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1

Contact SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hill Road, MS 99 Menlo Park, CA 94025 Tel: 650-926-4000 Fax: 650-926-4100 SSRL Director Kelly Gaffney, SSRL Director Tel. 650-926-2382 Piero Pianetta, SSRL Deputy Director Tel:...

2

SSRL Users' Organization | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

concerned with representing the interests of the SSRL users (see Charter). Users elect members to serve on the Users' Executive Committee (UEC) to carry out the business of...

3

SSRL SMB Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SMB Program SMB Program SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology program operates as a integrated resource and has three primary areas (or cores) of technological research and development and scientific focus: macromolecular crystallography (MC), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and small angle x-ray scattering/diffraction (SAXS). Central to the core technological developments in all three of these areas is the development and utilization of improved detectors and instrumentation, especially to be able to take maximum advantage of the increasingly high brightness of SSRL's storage ring (SPEAR3). There is also research and development in new methods - in techniques and instrumentation development and deployment. Included is the use of enhanced computing and data

4

Radioactive Materials at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials at SSRL Radioactive Materials at SSRL Contact Information SSRL Safety Officer (650) 926-3861 SSRL Radiation Protection Group (650) 926-4299 SSRLRadMat@SLAC.STANFORD.EDU Throughout the course of an SSRL Experimental Run, there are requests from users to transport and use small amounts of radioactive material in their experiments, either as stand alone samples or in a matrix of other materials. There is no minimum quantity for declaring the use of radioactive samples at SSRL. The purpose of this procedure is to enable Users, SSRL and SLAC staff to know what radiological controls will be implemented for these materials, based on the isotope, its toxicity risk and radiological controls. Radioactive materials at SSRL are classified into 4 classification Groups based on the radiotoxicity tables, see below.

5

Data Management at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management at SSRL Management at SSRL SSRL Users are responsible for meeting the Data Management obligations of their home institutions and granting agencies. In general, SSRL provides data acquisition systems (computers/software) and short term data storage on all of its beam lines. The beam line computers are connected to central servers via a high speed network, and data are transferred to these servers for backup and short-term storage. SSRL does not provide long term storage or archiving of data; users must generally transfer their data to their home institutions over the network or to their own portable storage devices. Individual beam lines may have specific resources and data management practices to help users meet their data management needs and obligations. Users should consult beam line staff when formulating data management plans

6

SSRL Experimental Run Schedule | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experimental Run Schedule Experimental Run Schedule SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be closed for the winter holidays, December 21, 2013 through January 5, 2014. SSRL generally operates November through August, using the shutdown period for upgrades and maintenance projects. SSRL operates at 500mA and employs a frequent fill schedule to maintain the SPEAR3 current approximately constant. Automatic injections will be conducted every 5 minutes. Automatic injections will only occur at the designated 5 minute intervals (i.e., on the hour and every 5 minutes thereafter). If the injector is not functional at the designated fill time, then the fill will be skipped. The current will be replenished at the next scheduled fill time after the injector is repaired and normal injection intervals will resume. The operator will give

7

SSRL Beam Lines by Number | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Number Number SSRL Beam Line Map | Beam Lines by Techniques | SPEAR3 Parameters BL Type Source Supported Technique(s) Energy Range Status Contacts 1-4 X-ray Bend Small angle x-ray scattering 7100-9000 eV Limited Chris Tassone Mike Toney 1-5 X-ray Bend Thin film diffraction 6000-14500 eV Limited Chad Miller 2-1 X-ray Bend Powder diffraction Thin film diffraction 4000-15800 eV Open Chad Miller Apurva Mehta 2-2 X-ray Bend White light station Instrumentation Development 1000-40000 eV Limited Bart Johnson 2-3 X-ray Bend X-ray absorption spectroscopy imaging 4500-24000 eV Open Sam Webb Ben Kocar 4-1 X-ray Wiggler X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy 6500-30000 eV Open John Bargar Matthew Latimer Ryan Davis 4-2 X-ray Wiggler Biological solution small angle x-ray scattering

8

SSRL Beam Lines by Technique | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technique Technique SSRL Beam Line Map | Beam Lines by Number | SPEAR3 Parameters Supported Technique(s) Beam Line X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Biological x-ray absorption spectroscopy 4-3, 7-3, 9-3, 14-3 Materials / catalysis / chemistry x-ray absorption spectroscopy 4-1, 4-3, 11-2, 14-3 MEIS x-ray absorption spectroscopy 4-1, 4-3, 11-2, 14-3 X-ray absorption spectroscopy imaging 2-3, 6-2a, 10-2a,14-3 Single crystal x-ray absorption spectroscopy 9-3 Grazing incidence x-ray absorption spectroscopy 11-2 Tender x-ray absorption spectroscopy 4-3, 14-3 Tender x-ray absorption spectroscopy imaging 14-3 Photoemission spectroscopy 8-1a, 8-1b, 8-2, 10-1, 13-2 X-ray absorption spectroscopy, near edge, soft energy 8-2, 10-1, 13-2 Elliptic polarization, soft energy photoemission spectroscopy 13-2

9

History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project...

10

Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

content Skip to search content Skip to search SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE Stanford SLAC SSRL LCLS AD PPA SUNCAT PULSE SIMES Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource An Office of Science User Facility Home About SSRL What is SSRL? Director's Office Organization Advisory Panels History SSRL News SSRL News and Events Science Highlights Press Releases SSRL Newsletter Photon Science Seminars SSRL Presents User Resources User Resources User Portal Schedules Deadlines Forms & Applications Beam Lines Beam Lines Map By Number By Technique Photon Source Parameters SPEAR3 Status Science at SSRL Science at SSRL Science Highlights Photon Science Faculty SSRL Imaging Group SSRL SMB Program Publications Publications & Reports SSRL Headline News SSRL Fact Sheet SSRL Brochure SLAC Discovery Brochure SPEAR3 SPEAR3

11

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN: 2013 - 2018 MEETING THE SCIENTIFIC CHALLENGES OF THE FUTURE FEBRUARY 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2 Synchrotron Radiation - A Unique Tool .................................................................................................................. 1 3 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource .......................................................................................................... 3 3.1 Looking into the Future: Building a New User Facility Paradigm at SSRL ....................................................... 4

12

SSRL HEADLINES July 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of SSRL: Collaboration and Community Chi-Chang Kao As the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource reaches the end of our FY2011 operational run - the last experiments...

13

User Facility Access Policy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Access Policy Facility Access Policy 1. Summary The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science national user facility that provides synchrotron radiation to researchers in many fields of science and technology, including biology, catalysis, chemistry, energy, engineering, forensics, geoscience, materials science, medicine, molecular environmental science, and physics. With a pioneering start in 1974, the facility was upgraded to a state-of-the-art third generation lightsource in 2004, providing major improvements in emittance, ring current and new or upgraded beam lines. SSRL's research programs include both the x-ray and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. SSRL is primarily supported by the DOE Offices of Basic Energy Sciences

14

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantification of the Mercury Adsorption Mechanism on Brominated Activated Carbon August 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida Figure Emissions from coal-fired power plants are...

15

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Elements of Stroke SSRL Science Summary - September 2012 Figure 1. Correlation between XRF iron maps and MR imaging. Ischemic lesions are outlined. Rapid diagnosis and...

16

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Competing Phases Found in High-Temperature Superconductor December 2012 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure larger image Although the...

17

SSRL Director Appointment Announcement | Stanford Synchrotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), I am very pleased to announce that Kelly Gaffney, a faculty member in the SLAC Photon Science Department and a member of the...

18

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure of the DUF2233 Domain in Bacteria and the Stuttering-associated UCE Glycoprotein July 2013 SSRL Science Summary (adapted from SLAC News Feature by Glennda Chui) Figure...

19

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure A single reconstructed slice and a volume rendering of the tomography sequence. Energy storage materials, such as batteries, are of increasing importance in the modern world. They support the storage and distribution of electricity generated by different mechanisms, enabling the use of green power sources when the resource itself is unavailable (for example, solar energy at night or wind energy on a calm day). Such devices also provide energy portability for consumer electronics and zero-emission options for transportation, in either hybrid or fully-electric vehicles. Many impressive battery technologies exist today, but the understanding of their operation is somewhat limited, which makes it very challenging to improve

20

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

," or PETE, could reduce the costs of solar energy production enough for it to compete with oil as an energy and molecular level. As one of five light sources funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, SSRL enables research that benefits every sector of the American economy and leads to major advances

Kay, Mark A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using X-rays to Find an Evolutionary Step in the Origin of Oxygenic Using X-rays to Find an Evolutionary Step in the Origin of Oxygenic Photosynthesis July 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis approximately 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago revolutionized life on Earth. For most modern-day terrestrial life, oxygen has become indispensable. At the heart of oxygenic photosynthesis is the production of oxygen from water - a process mediated by the water-splitting manganese cluster of Photosystem II. Little is known about how oxygenic photosynthesis originally evolved, although some have hypothesized a manganese-oxidizing photosystem as a precursor step. Researchers from the California Institute of Technology, SSRL, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have now found geological

22

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Element-Specific and Real-Time Observation of CO-Ru Chemisorption Bond Element-Specific and Real-Time Observation of CO-Ru Chemisorption Bond Breaking with Soft X-ray Spectroscopy March 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure An international collaboration of scientists, including several from SSRL, has taken advantage of the broad range of photon science capabilities available at the lab to investigate a proposal that adsorption and desorption of a molecule to a surface - both fundamental processes of interfacial chemistry - proceed through a transient "precursor" state in which the molecule is weakly bound to the surface. Their research focused on carbon monoxide adsorption/desorption on metal surfaces; although a large number of spectroscopic studies have been devoted to this reaction,

23

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watching Ions Hop in Superionic Nanomaterials Watching Ions Hop in Superionic Nanomaterials March 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure For the first time, ultrafast x-ray scattering and spectroscopic measurements carried out at SSRL, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) captured the atomic-level dynamics of a superionic nanocrystal as it transformed. Superionic materials are multi-component solids which can simultaneously display characteristics of both a solid and a liquid: Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one atomic species in the material exhibits liquid-like ionic conductivities and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Applications such as electrochemical storage materials and resistive

24

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-rays Illuminate Frustrated Materials X-rays Illuminate Frustrated Materials SSRL Science Summary - August 2012 Figure 1. Two sets of Cu spin orientations on a hexagon from the honeycomb lattice; either the "green" or "blue" set of spins describe the magnetic arrangement at a given time, illustrating that there is no preferred spin orientation; i.e the spins are "frustrated". Credit: Satoru Nakatsuji, University of Tokyo The electronic, spin, and ionic structures of closely packed atoms in solids are strongly co-dependent and interactions of these three lattices, whether innate or due to subtle manipulation, can cause exotic properties to emerge. The strong coupling among these lattices can also suppress a physical property through "frustration," the term for an incompatibility of

25

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Botulinum Neurotoxin is Bio-shielded by NTNHA in a Handshake Complex Botulinum Neurotoxin is Bio-shielded by NTNHA in a Handshake Complex SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure A single reconstructed slice and a volume rendering of the tomography sequence. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) invade motor neurons at their junctions with muscular tissue, where the toxins disable the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and subsequently paralyze the affected muscles. Accidental BoNT poisoning primarily occurs through ingestion of food products contaminated by Clostridium botulinum, the bacterium that produces BoNTs. However, BoNTs by themselves are fragile and sensitive to low pH environments and digestive proteases. So how do they survive the harsh environment of the host's gastrointestinal tract? Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Research Institute and the Medical School of

26

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Illuminating the Multiconfigurational Ground State of Elemental and Illuminating the Multiconfigurational Ground State of Elemental and Intermetallic Compounds of Uranium and Plutonium SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure Resonant x-ray emission spectra of actinide metals: Spectra show the emitted photon intensity as a function of the incident photon beam energy, EI, and the transfer energy, ET. Upper panel shows a sharp resonance dominated by a single uranium valence configuration. Bottom panel shows the broader resonance for the ground-state phase of elemental plutonium that is made up of differing amounts of three resonances = three valences. The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of U and Pu elements and intermetallics remain poorly understood despite decades of effort, and currently represent an important scientific frontier toward understanding

27

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories In recognition of the nation's expanding need to engage businesses and universities in the areas of commercial and basic science research, the Department of Energy has developed two special types of agreements for use at all DOE National Laboratories with approved designated user facilities, see http://www.gc.doe.gov/1002.htm. User Agreements All user experiments must be run under the terms of a User Agreement executed by the appropriate institutional officer(s) at your institution and their counterpart at Stanford University. A single User Agreement covers all experimenters from that institution (User Institution = "user"). Collaborators who are not coming to SSRL do not require a User Agreement.

28

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Long-sought Structure of α-Catenin Defines Its Functions for Cell-cell The Long-sought Structure of α-Catenin Defines Its Functions for Cell-cell Interactions June 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Full-length α-catenin crystal structure reveals its dimeric asymmetric arrangement. The individual domains are colored individually (dimerization domain in yellow, vinculin binding domain in green, M-fragment in cyan, and the F-actin binding domain in magenta). A: View onto the vinculin binding domains. B: View onto the dimerization domains. Cell-cell interactions play an important role in the development, architecture, maintenance, and function of tissues in all higher organisms. Cells use specialized protein complexes to bind each other. These complexes define the attachment sites known as adherens junctions and consist of

29

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Examination of Microdamage in Sheep Cortical Bone Nanoscale Examination of Microdamage in Sheep Cortical Bone April 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Lead-uranyl acetate staining of damage morphologies in notched bone samples. (A, B) Staining of lacunae and canaliculi in the compressive region seen in 20 of the 23 samples; (C, D) Cross hatching damage around notch tip in the tensile region observed in 10 of 23 samples; (E, F) Crack propagating from notch tip in the tensile region in a single sample. Staining appears white due to high attenuation of lead-uranyl acetate, with bone tissue appearing grey and voids black. Scale bar: A,C,E = 50 μm; B,D,F = 5 μm. Sample created in the longitudinal plane of the bone.] An important factor contributing to bone fractures is the accumulation of

30

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structural Basis of Wnt Recognition by Frizzled Structural Basis of Wnt Recognition by Frizzled SSRL Science Summary - September 2012 Figure 1. XWnt8 has an unusual two-domain structure. Wnts are a family of signaling proteins that regulate the development and growth of an organism, as well as tissue regeneration and wound healing. Misregulated Wnt signaling is associated with the development of many types of cancers, including colon cancer, breast cancer and melanoma, and degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Type 2 diabetes. Understanding of how Wnt proteins bind and activate Frizzled receptors is important for the development of effective anti-Wnt and anti-Frizzled drugs for the treatment of Wnt-related disease. To understand how Wnts function, a team of researchers from Stanford

31

SSRL Deadlines | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deadlines Deadlines Beam Time Requests - See How to Request Beam Time Due Dates X-ray / VUV (Submit in User Portal) November - February scheduling August 15 February - May scheduling November 15 May - July scheduling February 20 Macromolecular Crystallography (MC) (Submit in User Portal) November - February scheduling September 15 March - May scheduling January 22 June - July scheduling April 20 New Proposals & Extension Requests - See Proposal & Scheduling Guidelines Due Dates X-ray / VUV (Submit in User Portal) Beam time eligibility beginning in November June 1 Beam time eligibility beginning in February September 3 Beam time eligibility beginning in May December 1 Macromolecular Crystallography (Submit in User Portal) Beam time eligibility beginning November July 1

32

SSRL Imaging Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a wider range with full resolution. The incoming beam is focused using a capillary condenser, forming hollow cone illumination. It is capable of Zernike phase contrast at both...

33

SSRL Presents Series | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Presents Series Presents Series Date Seminar Title 11/20/2013 Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity 11/20/2013 Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity 10/24/2013 Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of Bimetallic Nanocatalysts by Fast Electrons 10/09/2013 New developments with SDD detectors 09/25/2013 X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the complex compounds 09/09/2013 Dopant Site Determination in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Utilizing X-ray Absorption Techniques 08/21/2013 Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability with Metal Poisoning within an Individual Catalyst Particle using X-ray Microscopy 08/12/2013 Lensless Imaging of Atomic Surface Structures via Ptychography 08/09/2013 The Best of Both Worlds: Bulk Diamond Properties Realized at the Nanoscale

34

Director's Office | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Director's Office Kelly Gaffney, SSRL Director Chi-Chang Kao, Associate Laboratory Director Kelly Gaffney, SSRL Director Email: Kelly Gaffney, SLAC Associate Laboratory Director...

35

Advisory Panels | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is broadly concerned with representing the interests of the SSRL user community. Users elect members to serve a formal organizational unit, the SSRL Users Executive Committee...

36

Scientific Advisory Committee | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientific Advisory Committee Scientific Advisory Committee » SAC DOCUMENTS 2013 Role and Charter of the SSRL SAC Scope The SSRL Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) reports to and advises the SSRL Director on issues related to: Operation of SSRL as a scientific user facility Planning, construction and operation of new SSRL facilities Long-term scientific directions of SSRL Membership and Officers SAC consists of 12 external members, and representatives from the following SSRL committees serve on the SAC in an Ex Officio capacity Co-Chairs of the SSRL Proposal Review Panel (PRP) Chair of the Structural Molecular Biology Advisory Committee (SMBAC) Chair of the SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee (SSRLUOEC SAC members are appointed by the SSRL Director for 3-year terms, with one third of the members rotating off and being replaced every year

37

Staff Resources | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Staff Resources Staff Resources General Online Time and Effort System (online form) SSRL Weekly Reports Beam Line Coordination Minutes SLAC BIS Home Page SLAC only (forms, property purchasing, and more) Administrative Contacts SSRL General Phonelist SSRL Organizational Chart BL Ops Staff Support Website (VMS log in) Mailing List Management (SSRL only) - Login SLAC Budget Office SLAC only (petty cash info) SLAC Conference Rooms SLAC Staff Resources SLAC/SSRL Tours - contact SSRL Building Manager, Administration and SLAC Security. Requisitions & Property SLAC Shipper Request PeopleSoft Procurement Requisitions (training required) Offsite Property Use Form New Vendor Request Computing SLAC e-mail on the Web SLAC Unix password SSRL Computer Network Group SSRL Computing Help Request Form

38

Top-Off Injection and Higher Currents at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a 234 m circumference storage ring for 3 GeV electrons with its synchrotron radiation serving currently 13 beamlines with about 27 experimental stations. It operated for long time with 100 mA peak current provided by usually three injections per day. In July 2009, the maximum beam current was raised to 200 mA. Over the period from June 2009 to March 2010, Top-Off operation started at every beamline. Top-Off, i.e., the injection of electrons into the storage ring with injection stoppers open, is necessary for SSRL to reach its design current of 500 mA. In the future, the maximal power of the injection current will also soon be raised from currently 1.5 W to 5 W. The Radiation Protection Department at SLAC worked with SSRL on the specifications for the safety systems for operation with Top-Off injection and higher beam currents.

Bauer, Johannes M.; Liu, James C.; Prinz, Alyssa A.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; ,

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Proposal Review Panel | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Review Panel Proposal Review Panel Submitting a proposal is the first step to access beam time at SSRL. Proposals are peer reviewed and rated by the SSRL Proposal Review Panel (PRP) on a scale from 1 (highest) to 5 (lowest). Successful proposals are eligble to request and may be awarded beam time on SSRL beam lines, with priority given to the highest rated proposals and those which demonstrate efficient and productive use of beam time. We have three proposal calls per year with one on-site PRP meeting at SSRL annually. Access Policy The work of the PRP is accomplished with four subpanels: BIO - The biology panel reviews proposals requesting beam time for imaging, X-ray spectroscopic studies, small-angle scattering experiments, and crystallography of biologically important samples.

40

Computer Networking Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Networking Group Networking Group Do you need help? For assistance please submit a CNG Help Request ticket. CNG Logo Chris Ramirez SSRL Computer and Networking Group Manager (650) 926-2901 | email Jerry Camuso SSRL Computer and Networking (650) 926-2994 | email Networking Support The Networking group provides connectivity and communications services for SSRL. The services provided by the Networking Support Group include: Local Area Network support for cable and wireless connectivity. Installation and maintenance of network printers and queues. Telephony installations and support. Printing Support The Networking group provides printer maintenance and support for SSRL Beamline Printers and plotters. The following models are supported: HP - Designjet large format plotters HP - Color and B/W Laserjet, Inkjet, Deskjet, Officejet

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Emergency Exit Maps | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emergency Exit Maps SSRL Exit Maps Exit map 219 exit map trailer 274 exit map 450 trailers exit map trailer 271 exit map trailer 270 exit map trailer 294 exit maps 118 & 117 exit...

42

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

43

PEP-X at SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Stanford University | SLAC | SSRL | PEP-II PEP-X PEP-II Gun Hall Workers PEP-X Wants to Hear from You With input from users, SSRL is developing the scientific case to define how PEP-X will enable the U.S. and international research community to address the grand scientific challenges of the future. You can become a part of this exciting process by sharing your ideas with us. Just contact the following individuals who are leading the brainstorming sessions to help envision future experiments that could be done at PEP-X that now cannot be done elsewhere: Hard X-rays Uwe Bergmann (bergmann@slac.stanford.edu) Soft X-rays Donghui Lu (dhlu@slac.stanford.edu) Structural Biology Hiro Tsuruta (tsuruta@slac.stanford.edu)

44

Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Using r-Space Phase Information in EXAFS to Characterize Possible Off-center Displacements in PbTe Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Structure of Chinese Herbal-based Medicine Captured by ATP on a Human tRNA Synthetase Previous Pause Next Supporting the User Community ginter Register Submit Proposals Request Beam Time Check-In Visiting scientists ("users") from universities, industries and laboratories around the world use SSRL experimental facilities to conduct experiments across a broad range of scientific, engineering, and environmental disciplines. Our Experimental Facilities SPEAR Plot Click for Full Status Beam Lines Labs Schedules

45

Experimental Equipment | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Equipment Equipment SSRL plans the distribution of its limited equipment on the basis of the information supplied on the Beam Time Request Form and the User Support Requirements Form. Please make sure to state all of your needs. Standard X-Ray Station Equipment Standard equipment to be found on an x-ray station includes: (1 ea.) Small and large ionization chambers (1) Exit slits (1) X-Y sample positioner (3) Keithly 427 current-to-voltage amplifier TEK 2215 60 MHZ 2 channel scope Voltage-to-frequency converter (3 channels) (1) Fluke high voltage power supply (1) Kinetic Systems hex scaler (1) Kinetic Systems up-down presettable counter (1) Ortec real-time clock (2) Joerger stepping motor controller DSP Micro VAX or Kinetic Systems G.I./CAMAC crate controller (1) Standard Engineering Corporation CAMAC power supply

46

SLAC Lightsource User Access Guidelines and Agreement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lightsource User Access Guidelines & Agreement Lightsource User Access Guidelines & Agreement August 3, 2011 SLAC-I-030-306-001-00-R002 1 SLAC Lightsource User Access Guidelines and Agreement LCLS / SSRL User Research Administration approval (signature/date): LCLS Safety Office approval (signature/date): SSRL Safety Office approval (signature/date): XFO Operations approval (signature/date): Revision Record Revision Date Revised Section(s) Affected Description of Change R001 October 4 th , 2010 User Form Updated SLAC Lightsource User Access Agreement Form R000 Sept 14, 2009 Original Release SLAC Lightsource User Access Guidelines & Agreement August 3, 2011 SLAC-I-030-306-001-00-R002 1 SLAC LIGHTSOURCE USER ACCESS GUIDELINES & AGREEMENT Introduction Welcome to SSRL and LCLS, SLAC's lightsource user facilities. We hope that your stay here will be

47

Photon Source Parameters | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Photon Source Parameters SSRL Beam Line Map | Beam Lines by Techniques | Beam Lines by Number Beam Energy 3 GeV Injection Energy 3 GeV Current 300-500 mA Fill Pattern 270 bunches distributed in six groups of 45 with 17 bunch gaps in between Circumferenc 234.137 Radio Frequency 476.315 MHz Bunch Spacing 2.1 n Horizontal Emittance 10 nm*rad Vertical Emittance 14 pm*rad Critical Energy 7.6 keV Energy Spread 0.097 Lifetime 12 hours @ 350 mA e- size (x,y) Dipole: 140, 14 µm rms Standard ID: 310, 8 µm rms Chicane ID: 300, 5 µm rms e- divergence (x,y) Dipole: 180, 2.9 µrad rms Standard ID: 33, 1.7 µrad rms Chicane ID: 34, 2.9 µrad rms Bunch Length 20 psec rms (6.0 mm rms) Straight sections for IDs (available ID length) 9 x 2.3 m 4 x 3.7 m 2 x 1.5 m (Chicane)

48

2010 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 Publications 10 Publications Journal Papers J. B. Aitken, E. A. Carter, H. Eastgate, M. J. Hackett, H. H. Harris, A. Levina, Y.-C. Lee, C.-l. Chen, B. Lai, S. Vogt and P. A. Lay, "Biomedical Applications of X-ray Absorption and Vibrational Spectroscopic Microscopies in Obtaining Structural Information from Complex Systems", Radiat. Phys. Chem. 79, 176 (2010) doi: 10.1016/j.radphyschem.2009.03.068 F. Aksoy, G. Akgul, Y. Ufuktepe and D. Nordlund, "Thickness Dependence of the L2,3 Branching Ratio of Cr Thin Films", J. Alloys Compd. 508, 233 (2010) doi: 10.1016/j.jallcom.2010.07.100 H. M. Alvarez, Y. Yue, C. D. Robinson, M. A. Canalizo-Hernández, R. A. Marvin, R. A. Kelly, A. Mondragón, J. E. Penner-Hahn and T. V. O'Halloran, "Tetrathiomolybdate Inhibits Copper Trafficking Proteins

49

SSRL HEADLINES February 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 February, 2011 8 February, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: DOE Reviews SSRL and Strategic Plan Development Continues Science Highlight - A Complex Relationship between Active Layer and Output Current in Organic Solar Cells Science Highlight - An mRNA Processing Complex with an Unusual Choice of Substrate SSRL Gains New Spectroscopy Capabilities SLAC Team Ensures Safety of SPEAR3 Upgrade Public Lectures: Dino-Bird and Microbes Built with Arsenic Lightsources.org Meeting in Washington, D.C. February Issue of NUFO News Now Online __________________________________________________________________________ 1. From the Director of SSRL: DOE Reviews SSRL and Strategic Plan Development Continues

50

Experimental Station 14-3a | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsourc...  

