compared with the new trap standard via a filter radiometer at four wavelengths between 368 nm and 862 nm and revealed a systematic difference of the order of 5 %. The link between radiometric and I0 calibration is the value of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum at the filter radiometer wavelengths which can be determined from these two calibrations and compared with published values.

Ch Wehrli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

422

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

423

The Effect of Gas Absorption on the Scattered Radiation in the Solar Almucantar: Results of Numerical Simulation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Absorption on the Gas Absorption on the Scattered Radiation in the Solar Almucantar: Results of Numerical Simulation T. Yu. Chesnokova, K. M. Firsov, I. M. Nasrtdinov, S. M. Sakerin, V. V. Veretennikov, and T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The methods for reconstruction of the aerosol optical characteristics (e.g., aerosol size distribution, and single-scattering albedo) from diffuse and direct radiation measured in the solar almucantar has been widely used during the last decade. The photometers with filters in the "atmospheric transparency windows" in the wavelength range 0.4 to 1 m were applied for measurements. Usually it was assumed that one could neglect the molecular absorption of the measured diffuse radiation. Further development

424

Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment A. B. White Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado C. W. Fairall National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Research Laboratories Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX), conducted in June 1992, was designed with the broad goal of improving the dynamical, radiative, and microphysical models of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds. This goal was pursued by combining measurements from a number of different platforms including aircraft,

425

Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

localization that limits the present measurements. The knowledge thus gained will have input not only to fusion research, but to may ques- tions of basic plasma physics....

426

Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the Department of Physics & Astronomy. Chapel Hill 2005 Approved: A. E. Champagne, Advisor J. C. Blackmon, Reader C. Iliadis, Reader ABSTRACT Ryan P. Fitzgerald: Measurement of...

427

Radon-222 Daughter Concentrations in Uranium Mine Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... undertaken to measure the concentrations of 210Pb and 210Po in uranium mine atmospheres at various radon daughter concentration levels, and to determine the amount of 210Pb in the mine atmosphere ... atmosphere relative to that which would be produced from the decay of the short-lived radon daughters deposited in the lungs. Radium-226 was also measured in air so as ...

RICHARD L. BLANCHARD

1969-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

Integrated Study of MFRSR-derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facili...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Study of MFRSR-Derived Parameters of Integrated Study of MFRSR-Derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facilities - Comparison with Satellite and Other Ground-Based Measurements M. D. Alexandrov and B. Cairns Columbia University National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York A. A. Lacis and B. E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Comparison of SGP MFRSR Network Aerosol Retrievals with MODIS Aerosol Product The network of Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site consists of 21 instrument sites

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric sulfate studies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PARTICLES T. Onasch, J... 1999 Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 13-17, 1999. Ammoniated sulfate particles are prevalent... the radiative properties of the atmosphere by...

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric test site Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atmospheric test site Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 METR 4233 Physical Meteorology III: Radiation and...

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheres final project Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 10 A new one-dimensional radiative equilibrium model for investigating atmospheric Summary: ) into equation (2.26)...

432

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric stability trends Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Global Warming Energy Balance Summary: qualitatively using the two concepts: Greenhouse effect: natural, beneficial consequence of an atmosphere Global... : Types of Radiation...

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric transparency studies Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Global Warming Energy Balance Summary: qualitatively using the two concepts: Greenhouse effect: natural, beneficial consequence of an atmosphere Global... : Types of Radiation...

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol characterisation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 4, 2004 Abstract Atmospheric aerosol particles scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation and... of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No....

435

What we can learn from atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics potential of future measurements of atmospheric neutrinos is explored. Observation of $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ driven sub-dominant effects and $\\theta_{13}$ driven large matter effects in atmospheric neutrinos can be used to study the deviation of $\\theta_{23}$ from maximality and its octant. Neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined extremely well due to the large matter effects. New physics can be constrained both in standard atmospheric neutrino experiments as well as in future neutrino telescopes.

Sandhya Choubey

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

437

Radiation protection and measurement issues related to cargo scanning with accelerator-produced high-energy X rays, NCRP Commentary No. 20  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......December 2008 book-review Book Review Radiation protection...technology in the current regulatory environment. The Introduction...radiation protection plan. Although there is not...radiation protection plan, the information can......

