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1

Adaptive Response Against Spontaneous Neoplastic Transformation In Vitro Induced by Ionizing Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to establish a dose response curve for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells in vitro under experimental conditions were an adaptive response, if it were induced, would have an opportunity to be expressed. During the first two years of the grant an exhaustive series of experiments were performed and the resulting data were reported at the 2000 Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society and then Subsequently published. The data showed that an adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation was seen up to doses of 10cGy of Cs-137 gamma rays. At dose of 30, 50 and 100 cGy the transformation frequencies were above background. This indicated that for this system, under the specific experimental conditions used, there was a threshold of somewhere between 10 and 30 cGy. The results also indicated some unexpected, though very interesting, correlations with relative risk estimates made from human epidemiologic studies.

J. Leslie Redpath, Ph.D.

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Radiation-induced bystander effect and adaptive response in mammalian cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

responses at low doses of radiation and have the potential to impact the shape of the dose the actual target and radiation dose effect and can contribute to our current understanding in radiation risk provide the best estimate of cancer risk over the dose range from 20 to 250 cGy. The cancer risk at doses

3

7, 72357275, 2007 Adaptive radiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Two adaptive radiative transfer schemes for numerical weather prediction models V. Venema 1 , A numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. The atmosphere and the land surface are complex-stream approximation. In most weather prediction models these parameterisation schemes are therefore called infre

Boyer, Edmond

4

Radiation Induced Mammary Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Induced Mammary Cancer R.L. Ullrich * R.J. Preston # * Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77550 # Biology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831, U.S.A Over the last......

R.L. Ullrich; R.J. Preston

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Biological Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Epithelial Cell Transformation Wenshu Chen Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Abstract The major hypothesis in this project is that low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation stimulates an adaptive response that protects cells from neoplastic transformation involving modulation of paracrine factors (e.g., cytokines), cell survival/death signaling pathways, and reprogramming of the epigenome. To test this hypothesis, a validated, sensitive in vitro transformation model and a media transfer method were used to study the mechanisms of low-LET gamma radiation activated natural protection (ANP) against chemical carcinogen-induced bronchial cell transformation. Immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell

6

Adaptive radiation of chemosymbiotic deep-sea mussels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...are credited. Adaptive radiation of chemosymbiotic deep-sea...Research Department, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth...Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan 2 Geoscience Center...Yamanashi 400-8510, Japan Adaptive radiations present fascinating opportunities...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive response induced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yin and Yang of Low-Dose Radiobiology Tom K. Hei1,2 Summary: and adaptive response. Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of biological effects... the...

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive responses induced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yin and Yang of Low-Dose Radiobiology Tom K. Hei1,2 Summary: and adaptive response. Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of biological effects... the...

9

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

10

An adaptive crystal bender for high power synchrotron radiation beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perfect crystal monochromators cannot diffract x-rays efficiently, nor transmit the high source brightness available at synchrotron radiation facilities, unless surface strains within the beam footprint are maintained within a few arcseconds. Insertion devices at existing synchrotron sources already produce x-ray power density levels that can induce surface slope errors of several arcseconds on silicon monochromator crystals at room temperature, no matter how well the crystal is cooled. The power density levels that will be produced by insertion devices at the third-generation sources will be as much as a factor of 100 higher still. One method of restoring ideal x-ray diffraction behavior, while coping with high power levels, involves adaptive compensation of the induced thermal strain field. The design and performance, using the X25 hybrid wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), of a silicon crystal bender constructed for this purpose are described.

Berman, L.E.; Hastings, J.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

An adaptive crystal bender for high power synchrotron radiation beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perfect crystal monochromators cannot diffract x-rays efficiently, nor transmit the high source brightness available at synchrotron radiation facilities, unless surface strains within the beam footprint are maintained within a few arcseconds. Insertion devices at existing synchrotron sources already produce x-ray power density levels that can induce surface slope errors of several arcseconds on silicon monochromator crystals at room temperature, no matter how well the crystal is cooled. The power density levels that will be produced by insertion devices at the third-generation sources will be as much as a factor of 100 higher still. One method of restoring ideal x-ray diffraction behavior, while coping with high power levels, involves adaptive compensation of the induced thermal strain field. The design and performance, using the X25 hybrid wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), of a silicon crystal bender constructed for this purpose are described.

Berman, L.E.; Hastings, J.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

{sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Su Xiaoming [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Suzuki, Hiromi [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Omori, Katsunori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko [Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Advanced Engineering Services Company, Limited, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazu, Toru [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Ishioka, Noriaki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Takeo, E-mail: tohnishi@naramed-u.ac.j [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Colette A. Sacksteder § , DJ Black ‡ , Heather Smallwood § , David G. Camp II † , and Thomas C. Squier § § Cell Biology and Biochemistry; † Biological Sciences Division Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 ‡ School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Kansas City MO 64110 The goal of this research is to identify the molecular mechanisms by which cells adapt to low dose radiation exposure. Previously we have shown a radiation dependent increase of Calmodulin (CaM) in RAW 264.7 macrophages (RAW). Therefore we hypothesize that CaM and associated signaling complexes are sensors of low-dose radiation, resulting in alterations in energy metabolism and gene expression. The ultimate experimental goal

14

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

15

Effects of Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity Model Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity Model Gregory Nelson Loma Linda University Abstract It has long been appreciated that cells of the immune system are radiosensitive and use apoptosis as the primary mechanism of cell death following injury. The hypervariability of the immunoglobulin superfamily of genes expressed in lymphoid cells also led to the appreciation of the nonhomologous end joining mechanism of DNA repair. Clinically, whole body irradiation is used in treatment of some lymphomas and as an immunosuppressive agent for bone marrow transplants. Inflammation at sites of radiotherapy is a common side effect. Many studies with radiation have addressed the changes in cell populations following radiation exposure and have shown a reproducible pattern of relative sensitivities amongst