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BL14-3 is the only beamline at SSRL capable of obtaining spectroscopy data at the phosphorous edge. In this configuration the beam is unfocused over a size of 1 mm x 6 mm to...

51

SSRL HEADLINES October 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 - October 2013 4 - October 2013 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From the Director PieroPianetta This year's SSRL/LCLS joint Users' Meeting and Workshops were a great success with a record attendance of scientists from around the world. I would like to thank to the organizers for their effort in planning a wonderful program that included many exciting workshops and the latest scientific results from both the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource and the Linac Coherent Light Source, and the participants for enthusiastically engaging with talks, interactions and expressing support for our user facilities. Many new ideas and suggestions were generated at the meeting, and we will follow up on several of them in our strategic planning processes.

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While You Are Here | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

While You Are Here While You Are Here To Enter the Site After Hours You Must Have a Picture I.D and Your Safety Training Must Be Current. You should plan to arrive at SSRL between 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Holidays. A knowledgeable person from your group should be available for consultation by the SSRL staff readying the beam line for your group the morning you are scheduled to go on line. A Safety Checklist (SCL) must be completed by the Operations staff before your experiment will be put on line. This cannot be done if your spokesperson has not signed the Safety Review Summary form (see Section 2, Safety Review of Scheduled Experiments). If you arrive after hours and are listed on the User Support Form you will be allowed entry after providing proof of identification (usually a drivers

53

Shining Light on Catalysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Shining Light on Catalysis Shining Light on Catalysis Tuesday, July 19, 2011 - 4:38pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Jeroen A. van Bokhoven, Professor for Heterogeneous Catalysis Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering ETH Zurich Head of Laboratory for Catalysis and Sustainable Chemistry (LSK) Swiss Light Source Paul Scherrer Institute Understanding a functioning catalyst requires understanding at the atomic scales in a time-resolved manner. X-rays can be readily used to accomplish that task, because of the large penetration depth of hard X-rays, in situ or operando experiments are possible. In addition, complementary techniques, such as the vibrational spectroscopies can be simultaneously applied. Recent development in instrumentation to perform quick EXAFS and secondary emission spectroscopy has provided exciting new opportunities to

54

SSRL HEADLINES Sep 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 - September 2012 3 - September 2012 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From Director Chi-Chang Kao As SSRL Director - I extend my invitation for you to attend our SSRL/LCLS joint Annual Users' Meeting in the first week of October. This annual event is the highlight of the year, and a valuable opportunity to hear from the Office of Science about their plans for the lightsources, for us to disseminate and our user community to learn about the latest plans, new developments and exciting research at SSRL and LCLS. It is also a great time to interact with other scientists, potential colleagues, and vendors of light source related products and services.

55

The Dale E. Sayers Fellowship | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Dale E. Sayers Fellowship Dale E. Sayers Fellowship North Carolina State University Physical and Mathematical Sciences Foundation A dear colleague, Dale E. Sayers, one of the three pioneers of the analytical technique Extended X- ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), died in November 2004 at age 60. The key EXAFS developments in which Dale participated (now about 30 years ago) opened a new field of research that is extensively useat almost all synchrotron radiation facilities worldwide. Dale was an extraordinary man - generous and witty, as well as a great scientist. Dale was a highly visible synchrotron radiation user for over 20 years. He touched the lives of many in this world-wide scientific community. You or some of your colleagues might have even known Dale personally. Of Dale's many qualities, his colleagues and friends would like to single

56

Ground Movement in SSRL Ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

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NEPA CX Determination SS-SC-11-01 for SSRL Seismic Upgrade Phase 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 for SSRL Seismic Upgrade Phase 2 1 for SSRL Seismic Upgrade Phase 2 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination A. SSO NEPA Control #: SS-SC-11-01 B. Brief Description of Proposed Action: The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is proposing to upgrade a portion of the existing Stanford Positron-Electron Asymmetric Ring (SPEAR) to meet seismic standards. The proposed work includes : 1) the replacement of concrete roof blocks, placement of footings and new concrete walls, and installation of seismic connections at the old Beam Line 4; 2) the replacement of existing concrete roof blocks with precast roof blocks, placement of new footings, and installation of seismic anchors and connections at the northeast section of the

58

SSRL HEADLINES - December 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 - December 2011 6 - December 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director - Outreach and Support Efforts Science Highlight - Manganese-II Oxidation: A Biotic and Abiotic Process Science Highlight - Characterization of Iron Diazene Complexes in Two Oxidation States Biological SAXS Symposium - A Tribute to Dr. Hiro Tsuruta Awards - Prof. Harold Hwang Named American Physical Society Fellow Announcements - Shipping, Lightsources.org Survey, SSRL at the Exploratorium, NUFO Profile - Postdoc Eric Verploegen Energized by Experiences, Mentoring In the News - Metallurgy, Earth's Core, Nitrogenase __________________________________________________________________________ 1. From the Director: Outreach and Support Efforts

59

SSRL Safety Guidelines & Resources | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

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Safety Guidelines & Resources Safety Guidelines & Resources The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) is committed to conducting research in a manner that ensures protection of the workers, the public and the environment, and it is a direct and individual responsibility of all BES managers and BES supported researchers and their staff. Funds provided by BES for research will be applied as necessary to ensure that all BES research activities are conducted safely and in an environmentally conscientious manner. Only research conducted in this way will be supported. Safety and Security Overview Each person who works at SSRL is required to be familiar with and identify in advance the hazards associated with his/her work, the hazards associated with work areas, and to properly implement all necessary procedures and

60

SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Home Agenda Location Visitor Information Transportation Tourism & Dining SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application June 2-5, 2009 Group photo of the attendees at the SSRL School on X-ray Spectropscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application held June 2-5, 2009 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. » View photos from XAS 2009 Overview: Modern synchrotron radiation based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS) techniques offer the ability to probe local molecular scale physical and electronic structures that govern key properties of technological and environmental materials and molecular complexes. The high collimation, intensity, and tunability of SR allow the investigation of a wide range of materials, including thin films and interfaces, nanoparticles, amorphous materials, solutions, hydrated and disordered bacteriogenic minerals, soils, interfaces, and dissolved species.

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SSRL HEADLINES April 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 April, 2004 0 April, 2004 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Fighting Antibiotic Resistance: New Drug Target Mapped The Structure of the First Coordination Shell in Water User Operations Update SPEAR3 Improved Performance Benefiting Users SiWeds Semiannual Meeting at SSRL Pre-Approval Required for On-Site Users from SST Countries Radiation Safety Training Needed for 2004 - Send GERT Documentation before Visit to Speed Up Training Transfer State Your Affiliation with SSRL when Making Guest House Reservations User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Fighting Antibiotic Resistance: New Drug Target Mapped

62

SSRL HEADLINES May 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 May, 2011 1 May, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: Thinking Big-Picture Science Highlight - Controlling for X-ray Radiation Damage in Measuring a Metalloenzyme Transition State Science Highlight - Hydrogen Storage Goes Nano Keith O. Hodgson Elected to the National Academy of Sciences User Jonathan Rivnay Receives Materials Research Society Graduate Student Award User Markus Guehr Receives DOE Early Career Research Award Workshop Announcement: XDL 2011 - Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit Upcoming SSRL Events: NUFO, SRXAS, Users' Conference User Administration Update In the News: Fungi, Light Source Development, PV Modules __________________________________________________________________________

63

Improved layered mixed transition metal oxides for Li-ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

out at the Stanford Synchroton Radiation Lightsource (SSRL).electrodes at the Stanford Synchroton Radiation Lightsourcein situ at the Stanford Synchroton Radiation Lightsource.

Doeff, Marca M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

SSRL HEADLINES Oct 2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Highlight - New SSRL Data Provides Challenge for Theory of the Random-Field Ising Model SSRL Director Keith Hodgson Appointed to University Endowed Professorship 29th...

65

SSRL HEADLINES September 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and select "Display as HTML."** From the Director of SSRL: Assuming the Directorship Kelly Gaffney Assuming the Directorship of SSRL has been an enormously exciting and humbling...

66

SSRL HEADLINES October 2008  

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the US New Safety Procedures for Hazardous, Radioactive or Nanomaterials New LHe Ordering Process for SSRL XAS Cryostats SSRL Building 120 Seismic Upgrade Project Completed Ahead...

67

SSRL HEADLINES December 2010  

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from the Director of SSRL Science Highlight - SSRL's Hard X-rays Probe Model Fuel-Cell Catalyst Science Highlight - MRI Contrast Agent Chemically Linked to NSF Disease...

68

Sure, a textbook can tell you about Bragg's Law and the x-ray absorption energies for any element in the periodic table, but it can't tell you how to plan and carry out an x-ray scattering experiment at one of the 50 or so synchrotron radiation facilitie  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Report Report SSRL 6 th Annual School on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences: Theory and Application SSRL SR-XRS participants. Synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (SR-XRS) techniques offer the ability to probe nano- and atomic-scale structure that dictates the properties of advanced technological and environmental materials. Important materials studied at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) include organic and inorganic thin films and interfaces, nanoparticles, complex oxides, solutions, polymers, minerals and poorly crystalline materials. Good planning and a good working knowledge of beam lines and techniques are required to successfully conduct SR-XRS measurements. This sixth annual School at SSRL on Synchrotron X-ray

69

LightSource Renewables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LightSource Renewables Jump to: navigation, search Name: LightSource Renewables Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92121 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind project developer...

70

Welcome to SSRL: User Check-In Procedures | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

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SSRL: User Check-In Procedures SSRL: User Check-In Procedures Note: SLAC will be closed for the holidays from December 21-January 5. SLAC has installed RFID proximity card readers which facilitate 24/7 access during normal operations - at the main entrance off Sand Hill Road, at the Alpine Road Gate, and at Security Gates 17 and Sector 30. Register and complete safety training before arrival. Scheduled users will obtain a SLAC ID badge with 30-90 days proximity access after completing training and check-in at the URA office in Building 120. If you have a proximity ID badge, contact URA to re-activate your proximity access before subsequent scheduled user experiments. If you do not yet have a proximity activated ID badge, enter SLAC from Sand Hill Road, turn right at the main entrance and visit the Security Office.

71

SSRL28 Abstract Submission  

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Visitor Info Visitor Info General Info Need more information? Contact: Cathy Knotts Manager, URA SSRL, MS 99 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 28th Annual Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Users' Meeting Menlo Park, California USA October 17-19, 2001 Oral Abstract Submissions - Due August 24 Poster Abstract Submissions - Due September 28 Users are invited to submit abstracts highlighting research activities conducted over the past year at SSRL for poster presentations at the Users' Meeting. Please use the abstract submission form via the web. POSTER SESSION Posters will be displayed throughout the meeting and will be highlighted during a poster session and reception on Thursday, October 19. The poster session will be located just steps away from the main auditorium and the vendor display area. Users presenting posters must also register for the Users' Meeting.

72

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Read Self-Assembled Nanoparticle Superlattices X-ray Reflectivity X-ray reflectometry is a technique for investigating the near-surface structure of many materials. It probes the electron density with a depth resolution of less than one nm for depths of up to several hundred nm. The method involves measuring the reflected X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray incidence angle (typically small angles are used). The method is used for studies of thin films and multilayers of metals, semiconductors and polymers. It can accurately determine films thickness, density, average roughness, and the roughness correlation function. Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering and Diffraction on Thin Films Grazing incidence X-ray scattering or diffraction (GIXS) refers to a method

73

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the replication process of Lassa virus as compared to other negative-strand viruses as Ebola and measles, which also encode some or all of their genes in the negative direction....

74

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CeO2 ENPs can reach the food chain and the next soybean plant generation, with potential health implications. Primary Citation J. A. Hernandez-Viezcas, H. Castillo-Michel, J. C....

75

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

scientific models, this research will lead to more efficient, less costly methods for uranium cleanup and mining. Their research hinged on the fundamental subject of electron...

76

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Lisa E. Mayhew, University of Colorado - Boulder Figure Hydrogen gas is produced in chemical reactions between anoxic water and iron-rich rocks at temperatures...

77

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of recent user developments and experimental results as well as future plans. Users elect members to serve on the Executive Committee to carry out the business of the SSRLUO....

78

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

such as solid uraninite, UO2, and its low solubility reduces the environmental risk. Naturally-occurring iron sulfide (FeS) is known to be an important electron source for the...

79

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Click on images to see sample screen shots. Complete rows beginning with row 24 with your radionuclide data. Context sensitive help is available in cells located in row 23. Step 3:...

80

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Configuration Options: Vortex detector, Si(111) Analyzer CrystalPhoto Multiplier Tube, Si(111) Data Collection Mode: Transmission Reflection Have you had previous experience...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sign Overview Synchrotron light is created by bending the path of electrons traveling the speed of light around a storage ring. These extremely bright x-rays are used by scientists...

82

1994 SSRL 21st USERS MEETING  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL 21st USERS MEETING SSRL 21st USERS MEETING SSRL 12 Oct 1994 October 17-18, 1994, SLAC Auditorium PROGRAM MONDAY, OCTOBER 17 7:30 Registration and Continental Breakfast - Auditorium Breezeway SESSION I Chair: Louis Terminello 8:30 Welcome - L. Terminello (LLNL) 8:35 SSRL Director's Report - A. Bienenstock (SSRL) 9:15 SSRLUO Report - J. Kortright (LBL) 9:30 Report from Washington - W. Oosterhuis (DOE) 9:45 Coffee Break SESSION II Surface and Reduced Dimensional Studies Chair: Charles Fadley lO:15 Ultra-trace Metal Analysis of Sillcon Wafer Surfaces using Synchrotron Radiation - A. Fischer-Colbrie (Hewlett-Packard) 10:35 Determination of Nanoscale Magnetic Structure from Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Diffraction using Magnetic X-ray Circular Dichroism - J. Tobin (LLNL) 10:55 Quantitative Determination of Magnetic Moments with Circularly

83

SSRL HEADLINES June 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lightsource School on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences: Theory and Application. This workshop had a simple goal: to familiarize...

84

SSRL HEADLINES October 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 October, 2009 4 October, 2009 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Researchers Visualize the Structural Intermediates of the Nickel-catalyzed Enzyme that Makes Methane SSRL User Operations Resume SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops Wrap-up Symposium Celebrates SSRL Pioneer SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee Election Results Researchers Reconstruct Complete Protein Network Herman Winick Awarded Andrei Sakharov Prize for Upholding Human Rights Submit X-ray/VUV Beam Time Requests by November 15 Upcoming X-ray, VUV and Macromolecular Crystallography Proposal Deadline Former SSRL Colleague will be Missed Please Report SSRL-Related Papers, Invited Talks, and Awards __________________________________________________________________________

85

SSRL HEADLINES June 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 June, 2011 2 June, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: Looking Ahead Science Highlight - Estimating Cr(VI) in Coal-Derived Fly-Ash Science Highlight - Staying One Step Ahead of Antibiotic Resistance Science Highlight - SSRL's Microfocus Macromolecular Crystallography Beam Line 12-2 First SSRL Pump-Probe Experiments Under Way SSRL X-rays Reveal Patterns in the Plumage of the First Birds Upcoming SSRL Events: Detectors, XRMS, 2011 Users' Conference Call for Nominations for Spicer and Klein Awards New SSRL Artwork Inspired by Science Talk User Administration Update Stig Hagström, Spectroscopy Pioneer, Dies at 78 In the News: Birds, Bacteria, SESAME __________________________________________________________________________

86

SSRL HEADLINES October 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 October, 2010 4 October, 2010 ____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Crystal Structure of NorM, a MATE Transmembrane Transporter Science Highlight - An Artificial Skin Sensitive Enough to be Bothered by a Fly From the Director of SSRL: Ready for the Next User Run Structural Genomics Research at SSRL Begins Exciting New Chapter LCLS/SSRL Users' Meeting Covers Recent Successes and Future Plans Sam Webb Honored with Lytle Award SSRL Student Poster Award Winners Photon Science Users and Faculty Honored A Warm Welcome to Newly Elected SSRL and LCLS UEC Members SSRL Reaches Seismic Upgrade Milestone Upcoming Beam Time Request & Proposal Deadlines ____________________________________________________________________________

87

SSRL28 Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9:15 am SLAC Director's Welcome - Jonathan Dorfan, SLAC 9:30 am SSRL Directors Report - Keith Hodgson, SSRL 10:00 am Report from Washington D.C. - Patricia Dehmer, DOE-BES 10:30...

88

SSRL HEADLINES January 2008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Illuminates Rare Materials SSRL Users' Organization Update Princess Sumaya of Jordan Visits SLAC Upcoming Beam Time Request and Proposal Deadlines ...

89

SSRL HEADLINES - November 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 - November 2011 5 - November 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: SSRL User Operations Resume Science Highlight - Mystery Solved: Nitrogenase's Central Atom is Carbon Science Highlight - Researchers Determine Structure of Key DNA Transcription Molecule Science Highlight - Structure and Reactivity of a Non-Heme Iron Complex A Warm Welcome to Newly Elected SSRL UEC Members Latest SSRL Seismic Upgrade Completed Announcements - SLAC Public Lecture, NESRC Computing Proposals, New SSRL Photo User Administration Update - Beam Time Requests and Proposals Due December 1 In the News - Ten Questions, Mystery Atom Cracked __________________________________________________________________________ 1. SSRL User Operations Resume

90

SSRL HEADLINES Jun 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Jun, 2001 2 Jun, 2001 _____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Studies at SSRL Lead to the Development of New Materials and Processes for Flat Panel Displays Prototype Crystal Mounting Robot Successfully Tested 3x3 CCD Detector Received and Installed on SSRL BL11-1 SSRL Powder Diffraction Station Sagittal Focusing Mirror Upgrade SSRL Users' Organization Activities and Issues User Research Administration Announcements Job Opportunities at SSRL 1. Science Highlight - Studies at SSRL Lead to the Development of New Materials and Processes for Flat Panel Displays (contact: Jo Stöhr, stohr@slac.stanford.edu) Flat panel displays, a $20 billion per year world-wide business, are based on liquid crystal (LC) molecules that are oriented by mechanically rubbed

91

SSRL HEADLINES August 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 August, 2009 2 August, 2009 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Riboswitch Crystal Structure May Lead to New Antibiotic Targets Science Highlight - Understanding Charge Transport in Plastic Electronics From the Acting Director of SSRL BL12-2 Microbeam Capability Established and Commissioned Register for the SSRL/LCLS Users' Conference - October 18-21, 2009 Users Needed to Serve on the SSRL and LCLS Users' Organization Executive Committees Abstracts for User Science Posters Due October 9 Please Report SSRL-Related Papers, Invited Talks, and Awards Recent Awards to Photon Science Faculty Ultrafast X-ray Summer School Held June 2009 Macromolecular Crystallography Beam Time Requests Due September 15

92

SSRL HEADLINES May 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 May, 2001 1 May, 2001 _____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Working Together in Harmony at the Molecular Level: Cooperativity in Protein Function Regulation Article Highlights SSRL Faculty Research on Brain Communications Welch Foundation Visit WHO Visits SSRL Request for Nominations for Annual Farrel W. Lytle Award User Research Administration Announcements Job Opportunities at SSRL 1. Science Highlight - Working Together in Harmony at the Molecular Level: Cooperativity in Protein Function Regulation (contacts: Evan Kantrowitz, evan.kantrowitz@bc.edu, and Hiro Tsuruta, tsuruta@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu) The combined use of x-ray crystallography and solution small angle x-ray scattering has enabled a research collaboration involving scientists from

93

SSRL HEADLINES July 2009  

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July, 2009 July, 2009 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: SSRL Initiates 200-mA Beam Line Operations Science Highlight - Molecular Mixing in Organic Solar Cells Science Highlight - Understanding Nature's Assembly of Molecules to Improve Tomorrow's Electronics New BL5 Branch Line Funded by DOE X-ray/VUV Beam Time Requests Due August 1 Register to Participate in the SSRL/LCLS Users' Conference - October 18-21, 2009 Submit Nominations for Spicer, Klein and Lytle Awards Call for User Science Posters and Outstanding Student Poster Competition SSRL Structural Molecular Biology Summer School - September 8-11, 2009 Vandalism at SSRL Provide Feedback Using User Portal __________________________________________________________________________

94

SSRL HEADLINES June 2009  

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2 June, 2009 2 June, 2009 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: SSRL Achieves Major Top-off Injection Milestone Science Highlight - The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils Science Highlight - Importance of Iron Speciation to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of Aerosol Source on Ocean Photosynthesis Science Highlight - Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing Iron in Ferritin Exotic Material Could Revolutionize Electronics Researchers Reveal Structure of Key Genetic Proofreading Protein Secretary of Energy Visits SLAC From the Director of SSRL: A Glimpse of SSRL's Future SSRL to Aid New Energy-Research Center July 29-31 LCLS Workshop: Science Drivers for Hard X-ray Upgrades

95

SSRL HEADLINES August 2005  

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2 August, 2005 2 August, 2005 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - The Mighty Manganese Oxides Secretary of Energy Visits SLAC DOE BES Director of Materials Science Meets with SSRL and GLAM Scientists SSRL's Scientific Advisory Committee and Proposal Review Panel Convenes User Operations Update Update on SSRL Beam Lines and Techniques Nominations for SSRLUOEC and Registration for the Annual SSRL Users' Meeting & Workshops, October 15-19 Students and Teachers Visit SLAC August 10 4th Stanford-Berkeley Summer School for Physical Science Held June 2005 Got News? User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - The Mighty Manganese Oxides

96

SSRL HEADLINES January 2003  

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the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division in DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, visited SSRL on January 15, 2003. The reason for his visit was mainly to...

97

SSRL HEADLINES Feb 2001  

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ALS and SSRL Hold Meeting on Cooperation Visit by Officials from University of Saskatchewan 1. John Galayda Named Assistant Director at SLAC for LCLS Program (contact: Lowell...