Robert May

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Temperature measurement of an atmospheric pressure arc discharge plasma jet using the diatomic CN (B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}, violet system) molecular spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CN (B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) molecular emission spectrum is used to measure both the vibrational and rotational temperatures in atmospheric pressure arc jet discharges. The vibrational and rotational temperature effects on the synthetic diatomic molecular spectra were investigated from the (v{sup '},v{sup ''})=(0,0) band to the (5,5) band. The temperatures obtained from the synthetic spectra compared with the experimental result of a low-frequency arc discharge show a vibrational temperature of (4250-5010) K and a rotational temperature of (3760-3980) K for the input power in the range of (80-280) W. As the (0,0) band is isolated from other vibrational transition bands, determination of the rotational temperature is possible based only on the (0,0) band, which simplifies the temperature measurement. From the result, it was found that the CN molecular spectrum can be used as a thermometer for atmospheric pressure plasmas containing carbon and nitrogen.

Moon, Se Youn; Kim, D. B.; Gweon, B.; Choe, W. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Instrument Development and Measurements of the Atmospheric Pollutants Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrate Radical, and Nitrous Acid by Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy and Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. , A method of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxidedetermination of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide in theDOAS) have measured nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitrate

Medina, David Salvador

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Measurements of photon ionizing radiation fields in the reactor room of the 4th power-generating unit of the chernobyl nuclear power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radiation examination of the reactor room of the damaged fourth unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was performed. The most strongly radiating surfaces...

A. G. Volkovich; V. N. Potapov; S. V. Smirnov; L. I. Urutskoev…

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation measurement atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Spectral behavior of the coupled land-atmosphere system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of this thesis is to understand the daily cycle of the energy coupling between the land and the atmosphere in response to a forcing of incoming radiation at their common boundary, the land surface. This ...

Gentine, Pierre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Middle-Atmosphere Hadley Circulation and Equatorial Inertial Adjustment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the tropical middle atmosphere the climatological radiative equilibrium temperature is inconsistent with gradient-wind balance and the available angular momentum, especially during solstice seasons. Adjustment toward a balanced state results ...

Kirill Semeniuk; Theodore G. Shepherd

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations S. Kato Center for Atmospheric Sciences Hampton University Hampton, Virginia Introduction Recent development of remote sensing instruments by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM?) Program provides information of spatial and temporal variability of cloud structures. However it is not clear what cloud properties are required to express complicated cloud fields in a realistic way and how to use them in a relatively simple one-dimensional (1D) radiative transfer model to compute the domain averaged irradiance. To address this issue, a simple shortwave radiative transfer model that can treat the vertical cloud optical property correlation is developed. The model is based on the gamma-weighted

444

Radiation effects on humans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

445

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Title Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors de Boer, Gijs, William D. Collins, Surabi Menon, and Charles N. Long Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 11 Start Page 11937 Pagination 11937-11949 Abstract Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

446

Distribution of Radiation Density in a Homogeneous Cloudy Laye  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia The program block (Monte-Carlo method) allowing calculating radiation density in...

447

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 8629EEC7C72DEEE5.1256/qj.05.87 Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation By S. POLAVARAPU1,2, T. G. SHEPHERD2 Data assimilation is employed at operational weather forecast centres to combine measurements and model

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

448

The Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... MEASUREMENTS of the radon content of the atmosphere were made so long ago as 1905 by Eve1-2 in ... whole seemed to support the original suggestion of Elster and Geitel6 in 1903 that the radon in the atmosphere arises mainly from the soil. These workers noted that the highest ...

W. ANDERSON; W. V. MAYNEORD; R. C. TURNER

1954-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

449

Experimental measurements of multiphoton enhanced air breakdown by a subthreshold intensity excimer laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

laser Jesse Way,a Jason Hummelt, and John Scharer Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering measurements of laser induced breakdown plasma in atmospheric air by subthreshold intensity 5.5 109 W/cm2 193 nm laser radiation. Using molecular spectroscopy and two-wavelength interferometry, it is shown

Scharer, John E.

450

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing radiation dose Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of radiation; radiation measurement; and dose information. ATOMS... Assessments, DOETIC-11026. RADIATION Radiation, or radiant energy, is energy in the form of waves... )...

451

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, Illinois Introduction Improving the representation of cloud-radiation interaction is a major challenge for the global climate simulation. The development of cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and the extensive Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARMs) provide a unique opportunity for shading some lights on this problem. Current general circulation models (GCMs) predict cloud cover fractions and hydrometeor concentra- tions only in individual model layers, where clouds are assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in a

452

Radiative–Convective Equilibrium over a Land Surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiative–convective equilibrium (RCE) describes an idealized state of the atmosphere in which the vertical temperature profile is determined by a balance between radiative and convective fluxes. While RCE has been applied extensively over oceans, ...