98

SSRL28 Registration Form  

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Need more information? Contact: Cathy Knotts Manager, URA SSRL, MS 99 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 28th Annual Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Users' Meeting Menlo Park, California USA October 17-19, 2001 Registration Form -- CLOSED -- Full Name: Institution: Address: City: State: Zip Code: Country: Phone: Fax: E-mail: Citizenship: Registration: The Registration fee includes meeting materials, invited talks, poster presentations, and vendor exhibits. Registration ($150) Student Registration ($50) Users' Mtg. Invited Speaker Workshop Only (click here & see below) Meals and Social Events: Please specify quantity of tickets desired and if vegetarian meal preferred. Select 1-Regular 1-Vegetarian 2-Regular 2-Vegetarian 2-(1 of each) Lunch, Oct. 18 ($8 per person)

99

SSRL HEADLINES August 2003  

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2 August, 2003 2 August, 2003 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Protecting against Cocaine, Heroin, and Sarin Gas X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Catches the Chemical Form of Mercury in Fish Final Phase of SPEAR3 Installation on Schedule Registration Extended for SSRL SMB Summer School Call for Nominations for 6th Annual Lytle Award Nominations for the SSRLUO-EC Several Workshops Planned for October 8, 2003 30th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting - October 9-10, 2003 __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Protecting against Cocaine, Heroin, and Sarin Gas (contact: Matthew Redinbo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) SSRL has played an important role in characterizing a family of enzymes

100

SSRL HEADLINES Jul 2001  

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1 Jul, 2001 1 Jul, 2001 _____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Complex Materials Research by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy: Challenging the Mystery of the High Tc Superconductivity 2000-2001 Experimental Run Highlights Stanford-Berkeley 2001 SR Summer School: A Successful Start to the First in a Series SSRL Well Represented at the American Crystallographic Association Meeting The Shutdown Clock is Ticking BL10 Insertion Device Repair on Track for November User Operations Semi-annual SPEAR3 Lehman Review SSRL's 28th Annual Users' Meeting is Coming Soon! User Research Administration Announcements Job Opportunities at SSRL 1. Science Highlight - Complex Materials Research by Angle-Resolved

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

SSRL HEADLINES October 2004  

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4 October, 2004 4 October, 2004 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Accelerators Shut Down at SLAC Following Electrical Accident Science Highlight - XAS Provides Scientific Basis for Technetium Nuclear Waste Remediation in the Hanford Tanks Science Highlight - Anthrax Toxin Hijacks Its Way into Human Cells Record Attendance at 31st Annual Users' Meeting and Workshops Congratulations to Hal Tompkins, Recipient of the 2004 Farrel Lytle Award Peter Armitage Receives First W.E. Spicer Young Investigator Award SSRL/Stanford Faculty Position in "Ultrafast X-ray Studies of Matter" CCLRC Directors Visit SLAC Former SSRL Staff Scientist Stan Ruby Dies at 80 Information Requested for Reports to SSRL Funding Agencies

102

SSRL HEADLINES February 2008  

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8 February, 2008 8 February, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Scientists Decipher Mechanism behind Antimicrobial "Hole Punchers" Science Highlight - Controlling the Wave Budget Impact on SSRL User Operations SPEAR3 and Beam Line Update First Light at SSRL's Newest Beam Line for Soft X-ray Material Science New and Improved Capabilities for Biological Small Angle X-ray Scattering on BL4-2 The March of the Carbon Nanotubes From the SSRL Director: From a Shed to a Directorate of SLAC The SSRLUOEC Thanks You for Your Feedback Ultrafast X-ray Summer School, June 17-20, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Scientists Decipher Mechanism behind

103

SSRL HEADLINES March 2008  

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9 March, 2008 9 March, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Novel Ferroelectric Nanostructures for Nanoelectronic Devices Science Highlight - The Structure of a Reaction Intermediate in Enzymatic Halogenation Budget Impact on SSRL User Operations Very Small Spot Size Achieved at the New BL13-2 SSRL School on Synchrotron XAS Techniques in Environmental and Material Sciences Ultrafast X-ray Summer School, June 17-20, 2008 2008 SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting, October 15-18, 2008 Big Science Gets Small: New BL6-2 Microscope __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Novel Ferroelectric Nanostructures for Nanoelectronic Devices (contacts: L.E. Fuentes-Cobas, Advanced Materials Research

104

SSRL HEADLINES - September 2011  

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3 - September 2011 3 - September 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: 2011 Users' Meeting - A Chance to Provide Strategic Input Science Highlight - X-ray Nanotomography Imaging for Circuit Integrity Science Feature - Proteins Better Analyzed at Room Temperature, Report Finds Science Feature - SSRL Invention Measures Stroke Damage in the Brain Science Feature - Scientists Get First Detailed Look at Nitrogen Doping in Single-layer Graphene Science Feature - Faster Organic Semiconductors for Flexible Displays Dr. Hirotsugu Tsuruta, SSRL Senior Scientist and Biophysicist, Passes Away Announcements: Users' Conference; UEC Membership; APS Meeting at SLAC; Seismic Upgrades; Changes to Gate Hours

105

SSRL HEADLINES July 2007  

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July, 2007 July, 2007 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Discovering the Many Sides of Cells Science Highlight - Floppy Hairs and Sound Waves Science Highlight - A Surprising Behavior of Yttrium Impurities Taking Aim at 500 mA Pottery Shards Reveal Clues about the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire Apply Now for SSRL Structural Molecular Biology Summer School Register for 2007 SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops Workshop on STXM and X-ray Nanoprobe Capabilities and Needs for Geo-, Environmental, and Biological Sciences Held in July SSRL Users' Organization Update User Administration Update Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________

106

SSRL HEADLINES - October 2011  

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4 - October 2011 4 - October 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: Engaging the User Community Science Highlight - New Work Solves Conundrum in High Temperature Superconductivity Science Highlight - Structure of FEN1 with DNA Substrate Revealed Video: Drug Discovery at SLAC SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting Highlights Recent Research and Future Plans Piero Pianetta Honored with Lytle Award Student Poster Award Winners Upcoming Events: APS Meeting, SLAC Public Lecture Beam Time Request & Proposal Deadlines In the News __________________________________________________________________________ 1. From the Director of SSRL: Engaging the User Community Chi-Chang Kao This year's Users' Meeting and Workshops were a great success with an

107

SSRL HEADLINES June 2004  

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2 June, 2004 2 June, 2004 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Anthrax Toxin - Working Towards an Antidote Linac Coherent Light Source Project Update Progress Made During SPPS Spring Run William E. Spicer, 1929 - 2004, Cofounder of SSRL and Pioneer in Photoemission Spectroscopy Welcoming Visitors to SSRL User Operations Update Emittance Measurement in SPEAR3 Upcoming Events at SSRL and Elsewhere User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Anthrax Toxin - Working Towards an Antidote (contact: Thiang Yian Wong, tywong@burnham.org) Anthrax makes a deadly cocktail of three toxin proteins that flood the bloodstream, leading to rapid death if the infection is not diagnosed and

108

SSRL HEADLINES Feb 2002  

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8 February, 2002 8 February, 2002 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Can Sulfur X-ray Spectroscopy Save the 17th-Century Swedish Warship Vasa? SPEAR3 Shutdown Begins a New Era at SSRL (April 2003-January 2004) SSRL Proposal Review Panel Holds 52nd Meeting LCLS Science Advisory Committee Meets and LCLS Makes the President's FY2003 Budget for Project Engineering and Design Plans for an Australian Light Source Upcoming Events at SSRL and Elsewhere User Research Administration Announcements __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Can Sulfur X-ray Spectroscopy Save the 17th-Century Swedish Warship Vasa? (contact: Magnus Sandström, magnuss@struc.su.se)

109

SSRL HEADLINES Oct 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 October, 2006 4 October, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Uranium-Hungry Bacteria Lead to Safer Water Supply Science Highlight - Uranium Trapped in Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxide Tunnels Roger Kornberg Wins the 2006 Chemistry Nobel Prize Another Successful Users' Meeting SSRL Awards Honor Mike Soltis and Bill Schlotter SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee Update Ground Breaking New Science NIH-NCRR Officials Visit SSRL SESAME to Open: Particle Accelerator Spurs Middle East Science Partnership Beam Time Requests for X-ray/VUV Beam Lines and Macromolecular Crystallography Proposals Due December 1 Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________

110

SSRL HEADLINES August 2008  

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2 August, 2008 2 August, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Lensless Nanoscale Imaging: Combining MAD Crystallography with X-Ray Holography Small, Fast, and Holographic Ajay Virkar to Receive 2008 Klein Professional Development Award How Plants Do It: Light, Oxygen, Action! Call for User Science Poster Abstracts for Joint SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops, October 15-18, 2008 Users Needed to Serve on the SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee Accelerator Physics Update on 500-mA Operation Updates to the Microprobe at BL2-3 LCLS Experiment Proposal Deadline and Developments SSRL Celebrates Another Successful Run User Research Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________

111

SSRL HEADLINES Jul 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July, 2006 July, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - An Octahedral Iron(VI) Complex - A Novel Form of Iron Science Highlight - Ordered Nanoporous Germanium Semiconductors SSRL Advisory Committees Convene in July Share Your Research Results at SSRL33, October 12-13, 2006 The XAFS13 Conference a Success at Stanford and SSRL Beam Line Update National Academies Report Encourages AMO Research Artie Bienenstock Goes to Washington Excerpts from SLAC Today User Administration Update Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - An Octahedral Iron(VI) Complex - A Novel Form of Iron (contact: S. DeBeer George, serena@slac.stanford.edu)

112

SSRL HEADLINES Jan 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL Headlines Vol. 1, No. 7 January, 2001 SSRL Headlines Vol. 1, No. 7 January, 2001 Contents of This Issue: SLAC to Provide Short-Term User Lodging Space Stanford Faculty Senate Meeting and Field Trip to SLAC Evaluation of Crystallogaphy Collaboratory Software Development SSRL Proposal Review Panel Meets for the 50th Time LCLS Technical Advisory Committee Meeting User Research Administration 1. SLAC to Provide Short-Term User Lodging Space (contact: Keith Hodgson, hodgson@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu) On January 31, SLAC Director Jonathan Dorfan announced a new initiative to help accommodate the growing user community on site. A new building project is being directed toward providing a remedy for the lack of short-term lodging for users in the area. SLAC will be constructing a three-story user lodging building that will have 110 rooms and some common meeting areas.

113

SSRL Safety Office Memo  

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Safety Office SSO 01/24/06 Safety Office SSO 01/24/06 Memo to SSRL staff concerning operation of Circuit Breakers and Disconnect Switches Recently SLAC has adopted new regulations (NFPA70E) which outline the "Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace". Specifically it requires that the Arc Flash Hazard be categorized and PPE stated for all circuit breakers and disconnect switches. This memo identifies requirement for operating circuit breakers or disconnect switches at SSRL. SSRL staff members shall be authorized to operate CB's and disconnect switches only if they meet the following requirement The staff member: 1. Has the task identified and authorized in their routine JHAM, which includes: a. Reading and understand the SSRL Breaker and Disconnect Switch Operation

114

SSRL HEADLINES Jun 2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 June, 2002 2 June, 2002 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - VISA: A Milestone on the Path Towards X-ray Free Electron Lasers 29th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting is Coming Soon! The Summer Shutdown Approaches Scientific Staff Positions Available at SSRL Rewarding Excellence User Lodging Update Upcoming Events at SSRL and Elsewhere 1. Science Highlight - VISA: A Milestone on the Path Towards X-ray Free Electron Lasers (contact: Heinz-Dieter Nuhn, nuhn@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu) Results of the VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) experiment have recently been published in the May 2002 issue of Physics Review Letters. The experiment was carried out by a BNL-LLNL-SLAC-UCLA collaboration with

115

SSRL HEADLINES Sep 2002  

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of the Structure of Nitrogenase MoFe-Protein 29th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting Workshops Held in Conjunction with Users' Meeting Vote for Your 2002-03 SSRLUO Executive Committee...

116

Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL  

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Biological Small Angle X-ray Scattering Workshop The SSRL Structural Molecular Biology Group hosted a 3-day comprehensive workshop on the use of non-crystalline small-angle...

117

SSRL HEADLINES August 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** SLAC Director Chi-Chang Kao Announces Kelly Gaffney as New SSRL Director On Monday, August 18, 2014, SLAC Director Chi-Chang Kao...

118

SSRL HEADLINES Jan 2002  

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7 January, 2002 7 January, 2002 _____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Bacterial Sulfur Storage Globules Delegation from Catalonia Visits SSRL SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee Update A Decade of Dedication Beam Line 2 Vacuum Leak Follow-up SSRL in the News Upcoming Events at SSRL and Elsewhere User Research Administration Announcements 1. Science Highlight - Bacterial Sulfur Storage Globules (contacts: Ingrid Pickering, pickering@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu, Graham George, george@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu) Sulfur is essential for all life, but it plays a particularly central role in the metabolism of many anaerobic microorganisms. Prominent among these are the sulfide-oxidizing bacteria that oxidize sulfide to sulfate. Many of these organisms can store elemental sulfur in "globules" for use when food is in short supply. The chemical nature of the sulfur in these globules has been an enigma since they were first described as far back as 1887; all known forms (or allotropes) of elemental sulfur are solid at room temperature, but globule sulfur has been described as "liquid", and it apparently has a low density - 1.3 compared to 2.1 for the common yellow allotrope alpha-sulfur. Various exotic forms of sulfur have been proposed to explain these properties, including micelles (small bubble-like structures) formed from long-chain polythionates, but all of these deductions have been based upon indirect evidence (for example, the density was estimated by flotation of intact cells), and many questions remained. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the sulfur K-edge recorded on SSRL's Beam Line 6-2, Ingrid Pickering, Graham George and Eileen Yu (SSRL) together with co-workers from Arizona State University, University of British Columbia, and ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co. have resolved this long-standing conundrum and the results are described in a recent publication.

119

SSRL HEADLINES July 2013  

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1 - July 2013 1 - July 2013 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From the Director - SSRL: 40 Years Down and Many More to Go PieroPianetta Over the past month we have been treated to several nice articles commemorating the 40th year of synchrotron radiation research at SLAC -starting with the first light out of SPEAR on July 6, 1973 at 10:42 AM, with SPEAR running at 1.5 GeV and 23.5 mA. The logbook entry from that date states "The picture shows the vertical mask completely open, and the sync. light in there - right in the middle of the Be-foil"; from there we were off and running! As we all know, the field has grown tremendously over the past 40 years, both at SLAC and around the world, with ever-improving photon source properties and new applications that have impacted all our lives.

120

SSRL HEADLINES Oct 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 - October 2012 4 - October 2012 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From Director Chi-Chang Kao Time flies. It's been more than two years since I came to SLAC as the director of SSRL, but I still clearly remember the warm acceptance I received from both the staff and the user community. I am grateful for the support you have all given me, and I have learned a tremendous amount from all of you. Together, we developed a strategic plan for SSRL that is sure to keep it an exciting place to do science for the next decade. Now that I've transitioned to my new role as SLAC director, I have asked Piero Pianetta to take over as the interim director of SSRL. Not only has Piero held a leadership position at SSRL for the past 30 years, but he also filled the role of acting director prior to my arrival in 2010. His extensive knowledge of the SSRL organization, the user community and the strategic directions we have developed makes him the clear choice for leading the team at this time.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Team | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Team Team Research team: John R. Bargar (SLAC), Research manager and co-principle investigator, bargar@slac.stanford.edu Scott Fendorf (Stanford), co-principle investigator, fendorf@stanford.edu Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford), gordon.brown@stanford.edu Sharon Bone (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Noémie Janot (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Morris Jones (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Collaborators: D.S. Alessi (University of Alberta) R. Bernier-Latmani (EPFL) J.A. Davis (LBNL) J. Dynes (Canadian Light Source) P.A. Fox (LBNL) E. Herndon (Kent State) D.E. Giammar (WUStL) D.E. Graham (ORNL) B. Gu (ORNL) E. Ilton (PNNL) L. Liang (ORNL) P.E. Long (LBNL) B. Mann (ORNL) P.S. Nico (LBNL) L. Pasa-Tolic (EMSL) P. Persson (University of Lund) T. Regier (Canadian Light Source) J.O. Sharp (School of Mines)

122

Theses | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theses Theses 2013 Elizabeth L. Baxter, "Uncovering Allostery in a Uniquely Folded Metalloprotein", University of California San Diego, 2013; Advisor: P. A. Jennings Martja A. Beckwith, "X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of Manganese Complexes Relevant to Photosystem II", Cornell University, 2013; Advisor: S. DeBeer Beate Fulda, "Changes in Copper and Cadmium Solubility and Speciation Induced by Soil Redox Dynamics - Competitive Metal Sulfide Formation and Interactions with Natural Organic Matter", ETH Zurich, 2013; Advisor: R. Kretzschmar Thomas D. Grant, "Understanding the Structure of Eukaryotic Glutaminyl-TRNA Synthetase: Combining X-ray Crystallography with Statistical Evaluations of Small Angle Scattering Data", State University of New York Buffalo, 2013;

123

28th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting -- Lytle Award  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Workshops Abstracts Lytle Award Vendor Exhibit Registration Payment by Credit SSRLUO Ballot Lodging Directions Visitor Info General Info 28th Annual Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Users' Meeting Menlo Park, California USA October 18-19, 2001 Annual Farrel W. Lytle Award -- Nominations Due September 5 The Annual Farrel W. Lytle Award was established by the SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee to promote important technical or scientific accomplishments in synchrotron radiation-based science and to foster collaboration and efficient use of beam time among users and staff at SSRL. The Lytle Award consists of a plaque that is displayed in the User Research Administration Office at SSRL and $1000. All SSRL users and staff are eligible for this award.

124

SSRL HEADLINES May 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 May, 2010 1 May, 2010 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging Science Highlight - Structural Basis for Senior Immunity to the Current H1N1 Flu Science Highlight - Suspected Copper Chelator Binds not just Copper but Copper-Protein Trimer Complexes From the Acting Director of SSRL: Where Do We Go from Here? SPEAR3 Increased Current and Frequent Fill Update ARRA Funded Facility Upgrade Project First Bio-Imaging Results from LCLS: Henry Chapman Presents June 7 SLAC Colloquium LCLS/SSRL Users' Conference and Workshops, October 17-21, 2010 Fomer SSRL Director Named to the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences

125

SSRL HEADLINES Jul 2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 July, 2002 1 July, 2002 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Plants with the Midas Touch: Formation of Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants SPEAR3 Technical Progress on Track Summer Shutdown Projects Help Yourselves to Some Limelight 2002 Stanford-Berkeley Synchrotron Summer Schools a Success SSRL29 is Fast Approaching 2002 SPEAR Run Ends Very Successfully CANDLE Representative Visits SSRL Upcoming Events at SSRL and Elsewhere User Research Administration Announcements SMB Staff Scientist Position in Macromolecular Crystallography 1. Science Highlight - Plants with the Midas Touch: Formation of Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants (contact: Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, jgardea@utep.edu) As the legend goes, King Midas could convert anything he touched to gold.

126

SSRL HEADLINES January 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 - January 2012 7 - January 2012 **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From SSRL Director Chi-Chang Kao: SSRL Takes on the Frontiers of Materials Science As we at SSRL continue to refine our five-to-ten-year strategic plan, our materials science goals are becoming increasingly clear. Advanced materials are at the heart of our technically driven society, and recent advances in theory, computation power, materials synthesis, and characterization tools have brought the goal of "materials by design" within reach. Synchrotron light sources, with their exceptional properties, play a critical role in the materials-by-design process, providing the powerful characterization capabilities required by the materials research community. Read more...

127

SSRL HEADLINES June 2008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 June, 2008 2 June, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Keeping Electronics in Line with the Law Science Highlight - Electronics go Organic Safety Reminder Beam Line Updates Register for 2008 SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting & Workshops, October 15-18, 2008 Call for Nominations for Spicer, Klein and Lytle Awards Sign Up for the Synchrotron Summer School, August 17-22, 2008 SSRL User Receives First Polymer International-IUPAC Award Stanford/SSRL Researchers Receive $25 Million Grant for Solar Research Kornberg Advises Support for Basic Science to Solve Medical Challenges Dr. Harriet Kung becomes Associate Director of the Office of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences User Research Administration Update

128

SSRL HEADLINES Apr 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 April, 2001 0 April, 2001 _____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Reading the Genome and Creating the Message - A Process Essential to All Life SSRLUO Update: Notes from the Users' Executive Committee 28th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting: October 18-19, 2001 SPEAR2 -> SPEAR3: Impact on User Operations Schedule Statewide Power Problems May Affect SSRL Technical Update on the SPEAR3 Project: Magnet Shoptalk Walk, Talk and Clean Wrap-Up Job Opportunities at SSRL 1. Science Highlight - Reading the Genome and Creating the Message - A Process Essential All Life (contacts: Roger Kornberg - kornberg@stanford.edu, Dave Bushnell - bushnell@stanford.edu, Patrick Cramer - cramer@lmb.uni-muenchen.de)

129

SSRL HEADLINES April 2010  

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0 April, 2010 0 April, 2010 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - The Structure of an Algal Hydrogenase Reveals the Assembly and Evolution of Complex Metalloenzymes Science Highlight - Scientists Find Unexpected Electron Behavior in the Pseudogap of High-temperature Superconductors Science Highlight - Reducing Fuel Cell Costs by Changing the Structure and Reactivity of Platinum Booster Klystron Repaired and User Operations Resumed in Just 5 Days Visit of Synchrotron SOLEIL Director General to SSRL Public Lecture May 25: Jeremy Dahl on Ultimate Atomic Bling Register for June 1-3 SSRL SRXRS School Update on July VUVX2010 Conference in Vancouver, Canada and Satellite Meeting at SLAC Upcoming June and July Deadlines for SSRL Proposals

130

SSRL HEADLINES Oct 2001  

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4 October, 2001 4 October, 2001 _____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Multidrug Resistance-ABC Transporters SSRL and CCLRC Enter into Memorandum of Understanding 28th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting and Associated Workshops Britt Hedman Receives Annual Farrel Lytle Award Stanford Board of Trustees Visit SLAC and Tour SSRL Startup Activities on Track for User Beam on November 1 SSRL Users Organization Executive Committee Update User Research Administration Announcements Job Opportunities at SSRL 1. Science Highlight - Multidrug Resistance-ABC Transporters (contact: Geoffrey Chang, gchang@scripps.edu) Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious medical problem and presents a major challenge to the treatment of disease and the development of novel therapeutics. ABC transporters that are associated with multidrug resistance (MDR-ABC transporters) translocate hydrophobic drugs and lipids from the inner to the outer leaflet of the cell membrane. To better elucidate the structural basis for the "flip-flop" mechanism of substrate movement across the lipid bilayer, Chang's group from Scripps determined the structure of the lipid flippase MsbA from Escherichia coli using diffraction data collected on SSRL BLs 11-1 and 9-2. MsbA is organized as a homodimer with each subunit containing six transmembrane -helices and a nucleotide-binding domain. The asymmetric distribution of charged residues lining a central chamber suggests a general mechanism for the translocation of substrate by MsbA and other MDR-ABC transporters. The structure of MsbA can serve as a model for the MDR-ABC transporters that confer MDR to cancer cells and infectious microorganisms.

131

SSRL HEADLINES November 2000  

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5 November, 2000 5 November, 2000 _____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: SPEAR2 is Still Going Strong! The SSRL Proposal Review Panel Welcomes a New Member X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy - Insights into Molecular Toxicology A New Face in the User Research Administration SSRLUO Executive Committee Election Results New Mirror for Powder Diffraction Beam Line _____________________________________________________________________________ 1. SPEAR2 is Still Going Strong! (contact: Ed Guerra - guerra@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu) We are happy to report that in our efforts to prepare for SPEAR3 construction during the recent shutdown, we did not break SPEAR2. The FY2001 run, which saw first users on-line on November 1, 2000, has come off

132

SSRL HEADLINES May 2004  

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1 May, 2004 1 May, 2004 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Speed Limit of Magnetic Recording DOE Office of Science Reviews SLAC SMB Summer School Coming Up in August User Operations Update SLAC Scientific Policy Committee Spring Meeting SSRL Users Organization Update SLAC Guest House Implements Slight Rate Increase User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Speed Limit of Magnetic Recording (contact: Jo Stöhr, stohr@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu) Two important goals of technology are: smaller and faster. In line with this goal the 50 billion dollar per year magnetic recording industry has long wondered where it would run into obstacles set by fundamental physical

133

SSRL HEADLINES September 2008  

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3 September, 2008 3 September, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Steap3 - a Protein to Enable Iron Incorporation in Cells Science Highlight - A Different Type of High Temperature Superconductor Joe Kline to Receive the 2008 Spicer Young Investigator Award Annual Users' Meeting October 15-18: Register and Vote LCLS/SSRL Workshops Held in Conjunction with Users' Meeting Information Requested for Reports to SSRL Funding Agencies The Fourth Conference on Synchrotron Environmental Science Beam Line Update User Research Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Steap3 - a Protein to Enable Iron Incorporation in Cells

134

SSRL HEADLINES July 2010  

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1 July, 2010 1 July, 2010 ____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Scientists Probe the Mechanism for Microbial Carbon Fixation Science Highlight - Chemical Analysis Shows an Ancient Ceramic Vessel was Broken and Burned in Cremation Burial First Results from the LCLS: Unpeeling Atoms and Molecules from the Inside Out From the Acting Director of SSRL: A Successful 2010 User Run 350 mA and Beyond... SLAC to Join New DOE Research Hub for Artificial Photosynthesis Annual SSRL/LCLS Users' Conference - Oct 17-21, 2010 Call for Nominations for Spicer, Klein and Lytle Awards User Administration Update New AT&T Cell Tower Online Peninsula Bridge Summer Program Student Tour ____________________________________________________________________________

135

SSRL HEADLINES October 2003  

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4 October, 2003 4 October, 2003 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Structural Insight into the Metal Active Site of Methane Monooxygenase - an Enzyme that Converts Methane to Methanol Annual On-site Review by DOE Office of Science Visit to SLAC and SSRL by Staff from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) SPEAR3 Passes Final DOE Construction Review Record Attendance at 30th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting and Workshops James Penner-Hahn Receives 2003 Lytle Award SSRLUO-EC Election Results and Update JCSG Hits the 100 Solved Structures Mark User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Structural Insight into the Metal Active Site of

136

SSRL HEADLINES April 2006  

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April, 2006 April, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - SSRL Aids Development of Plastic Electronics Science Highlight - Developing Ways to Treat Arthritis SPEAR3 Accelerator Safety Envelope Streak Camera Measurements of the SPEAR3 Beam JCSG 5th Annual Meeting User Advocacy Update Apply for Berkeley-Stanford Summer School User Administration Update Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - SSRL Aids Development of Plastic Electronics (contact: M.F. Toney, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu) Schematic of orientation of crystals within the film. For close to a decade, researchers have been trying to improve the

137

SSRL HEADLINES Feb 2007  

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8 February, 2007 8 February, 2007 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Five Images for the Price of One: Using X-ray Holography for Simultaneous Imaging Science Highlight - Using Microorganisms to Understand Hydrogen Catalysis Science Highlight - Ultrafast Bond Softening in Bismuth - a Femto-second Pump-probe SPPS Study XAS Course for Structural Molecular Biology Applications - March 13-16 SSRL Advisory Committees Convene in February John Zachara among Eight DOE Lawrence Award Winners SSRL Macromolecular Crystallography Remote Data Collection X-ray/VUV Beam Time Requests due by March 5 Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________

138

SSRL HEADLINES - August 2011  

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2 - August 2011 2 - August 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: Continuous Improvement Science Highlight - Controlling Protein Aggregation: Lessons from Fungi Science Highlight - Exploiting Instability for Tomorrow's Electronics Science Highlight - New Techniques for Identifying Iron Species in Geologic Samples Annual Users' Conference, October 22-26 Awards: Stefan Mannsfeld, Jonathan Rivnay, Johanna Nelson User Administration Update How to Wow! "Secrets" for a Successful Proposal In the News: Graphene Electronics, Vemurafenib __________________________________________________________________________ 1. From the Director of SSRL: Continuous Improvement Chi-Chang Kao

139

SSRL HEADLINES Jun 2006  

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1 June, 2006 1 June, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Chemists Discover how Nature Makes Medicine Science Highlight - Protecting against DNA Invasion SPEAR3 Fast Orbit Feedback Milestone Achieved in June Register for SSRL Summer Workshops in the Structural Biology Sciences Call for Nominations for Klein, Spicer and Lytle Awards Stanford Board of Trustees Committee Visits SLAC Secretary of Energy Bodman Speaks to DOE Employees Summer Public Science Lectures at SLAC and Stanford University More SSRL News for a Wider Audience Macromolecular Crystallography Proposals due July 1 Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________

140

SSRL HEADLINES July 2004  

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July, 2004 July, 2004 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Nanomaterials Act Differently than Bulk Materials Science Highlight - Ordering in Thermally Oxidized Silicon Message from the SSRL Director DOE Secretary Abraham Visits SLAC; Launches STARS Program LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee Meets to Review Proposals User Operations Update SSRL Honors Bill Spicer by Creating a New Investigator Award and Special Sessions at the October Users' Meeting Call for Nominations for 2004 Lytle Award Upcoming Seminars, Workshops, Meetings User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Nanomaterials Act Differently than Bulk

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141

SSRL HEADLINES JAN 2013  

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7 - January 2013 7 - January 2013 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From Director PieroPianetta We have begun the new year with a flurry of activities, and it promises to be a busy few months. The run started on schedule after the well-deserved holiday break for the staff, and the science activities began immediately as SPEAR3 was ramped to 450 mA current and the beam lines rapidly opened up. We were pleased with the announcement of the Stanford-DOE Management and Operations Contract extension, ensuring a seamless continuation of SSRL's user program. Last week the SSRL Scientific Advisory Committee met (as it does twice a year) and we presented our progress in science, beam lines and accelerator performance as well as our future plans, all of which was well received. We are now moving vigorously to prepare for an operations review that the Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences is performing for all user facilities this year. Our turn arrives in April -this is a very important review for SSRL - and we intend to do well! On a different note - we welcome Soichi Wakatsuki back to SSRL and SLAC and look forward to working with him on future program developments.

142

SSRL HEADLINES Nov 2012  

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5 - November 2012 5 - November 2012 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From Director PieroPianetta I would like to ask you all to join me in thanking Chi-Chang Kao for his outstanding leadership of SSRL over the past two years and anticipating his continued interaction as Director of SLAC. He created a vision that, while keeping SSRL's core values of doing outstanding science and providing excellent support to its users, brought new approaches to enhance SSRL's capabilities and contribute to the research that addresses paths towards meeting the Nation's energy needs. This has created new connections with groups beyond our traditional user base and new synergies between our research groups at SSRL, Photon Science and Stanford University. Now that I'm back in the saddle, I look forward to the challenge of maintaining the momentum we have developed over the past several years as well as working with all of you to develop new directions in the future.

143

SSRL HEADLINES April 2013  

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0 - April 2013 0 - April 2013 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From Director PieroPianetta As we have communicated in several SSRL Headlines issues over the past year, SSRL has spent a significant effort to define our scientific priorities, strategic focus in key areas, and future plans. We have worked with many of you during this process, and sought and received feedback from our advisory committees. We are pleased to say that we have recently completed this endeavor and formalized our plans in a document - The SSRL Strategic Plan 2013. We welcome your comments - and participation in realizing it. It lays out our future plans for enhancements to the SPEAR3 accelerator, new and further evolved beam lines and facilities driven by science programs in energy materials, chemistry and catalysis, and structural molecular biology, and our approach to user support. The Plan was also an important instrument in our planning for the DOE Basic Energy Science Operations Budget Review, which is being performed for all synchrotron facilities this year; SSRL's turn was during April 11-12.

144

SSRL HEADLINES DEC 2012  

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6 - December 2012 6 - December 2012 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From Director PieroPianetta We've reached the end of another exciting year at SSRL and are getting ready for the winter break. The 2012 run was quite successful with an average uptime of 96.8% in spite of a site-wide power outage in April. We delivered 5,162 hours which was almost 400 hours more than the previous year enabling 1,597 users to conduct experiments. In the past year, we raised the SPEAR3 current to our new standard of 450 mA and finished insulating the accelerator tunnel which will provide for even more stable photon beams. I would like to offer my thanks to the outstanding SSRL staff for their hard work in continuing to keep SSRL at the forefront, and our users for performing such excellent science using our very diverse beam line facilities. Thanks also goes to our funding agencies for their support in enabling SSRL to serve the science community.

145

Light-Source Facilities  

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Facility, P.R. China CANDLE, Armenia HSRC - Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Japan iFEL - Institute of Free Electron Laser, Japan INDUS 1 INDUS 2, India IR FEL...

146

SSRL HEADLINES March 2013  

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9 - March 2013 9 - March 2013 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** Science Highlights thumbnail Biotic-Abiotic Pathways: A New Paradigm for Uranium Reduction in Sediments - Contact: John Bargar (SSRL) As part of a larger, DOE-funded investigation into bioremediation of uranium in contaminated aquifers, a group of SSRL scientists made a surprising discovery about how uranium ions behave in the environment. In addition to overturning current scientific models, this research will lead to more efficient, less costly methods for uranium cleanup and mining. Their research hinged on the fundamental subject of electron transfer-redox

147

SSRL HEADLINES August 2007  

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2 August, 2007 2 August, 2007 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - The Chemical Form of Mercury in the Fish We Eat Science Highlight - How Stents Take the Strain 2007 Spicer Young Investigator Award to be Presented to Hugh Harris Jessica Vey to Receive 2007 Klein Award Register for 2007 SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops, September 28-October 3 Learn About SR Techniques or Brush Up Your Skills at September 30 Workshop Several Concurrent Workshops Offered on October 3 Calling Interested Users to Serve on the SSRLUO Executive Committee SSRL Advisory Committees Convene in August Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - The Chemical Form of Mercury in the Fish We Eat

148

SSRL Seminar Series  

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Hiring Filamentous Bacteriophage for Targeted Cancer Treatment Hiring Filamentous Bacteriophage for Targeted Cancer Treatment SSRL Seminar Tuesday, August 24, 2010 11:00 - 12:30 SSRL Conference room -137-322 Chuanbin Mao Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry - University of Oklahoma My research group is actively employing viruses, flagella and bacteria to perform varying functions for the development of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. This talk will highlight our recent work in this area and focus on the use of genetically modifiable bacteriophage (also called phage) for targeted cancer treatment. Filamentous phage is a nanorod-like virus (~900 nm long and ~7 nm wide) that specifically infects bacteria and is non-toxic to human beings. It is assembled from a core of DNA surrounded by a shell of coat proteins. The coat proteins are

149

SSRL HEADLINES March 2011  

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9 March, 2011 9 March, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: SAC Feedback and Evolving Strategic Plan To our Friends and Colleagues in Japan Science Highlight - Mixing of Active Layer Components in Plastic Solar Cells Science Highlight - Small Structural Changes can Cause Significant Functional Changes in Oxygen-Binding Enzymes SLAC Starts Photon Science Seminar Series 2011 SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops, October 24-26 Summer School on Synchrotron X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, June 28-July 1 Workshop on XAS and RIXS Data Analysis Using CTM4XAS and CTM4RIXS, May 24 A Science to Art, an Art to Science User Administration Update End of Run Summaries Now Online NUFO Goes to Washington

150

SSRL HEADLINES Aug 2012  

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2 - August 2012 2 - August 2012 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From Director Chi-Chang Kao The SSRL FY2012 run ended on August 13, with a 96.8% uptime of the accelerator and 5162 hours delivered to our users - the completion of yet another highly successful run cycle. As I mentioned in last month's column, SSRL also passed a major milestone this run, in that the SPEAR3 accelerator current was increased on July 25 to 450 mA, and we continued at this current through the end of the run. Many experiments saw a direct benefit from this new level of resulting flux/brightness and we are continuing to evaluate the results and improvements during the shutdown.

151

SSRL HEADLINES March 2010  

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9 March, 2010 9 March, 2010 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature from the Oxygen-evolving Complex of Photosynthesis Science Highlight - Deadly Carcinogen Unraveled: The Molecular Origami of Fungal Polyketides Researchers Rediscover the Structure of Water SSRL Scientific Advisory Committee Convened in March Joachim Stöhr to Deliver the 2010 Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lectures April 12-13 The 5th Annual SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences: Theory and Application The 37th International Conference on Vacuum Ultraviolet and X-ray Physics (VUVX2010) Workshop Wrap-up on Exploring X-ray Effects on Biological Samples

152

SSRL HEADLINES April 2011  

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0 April, 2011 0 April, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: Planning for this Fiscal Year and Many More to Come Science Highlight - Understanding the Innate Immune System Science Highlight - High-temperature Superconductor Spills Secret: A New Phase of Matter Stanford-Berkeley Group Awarded $25 Million for Advanced Solar Research Axel Brunger Receives DeLano Award Stern, Lytle, Sayers, and Rehr Win 2011 APS Arthur H. Compton Award Seen at SSRL: Leland Cogliani User Science Exhibition on Capitol Hill Science & Engineering Nifty Fifty Upcoming Events: New Scientific Computing Series; Annual Users' Conference User Administration Update In the News: A New Type of Battery, Reptile Skin, and Magnet Design

153

SSRL HEADLINES May 2012  

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1 - May 2012 1 - May 2012 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From Director Chi-Chang Kao I attended the "X-rays in the Fourth Dimension" workshop organized by the Advanced Photon Source earlier in May. Although it has been less than a year from the "Time Resolved X-Ray Science at High Repetition Rate" workshop held at the SSRL/LCLS user conference last fall, there has been significant development in sources, including demonstration of self-seeding at LCLS and hybrid low-alpha mode at SSRL. This latest workshop again generated many novel new ideas in science, and accelerator improvements that will lead to exciting new developments in the coming years.

154

SSRL HEADLINES April 2012  

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0 - April 2012 0 - April 2012 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** From Director Chi-Chang Kao: SSRL's Molecular Environmental and Interface Science Strategy We continue to define SSRL's five-to-ten year strategic goals. In this column we present our plans for Molecular Environmental and Interface Science at SSRL. Understanding and mitigating biological and environmental impacts of energy production is important to society. Fundamental research is needed to better understand or control carbon cycling and sequestration (in soils, oceans, the atmosphere, and geological repositories), safe disposition of nuclear waste, fate and mitigation of groundwater contaminants, and sustainability and resiliency of complex biogeochemical and environmental systems that support life on Earth. Key processes are driven by reactions occurring at the molecular scale, at interfaces between water, minerals, and biological surfaces (e.g., biofilms), and in complex natural mesoscale systems in which dimensions range from nano- to millimeter. The exceptional capabilities of synchrotron light source facilities, which provide information about bonding environments and electronic structure under in situ conditions, over a continuum of length and temporal scales, are crucial to enabling new discoveries and building our understanding in these research areas. Full understanding of these systems requires consideration of both "bio" and "geo" components and how they interact. Read more...

155

SSRL HEADLINES Nov 2001  

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5 November, 2001 5 November, 2001 _____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Complex Environmental Systems: Heavy Metals, Mineral Surfaces, and Biofilms DOE Under Secretary Visits SLAC High Magnetic Field Facility Now Fully Functional FY2002 Experimental Run Off to a Good Start Crystallography Beam Lines Up and Running with New Developments Janos Hajdu Discusses Interest in FEL Project at SLAC User Research Administration Announcements Job Opportunities at SSRL 1. Science Highlight - Complex Environmental Systems: Heavy Metals, Mineral Surfaces, and Biofilms (contact: Alexis Templeton, alexis@pangea.stanford.edu) Microbial biofilms are widespread in soils and form microenvironments in which aqueous chemical conditions differ from that of the host ground

156

SSRL HEADLINES January 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 January, 2004 7 January, 2004 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Towards a Better Understanding of the Platelet Activation Mechanism SPEAR3 Kicks Off with Dedication Event New Tool for Reading a Molecule's Blueprints Announced SPPS Progress Report SSRL Proposal Review Panel and NIH SMB Advisory Committee Meet SSRLUOEC Update User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Towards a Better Understanding of the Platelet Activation Mechanism (contact: Kottayil I. Varughese) When a blood vessel is cut, the body activates a repair mechanism that eventually seals the cut and prevents further blood loss. This life saving

157

SSRL HEADLINES April 2008  

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0 April, 2008 0 April, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Faster than the Speed of Melting Science Highlight - Taming Asthma-related Proteins Could Lead to Easier Breathing for Many LCLS Proposal Preparation Workshops Announced Other Upcoming Schools, Users' Meetings and Workshops JCSG Annual Meeting New Sample Preparation Laboratory Access Policies at SSRL User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Faster than the Speed of Melting (contacts: A.M. Lindenberg, aaronl@slac.stanford.edu and K.J. Gaffney, kgaffney@slac.stanford.edu) The process of melting has long been of interest to scientists. In the case

158

SSRL HEADLINES November 2007  

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5 November, 2007 5 November, 2007 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Tuning the Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins Science Highlight - A Step Toward Understanding High-Temperature Superconductors Call for User Publications, Awards, Invited Lectures JCSG Celebrates Its 500th Structure Planning Any International Shipments? Holiday Shutdown User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Tuning the Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins (contacts: B. Hedman, hedman@ssrl.slac.stanford; K.O. Hodgson, hodgson@slac.stanford.edu; E.I. Solomon, edward.solomon@stanford.edu) Proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous in nature and

159

SSRL HEADLINES March 2009  

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9 March, 2009 9 March, 2009 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Scientists Identify Achilles' Heel of Flu Viruses Science Highlight - Macroscopic Quantum Insulator State Observed SLAC to Receive $68.3 Million in Recovery Act Funding SSRL's New CAMS Group has Great Chemistry XAS Experiments Resume on the 'New' BL4-1 SLAC Shines in Condensed Matter Physics at the March APS Meeting New Alloys under Pressure Studied by Photon Science Faculty Member SON, GERT and RWT1 User Safety Training Now Available via the Web New X-ray/VUV Proposal Deadlines Upcoming Photon Science-Related Workshops, Conferences and Schools __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Scientists Identify Achilles' Heel of Flu

160

SSRL HEADLINES March 2005  

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9 March, 2005 9 March, 2005 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Understanding the Mysteries of High-temperature Superconductors XLAM-GLAM Materials Science Review in Washington DC Applications for Stanford-Berkeley Physical Sciences Summer School Due by May 8 SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee March Meeting Visitors from the Photon Factory and the Chalmers University of Technology SPEAR3 "Breathes" in Response to Temperature Changes Clyde Smith to Give SLAC Public Lecture on April 26 User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Understanding the Mysteries of High-temperature Superconductors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SSRL HEADLINES Aug 2006  

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2 August, 2006 2 August, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - The Elusive Active Fold of a Catalytic RNA Call for Abstracts for SSRL33, October 12-13 Calling Interested Users to Serve on the SSRLUO Executive Committee Several Workshops Offered on October 11 Staff Director for the House Subcommittee on Energy Visits SLAC Ancient Science Revealed through X-ray Fluorescence Imaging Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Diffraction Studies Workshop Wrap-up Remote Macromolecular Crystallography Data Collection SLAC Kids Day 2006 - the Biggest and Best Yet! Even Electrons Need a Vacation Hydrogen: Key to a Sustainable Future - Excerpts from SLAC Today Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________

162

SSRL HEADLINES March 2006  

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9 March, 2006 9 March, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Two Negatives Make a Positive for Gene Therapy Science Highlight - Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine Antibody Science Highlight - Structure of a SARS Protein Teamwork Restores Beam in SPEAR3 SPPS Experiment Concludes in March Progress on New Beam Line for Advanced Micro-crystal Analysis Using X-ray Fluorescence to Reveal Archimedes' Buried Text Department of Energy Officials Visit SLAC SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee to Meet April 17 Upcoming Meetings User Administration Update Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Two Negatives Make a Positive for Gene Therapy

163

SSRL HEADLINES May 2006  

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May, 2006 May, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Revealing the Structure of a Hereditary Disease New Information in the Fight against Drug-resistant Bacteria Beam Line 7 Gets a Makeover Electrical Safety Month across the DOE Complex DOE Officials Visit SLAC Spring SLAC Policy Committee Meeting Workshop on Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Diffraction Studies in Structural Biology SSRL Remote Access Workshop to be Held in New York Wrap-up on First Annual Workshop on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences Macromolecular Crystallography Proposals due July 1 Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________

164

SSRL HEADLINES January 2006  

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7 January, 2006 7 January, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Hydrogenation of Carbon Nanotubes Provides Step toward Hydrogen Vehicles Beam Line Update Arsenic the Silent Killer - Public Lecture on February 28 Abstracts for XAFS13 Due March 15 First Announcement - Workshop on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences: Theory and Application Light Source Communicators Meet at SLAC in January SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee Meets on February 13 Sample Furnace Now Available for General Use Beam Time Requests Due in February Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Hydrogenation of Carbon Nanotubes Provides Step

165

SSRL HEADLINES Jan 2007  

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7 January, 2007 7 January, 2007 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Key Component of Malaria Parasite Invasion Motor Revealed Science Highlight - On the Role of Copper Regulation in a M. tuberculosis Repressor Science Highlight - Minding the Gaps: Explaining the Behavior of a High-Temperature Superconductor XAS Course for Structural Molecular Biology Applications in March New Hard X-ray Microscope Commissioned on Beam Line 6-2 Scanning the Microworld: SSRL's New Hard X-ray Microprobe Sagittal Focusing, LN-cooled Monochromator Installed on Beam Line 7-2 Workshop on New Directions in X-ray Scattering Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________

166

SSRL29 Abstract Form  

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Users are invited to submit abstracts highlighting research activities conducted over the past year at SSRL for oral or poster presentation at the meeting. Posters will be displayed throughout the meeting and will be highlighted during a poster session and reception on Monday, October 7. Graduate students submitting posters must also register for the Users' Meeting and are eligible for one of the poster prizes. All posters require submission of this form no later than September 23 to guarantee space and inclusion in the program materials. Users are invited to submit abstracts highlighting research activities conducted over the past year at SSRL for oral or poster presentation at the meeting. Posters will be displayed throughout the meeting and will be highlighted during a poster session and reception on Monday, October 7. Graduate students submitting posters must also register for the Users' Meeting and are eligible for one of the poster prizes. All posters require submission of this form no later than September 23 to guarantee space and inclusion in the program materials. Please Note: Fields marked with require entry. General Presentation Information Please select a presentation type: Oral Presentation Poster Presentation Invited Presentation: Users' Meeting Invited Presentation: Workshop Speaker

167

SSRL HEADLINES April 2012  

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Molecular Environmental and Interface Science Strategy Molecular Environmental and Interface Science Strategy We continue to define SSRL's five-to-ten year strategic goals. In this column we present our plans for Molecular Environmental and Interface Science at SSRL. Chi-Chang Kao Understanding and mitigating biological and environmental impacts of energy production is important to society. Fundamental research is needed to better understand or control carbon cycling and sequestration (in soils, oceans, the atmosphere, and geological repositories), safe disposition of nuclear waste, fate and mitigation of groundwater contaminants, and sustainability and resiliency of complex biogeochemical and environmental systems that support life on Earth. Key processes are driven by reactions occurring at the molecular scale, at interfaces between water, minerals, and biological surfaces (e.g., biofilms), and in complex natural mesoscale systems in which dimensions range from nano- to millimeter. The exceptional capabilities of synchrotron light source facilities, which provide information about bonding environments and electronic structure under in situ conditions, over a continuum of length and temporal scales, are crucial to enabling new discoveries and building our understanding in these research areas. Full understanding of these systems requires consideration of both "bio" and "geo" components and how they interact.

168

SSRL HEADLINES May 2003  

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1 May, 2003 1 May, 2003 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Investigating Chromium-Contamination and Remediation SPPS Experiment Begins at SSRL and SLAC SPEAR3 Installation Progress Continues on Track XAS-Imaging User Commissioning Run on BL9-3 BL6-2 Available for Low Energy XAS with SPEAR3 Transitions in Leadership in ASD and SPEAR3 SLAC Scientific Policy Committee Meets Register Now for SRI 2003 and X-ray Coherence Satellite Meeting SSRLUO-EC Update SLAC Guest House Taking Reservations 1. Science Highlight - Investigating Chromium-Contamination and Remediation (contact: Colleen Hansel, Stanford University) Industrial activities have led to widespread chromium (Cr) contamination in the environment. Although Cr is an essential element for humans, the

169

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

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3-3 Jumbo START UP DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti 5-2 SSRL DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti DOWN -Faciliti START UP 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 5-4 NIM 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac 8820 -D.Lu-Fac

170

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

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this within 7.5 months with beam turn in the followin g month--2 months ahead of the completion milestone. Richard Boyce, responsible for the magnet and supports acquisition,...

171

SSRL ETS Group  

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STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Engineering & Technical Services Groups: Mechanical Services Group Mechanical Services Group Sharepoint...