Nicolas Rochetin; Benjamin R. Lintner; Kirsten L. Findell; Adam H. Sobel; Pierre Gentine

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Incorporating biologic measurements (SF2, CFE) into a tumor control probability model increases their prognostic significance: a study in cervical carcinoma treated with radiation therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess whether incorporation of measurements of surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) and colony-forming efficiency (CFE) into a tumor control probability (tcp) model increases their prognostic significance. Methods and Materials: Measurements of SF2 and CFE were available from a study on carcinoma of the cervix treated with radiation alone. These measurements, as well as tumor volume, dose, and treatment time, were incorporated into a Poisson tcp model (tcp?,?). Regression analysis was performed to assess the prognostic power of tcp?,? vs. the use of either tcp models with biologic parameters fixed to best-fit estimates (but incorporating individual dose, volume, and treatment time) or the use of SF2 and CFE measurements alone. Results: In a univariate regression analysis of 44 patients, tcp?,? was a better prognostic factor for both local control and survival (p CFE alone (p = 0.015 for local control, p = 0.38 for survival). In multivariate analysis, tcp?,? emerged as the most important prognostic factor for local control (p CFE was still a significant independent prognostic factor for local control, whereas SF2 was not. The sensitivities of tcp?,? and SF2 as predictive tests for local control were 87% and 65%, respectively. Specificities were 70% and 77%, respectively. Conclusions: A Poisson tcp model incorporating individual SF2, CFE, dose, tumor volume, and treatment time was found to be the best independent prognostic factor for local control and survival in cervical carcinoma patients.

Francesca Meteora Buffa; Susan E. Davidson; Robert D. Hunter; Alan E. Nahum; Catharine M.L. West

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A Global Climatology of Outgoing Longwave Spectral Cloud Radiative Effect and Associated Effective Cloud Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Longwave (LW) spectral flux and cloud radiative effect (CRE) are important for understanding the earth’s radiation budget and cloud–radiation interaction. Here, the authors extend their previous algorithms to collocated Atmospheric Infrared ...

Xianglei Huang; Xiuhong Chen; Gerald L. Potter; Lazaros Oreopoulos; Jason N. S. Cole; Dongmin Lee; Norman G. Loeb

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

456

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 37, NO. 3, MAY 1999 1597 First Results of the POLDER "Earth Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- atmosphere system. Algorithms of the "Earth Radiation Budget and Clouds" processing line implemented thickness retrieval. As expected, a water droplet model is suitable for liquid water clouds and inadequate is derived from O2-absorption measurements and a Rayleigh cloud pressure from polarization observations

Boyer, Edmond

457

P8.13 CONTRAIL STUDIES AND FORECASTS IN THE SUBARCTIC ATMOSPHERE ABOVE FAIRBANKS, Martin Stuefer* and Gerd Wendler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the radiative characteristics of contrails are similar to those of thin layers of naturally occurring cirrus are of interest for scientists investigating atmospheric radiation transfer processes, the chemical state of temperatures in the lower atmosphere by reducing the net radiation to the surface during the day and reducing

Stuefer, Martin

458

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

459

Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the accuracy of European weather forecasts. Today, they provide a unique base for studies of atmospheric levels. Measurements in the free troposphere (FT) are particularly useful, because trace gas and particle

Honrath, Richard E.

460

Radioactivity and Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

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461

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

462

The BOOMERANG North America Instrument: A Balloon-borne Bolometric Radiometer Optimized for Measurements of Cosmic Background Radiation Anisotropies from 03 to 4°  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the BOOMERANG North America instrument, a balloon-borne bolometric radiometer designed to map the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation with 03 resolution over a significant portion of the sky. This receiver employs new technologies in bolometers, readout electronics, millimeter-wave optics and filters, cryogenics, scan, and attitude reconstruction. All these subsystems are described in detail in this paper. The system has been fully calibrated in flight using a variety of techniques, which are described and compared. Using this system, we have obtained a measurement of the first peak in the CMB angular power spectrum in a single, few hour long balloon flight. The instrument described here was a prototype of the BOOMERANG Long Duration Balloon experiment.

F. Piacentini; P. A. R. Ade; R. S. Bhatia; J. J. Bock; A. Boscaleri; P. Cardoni; B. P. Crill; P. de Bernardis; H. Del Castillo; G. De Troia; P. Farese; M. Giacometti; E. F. Hivon; V. V. Hristov; A. Iacoangeli; A. E. Lange; S. Masi; P. D. Mauskopf; L. Miglio; C. B. Netterfield; P. Palangio; E. Pascale; A. Raccanelli; S. Rao; G. Romeo; J. Ruhl; F. Scaramuzzi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463