172

Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Floor Support Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 Scheduling X-ray/VUV Macromolecular Crystallography Cathy Knotts Lisa Dunn 120 120 3191 2087 User Check-In/Badging Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 User Financial Accounts Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 Beam Lines/ VUV Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Mechanical Chuck Troxel, Jr. 120 2700 Beam Lines/ X-ray-VUV Electronics Alex Garachtchenko 120 3440 Beam Lines/ Macromolecular Crystallography Mike Soltis 277 3050 SMB XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer Erik Nelson 274 274 4944 3938 MEIS XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer

173

SPEAR History | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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SPEAR History SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the colliding-beam technique. Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring The next in the succession of Stanford colliders was the SPEAR (Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring) machine at SLAC, completed in 1972. SPEAR consists of a single ring some 80 meters in diameter, in which counter-rotating beams of electrons

174

Press Releases | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases 2012 Press Releases December 10, 2012 Experiment Finds Ulcer Bug's Achilles' Heel (see Press Release) June 6, 2012 New secrets from "Bay of the Pirates" warship that sunk 2,300 years ago (see Press Release) March 5, 2012 X-rays Reveal How Soil Bacteria Carry Out Surprising Chemistry (see Press Release) 2011 Press Releases July 3, 2011 Researchers Decipher Protein Structure of Key Molecule in DNA Transcription System (see Press Release) June 30, 2011 X-rays Reveal Patterns in the Plumage of the First Birds (see Press Release) March 24, 2011 High-temperature Superconductor Spills Secret: A New Phase of Matter (see Press Release) March 23, 2011 First Image of Protein Residue in 50 Million Year Old Reptile Skin (see Press Release) 2010 Press Releases

175

Proprietary Research | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Proprietary Research Proprietary Research Proprietary Research is defined as that for which users request confidentiality of proposal, data and results for a certain period of time. This research follows the guidelines for implementation by the Stanford University Faculty Senate and is executed through a Proprietary User Agreement. Proprietary Research is subject to the Department of Energy's full-cost recovery requirement for facility charges for the use of user facilities and advance payment of those charges. The facility charges are established as a dollar rate for each shift of beam time. Experimenters interested in conducting Proprietary Research should contact the User Research Administration Manager well in advance of the anticipated need for beam time as the legal and financial procedures involved may take

176

2012 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Publications 2 Publications Journal Papers L. A. Abriata, D. Alvarez-Paggi, G. N. Ledesma, N. J. Blackburn, A. J. Vila and D. H. Murgida, "Alternative Ground States Enable Pathway Switching in Biological Electron Transfer", Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17348 (2012) doi: 10.1073/pnas.1204251109 H. B. Akkerman, A. C. Chang, E. Verploegen, C. J. Bettinger, M. F. Toney and Z. Bao, "Fabrication of Organic Semiconductor Crystalline Thin Films and Crystals from Solution by Confined Crystallization", Org. Electron. 13, 235 (2012) doi: 10.1016/j.orgel.2011.11.005 A. E. Aleshin, R. G. DiScipio, B. Stec and R. C. Liddington, "Crystal Structure of C5b-6 Suggests Structural Basis for Priming Assembly of the Membrane Attack Complex", J. Biol. Chem. 287, 19642 (2012) doi:

177

The Research Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Research Program The Research Program What is the chemical and physical form of uranium in reduced aquifers? Uranium behavior in the Rifle, CO, aquifer. In order to directly interrogate the chemical and physical form of reduced uranium (U(IV)) in bioremediated sediments within the contaminated aquifer at the Rifle site, a novel technique was developed based on reactors installed in wells (center right). U(IV) was found to be bound to biomass (structural model shown in upper left-hand) within thin (microns) sulfide-rich coatings on mineral grains (bottom left). Uranium in its oxidized (U(VI)) form, is one of the most common, abundant, and problematic subsurface contaminants at legacy nuclear sites. In contrast, the tetravalent form of uranium (U(IV) ) is relatively insoluble

178

2005 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Publications 5 Publications Journal Papers E. C. Abresch, H. L. A. Axelrod, J. T. Beatty, J. A. Johnson, R. Nechushtai and M. L. Paddock, "Characterization of a Highly Purified, Fully Active, Crystallizable RC-LH1-PufX Core Complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides", Photosynth. Res. 86, 61 (2005) E. J. Adams, Y.-H. Chien and K. C. Garcia, "Structure of a gdT Cell Receptor in Complex with the Nonclassical MHC T22", Science 308, 5719 (2005) H. Adhikari, P. C. McIntyre, S. Sun, P. Pianetta and C. E. D. Chidsey, "Photoemission Studies of Passivation of Germanium Nanowires", Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 263109 (2005) M. Adler, J. Bryant, B. Buckman, I. Islam, B. Larsen, S. Finster, L. Kent, K. May, R. Mohan, S. Yuan and M. Whitlow, "Crystal Structures of

179

Forms & Applications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forms & Applications Forms & Applications Forms: Before You Arrive User Information Log in to the User Portal to Register or Update Contact Informatioin Proposals Submit Proposals via User Portal (including Rapid Access and Letters of Intent) Proposal Extension Requests X-ray/VUV/SMB Macromolecular Crystallography (MC) User Agreements Non-Proprietary User Agreement Proprietary Research User Agreement Beam Time & Support Requests Log in to User Portal to Submit Beam Time or User Support Requests Computer Account X-ray/VUV/SMB Macromolecular Crystallography Use of SLAC Information Resources (submit with account request) User Financial Account User Financial Account Gas & Cryogenics Liquid Helium & Standard/Specialty Shipping & Receiving Hazardous Materials Shipper Non-Hazardous Materials Shipper

180

User Agreements | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agreements Agreements Institutional Agreements Required to Access DOE National User Facilities In recognition of the nation's expanding need to engage businesses and universities in the areas of commercial and basic science research, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed two special types of agreements for use at all DOE National Laboratories with approved designated user facilities, see http://www.gc.doe.gov/1002.htm. Non-Proprietary User Agreement (PDF) (General User Agreement; no cost for general users) Proprietary User Agreement (PDF) (For Confidential or Proprietary Research; also requires advance payment) A User Agreement is required for all users and must be executed by the appropriate institutional officer(s) at the user's institution. A single User Agreement covers all experimenters from that institution (User

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

User Financial Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Financial Accounts Financial Accounts Why Have a User Financial Account? Each user group should establish a user financial account to procure gases, chemicals, supplies or services to support your experiment at SLAC's user facilities and to send samples, dewars, or other equipment between SLAC and your institution. Establishing/Renewing a User Financial Account The most common method of establishing or renewing a user financial account is by providing a purchase order (PO) (or a letter from the financial officer of the user institution). The PO should be made to SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the amount of estimated expenditures (the suggested minimum is $1,000). The PO should include the expiration date, user names, funding agency, grant/contract number and whether expenditures

182

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics and Technology Development Workshop on Photocathode Experiments at the SLAC Gun Test Facililty Friday, December 3, 2010 A workshop was held on Friday, December 3, 2010...

183

SLAC Access Update | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have an appropriate visa before entering the US (for business purposes and not for tourism). * Bring identification to verify citizenship (US driver's license for US citizens,...

184

Computer Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accounts Each user group must have a computer account. Additionally, all persons using these accounts are responsible for understanding and complying with the terms outlined in the...

185

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of any merchandise shipped or consigned by or to the FPPI and to receive or ship any merchandise on the FPPI's behalf. I hereby certify that all statements and...

186

2014 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R. A. Mulvenna, J. L. Weidman, B. Jing, J. A. Pople, Y. Zhu, B. W. Boudouris and W. A. Phillip, "Tunable Nanoporous Membranes with Chemically-Tailored Pore Walls from Triblock...

187

Foreign Users | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Customs) Passport Legal Permanent Residents (LPR) (Also known as Permanent Resident Aliens, PRA's, andor "green card" holders) Or Conditional Permanent Residents (CPR)...

188

UF Access List | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NL Alaverdashvili Mariam 522740 010915-011215 011515-012015 3614 3614 U SASKATCHEWAN Albert Felicie 458988 072515-072915 LG84 LLNL Aleshin Alexander 280950 1128...

189

2011 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Uranium Chemical Species Electrodeposited for Alpha Spectrometry Sources", Rev. Mex. Fis. 57, 21 (2011) M. T. Burger, S. Pecchi, A. Wagman, Z.-J. Ni, M. Knapp, T. Hendrickson,...

190

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SPEAR History SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the colliding-beam technique. Linac map showing SPEAR The next in the succession of Stanford colliders was the SPEAR (Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring) machine at SLAC, completed in 1972. SPEAR consists of a single ring some 80 meters in diameter, in which counter-rotating beams of electrons and positrons were circulated at

191

2009 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

09 Publications 09 Publications Journal Papers J. Abendroth, A. C. Kreger and W. G. J. Hol, "The Dimer Formed by the Periplasmic Domain of EpsL from the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio parahaemolyticus", J. Struct. Biol. 168, 313 (2009) doi: 10.1016/j.jsb.2009.07.022 J. Abendroth, D. D. Mitchell, K. V. Korotkov, T. L. Johnson, A. Kreger, M. Sandkvist and W. G. J. Hol, "The Three-dimensional Structure of the Cytoplasmic Domains of EpsF from the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio cholerae", J. Struct. Biol. 166, 303 (2009) doi: 10.1016/j.jsb.2009.03.009 V. Aguilar-Guerrero, R. J. Lobo-Lapidus and B. C. Gates, "Genesis of a Cerium Oxide Supported Gold Catalyst for CO Oxidation: Transformation of Mononuclear Gold Complexes into Clusters as Characterized by X-ray

192

SSRL HEADLINES May 2002  

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requisite technologies and a broad range of scientific applications. It will cover both fundamentals of EUV, soft x-ray, hard x-ray synchrotron radiation and its use in...

193

SSRL- Proposal Review Panel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab search Go [an error occurred while processing this directive] Proposal Review Panel Sub Panels Structural Molecular Biology & Biophysics Materials 1: Structure, Reactivity & Self-Assembly Materials 2: Electronic Properties, Magnetic Properties & Surface Science Molecular Environmental & Interface Science Membership Torgny Gustafsson Rutgers University Dept of Physics & Astronomy 136 Frelinghuysen Rd Piscataway NJ 08854-0849 Victor Henrich Yale University Dept of Applied Physics 327 Becton Center, 15 Prospect St. New Haven CT 06511 Christopher P. Hill University of Utah Biochemistry 15 N. Medical Dr. East, Rm 4100 Salt Lake City, UT 84112-5650 Franz Himpsel University of Wisconsin Dept of Physics 1150 University Avenue

194

1998 SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule Proposal Deadline Schedule Announcement Experimental Period Duration Tue, Nov 11, 17:00 Wed, Nov 12, '97 17:00 Mon, Nov 17, '97 18:00-Wed, Nov 19, '97 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Dec 01, '97 17:00 Tue, Dec 02, '97 13:00 Mon, Dec 08, '97 06:00-Wed, Dec 10, '97 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Jan 05, 17:00 Tue, Jan 06, 13:00 Mon, Jan 12, 18:00-Wed, Jan 14, 02:00 32 hrs Fri, Jan 16, 17:00 Tue, Jan 20, 13:00 Mon, Jan 26, 06:00-Wed, Jan 28, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Feb 02, 17:00 Tue, Feb 03, 13:00 Tue, Feb 10, 18:00-Thu, Feb 12, 02:00 32 hrs Tue, Feb 17, 17:00 Wed, Feb 18, 17:00 Mon, Feb 23, 06:00-Wed, Feb 25, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Mar 02, 17:00 Tue, Mar 03, 13:00 Mon, Mar 09, 18:00-Wed, Mar 11, 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Mar 16, 17:00 Tue, Mar 17, 13:00 Mon, Mar 23, 06:00-Wed, Mar 25, 02:00 44 hrs

195

1997 SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule Proposal Deadline Schedule Announcement Experimental Period Duration Mon, Nov 11, '96 17:00 Tue, Nov 12, '96 13:00 Tue, Nov 19, '96 15:00-Wed, Nov 20, '96 02:00 11 hrs Mon, Dec 02, '96 17:00 Tue, Dec 03, '96 13:00 Mon, Dec 09, '96 06:00-Wed, Dec 11, '96 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Jan 06, 17:00 Tue, Jan 07, 13:00 Mon, Jan 13, 18:00-Wed, Jan 15, 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Jan 20, 17:00 Tue, Jan 21, 13:00 Mon, Jan 27, 06:00-Wed, Jan 29, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Feb 03, 17:00 Tue, Feb 04, 13:00 Tue, Feb 11, 18:00-Thu, Feb 13, 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Feb 18, 09:30 Tue, Feb 18, 13:00 Mon, Feb 24, 06:00-Wed, Feb 26, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Mar 03, 17:00 Tue, Mar 04, 13:00 Mon, Mar 10, 18:00-Wed, Mar 12, 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Mar 17, 17:00 Tue, Mar 18, 13:00 Mon, Mar 24, 06:00-Wed, Mar 26, 02:00 44 hrs

196

2000 SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule Proposal Deadline Schedule Announcement Experimental Period Duration Mon, Nov 08, '99 17:00 Tue, Nov 09, '99 13:00 Mon, Nov 15, '99 18:00-Wed, Nov 17, '99 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Nov 29, '99 17:00 Tue, Nov 30, '99 13:00 Mon, Dec 06, '99 06:00-Wed, Dec 08, '99 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Jan 03, 17:00 Tue, Jan 04, 13:00 Mon, Jan 10, 18:00-Wed, Jan 12, 02:00 32 hrs Fri, Jan 14, 17:00 Tue, Jan 18, 13:00 Mon, Jan 24, 06:00-Wed, Jan 26, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Feb 14, 17:00 Tue, Feb 15, 17:00 Tue, Feb 22, 06:00-Thu, Feb 24, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Feb 28, 17:00 Tue, Feb 29, 13:00 Mon, Mar 06, 18:00-Wed, Mar 08, 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Mar 13, 17:00 Tue, Mar 14, 13:00 Mon, Mar 20, 06:00-Wed, Mar 22, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Apr 10, 17:00 Tue, Apr 11, 13:00 Mon, Apr 17, 06:00-Wed, Apr 19, 02:00 44 hrs

197

2002 SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule Proposal Deadline Schedule Announcement Experimental Period Duration Mon, Nov 05, '01 17:00 Tue, Nov 06, '01 13:00 Mon, Nov 12, '01 18:00-Wed, Nov 14, '01 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Dec 03, '01 17:00 Tue, Dec 04, '01 13:00 Mon, Dec 10, '01 06:00-Wed, Dec 12, '01 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Dec 17, '01 09:00 Tue, Dec 18, '01 13:00 Mon, Jan 07, 18:00-Wed, Jan 9, 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Jan 14, 12:00 Tue, Jan 15, 13:00 Tue, Jan 22, 06:00-Thu, Jan 24, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Jan 28, 17:00 Tue, Jan 29, 17:00 Tue, Feb 05, 18:00-Thu, Feb 07, 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Feb 11, 17:00 Tue, Feb 12, 17:00 Tue, Feb 19, 06:00-Wed, Feb 20, 02:00 20 hrs Mon, Feb 25, 17:00 Tue, Feb 26, 13:00 Mon, Mar 04, 18:00-Wed, Mar 06, 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Mar 11, 17:00 Tue, Mar 12, 13:00 Mon, Mar 18, 06:00-Wed, Mar 20, 02:00 44 hrs

198

1999 SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule 9 SSRL Accelerator Physics Schedule Proposal Deadline Schedule Announcement Experimental Period Duration Mon, Nov 30, '98 17:00 Tue, Dec 01, '98 13:00 Mon, Dec 07, '98 06:00-Wed, Dec 09, '98 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Jan 04, 17:00 Tue, Jan 05, 13:00 Mon, Jan 11, 18:00-Wed, Jan 13, 02:00 32 hrs Fri, Jan 15, 17:00 Tue, Jan 19, 13:00 Mon, Jan 25, 06:00-Wed, Jan 27, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Feb 01, 17:00 Tue, Feb 02, 13:00 Tue, Feb 09, 18:00-Thu, Feb 11, 02:00 32 hrs Tue, Feb 16, 17:00 Wed, Feb 17, 17:00 Mon, Feb 22, 06:00-Wed, Feb 24, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Mar 01, 17:00 Tue, Mar 02, 13:00 Mon, Mar 08, 18:00-Wed, Mar 10, 02:00 32 hrs Mon, Mar 15, 17:00 Tue, Mar 16, 13:00 Mon, Mar 22, 06:00-Wed, Mar 24, 02:00 44 hrs Mon, Apr 12, 17:00 Tue, Apr 13, 13:00 Mon, Apr 19, 06:00-Wed, Apr 21, 02:00 44 hrs

199

SSRL Meetings, Workshops & Training Archive | Stanford Synchrotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8-11 October 2014 SSRLLCLS Users' Conference and Workshops 7-8 October 2014 High Power Laser Workshop 3-5 June 2014 7th SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Scattering in Materials...

200

SPEAR3 | A Brighter Source at SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

500 mA news : last update July 19, 2005 500 mA news : last update July 19, 2005 SPEAR3 2004 Closeout Report SPEAR3 Commissioning Update First SPEAR3 Beam into SSRL Beam Line Hutch A major milestone for the SPEAR3 commissioning occurred at 17:56 on Monday, March 8, 2004, when the first SPEAR3 synchrotron light was observed on a monitor located inside BL9-3's monochromator housing (Fig. 1). This was followed by threading the beam through the focusing optics to deliver beam inside the experimental hutch enclosure some 20 mins later. The in-hutch picture of the beam (Fig. 2) shows banding, which is consistent with the effect of the separated pole pairs in the wiggler viewed at the 5-mrad off-axis observation angle of BL9-3. This effect could not be seen with the old SPEAR2 ring as its source size was so big that the radiation from each pole pair could not be resolved. Thus even in this first photo the effect of the reduced source size on SPEAR3 is immediately seen.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Biomimetic Model Studies Reveal the Role of the Ca2+ Ion in Photosyste...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MSIP of Korea through NRF (2013R1A1A2062737) and an ALCA project from JST from MEXT of Japan. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) operations are funded by the U.S....

202

Microsoft Word - Sarangi bh  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MSIP of Korea through NRF (2013R1A1A2062737) and an ALCA project from JST from MEXT of Japan. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) operations are funded by the U.S....

203

SSRL Computer & Networking Support Requests  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Help Request Help Request To use this form - Please enter your contact information below and select a category for your request. Also, provide a brief description of your request. When purchasing items, please include an account number. Priority*: Normal Urgent Requestor: (Name of person to contact for this request) Email: Phone: Support Required: I don't know Computer Support Network Support Printer Support Select Type of Request I don't know Details of your request: Property Control #: PC# Account number (as needed): * Normal priority requests will be attended to within the next two business days at the most. Urgent requests will receive attention as soon as possible. Submit Clear Fields SSRL Computing SSRL Home SLAC Home Stanford University Last Updated: 06 JUN 2007

204

New Directions in X-ray Scattering - SSRL  

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6, 2006 A summary of the workshop on New Directions in X-ray Scattering On Dec 6th, we held a day long workshop to solicit user input on the new directions that the SSRL...

205

SPEAR III: A brighter source at SSRL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By replacing the magnets and vacuum chamber for the 3 GeV SPEAR II storage ring, the natural emittance of the machine can be reduced from 130 to 18 nm-rad and the stored current can be raised from 100 to 200 mA with a 50 h lifetime. This configuration increases focused photon flux for insertion device beamlines by an order of magnitude and the photon brightness for future undulators would exceed 10{sup 18} at 5 keV. Due to a higher critical energy, the photon flux in the 20 keV range for bending magnet beamlines increases by more than two orders of magnitude. We present preliminary SPEAR III design study results and plans to implement the facility upgrade with minimal downtime for SSRL users.

Hettel, R.; Boyce, R.; Brennan, S. [and others

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

206

BL1-4 Cheat Sheet | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BL1-4 Cheat Sheet BL1-4 Cheat Sheet Last updated 30 April 2012 This is a guide to help you operate SAXS Beamline 1-4 a beamline primarily dedicated to the SAXS Materials Science technique. Computer Control of Beamline 1-4 MARCCD PC runs on a LINUX OS. MARCCD runs the Mar (Rayonix) detector acquisition software, also called marccd (invoked with the command "marccd"). The Rayonix software is extremely unstable and bug-ridden and will crash even if simple interactions are attempted (e.g. inverting the intensity output display). Best to leave this PC well alone. The good news is that the functions that are necessary for data collection are all stable and can all be invoked remotely from BL14LX. MARCCD has been taken off the network so it is not perturbed by crosstalk.

207

Experimental Station 13-3 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(limited angle chiphi angle) Janis Liq-He cryostat Detector: Hamamatsu GaAsP photodiode, SJUTS channeltron - CXI - in vacuum x,y,z sample translator Janis Liq-He cryostat...

208

Experimental Station 4-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Detectors: Rayonix MX225HE, Dectris Pilatus 300k (for fast TR-SAXS), photodiode for transmitted intensity, APD for incident intensity, Vortex detector Slits:...

209

Experimental Station 13-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with a STXM microscope that provides 30 nm spatial resolution and a fast Avalanche photodiode that allows for time resolved pump probe experiments with 50 ps temporal resolution....

210

New Glass Vial Procedure | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

use. The rubber septa may become brittle at low temperatures, thus compromising the air-tight seal. If it becomes necessary to transport samples in crimp vials at low...

211

SLAC Science Focus Area | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

along active river margins as a result of alluvial channel migration and overbank flood events. We predict that NRZs are common in floodplains throughout the upper Colorado...

212

SSRL Radioactive Material Sample Holder Catalog 5/30/14 Page 1 of 17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SSRL Radioactive Material Sample Holder Catalog 5/30/14 Page 1 of 17 Hazard Class Category finger under vacuum #12;SSRL Radioactive Material Sample Holder Catalog 5/30/14 Page 2 of 17 1.d USGS polyethylene envelopes. Check for no contamination of each envelope. - External envelope glued onto the cell

Wechsler, Risa H.

213

Elements of doing work at SSRL (rev  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

follow JHAMs, safety procedures, and work plans (e.g., non-routine JHAMs, equipment lockout procedures, and radiation safety work control forms). 2. Ensure STAs are up to date...

214

SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

SSRL End of Run Party - 2014 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Party - 2014 August 8, 2014 (Friday) starts at 4:00PM Location - SLAC's Arrillaga Recreation Center Field, Bldg. 55. Please RSVP for Non-SLAC Employees (Your Guests). We must...

216

SSRL 32nd Users' Meeting Oct 17 - 19, 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Role of Small-Angle X-ray Scattering in Materials Science The Role of Small-Angle X-ray Scattering in Materials Science Chairs: M. Toney, J. Pople Admin Contact: Jackie Robleto Wed. Oct. 19th 9am - 5pm Location: SLAC Bldg. 40, Orange Conference Room This will be a hands on workshop with intent to demonstrate the burgeoning applicability of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) resulting from the expansion of research and development on the nanoscale. The day will begin with presentations, briefly showing the techniques involved in SAXS in Materials Science and more closely focusing on current experimental data at the forefront of research which demonstrate the power of SAXS capabilities. The presentations will be semi-formal, with questions and discussion encouraged. Attendees will then move onto the beamline floor to gain hands-on control of configuring the SAXS beamlines (Beamlines 1-4 and 4-2 will be utilized for this purpose) and collecting and analyzing data. New software recently developed for data analysis with be demonstrated. This practical aspect of the workshop will highlight both the techniques involved in SAXS data collection, reduction and analysis as well as identifying the limitations of existing beamline facilities. A final presentation will outline suggestions for a new Materials Science beamline at SSRL which can overcome those limitations and advance the capabilities that SSRL is can provide to the Materials Science community.

217

SPEAR3 | A Brighter Source at SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pat Dehmer's Talk: Pat Dehmer's Talk: Almost precisely se ven years ago, the Office of Basic Energy Sciences commissioned the first review of its four light sources. The review was headed by Bob Birgeneau, who was then the Dean of Science at MIT. The committee members were among the most distinguished researchers in the country. However, very deliberately, only a fraction of them knew about the light sources. Some of the others were skeptics. A few were hostile, primari ly because of the large budgets associated with construction and operation of the light sources. We asked this committee ten questions. The first question, the most important question, was: "What has been the scientific impact of synchrotron radiation based research during the past decade, and what is it expected to be during the next decade?"

218

Menlo Park,CA94025 SSRL/SMB Computer Account Request Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to 650-926-3292 or mail to Thomas Eriksson, SSRL,2575 Sand Hill Road, Bldg 120, to 650-926-3292 or mail to Thomas Eriksson, SSRL,2575 Sand Hill Road, Bldg 120, Menlo Park,CA94025 SSRL/SMB Computer Account Request Form June 2007 Fill in this form and sign the security statement mentioned at the bottom of this page to obtain an account on the Structural Molecular Biology Group computers at SSRL. Name Institution Mailing Address Email Address Telephone Your Username will normally be your last name, modified by your first initial if that account name is already in use. Initial password desired. (must be changed at your first login). The password must be exactly 8 characters in length, must be a combination of alpha numeric and special characters and can not be too obviously derived from a dictionary word. Note: The encrypted passwords are routinely scanned with commonly available cracking

219

SPEAR3 | A Brighter Source at SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SPEAR3 500mA first beam line operation SPEAR3 500mA first beam line operation Screen Shot showing BL 6-2 open at 500 mA - click for large version SPEAR3 at 500mA July 19, 2005 For the first time, on July 19, 2005, a beam line on SPEAR3 was opened and successfully operated at a current of 500 mA. This is a significant milestone along the path of bringing all the beam lines to sustained 500 mA operation. Furthermore, the previous evening saw successful first operation of SPEAR3 at 500 mA with all insertion device gaps closed. Beam Line 6-2, which was rebuilt for 500 mA last year, was used for this test. Rocking curve measurements and radiation surveys were conducted at 25, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 mA. These measurements were made using both the Si(111) and Si(333) reflections to observe any changes in the rocking

220

Microsoft Word - Work Authorization Internal to SSRL v03.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Division Internal Work Authorization Division Internal Work Authorization Work at SSRL is assigned on a distributed basis from the division director down through the organization. This document explains how that work assignment is communicated and authorized as it flows through the organization and how the results of the work and related improvement recommendations flow back through the division to inform all levels of management. At the management level, the assignment is the result of identifying what is to be accomplished, identifying what sector of the organization has the necessary skills and training to do that work, identifying and allocating resources and a schedule, and giving the assignment to perform the work. At levels closest to the work, the assignment is received and the Job Hazard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Two-Color Self-Seeding at LCLS | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two-Color Self-Seeding at LCLS Two-Color Self-Seeding at LCLS Wednesday, September 18, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Franz-Josef Decker, Accelerator Directorate The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) produces typically SASE FEL pulses with intensities of up to 5 mJ and at high photon energy an FEL bandwidth 0.2% (FWHM). Self-seeding with a diamond crystal reduces the bandwidth by a factor of 10 to 40. The range depends on which Bragg reflection is used, or the special setup of the electron beam like over-compression. The peak intensity level is lower by a factor of only five, giving the seeded beam an advantage of about 2.5 in average intensity over the use of a monochromator with SASE. At certain energies and crystal angles different Bragg lines cross which allows seeding at two or even three different colors inside the bandwidth

223

SSRL School 2007 on Hard X-ray Scattering Techniques in MES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 15-17, 2007 SSRL School on Hard X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences Group photo taken at the SSRL School on Hard X-ray Scattering Techniques in Materials and Environmental Sciences. A large, printable version of this group image is available via clicking on the image. Overview: Modern synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (SR-XRS) techniques offer the ability to probe nano- and atomic-scale structures and order/disorder relationships that critically govern the properties of advanced technological and environmental materials. The high collimation, intensity, and tunability of SR allow the investigation of a wide range of materials, including thin films and interfaces, nanoparticles, amorphous materials, solutions, hydrated and disordered bacteriogenic minerals,

224

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Emittance Measurements of the SSRL Gun Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A photocathode RF gun test stand is under construction in the injector vault of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. The goal of this facility is to produce an electron beam with a normalized emittance of 1-3[mm-mr], a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 10[ps] FWHM and approximately 1[nC] of charge per bunch. The beam will be generated from a laser driven copper photocathode RF gun developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL and UCLA. The 3-5[MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section. The emittance of the electron beam will be measured through the use of quadrupole scans with phosphor screens and also a wire scanner. The details of the experimental setup will be discussed, and first measurements will be presented and compared with results from PARMELA simulations.

Hernandez, Michael; Clendenin, James; Fisher, Alan; Miller, Roger; Palmer, Dennis; Park, Sam; Schmerge, John; Weaver, Jim; Wiedemann, Helmut; Winick, Herman; Yeremian, Dian; /SLAC; Meyerhofer, David; Reis, David; /Rochester U.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

27th Annual SSRL Users' Meeting -- Poster Session & Abstract Submission  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Poster Session Poster Session Poster Abstract Submissions - Due October 9 Users are invited to display posters highlighting research activities conducted over the past year at SSRL. Posters will be displayed throughout the meeting and will be highlighted during a poster session and reception on Thursday, October 19. Graduate students submitting posters must also register for the Users' Meeting and are eligible for one of four poster prizes. All posters require submission of the poster abstract form via the web no later than October 9. Each author will be assigned a 48" x 48" foam board on which diagrams, graphs, data, pictures and a small amount of text may be mounted. The foam board will be mounted on an easel. Each author will be expected to remain with his/her poster presentation throughout the poster session on Thursday afternoon.

229

Automation of High?Throughput Crystal Screening and Data Collection at SSRL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A robotic system for auto?mounting crystals from liquid nitrogen is now operational on SSRL beamlines (Cohen et al. J. Appl. Cryst. (2002). 35 720726). The system uses a small industrial 4?axis robot with a custom built actuator. Once mounted automated alignment of the sample loop to the X?ray beam readies the crystal for data collection. After data collection samples are returned to the cassette. The beamline Dewar accommodates three compact sample cassettes (holding up to 96 samples each). During the past 4 months the system on beamline 11?1 has been used to screen over 1000 crystals. The system has reduced both screening time and manpower. Integration of the hardware components is accomplished in the Distributed Control System architecture developed at SSRL (McPhillips et al. J. Synchrotron Rad. (2002) 9 401406). A crystal?screening interface has been implemented in Blu?Ice. Sample details can be uploaded from an Excel spreadsheet. The JCSG generates these spreadsheets automatically from their tracking database using standard database tools (http://www.jcsg.org). New diffraction image analysis tools are being employed to aid in extracting results. Automation also permits tele?presence. For example samples have been changed during the night without leaving home and scientists have screened crystals 1600 miles from the beamline. The system developed on beamline 11?1 has been replicated onto 1?5 9?1 9?2 and 11?3 and is used by both general users and the JCSG.

Mitchell D. Miller; Linda S. Brinen; Aina Cohen; Ashley M. Deacon; Paul Ellis; Scott E. McPhillips; Timothy M. McPhillips; R. Paul Phizackerley; S. Michael Soltis; Henry van den Bedem; Gnter Wolf; Qingping Xu; Zepu Zhang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

CX-005113: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

113: Categorical Exclusion Determination 113: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005113: Categorical Exclusion Determination Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Seismic Upgrade Phase 2 CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 01/24/2011 Location(s): California Office(s): Stanford Linear Accelerator Site Office The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is proposing to upgrade a portion of the existing Stanford Positron-Electron Asymmetric Ring (SPEAR) to meet seismic standards. The proposed work includes : 1) the replacement of concrete roof blocks, placement of footings and new concrete walls, and installation of seismic connections at the old Beam Line 4; 2) the replacement of existing concrete roof blocks with precast roof blocks, placement of new footings, and installation of seismic anchors and

231

Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The {sup 237}Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination.

Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Radiation Safety Work Control Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Safety Work Control Form Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-2) Rev July-2012 Area: Form #: Date: Preliminary Applicability Screen: (a) Will closing the beam line injection stoppers mitigate the radiological hazards introduced by the proposed work? Yes No (b) Can the closed state of the beam line injection stoppers be assured during the proposed work (ie., work does NOT involve injection stoppers or associated HPS)? Yes No If the answers to both questions are yes, the work can be performed safely under an SSRL RSWCF. If the answer to either question is no, then the work must be performed under a SPEAR3 RSWCF. Section 1: Description of work to be done, including date and time. (Person Responsible completes section)

233

Outline for doing work at SSRL 1. Work effectively, efficiently and safely  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, equipment lockout procedures, and radiation safety work control forms). 2. Ensure STAs are up to date.slac.stanford.edu/ad/addo/gfo/gfoindex.html. 5. CoHE (Control of Hazardous Energy) policy: http://www- group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/hazardous_activities/lockout

Wechsler, Risa H.

234

lightsource_data_challenge-analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Neutron Sources) serve 10,000 researchers per year. Recent improvements in detector speed and light source luminosity are yielding unprecedented data rates which exceed the...

235

SSRL HEADLINES February 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 February, 2009 8 February, 2009 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - X-rays Focusing on Mercury Water: The Strangest Liquid White Paper on Science and Technology of Future Light Sources Dehmer Announces DOE Accelerator Workshop From the Directors of Photon Science and SIMES: An Energy Facet of the SLAC-Stanford Partnership Uwe Bergmann to Head Chemical and Materials Science and User Support Group Upcoming Workshop on Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Diffraction Studies in Structural Biology User Experiments Resume on Upgraded BL4-1 and BL4-3 in March Rapid Access Program Expanded to Include BL7-2 XRD Experiments Purdue Scientist on Sabbatical at SLAC to Develop Ideas for Faster Synchrotron Imaging Methods

236

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-5 1-5 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI

237

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1, 2002 Nov. 18, 2002 Nov. 25, 2002 Dec. 02, 2002 1, 2002 Nov. 18, 2002 Nov. 25, 2002 Dec. 02, 2002 Dec. 09, 2002 Dec. 16, 2002 Dec. 23, 2002 Dec. 30, 2002 Jan. 06, 2003 Jan. 13, 2003 Jan. 20, 2003 Jan. 27, 2003 Feb. 03, 2003 Feb. 10, 2003 Feb. 17, 2003 Feb. 24, 2003 Mar. 03, 2003 Mar. 10, 2003 Mar. 17, 2003 Mar. 24, 2003 Mar. 31, 2003 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 11, 2002 Nov. 11, 2002 Nov. 12, 2002 Nov. 13, 2002 Nov. 14, 2002 Nov. 15, 2002 Nov. 16, 2002 Nov. 17, 2002 BEAM LINE 1-4 Nov. 11, 2002 Nov. 12, 2002 Nov. 13, 2002 Nov. 14, 2002 Nov. 15, 2002 Nov. 16, 2002 Nov. 17, 2002 Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled

238

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-4 SAS START UP START UP START UP START UP START UP START UP 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins 2-1 2-CIRCLE START UP START UP 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins START UP START UP 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins 8801A-Tompkins START UP START UP 8806 -Rek 8806 -Rek 8806 -Rek 8806 -Rek

239

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN BEAM LINE 1-5 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN

240

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 Dec. 09, 2013 Dec. 16, 2013 Dec. 23, 2013 Dec. 30, 2013 Jan. 06, 2014 Jan. 13, 2014 Jan. 20, 2014 Jan. 27, 2014 Feb. 03, 2014 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 04, 2013 Ops Re-start Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 BEAM LINE 1-4 Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 DOWN DOWN DOWN 8891 C.TASSONE 8891 C.TASSONE 8891 C.TASSONE 8891 C.TASSONE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-4 1-4 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled Unscheduled 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY Unscheduled CHANGE/8051 M.TONE 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY Unscheduled 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY 8051 M.TONEY BEAM LINE 2-1 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 3157* M.MONTERO-CA 3087 L.FUENTES-COB 3087 L.FUENTES-COB

242

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-5 1-5 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN

243

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7-1 7-1 Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 16, 2010 Nov. 17, 2010 Nov. 18, 2010 Nov. 19, 2010 Nov. 20, 2010 Nov. 21, 2010 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ MC CHECKOUT/2B87 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 8845 A.GONZALEZ 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA 2B87 I.SEVRIOUKOVA BEAM LINE 9-1 Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 16, 2010 Nov. 17, 2010 Nov. 18, 2010 Nov. 19, 2010 Nov. 20, 2010 Nov. 21, 2010 8866 T.DOUKOV 8866 T.DOUKOV 8866 T.DOUKOV 8866 T.DOUKOV 8866 T.DOUKOV FACI FACI

244

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 21, 2005 Feb. 28, 2005 Mar. 07, 2005 Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 21, 2005 Feb. 28, 2005 Mar. 07, 2005 Mar. 14, 2005 Mar. 21, 2005 Mar. 28, 2005 Apr. 04, 2005 Apr. 11, 2005 Apr. 18, 2005 Apr. 25, 2005 May 02, 2005 May 09, 2005 May 16, 2005 May 23, 2005 May 30, 2005 Jun. 06, 2005 Jun. 13, 2005 Jun. 20, 2005 Jun. 27, 2005 Jul. 04, 2005 Jul. 11, 2005 Jul. 18, 2005 Jul. 25, 2005 Aug. 01, 2005 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 15, 2005 Feb. 16, 2005 Feb. 17, 2005 Feb. 18, 2005 Feb. 19, 2005 Feb. 20, 2005 BEAM LINE 1-5 Feb. 14, 2005 Feb. 15, 2005 Feb. 16, 2005 Feb. 17, 2005 Feb. 18, 2005 Feb. 19, 2005 Feb. 20, 2005 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRIN/DOWN 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRINGTON 8858 D.HARRINGTON

245

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oct. 29, 2012 Nov. 05, 2012 Nov. 12, 2012 Nov. 19, 2012 Oct. 29, 2012 Nov. 05, 2012 Nov. 12, 2012 Nov. 19, 2012 Nov. 26, 2012 Dec. 03, 2012 Dec. 10, 2012 Dec. 17, 2012 Dec. 24, 2012 Dec. 31, 2012 Jan. 07, 2013 Jan. 14, 2013 Jan. 21, 2013 Jan. 28, 2013 Feb. 04, 2013 Feb. 11, 2013 Feb. 18, 2013 Feb. 25, 2013 Mar. 04, 2013 Mar. 11, 2013 Mar. 18, 2013 Mar. 25, 2013 Apr. 01, 2013 Apr. 08, 2013 Apr. 15, 2013 Apr. 22, 2013 Apr. 29, 2013 May 06, 2013 May 13, 2013 May 20, 2013 May 27, 2013 Jun. 03, 2013 Jun. 10, 2013 Jun. 17, 2013 Jun. 24, 2013 Jul. 01, 2013 Jul. 08, 2013 Jul. 15, 2013 Jul. 22, 2013 Jul. 29, 2013 Aug. 05, 2013 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Oct. 29, 2012 Oct. 29, 2012 Oct. 30, 2012 Oct. 31, 2012 Nov. 01, 2012 Nov. 02, 2012 Nov. 03, 2012 Nov. 04, 2012

246

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9, 2012 Nov. 05, 2012 Nov. 12, 2012 Nov. 19, 2012 9, 2012 Nov. 05, 2012 Nov. 12, 2012 Nov. 19, 2012 Nov. 26, 2012 Dec. 03, 2012 Dec. 10, 2012 Dec. 17, 2012 Dec. 24, 2012 Dec. 31, 2012 Jan. 07, 2013 Jan. 14, 2013 Jan. 21, 2013 Jan. 28, 2013 Feb. 04, 2013 Feb. 11, 2013 Feb. 18, 2013 Feb. 25, 2013 Mar. 04, 2013 Mar. 11, 2013 Mar. 18, 2013 Mar. 25, 2013 Apr. 01, 2013 Apr. 08, 2013 Apr. 15, 2013 Apr. 22, 2013 Apr. 29, 2013 May 06, 2013 May 13, 2013 May 20, 2013 May 27, 2013 Jun. 03, 2013 Jun. 10, 2013 Jun. 17, 2013 Jun. 24, 2013 Jul. 01, 2013 Jul. 08, 2013 Jul. 15, 2013 Jul. 22, 2013 Jul. 29, 2013 Aug. 05, 2013 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Oct. 29, 2012 Oct. 29, 2012 Oct. 30, 2012 Oct. 31, 2012 Nov. 01, 2012 Nov. 02, 2012 Nov. 03, 2012 Nov. 04, 2012

247

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5-1 5-1 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 5-2 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI

248

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-4 1-4 Oct. 30, 2006 Oct. 31, 2006 Nov. 01, 2006 Nov. 02, 2006 Nov. 03, 2006 Nov. 04, 2006 Nov. 05, 2006 DOWN Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled BEAM LINE 2-1 Oct. 30, 2006 Oct. 31, 2006 Nov. 01, 2006 Nov. 02, 2006 Nov. 03, 2006 Nov. 04, 2006 Nov. 05, 2006 DOWN 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON

249

SSRL HEADLINES January 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 January, 2010 7 January, 2010 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - A Crystal Structure of HIV-1 Capsid Proteins Shows Flexibility Necessary for Capsid Assembly Science Highlight - Researchers Visualize and Measure the Morphological Phases of Platinum Nanocrystals Science Highlight - A Very High-resolution Crystal Structure of a SUMO-like Domain in a Yeast Rad60 Protein Operations Resume after Storm-related Power Outage Todd Martinez Named 2010 National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow by DoD Decorated with Electric Current, Nanoribbons Align with Expectations 48th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on Future Light Sources User Research Administration Fresh Food Delivered to Bldg. 120 Kitchen Every Weekday

250

SSRL HEADLINES June 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - June 2013 2 - June 2013 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** Science Highlights thumbnail Water-Rock Reactions Produce Hydrogen Gas at Temperatures within the Limits of Life - Contacts: Lisa Mayhew & Alexis Templeton, University of Colorado - Boulder Hydrogen gas is produced in chemical reactions between anoxic water and iron-rich rocks at temperatures above 200°C - conditions too hot to support life. However, at hydrothermal vents or hot springs, where hydrogen-rich fluids mix with cooler waters and temperatures have dropped sufficiently, hydrogen-consuming organisms can survive. Less is known about

251

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 1, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 Dec. 09, 2013 Dec. 16, 2013 Dec. 23, 2013 Dec. 30, 2013 Jan. 06, 2014 Jan. 13, 2014 Jan. 20, 2014 Jan. 27, 2014 Feb. 03, 2014 Feb. 10, 2014 Feb. 17, 2014 Feb. 24, 2014 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 12, 2013 Nov. 13, 2013 Nov. 14, 2013 Nov. 15, 2013 Nov. 16, 2013 Nov. 17, 2013 BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 12, 2013 Nov. 13, 2013 Nov. 14, 2013 Nov. 15, 2013 Nov. 16, 2013 Nov. 17, 2013 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 4B02 A.Yeh 8050 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith Unscheduled MC CHECKOUT/8050 8050 C.Smith

252

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2011 Nov. 21, 2011 Nov. 28, 2011 Dec. 05, 2011 4, 2011 Nov. 21, 2011 Nov. 28, 2011 Dec. 05, 2011 Dec. 12, 2011 Dec. 19, 2011 Dec. 26, 2011 Jan. 02, 2012 Jan. 09, 2012 Jan. 16, 2012 Jan. 23, 2012 Jan. 30, 2012 Feb. 06, 2012 Feb. 13, 2012 Feb. 20, 2012 Feb. 27, 2012 Mar. 05, 2012 Mar. 12, 2012 Mar. 19, 2012 Mar. 26, 2012 Apr. 02, 2012 Apr. 09, 2012 Apr. 16, 2012 Apr. 23, 2012 Apr. 30, 2012 May 07, 2012 May 14, 2012 May 21, 2012 May 28, 2012 Jun. 04, 2012 Jun. 11, 2012 Jun. 18, 2012 Jun. 25, 2012 Jul. 02, 2012 Jul. 09, 2012 Jul. 16, 2012 Jul. 23, 2012 Jul. 30, 2012 Aug. 06, 2012 Aug. 13, 2012 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 14, 2011 Nov. 14, 2011 Nov. 15, 2011 Nov. 16, 2011 Nov. 17, 2011 Nov. 18, 2011 Nov. 19, 2011 Nov. 20, 2011

253

SSRL HEADLINES May 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 - May 2013 1 - May 2013 View the Archives **Note for Outlook users: For easier reading, please click the bar at the top of this message that reads "This message was converted to plain text" and select "Display as HTML."** Science Highlights thumbnail Mesoscale Phase Distribution in Li-ion Battery Electrode Materials - Contact: Jordi Cabana (LBNL) Li-ion batteries are key elements in the effort to develop efficient chemical energy storage from sustainable energy sources. However, any effort to optimize battery performance requires a deeper understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of diffusion and phase transformation in battery electrodes. In this study, supported by the Northeastern Center for Chemical Energy Storage, an Energy Frontier Research Center, scientists

254

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-5 1-5 Nov. 10, 2008 Nov. 11, 2008 Nov. 12, 2008 Nov. 13, 2008 Nov. 14, 2008 Nov. 15, 2008 Nov. 16, 2008 DOWN FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 10, 2008 Nov. 11, 2008 Nov. 12, 2008 Nov. 13, 2008 Nov. 14, 2008 Nov. 15, 2008 Nov. 16, 2008 DOWN FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI

255

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN BEAM LINE 9-1 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 Unscheduled CHANGE/8837 A.COHE 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN

256

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5-4 5-4 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU CHANGE/8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU BEAM LINE 8-1 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 8821 D.Brehmer 8821 D.Brehmer 8821 D.Brehmer 3064* S.SUN 3075 M.GARNER 3075 M.GARNER 3075 M.GARNER

257

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7-1 7-1 Oct. 26, 2009 Oct. 27, 2009 Oct. 28, 2009 Oct. 29, 2009 Oct. 30, 2009 Oct. 31, 2009 Nov. 01, 2009 CHANGE/8803* C.SMI 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH 8803* C.SMITH BEAM LINE 9-1 Oct. 26, 2009 Oct. 27, 2009 Oct. 28, 2009 Oct. 29, 2009 Oct. 30, 2009 Oct. 31, 2009 Nov. 01, 2009 CHANGE/8861* I.MAT 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS 8861* I.MATHEWS

258

SSRL HEADLINES Nov 2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 November, 2002 5 November, 2002 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Towards the Chemically Specific Structure of Amorphous Materials: Anomalous X-ray Scattering from a Molybdenum-Germanium Alloy U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham Visits SLAC Critical Decision 1 Approval Moves LCLS Project Forward SLAC-DESY MOU Amped Up and Ready to Go! Organizational Changes in Macromolecular Crystallography Group User Research Administration Announcements 1. Science Highlight -Towards the Chemically Specific Structure of Amorphous Materials: Anomalous X-ray Scattering from a Molybdenum-Germanium Alloy (contacts: Hope Ishii, Sean Brennan, and Arthur Bienenstock) In a significant advance in the field of structural studies of amorphous

259

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 4, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 Dec. 09, 2013 Dec. 16, 2013 Dec. 23, 2013 Dec. 30, 2013 Jan. 06, 2014 Jan. 13, 2014 Jan. 20, 2014 Jan. 27, 2014 Feb. 03, 2014 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 04, 2013 Ops Re-start Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 BEAM LINE 5-4 Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN

260

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-4 1-4 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE CHANGE/8840 J.POPL 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE BEAM LINE 2-1 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5-4 5-4 Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 16, 2010 Nov. 17, 2010 Nov. 18, 2010 Nov. 19, 2010 Nov. 20, 2010 Nov. 21, 2010 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU BEAM LINE 8-1 Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 16, 2010 Nov. 17, 2010 Nov. 18, 2010 Nov. 19, 2010 Nov. 20, 2010 Nov. 21, 2010 Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled 3269 S.SUN 3269 S.SUN 3269 S.SUN 3269 S.SUN

262

SSRL HEADLINES May 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 May, 2005 1 May, 2005 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - The Flip-side of MsbA Transporter Science Highlight - The First Known Native Cadmium Enzyme Found in Marine Phytoplankton X-rays Illuminate Ancient Archimedes Text Fallen Tree Interrupts User Operations for Several Days DOE Site Review of SLAC in Washington DC Keith Hodgson Named Deputy Director of SLAC DOE Review of LCLS Project and Proposed LUSI Project Director of OSTP Visits SLAC Axel Brunger Elected to the National Academy of Sciences Spring Meeting of the SLAC Scientific Policy Committee Machine Readable Passports Required for All Visa Waiver Program Travel as of June 26, 2005 __________________________________________________________________________

263

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2011 Nov. 21, 2011 Nov. 28, 2011 Dec. 05, 2011 4, 2011 Nov. 21, 2011 Nov. 28, 2011 Dec. 05, 2011 Dec. 12, 2011 Dec. 19, 2011 Dec. 26, 2011 Jan. 02, 2012 Jan. 09, 2012 Jan. 16, 2012 Jan. 23, 2012 Jan. 30, 2012 Feb. 06, 2012 Feb. 13, 2012 Feb. 20, 2012 Feb. 27, 2012 Mar. 05, 2012 Mar. 12, 2012 Mar. 19, 2012 Mar. 26, 2012 Apr. 02, 2012 Apr. 09, 2012 Apr. 16, 2012 Apr. 23, 2012 Apr. 30, 2012 May 07, 2012 May 14, 2012 May 21, 2012 May 28, 2012 Jun. 04, 2012 Jun. 11, 2012 Jun. 18, 2012 Jun. 25, 2012 Jul. 02, 2012 Jul. 09, 2012 Jul. 16, 2012 Jul. 23, 2012 Jul. 30, 2012 Aug. 06, 2012 Aug. 13, 2012 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 14, 2011 Nov. 14, 2011 Nov. 15, 2011 Nov. 16, 2011 Nov. 17, 2011 Nov. 18, 2011 Nov. 19, 2011 Nov. 20, 2011

264

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2011 Nov. 14, 2011 Nov. 21, 2011 Nov. 28, 2011 7, 2011 Nov. 14, 2011 Nov. 21, 2011 Nov. 28, 2011 Dec. 05, 2011 Dec. 12, 2011 Dec. 19, 2011 Dec. 26, 2011 Jan. 02, 2012 Jan. 09, 2012 Jan. 16, 2012 Jan. 23, 2012 Jan. 30, 2012 Feb. 06, 2012 Feb. 13, 2012 Feb. 20, 2012 Feb. 27, 2012 Mar. 05, 2012 Mar. 12, 2012 Mar. 19, 2012 Mar. 26, 2012 Apr. 02, 2012 Apr. 09, 2012 Apr. 16, 2012 Apr. 23, 2012 Apr. 30, 2012 May 07, 2012 May 14, 2012 May 21, 2012 May 28, 2012 Jun. 04, 2012 Jun. 11, 2012 Jun. 18, 2012 Jun. 25, 2012 Jul. 02, 2012 Jul. 09, 2012 Jul. 16, 2012 Jul. 23, 2012 Jul. 30, 2012 Aug. 06, 2012 Aug. 13, 2012 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 07, 2011 Nov. 07, 2011 Nov. 08, 2011 Nov. 09, 2011 Nov. 10, 2011 Nov. 11, 2011 Nov. 12, 2011 Nov. 13, 2011

265

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2010 Nov. 22, 2010 Nov. 29, 2010 Dec. 06, 2010 5, 2010 Nov. 22, 2010 Nov. 29, 2010 Dec. 06, 2010 Dec. 13, 2010 Dec. 20, 2010 Dec. 27, 2010 Jan. 03, 2011 Jan. 10, 2011 Jan. 17, 2011 Jan. 24, 2011 Jan. 31, 2011 Feb. 07, 2011 Feb. 14, 2011 Feb. 21, 2011 Feb. 28, 2011 Mar. 07, 2011 Mar. 14, 2011 Mar. 21, 2011 Mar. 28, 2011 Apr. 04, 2011 Apr. 11, 2011 Apr. 18, 2011 Apr. 25, 2011 May 02, 2011 May 09, 2011 May 16, 2011 May 23, 2011 May 30, 2011 Jun. 06, 2011 Jun. 13, 2011 Jun. 20, 2011 Jun. 27, 2011 Jul. 04, 2011 Jul. 11, 2011 Jul. 18, 2011 Jul. 25, 2011 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 15, 2010 Nov. 16, 2010 Nov. 17, 2010 Nov. 18, 2010 Nov. 19, 2010 Nov. 20, 2010 Nov. 21, 2010

266

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 Dec. 09, 2013 Dec. 16, 2013 Dec. 23, 2013 Dec. 30, 2013 Jan. 06, 2014 Jan. 13, 2014 Jan. 20, 2014 Jan. 27, 2014 Feb. 03, 2014 Feb. 10, 2014 Feb. 17, 2014...

267

SSRL HEADLINES January 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impacts the Global Carbon Cycle Science Highlight - Ions in the Clutches of Carbon Nanotubes New Hours for Security Gates Safety Update Energy Secretary Looks to National...

268

Structural Molecular Biology, SSRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of tRNA synthetase in organisms. Structure of the DUF2233 Domain in Bacteria and the Stuttering-associated UCE Glycoprotein UCE plays a key role in the functioning of lysosomes,...

269

SSRL HEADLINES January 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protein Interface Design Science Highlight - Effects of Thermal Annealing on Organic Solar Cells Science Highlight - Potential Anti-cancer Drug has Novel Mechanism of Action New...

270

SSRL30 Abstracts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Users' Meeting. Please use the abstract submission form via the web. Poster Session Posters will be displayed throughout the meeting and will be highlighted during a poster...

271

SSRL HEADLINES February 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the significant and important role that scientific user facilities play in science education, economic competitiveness, fundamental knowledge, and scientific achievements....

272

SSRL HEADLINES January 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoscale "Necklace" LCLS Project Gets an Injection of Funds from Congress W.M. Keck Foundation Grant to Advance Ultrafast X-ray Studies in the Chemical Sciences Visitors from DC:...

273

SSRL HEADLINES February 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to get further instructions. Also, do not immediately follow someone else through the pedestrian gate without swiping your badge as well - this constitutes tailgating. All of...

274

SSRL HEADLINES June 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by 4 pm (PST) on July 29, 2014 - Submit proposals and beam time requests through the user portal. Food Service Available during Construction of New Cafeteria in Science and User...

275

SSRL HEADLINES October 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and nanoscale battery imaging from SLAC and the Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) at Stanford University. See website for additional information and pre-registration...

276

SSRL HEADLINES February 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). We will also continue to grow our strong scientific partnership with the SUNCAT...

277

SSRL HEADLINES Sep 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(or "CMR" -- a tremendous sensitivity of electrical resistivity to applied magnetic fields), derive from a complex interplay of interactions among the electrons in the crystal...

278

SSRL HEADLINES September 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

without bulky magnets such as the readwrite head in current hard drives. Being great thermoelectric material, bismuth telluride could even convert temperature gradients across...

279

SSRL HEADLINES Dec 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Solving a Forefront Problem in Materials Science: The Magnetic and Chemical Structure of a Buried Interface Holiday Greetings from...

280

SSRL HEADLINES Aug 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18th will be a western-theme barbecue, so don't forget to wear your cowboy hats and boots 9. User Research Administration Announcements (contacts: Cathy Knotts,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2006 Dec. 10, 2006 8821 D.BREHMER 8821 D.BREHMER 8821 D.BREHMER 8821 D.BREHMER 2865 S.SUN 2865 S.SUN 2865 S.SUN 8821 D.BREHMER 8821 D.BREHMER 8821 D.BREHMER CHANGE2865 S.SUN...

282

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nov. 13, 2008 Nov. 14, 2008 Nov. 15, 2008 Nov. 16, 2008 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN 3064 S.SUN 3064 S.SUN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN VUV CHECKOUT 3064 S.SUN 3064 S.SUN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN...

283

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oct. 28, 2009 Oct. 29, 2009 Oct. 30, 2009 Oct. 31, 2009 Nov. 01, 2009 Unscheduled 3269 S.SUN 3147 G.LUCOVSKY 3147 G.LUCOVSKY 3147 G.LUCOVSKY DOWN DOWN VUV CHECKOUT CHANGE3147...

284

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

27, 2009 Oct. 28, 2009 Oct. 29, 2009 Oct. 30, 2009 Oct. 31, 2009 Nov. 01, 2009 8859* B.JOHNSON 8859* B.JOHNSON 8859* B.JOHNSON 8859* B.JOHNSON 8859* B.JOHNSON 3256 J.GROVES 3256...

285

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2008 Nov. 12, 2008 Nov. 13, 2008 Nov. 14, 2008 Nov. 15, 2008 Nov. 16, 2008 DOWN 8859 B.JOHNSON 8051* M.TONEY 8051* M.TONEY 8051* M.TONEY 3205 M.BIBEE 3205 M.BIBEE Xray CHECKOUT...

286

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feb. 03, 2005 Feb. 04, 2005 Feb. 05, 2005 Feb. 06, 2005 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON DOWN DOWN DOWN CHANGE8859 B.JOHN 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859...

287

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

90R9 -Lange 90R9 -Lange 90R6 -Yang 90R6 -Yang 90R6 -Yang 90R6 -Yang START UP 8859 -Johnson 8859 -Johnson 8859 -Johnson 2764 -Bargar 2764 -Bargar 2764 -Bargar 2-1 2-CIRCLE 8859...

288

SSRL HEADLINES Sep 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

input from industrial colleagues and support from the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of DOE. Magnetism: From Fundamentals to Nanoscale Dynamics Springer Series in Solid-State...

289

SSRL HEADLINES May 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

line side, we have taken advantage of new partnerships to begin the development of three brand new beam lines and the upgrade of two others. The partnerships include a...

290

SSRL HEADLINES March 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

insulators, to its first practical applications: flexible, transparent electrodes for solar cells, sensors and optical communications devices. Read more... Obama to Nominate...

291

SSRL HEADLINES September 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

what issues are most important to users and how we can better meet user needs. Mike Lubell, American Physical Society, will share tips with users on communicating their science...

292

SSRL HEADLINES October 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organization, including a summary of material prepared for a DC trip last spring. Mike Lubell (Director of Public Affairs, American Physical Society and Chairman, Department of...

293

SSRL HEADLINES October 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

http:www-conf.slac.stanford.edussrl-lcls2007slidesCSKimSSRLUOECtalk.pdf Mike Lubell, APS Director of Public Affairs and CCNY Professor of Physics, shared his insights...

294

SSRL HEADLINES November 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

variety of locations and work long hours in close quarters. Flu Symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some...

295

SSRL HEADLINES April 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

staying healthy during any flu season: Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. Wash your hands often with...

296

SSRL HEADLINES July 2008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

eliminate spurious low-flow interlock trips that have been experienced in the past. User Mtg banner 6. Register for SSRLLCLS 2008 Register now for the Joint SSRLLCLS Users'...

297

SSRL HEADLINES May 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thus, the best crystal of each protein target is selected for MAD data collection. The process is very efficient; for example, during the period of May 2008 to April 2009, the...

298

SSRL HEADLINES June 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the immune system, and they carry receptors that undergo an extensive "education" process for recognizing specific proteins from these invaders. Mature T-cells also show...

299

SSRL HEADLINES June 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, with high exposure levels...

300

SSRL HEADLINES March 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactions with Sediments First SPEAR3 Light Seen at BL9-3 and Progress on Other Beam Lines and Commissioning Instrument Development Workshop held on LCLS Biological Imaging...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12, 2013 Nov. 13, 2013 Nov. 14, 2013 Nov. 15, 2013 Nov. 16, 2013 Nov. 17, 2013 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 8803 C.Smith 4B02 M.Feese 8050 C.Smith 8803...

302

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

07, 2006 Nov. 08, 2006 Nov. 09, 2006 Nov. 10, 2006 Nov. 11, 2006 Nov. 12, 2006 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803...

303

SSRL Web Requests  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pagesite Change Fix existing form or application Develop new form or application Web-ImagesGraphics Web-Flash Webserver bug - error report Login Help Details of your...

304

SSRL HEADLINES March 2003  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Exploring the Folding Landscape of a Structured RNA by SAXS SPEAR2 Ends a Remarkable 30 Years on March 31 More on...

305

SSRL- Experimental Run Schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FY2008 Experimental Run Schedules 2008 Run Ends August 11, 2008. User Operations will resume November 2008. Operating Maintenance Beam Line Schedule FY2009 FY2008 X-ray (1-4,...

306

SSRL HEADLINES April 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the Helmholtz Virtual Institute for Dynamic Pathways in Multidimensional Landscapes, Germany. The goal of UXSS 2014 is to disseminate information and train students and...

307

SSRL HEADLINES March 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the Helmholtz Virtual Institute for Dynamic Pathways in Multidimensional Landscapes, Germany. The goal of UXSS 2014 is to disseminate information and train students and...

308

SSRL29 Workshop Summaries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Workshop Summaries X-ray Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future< font> (Chairs: John Miao and Keith Hodgson) This workshop provided a forum to discuss the...

309

SSRL29 Workshops  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

photoemission microscopy, coherent diffraction imaging, X-ray microscopy, micro-tomography, holographic imaging, and X-ray micro-probe. The goal is to identify the...

310

10 Questions for a Beamline Scientist: Apurva Mehta | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 Questions for a Beamline Scientist: Apurva Mehta 10 Questions for a Beamline Scientist: Apurva Mehta 10 Questions for a Beamline Scientist: Apurva Mehta November 4, 2011 - 1:02pm Addthis Apurva Mehta | Image courtesy of SLAC Apurva Mehta | Image courtesy of SLAC Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs "It was exhilarating when we found a novel solution and the instrument evolved." Apurva Mehta, Beamline Scientist Fifteen years ago, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) scientist Apurva Mehta volunteered to help a friend build beamline parts at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). Today, he's "still mucking around with beamlines."
 
In the latest 10 Questions, Dr. Mehta shares how he landed at SLAC and his adventures in a wide range of projects, from advanced semiconductors to

311

SSRL Computer Account Request Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Name of supervisor or advisor, or other person with whom we can make contact should there be any question about the...

312

C Goldschmidt Abstracts 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...121 nm) lines from solar radiation could change the isotopic...or the variability in solar radiation. We investigated the effects...and organic matter-rich naturally occurring ferrihydrite A...author) 2 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National...

313

B Goldschmidt Abstracts 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biotite weathering under naturally occuring K and Mg limitations...33493365 Synchrotron radiation characterization of...suggested that the high pH, radiation, and limiting nutrients...Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo...

314

Studies of magnetism and exchange scattering in solids using synchroton radiation and spin-polarized photoemission. Progress report, June 1, 1982-May 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the experiments necessary for proving the existence of Spin Polarized EXAFS (SPEXAFS) and for establishing it as a useful techncique for studying magnetism in solids have been carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Transmission EXAFS, which does not depend on electron spin, has been measured in several manganese compounds. The 3s photopeaks of Mn/sup 2 +/ in MnF/sub 2/ have been shown to display EXAFS-like oscillations. The pin dependence of these oscillations will next be studied. Observations of the 3p photopeaks of iron metal on a palladium substrate have shown anomalous intensity variations with varying photon energy. This phenomenon will also be studied further. The existence of Cooper minima in the iron 3s and 3p photoabsorption cross sections has been sought, and this investigation will continue.

Rothberg, G.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Alpha Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

316

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

317

Advanced Light Source (ALS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

318

Advanced Photon Source (APS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

319

National Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

320

Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

322

About Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

323

ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activation of cancer cell growth by naturally occurring estrogen in a woman's body. Research at the APS Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, and the Advanced Light Source, researchers have achieved a significant

Kemner, Ken

324

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le confrencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrle des zones et les prcautions prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

325

SSRL_2003_Run_Sched.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

26/02 26/02 Run Shutdown Weekends Maintenance / AP Injector Startup University Holidays PPS Certification Injector / SPEAR Startup SLAC Closed Edited - Robleto, Scott 10 11 12 AP 13 14 12 AP MA/AP 13 14 15 8 9 7 3 L A 11 12 8 9 I S N 30 11 O 12 13 14 18 A I T 31 29 2002 2003 1 2 3 13 4 2002 2003 1 2 3 4 25 26 29 30 28 30 5 6 5 6 8 9 22 16 17 15 16 N 23 24 25 5 17 18 19 Startup 23 24 23 22 21 1 2 3 MA/AP 10 4 5 AP 6 7 8 9 20 22 18 24 24 17 22 23 20 21 14 15 11 16 10 12 9 13 7 8 S T A 1 2 3 15 4 5 5 6 8 6 4 5 R T 8 1 7 6 7 U P 2 3 10 9 10 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 31 24 25 26 27 30 18 19 28 29 20 21 22 23 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 1 2 3 4 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 19 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 31 25 26 27 28 29 14 15 16 20 17 18 19 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 30 31 21 15 16 13 14 10 27 28 26 22 23 24 25 8 9 10 21 20 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 22 23 15 16 21 8 9 10 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 15 22 23 16 17 18 19 26 27 28 30 25 24 20 21 23 24 14 1 2 3 4 15 16 29 30 31 29 31 28 20 28 21 22 23 24 25 17 26 27 18 19 20 24

326

SSRL HEADLINES November/December 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(PEM) fuel cells are potential candidates for the environmentally friendly and cost-efficient production of renewable energy from hydrogen and oxygen. At the fuel cell's...

327

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE FY2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

07, 2012 Nov. 08, 2012 Nov. 09, 2012 Nov. 10, 2012 Nov. 11, 2012 DOWN DOWN DOWN 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH 8803 C.SMITH DOWN DOWN CHANGE8803 C.SMIT 8803 C.SMITH 8803...

328

Plasma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... JUST over ten years ago the first book on plasma physics as a subject in its own right appeared; in a gradually swelling stream ... been surprisingly few monographs. One topic which has had scant coverage in any form is plasma radiation (except for spectral-line radiation which has been dealt with very fully in ...

T. J. M. BOYD

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

332

Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Research | Stanford  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Research Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Research New Proposals Standard GU Proposals Instructions for New Standard Proposals (Not LOI or Rapid Access) Tips for How to Wow Rapid Access Letter of Intent (LOI) Proposal Extension Requests X-ray/VUV Macromolecular Crystallography Beam Time Allocation/Scheduling How to Request Beam Time SSRL Access Policy SSRL Schedules New Proposals SSRL operates as a dedicated synchrotron radiation source for approximately nine months per year (usually from early November through early August). Submitting a proposal is the first step to access beam time at SSRL. SSRL scientists are available to help answer questions about the accelerator (SPEAR3), beam lines, capabilities, science or techniques to help users plan their experiments and their SSRL proposals.

333

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

334

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

335

Radiation protection: Natural radiation risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... radiation to which humans are exposed consists of four components - cosmic, gamma, internal, radon. The relative contribution that each makes to the sum is shown in the chart. ... but exposure of the whole body to terrestrial gamma rays and of the lungs to radon daughters are influenced by the nature and location of housing. Gamma rays are emitted ...

M. C. O'Riordan

1983-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Comparison of Image Quality Evaluation Techniques for Transmission X-Ray Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beamline 6-2c at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is capable of Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) at 30 nm resolution. Raw images from the microscope must undergo extensive image processing before publication. Since typical data sets normally contain thousands of images, it is necessary to automate the image processing workflow as much as possible, particularly for the aligning and averaging of similar images. Currently we align images using the 'phase correlation' algorithm, which calculates the relative offset of two images by multiplying them in the frequency domain. For images containing high frequency noise, this algorithm will align noise with noise, resulting in a blurry average. To remedy this we multiply the images by a Gaussian function in the frequency domain, so that the algorithm ignores the high frequency noise while properly aligning the features of interest (FOI). The shape of the Gaussian is manually tuned by the user until the resulting average image is sharpest. To automatically optimize this process, it is necessary for the computer to evaluate the quality of the average image by quantifying its sharpness. In our research we explored two image sharpness metrics, the variance method and the frequency threshold method. The variance method uses the variance of the image as an indicator of sharpness while the frequency threshold method sums up the power in a specific frequency band. These metrics were tested on a variety of test images, containing both real and artificial noise. To apply these sharpness metrics, we designed and built a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) called 'Blur Master.' We found that it is possible for blurry images to have a large variance if they contain high amounts of noise. On the other hand, we found the frequency method to be quite reliable, although it is necessary to manually choose suitable limits for the frequency band. Further research must be performed to design an algorithm which automatically selects these parameters.

Bolgert, Peter J; /Marquette U. /SLAC

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Radiating gravastars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considering a Vaidya exterior spacetime, we study dynamical models of prototype gravastars, made of an infinitely thin spherical shell of a perfect fluid with the equation of state p = ?, enclosing an interior de Sitter spacetime. We show explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, an unstable gravastar, a stable gravastar or a 'bounded excursion' gravastar, depending on how the mass of the shell evolves in time, the cosmological constant and the initial position of the dynamical shell. This work presents, for the first time in the literature, a gravastar that emits radiation.

Chan, R. [Coordenao de Astronomia e Astrofsica, Observatrio Nacional, Rua General Jos Cristino, 77, So Cristvo 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, M.F.A. da [Departamento de Fsica Terica, Instituto de Fsica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua So Francisco Xavier 524, Maracan 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Jaime F. Villas da [Instituto de Biocincias, Departamento de Cincias Naturais, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Pasteur 458, Urca, CEP 22290-240, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wang, Anzhong, E-mail: chan@on.br, E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com, E-mail: jfvroch@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu [GCAP-CASPER, Department of Physics, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Microsoft Word - BOOK_2003_V4.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 30 th Annual Users' Meeting PROGRAM & ABSTRACTS OCTOBER 8 - 10, 2003 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory SLAC, Stanford University Stanford, CA 94309 Organizers: Benjamin Bostick, Dartmouth College Timothy McPhillips, SSRL SSRL is funded by the Department of Energy, Offices of Basic Energy Sciences and Biological and Environmental Research; the National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources, Biomedical Technology Program, and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Acknowledgments SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee Uwe Bergmann, Chairman, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Corwin Booth, ex-officio, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

339

Natural and Radiation Carcinogenesis in Man. III. Radiation Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mice. NATURAL AND RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN MAN. 3. RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS. | Journal Article | Japan Neoplasms etiology Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced Radiation Genetics | JAPAN NEOPLASM ETIOLOGY NEOPLASMS, RADIATION-INDUCED RADIATION...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Archeology Workshop Draft Agenda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SSRL27 Users' Meeting | Workshops | Registration | SSRL Home Page SSRL27 Users' Meeting | Workshops | Registration | SSRL Home Page Application of Synchrotron Techniques to Materials Issues in Art and Archeology October 18, 2000 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC Panofsky Auditorium Organizers: Russell Chianelli (University of Texas at El Paso) Nicholas Pingitore (University of Texas at El Paso) Herman Winick (SSRL) Materials -- bones, artifacts, artwork -- lie at the heart of both archaeology and art conservation. Synchrotron radiation techniques provide powerful new ways to interrogate these records of our physical and cultural past -- if we know the right questions to ask and how to ask them. The purpose of this workshop is to discuss and explore the current and potential applications of synchrotron science to problems in archaeology and art conservation. Bringing together key members of the synchrotron and archaeology/art communities, the interdisciplinary workshop will report their latest research accomplishments, highlight ongoing projects, and catalyze new interactions between these fields.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Radiation Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

343

Women @ Energy: Ritimukta Sarangi | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ritimukta Sarangi Ritimukta Sarangi Women @ Energy: Ritimukta Sarangi March 19, 2013 - 4:11pm Addthis Ritimukta Sarangi is a Staff Scientist for the Structural Molecular Biology Division at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Ritimukta Sarangi is a Staff Scientist for the Structural Molecular Biology Division at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Watch a video of Ritimukta Sarangi at work here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wa2SWwhut5o Ritimukta Sarangi is a Staff Scientist for the Structural Molecular Biology Division at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource of the SLAC National

344

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

346

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

347

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

348

Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of ionizing radiation protection and safety. The course curriculum combines...

349

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiation emitted by the earth. This instrument is onboard a European Union geostationary weather satellite launched in December 2005; it is collecting data over Niamey and the...

350

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

351

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

352

SLAC Site Office CX Determinations | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

01312011 Radiation Portal Monitor .pdf file (28KB) B2.2 01242011 SSRL Seismic Upgrade Phase 2 .pdf file (28KB) B2.5 03132010 End Station Test Beam .pdf file (43KB) B3.10...

353

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................10 AREA RADIATION SURVEYS AND CONTAMINATION CONTROL...........................................11.....................................................................................................13 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT meetings of the Radiation Safety Committee where new users and uses of radioactive materials, radiation

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

354

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

355

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air- tantly, what radiation dose people may have received. An independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP, additionalProjectworkcouldresultin revisions of these dose estimates. April 21, 1994 Companion

357

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

358

WI Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

359

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

360

Radioactivity and Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

VISA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

M. Cornacchia (SSRL), H.-D. Nuhn (SSRL) and C. Pellegrini (UCLA) for the VISA collaboration M. Cornacchia (SSRL), H.-D. Nuhn (SSRL) and C. Pellegrini (UCLA) for the VISA collaboration Figure 1 Intensity distribution of a Single SASE radiation pulse as produced by VISA when operating at saturation. Advances in accelerator technology and in the theoretical understanding of collective instabilities and production of coherent radiation, have been the driving forces of the progress toward brighter synchrotron radiation sources, with scientific applications developing in response to the availability of new sources. The rate of improvement in source capability has been tremendous: for 30 years x-ray source brightness has been increasing exponentially with a doubling time of about 10 months. A modern synchrotron source is eleven orders of magnitude brighter than a 1960s

362

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Americans' Average Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

NA

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

364

Radiation: Facts, Risks and Realities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Radiation 3 Understanding Radiation Risks 6 Naturally Occurring (Background) Radiation 7 Man-Made Radiation, beta particles and gamma rays. Other types, such as x-rays, can occur naturally or be machine-produced. Scientists have also learned that radiation sources are naturally all around us. Radiation can come from

365

SSRL_2004_Run_Sched_3_22_04.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2/04 2/04 Run Shutdown Maintenance / AP Injector Startup SLAC Closed Injector / SPEAR Startup University Holidays 17 MA/AP 18 MA 5 1 1 1 AP 3 4 7 4 9 5 6 8 10 20 10 11 12 11 AP 9 1 4 1 2 8 12 20 24 21 22 21 26 5 5 2 3 6 7 16 MA O 9 12 I 15 10 S 8 9 13 11 11 12 13 6 2 MA MA/AP AP 3 2 4 2 1 1 AP 3 T 17 17 18 16 16 4 3 13 14 12 8 14 15 U 20 10 21 13 MA 15 12 11 9 MA 4 5 5 3 MA 6 1 9 MA 16 13 3 4 1 13 M 5 12 11 M S C 8 11 M M 14 14 15 A E B M 31 M 29 28 MA 18 19 17 4 10 11 7 18 22 17 19 21 20 23 26 25 A 25 24 30 20 24 25 P 29 28 U 31 29 30 MA/AP 29 2003 2004 5 17 4 9 10 11 8 12 13 14 H D 15 16 14 O 13 N 7 User Conf. W 7 7 3 3 9 10 6 4 2 2 6 27 T 2003 2004 1 2 3 24 S 26 R 22 23 T AP 30 29 29 30 31 AP A M E 20 T 30 22 23 24 30 24 MA 25 N N 19 25 17 MA B 20 17 19 18 O W/ I S 27 C 7 8 6 14 15 16 7 10 9 8 10 6 6 7 5 17 15 MA 9 12 11 14 24 26 23 21 26 23 22 I N 2 3 5 2 3 4 8 1 S T 7 6 A L L 7 7 8 9 10 T 6 A I 11 12 I I 10 O 9 11 12 13 10 14 15 16 17 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 30 28 29 O N 22 23 28 20 13 14 15 16 18 19 25 26 O 22 18 27 24 27 22 23 24 30 29 28 21 12 13 22 31 25 23 21 29 30 13 14 27 19 26 24 25 15 16 27 28 29 28 27 26 29 N 28 I 31

366

Microsoft Word - SSRL_LCLS_User_Shipping_Request_Form_hazmat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Date: Where can you be reached if there are questions (cell phone?): Proposal and SpokespersonPI name:...

367

SSRL 32nd Users' Meeting Oct 17 - 19, 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

formation of a user community with a common interest in ultrafast and ultrabright soft x-ray pulses from a free electron laser like LCLS. The workshop will bring together...

368

SSRL 32nd Users' Meeting Oct 17 - 19, 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pat Dehmer's talk Jonathan Dorfan's talk Ian Evans's talk Bob Hettel's talk Mike Lubell's talk Tom Rabedeau's talk Jo Sthr's opening talk...

369

SSRL Web Interface FAQ as of April 6, 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Web Interface FAQ as of April 6, 2011 1) What version of Excel do I require to use the Spreadsheet? The spreadsheet was created in Excel 2007, but is compatible with Excel 97-2003....

370

Microsoft Word - Work Authorization Internal to SSRL v03.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vendors to provide services, the Pre-Work Hazard Analysis (PWHA) Form. Progress and completion status are reported up with comments and suggestions for future activities....

371

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

373

The flying radiation case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Applied Theoretical and Computational Physics Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

376

Radiation.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An average American's exposure is about 620 millirems per year from naturally occurring and other sources. Other Factors Background radiation varies with location....

377

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

378

Radiation Safety September 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 8 2.6 RUA Holder........................................................................................................ 11 3.3 Radiation Use Authorization (RUA).......................................................................................... 11 3.4 Review of RUA Applications

California at Irvine, University of

379

Radiative polarization of electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a new method of calculating the radiative polarization of electrons in homogeneous magnetic fields, using the modified electron propagation function.

Julian Schwinger and Wu-yang Tsai

1974-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for understanding

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM

Pennycook, Steve

382

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposedAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 Fig. F.1. The hydrogen atom and its

Pennycook, Steve

383

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation G-3 Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

384

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

385

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

http://www.aps.anl.gov/aps/news/20030616.html  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Supports SSRL Sub-Picosecond Particle Source Technology Supports SSRL Sub-Picosecond Particle Source The SPPS multilayer monochromator designed and fabricated at the APS. (Courtesy of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory) A new photon source, the Sub-Picosecond Particle Source (SPPS), that promises to image the movement of objects down to the atomic level in subpicosecond time scales will benefit from the contributions of the Advanced Photon Source, the Optics Fabrication and Metrology Group of Argonne's Experimental Facilities Division (XFD), and BioCARS (The University of Chicago). The SPPS is being constructed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), part of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California. According to the article on the SSRL Web site, the SPPS "will produce and deliver x-rays from bright electron beam pulses. This project provides a fast, relatively inexpensive way to

387

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DDE ESTIMATED DOSE FROM CONCEPTION TO DECLARATION: DDE Radiation Safety Officer Signature for increased protection from ionizing radiation for declared pregnant radiation workers. The radiation dose of the occupational dose limit of 50 mSv (5.0 rem). The CPMC Radiation Safety Office will provide education

Jia, Songtao

388

RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. · Radiation therapist - a health professional who designs, calculates (plans) and provides the radiation dose and monitors the delivery of radiation therapy, taking into account the protection and safety of patientsRADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE #12;A Career in Radiation Oncology YOUR CHOICE SAVE LIVES

Tobar, Michael

389

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......occupational illness to personnel, major damage...acceptable levels. Selection of control measures...or equipment operating correctly in...99 103 to 104 Personnel life safety...and abnormal operating conditions under...radiation risk to personnel, public and...worker radiation training) reduces the......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disable this safety function and...circuits and software. Other required...source in case of radiation monitors. Feedback...from other non-safety systems to prevent...write and check software. The expected...logic systems for safety functions can...levels of prompt radiation hazard. ACS......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Risks from ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... RADON indoors now accounts for nearly half of the average UK population exposure to ionizing radiation ... exposure to ionizing radiation. We believe that the extent of the variation in exposure to radon in the United Kingdom and else-where and its magnitude in relation to exposures from ...

R. H. Clarke; T. R. E. Southwood

1989-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Radiation Weighting Factors and High Energy Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......generally inadequate for high energy radiation. In order to determine...appropriate wR values in the high energy region, several criteria are...are proposed for neutrons of energy above 100 MeV and for protons above 10 MeV. The wR value for muons is confirmed to be practically......

M. Pelliccioni

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radiation effects on humans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

395

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward 10.1126/science.331.6024...radiation, workers at the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant wear protective gear...Candidate radiation drugs inch forward. | News | 0 (E)-4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone...

Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

397

RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN ULTRARELATIVISTIC OUTFLOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for the equation of radiative transfer in ultrarelativistic opaque jets. The solution describes the initial trapping of radiation, its adiabatic cooling, and the transition to transparency. Two opposite regimes are examined. (1) Matter-dominated outflow. Surprisingly, radiation develops enormous anisotropy in the fluid frame before decoupling from the fluid. The radiation is strongly polarized. (2) Radiation-dominated outflow. The transfer occurs as if radiation propagated in vacuum, preserving the angular distribution and the blackbody shape of the spectrum. The escaping radiation has a blackbody spectrum if (and only if) the outflow energy is dominated by radiation up to the photospheric radius.

Beloborodov, Andrei M., E-mail: amb@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

399

Radiation prevents much cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence reviewed here supports the concept that chronic exposure to ionising radiation can dramatically decrease cancer incidence and mortality. This evidence includes an inverse relationship between radiation levels and cancer induction and/or mortality in: over 200 million people in the USA; 200 million people in India; 10,000 residents of Taipei who live in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; high radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; almost 300,000 homes with radon in the USA; non-smokers in high radon areas of Saxony, Germany.

T.D. Luckey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Biophysics and synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book, contains contributions to the conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation held in July 1986 at Frascati. It is devoted to advances in the resolution of biological molecule structure obtainable through synchroton radiation studies. The use of synchroton radiation has firmly established x-ray spectroscopy of biological molecules. More detailed knowledge on the local structure of active sites of metalloproteins, as well as a number of studies on the interaction of metal ions with other important biological macromolecular systems are presented. This new method for protein structure analysis is a major improvement for the rapidly expanding field of protein engineering.

Bianconi, A.; Castellano, C.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

405

Low Dose Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

406

Radiation from accelerated branes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

Mohab Abou-Zeid and Miguel S. Costa

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Radiation Induced Mammary Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Induced Mammary Cancer R.L. Ullrich * R.J. Preston # * Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77550 # Biology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831, U.S.A Over the last......

R.L. Ullrich; R.J. Preston

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

410

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

Dai, Pengcheng

411

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

Dai, Pengcheng

412

Radiative Muon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The theory of radiative muon capture is developed. The discussion includes both parity conserving and nonconserving effects. The Gell-Mann weak magnetic term and the induced pseudoscalar are included, along with comparable relativistic effects in the nucleons. The theory is applied to light nuclei and especially to the radiative Godfrey reaction ?-+C126??+?+B125. An experiment to detect the induced pseudoscalar directly is proposed.

Jeremy Bernstein

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

414

Radiation and viral DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

415

Radiative muon capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown by relating the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture to that of radiative pion capture, that the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture proposed recently by Hwang and Primakoff differs from the others mainly by Low's counter terms. Despite the fact that the "original" transition amplitude does not violate seriously the conservation of the hadronic electromagnetic current, Low's counter terms, as introduced via Low's prescription to secure the presence of small conservation-of-hadronic-electromagnetic-current-breaking terms, are confirmed to be of numerical importance. Further, it is found in the "elementary-particle" treatment of radiative muon capture that the uncertainty arising from the nuclear structure can be reduced to become negligible. Therefore, an exclusive radiative muon capture experiment can in principle differentiate the Hwang-Primakoff theory from the others and yet provide a comprehensive test of partial conservation of axial-vector current.RADIOACTIVITY Theories of radiative muon capture, linearity hypothesis versus Low's prescription; nuclear structure and PCAC.

W -Y. P. Hwang

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

417

Appendix G: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix G: Radiation #12;#12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

418

Appendix A: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix A: Radiation #12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

419

Proteasome Structures Affected by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effect of ionizing radiation on 26S but...radiation doses, and immediately...the dose range 1 to 20 Gy...ionizing radiation induced a...38), ionizing radiation (39...over a wide range of radiation doses and further...

Milena Pervan; Keisuke S. Iwamoto; and William H. McBride

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reducing Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

422

How to Request & Access Beam Time | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How to Request & Access Beam Time How to Request & Access Beam Time Step 1: Submit a proposal that summarizes proposed research plans. Step 2: Submit beam time requests. Step 3: Review & accept beam time allocations. Instructions for users allocated beam time on SSRL X-ray/VUV beam lines. Accept Beam Time & Submit Support Request Registration & Assistance User Agreements User Financial Accounts, Supplies, Gases, Domestic & International Shipments User Computer Accounts User Safety Preparing for Arrival/Lodging/Check-In Acknowledgements, Publications, Science Highlights & News Feedback Step 1: Submit a proposal that summarizes proposed research plans. Review the guidelines for proposals and scheduling procedures. Standard proposals can be submitted through the user portal three times each year:

423

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

424

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Radiation Minimum Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frost resulting from cooling of vegetation by nocturnal radiation is a serious agricultural problem. Because of the number of variables involved attacks on this problem from a purely theoretical point of view have met with only moderate success. It seems logical to suppose that an instrument might be devised which would speed up the natural radiation processes and enable an observer to obtain in a few hours a measure of the cooling which occurs naturally over a period of 12 to 14 hr. Such an instrument could serve as a frost warning device. This paper describes the construction of a radiation device and presents experimental evidence to show that it can be used as a predictor of freezing temperatures at vegetation level.

Francis K. Davis Jr.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Audible radiation monitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

428

Tunable terahertz radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

RADIATION ALERT User Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not contaminate the Inspector by touching it to radioactive surfaces or materials. If contamination is suspected Environmental Area Monitoring 16 Checking for Surface Contamination 16 5 Maintenance 17 Calibration 17, and x-ray radiation. Its applications include: · Detecting and measuring surface contamination

Haller, Gary L.

430

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Solar energy: Radiation nation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Australia receives more solar radiation per square metre, on average, than any other continent. Although turning this ... to make use of its heat. We spoke to Australian proponents of two very different solar-thermal systems, both rather confusingly known as ...

Carina Dennis

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

432

Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. (Psoriasis Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos Soares

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

434

Infrared radiation: Herschel revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The year 2000 marks the 200th anniversary of Herschels discovery of infrared radiation. Using a car light in place of the Sun and a liquid crystal sheet instead of thermometers the experiment is an effective classroom demonstration of invisible light.

Erin E. Pursell; Richard Kozlowski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

437

Assessing exposure to radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the founding of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been world leaders in evaluating the risks associated with radiation. Ultrasensitive tools allow us not only to measure radionuclides present in the body but also to reconstruct the radiation dose from past nuclear events and to project the levels of radiation that will still be present in the body for 50 years after the initial intake. A variety of laboratory procedures, including some developed here, give us detailed information on the effects of radiation at the cellular level. Even today, we are re-evaluating the neutron dose resulting from the bombing at Hiroshima. Our dose reconstruction and projection capabilities have also been applied to studies of Nagasaki, Chernobyl, the Mayak industrial complex in the former Soviet Union, the Nevada Test Site, Bikini Atoll, and other sites. We are evaluating the information being collected on individuals currently working with radioactive material at Livermore and elsewhere as well as previously collected data on workers that extends back to the Manhattan Project.

Walter, K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of external surfaces by naturally occurring atomic oxygen. CCD detectors are particularly vulnerable to damage damage. A comprehensive discussion of the types of radiation damage known to occur in CCDs is beyond1 ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment Michael R. Jones Space Telescope Science

Sirianni, Marco

439

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

440

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports September 24, 2013 Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Radiation Exposure Welcome The Occupational Radiation Exposure Information page on this web page is intended to provide the latest available information on radiation exposure to...

442

Acceleration and Classical Electromagnetic Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classical radiation from an accelerated charge is reviewed along with the reciprocal topic of accelerated observers detecting radiation from a static charge. This review commemerates Bahram Mashhoon's 60th birthday.

E. N. Glass

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

443

Mathematical Problems of Radiative Equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in turn with the cases of purely absorbing and grey material in local radiative equilibrium (Schwarzschild-Milne model) and that of monochromatic radiative equilibrium with scattering but zero emissivity (Schuster ...

1935-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

444

Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist) senior subject matter expert for health physics/radiation safety at the sites. You will...

445

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued) ... Examines nuclear instrumentation available from several major U.S. manufacturers. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

DOE Radiation Records Contacts List  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

447

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

448

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

449

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing ...

H. F. Kraybill; D. C. Brunton

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

453

Terahertz radiation mixer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

454

Time encoded radiation imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

455

Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Managing Radiation Emergencies Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstrations Procedure Demonstrations Note: RealPlayer is needed for listening to the narration that accompany these demonstrations. Real Player Dressing To Prevent the Spread of Radioactive Contamination This demonstration shows how your team can dress to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Click to begin presentation on dressing to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Preparing The Area This demonstration shows basic steps you can take to gather equipment and prepare a room to receive a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material. Click to begin presentation on preparing a room to receive a radioactive contaminated patient. Removing Contaminated Clothing This demonstration shows the procedure for removing clothing from a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material.

456

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Aharonov-Bohm radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solenoid oscillating in vacuum will pair produce charged particles due to the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interaction. We calculate the radiation pattern and power emitted for charged scalar particles. We extend the solenoid analysis to cosmic strings and find enhanced radiation from cusps and kinks on loops. We argue by analogy with the electromagnetic AB interaction that cosmic strings should emit photons due to the gravitational AB interaction of fields in the conical spacetime of a cosmic string. We calculate the emission from a kink and find that it is of similar order as emission from a cusp, but kinks are vastly more numerous than cusps and may provide a more interesting observational signature.

Jones-Smith, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Vachaspati, Tanmay [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Medical radiation protection in next decade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......towards increasing radiation safety levels. Whether...users whenever the radiation dose to the patient...human errors and software-related problems...global view of radiation protection in medicine...increasing radiation safety levels. Whether......

Madan M. Rehani; Eliseo Vano

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Coherence in Spontaneous Radiation Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By considering a radiating gas as a single quantum-mechanical system, energy levels corresponding to certain correlations between individual molecules are described. Spontaneous emission of radiation in a transition between two such levels leads to the emission of coherent radiation. The discussion is limited first to a gas of dimension small compared with a wavelength. Spontaneous radiation rates and natural line breadths are calculated. For a gas of large extent the effect of photon recoil momentum on coherence is calculated. The effect of a radiation pulse in exciting "super-radiant" states is discussed. The angular correlation between successive photons spontaneously emitted by a gas initially in thermal equilibrium is calculated.

R. H. Dicke

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

SPEAR3 | Onsite Logistics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lodging Options How to Get Here Transportation Site Map Gate Hours Safety at SSRL SSRL | SLAC | Stanford University | SSRL Computing | SLAC Computing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

462

Anisotropic radiation elds: causality and quantum statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation transport 5 2.1 Radiation transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Closures The transport of radiation through a medium is described by the radiation transport equation for the radiative is used to describe anisotropic radiation. Because the two moment equations do not form a closed set

Honingh, Aline

463

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earths surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

465

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

466

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

467

RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R : R : . . . RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

468

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), requires assessment, recording and reporting of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or radioactive contamination. This includes assessing external exposure from a variety of radiation types, such as, beta, photon, and neutron radiation. External exposures may be uniform over the whole body or occur in a non-uniform (i.e., limited body location) fashion. Internal doses occur when radioactive material is taken into the body through ingestion, inhalation, absorption or wounds. The requirements include assessing doses to the whole body, skin, lens of the eyes, extremities and various organs and tissues.

471

Measurement of radiation impedance of stepped piston radiator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was noted in a paper given in 1972 [A. H. Lubell J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 52 1310 (1972)] that the radiation mass of a stepped piston underwater loudspeaker was approximately half of the value expected from simple piston theory. Recently the integral equation approach was used to compute the radiation impedance for the Lubell Laboratories model 98 underwater loudspeaker and new measurements were made. This paper reviews the measurement and data reduction procedures and compares measured and theoretical radiation impedances. The original observation of reduced radiation mass is supported. A companion paper covers the integral equation computation. [This work was supported by Lubell Laboratories Inc.

Alan H. Lubell

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

473

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

474

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems, and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g.\\ at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H \\textsc{ii} region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick "adiabatic" regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved,for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state, and we derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability conditi...

Jacquet, Emmanuel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of proton radiation damage. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine the relative cataractogenic effects of different proton en- ergies, (2) to determine the relative cataractogenic effects of different radiation doses and (3) to determine... Laboratory in 1945 and 1946. Ten victims were exposed to various doses of moderately fast neutrons and hard gamma rays. In the eight survivors, two radiation cataracts resulted (15). In 1948 it was reported that five nuclear physicists with a common...

Kyzar, James Ronald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

477

Deterministic methods in radiation transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W. (eds.)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improving Global Response Improving Global Response to Radiation Emergencies Improving Radiation Emergency Response Through Education and Specialized Expertise In the event of a radiological or nuclear incident, first responders as well as hospital and emergency management personnel must call on their knowledge and training to provide immediate and effective care for victims. Through practical, hands-on education programs, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is improving global response to radiation emergencies. In addition, dedicated 24/7 deployable teams of physicians, nurses, and health physicists from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), which is managed by ORAU for DOE/NNSA, provide expert medical management of radiological incidents

479

Presentation: Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources delivered by Patricia Dehmer, U.S. Department of Energy

480

Reporting Occupational Radiation Exposure Data  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Due to increasing security concerns for the protection of Personnally Identifiable Information (PII), AU-23 has issued a policy statement regarding the submission of radiation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation lightsource ssrl" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE The Radiation Safety Committee shall advise the Provost on all policy matters relating to radiation safety;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE Functions The Radiation Safety Committee shall advise the Provost on all policy matters relating to radiation safety; formulate campus radiation safety policies in compliance the Risk Manager) monitor the performance of the Radiation Safety Officer as it relates to implementation

Sze, Lawrence

482

RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. <' ," . . * . RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED . 370 Lexl.ngton Avenue New York 17# New York jq.5' L- Contract No. A T (30-l)-2093 with the United States Atom ic Energy Commission F O A M SEPARATION Progress Report for March, 1959 Abstract Appreciable cesium enrichment in the foam has been obtained using the system sodium tetraphenyl boron-Geigy reagent. Enrichment ratios varied from 1.5 to 3.5 depending upon operating conditions. The en- richment appears to depend on the ratio of the sodium tetraphenyl boron to Geigy reagent rather than on the absolute values of the indi- vidual concentrations. Further experiments are being conducted to verify and extend the range of results. Continuous countercurrent column operation has been continued.

483

Appendix F. Radiation Annual Site Environmental Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis

Pennycook, Steve

484

Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: An Evaluation of the State of the Field in 2002 A BioSync Report. Issued by the Structural Biology Synchrotron users Organization, October, 2002. 2 Table of Contents: Introduction .................................................................................................... 3 Abbreviations .................................................................................................. 5 Executive Summary ......................................................................................... 6 General Concerns ............................................................................................ 9 Synchrotron operations and maintenance ............................................... 9 NSLS, CHESS and the geographical distribution of beam lines

485

RADIATION PROTECTION KEYWORDS: equivalent sphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION PROTECTION KEYWORDS: equivalent sphere model, space radiation, organ dose IMPROVEMENT- alent sphere is used to represent the organ for a fast estimate of the organ dose. It has been found ~ESM! with an organ- specific constant radius parameter is used for fast estimates of the organ dose

Lin, Zi-wei

486

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

487

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Photo of two researchers standing on a platform near a solar tracker at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory gathers solar radiation and meteorological data on South Table Mountain. NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar radiation components since 1981. Since then, it has expanded its expertise to include integrated metrology, optics, electronics, and data acquisition capabilities. In addition, the SRRL provides facilities for outdoor performance testing of new research instrumentation and energy conversion devices such as photovoltaic modules. The SRRL is located on NREL's South Table Mountain site in Golden, Colorado, where it has excellent solar access because of its unrestricted

488

7 - Estimation of Radiation Doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Radiation doses to the Japanese population from inhalation of contaminated air, external irradiation, terrestrial and marine food contamination are estimated and compared with other sources of anthropogenic (global fallout, Chernobyl accident), natural (radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation) and medical applications (X-ray tests, CT-tests, etc.) of ionizing radiation. The estimated doses from inhalation, ingestion of terrestrial and marine food, and radiation exposure from radioactive clouds and deposited radionuclides were generally below the levels which could cause health damage of the Japanese population, as well as of the world population. The estimated total radiation doses to fish and shellfish in coastal waters during the largest radionuclide releases were by a factor of 10 lower than the baseline safe level postulated for the marine organisms, therefore no harmful effects are expected for the marine ecosystem as well.

Pavel P. Povinec; Katsumi Hirose; Michio Aoyama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

490

Molecular Pathways: Targeted ?-Particle Radiation Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and profibrotic cytokines. Radiation-induced malignancy can...1-5 Gy). Kyoji Furukawa (Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan) reviewed the Japanese atomic...late effects of ionizing radiation exposure at low/moderate...

Kwamena E. Baidoo; Kwon Yong; and Martin W. Brechbiel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Resistance of Marine Bacterioneuston to Solar Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Marine Bacterioneuston to Solar Radiation Helene Agogue Fabien...after exposure to simulated solar radiation. Bacterioneuston...estimate of their screening capacity. Appl. Environ. Microbiol...D. P. 2000. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on aquatic...

Hlne Agogu; Fabien Joux; Ingrid Obernosterer; Philippe Lebaron

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

SPEAR3 | Technical Documentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Documentation Hardware Component Database: Mechanical Electrical Drawing shor tcuts BPM Development SSRL | SLAC | Stanford University | SSRL Computing | SLAC Computing last...

494

DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

available on the U.S. Department of Energy Radiation Exposure Monitoring System Program Web Site at: http:energy.govehssoccupational-radiation-exposure Foreword iii MATTHEW B....

495

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2008 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2008.

496

ANNUAL DOE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE | 2013 REPORT  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2013.

497

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

498

Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

499

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2004 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE 2004 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2004.

500

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.