16

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Frequencies of Radiation-Induced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Randomness of Chromosome Territory Locations Relative to One Another. Authors: RK Sachs,§ MN Cornforth,‡ KM Greulich-Bode,* L Hlatky, and DJ Brenner|| Institutions: §Department of Mathematics, University of California, ‡University of Texas Medical Branch, *Department of Skin Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center DFCI, Harvard Medical School, ||Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. Leukemogenesis, and perhaps carcinogenesis in general, often involves specific chromosome translocations. Radiation-induced chromosome translocation frequencies are strongly influenced by how close participating chromosomes are to one another in an interphase cell nucleus. We sought to determine whether chromosomes in human peripheral blood

17

Origin, adaptive radiation and diversification of the Hawaiian lobeliads (Asterales: Campanulaceae)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Givnish, T.J Adaptive radiation of plants on oceanic islands...Givnish, T.J Adaptive radiation, dispersal, and diversification...Kato1999pp. 67-90. Eds. Tokyo, Japan:Springer. Givnish, T...Molecular evolution and adaptive radiation T.J Givnish and K.J Sytsma1997pp...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Solar radiation induces sublethal injury in Escherichia coli in seawater.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...after cells were exposed to solar radiation. Injury was detected...030670-05$02.00/0 Solar Radiation Induces Sublethal...Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 Sublethal injury was...after cells were exposed to solar radiation. Injury was detected...

R B Kapuscinski; R Mitchell

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation-induced electron migration along DNA is a mechanism by which randomly produced stochastic energy deposition events can lead to nonrandom types of damage along DNA manifested distal to the sites of the initial energy deposition. Electron migration along DNA is significantly influenced by the DNA base sequence and DNA conformation. Migration along 7 base pairs in oligonucleotides containing guanine bases was observed for oligonucleotides irradiated in solution which compares to average migration distances of 6 to 10 bases for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in solution and 5.5 base pairs for Escherichia coli DNA irradiated in cells. Evidence also suggests that electron migration can occur preferentially in the 5{prime} to 3{prime} direction along DNA. Our continued efforts will provide information regarding the contribution of electron transfer along DNA to formation of locally multiply damaged sites created in DNA by exposure to ionizing radiation.

Fuciarelli, A.F.; Sisk, E.C.; Miller, J.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Zimbrick, J.D. [National Research Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Major adaptive radiation in neritopsine gastropods estimated from 28S rRNA sequences and fossil records  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2178 Major adaptive radiation in neritopsine gastropods...of Geology Tokyo Japan Chiba Satoshi Author...Tohoku University Japan 2457 2465 PRLBA4...2002 Major adaptive radiation in neritopsine gastropods...Prefecture, Central Japan. Trans. Proc...291324. Adaptive radiation in neritopsine gastropods...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Prevention of Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability with Clinically Relevant Non-Protein Thiols and Vitamin E.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prevention of Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability with Clinically Relevant Prevention of Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability with Clinically Relevant Non-Protein Thiols and Vitamin E. J.S. Murley 1 , Y. Kataoka 1 , W.F. Morgan 2 , and D.J. Grdina 1 . The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 1 , The University of Maryland Medical School, Baltimore, MD 2 Induced or delayed radioprotection is a novel phenomenon that shares many similarities with the low dose radiation-induced radiobiological phenomenon referred to as the adaptive response. Induced or delayed radioprotection is defined as an enhancement in the radiation resistance of cells at long times following their exposure to non-protein thiols (NPT) such as WR1065, the free thiol form of amifostine. This effect is the result of the induction of a cascade of intracellular

23

Origins and consequences of radiation…induced centrosome aberrations  

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Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar, Nisarg Shah, Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia, Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY. Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator

24

Radiation induced by relativistic beams passing over a diffraction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

August 2000 FEL 2000 1 Radiation Induced by Relativistic Beams Passing Over a Diffraction Grating J.H. Brownell, J. Walsh, J. Swartz, S. Trotz Dept. of Physics and Astronomy,...

25

Radiation induced strand breakage analyzed by tunel technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION INDUCED STRAND BREAKAGE ANALYZED BY TUNEL TECHNIQUE A Thesis MAtuSSA DAWN REYNOLDS Submitted to the 015ce of Graduate Studies of Texas Ad. M University in partial fu1611ment of the requirements for the dree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 2003 Major Subject: Health Physics RADIATION INDUCED STRAND BREAKAGE ANALYZED BY TUNEL TECHNIQUE A Thesis MAtuSSA DAWN REYNOLDS Submitted to Texas %%:M University in partial fulfillmen of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

Reynolds, Marissa Dawn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Biological Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Epithelial Cell Transformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Epithelial Cell Transformation Wenshu Chen, Xiuling Xu, Lang Bai, Mabel T. Padilla, Carmen Tellez, Katherine M. Gott, Shuguang Leng, Julie A. Wilder, Steven A. Belinsky, Bobby R. Scott and Yong Lin, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108 The major hypothesis in this project is that low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation stimulates an adaptive response that protects cells from neoplastic transformation involving modulation of paracrine factors (e.g., cytokines), cell survival/death signaling pathways, and reprogramming of the epigenome. To test this hypothesis, a validated, sensitive in vitro transformation model and a media transfer

27

Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD in mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......subsyndrome [5, 6]. Other radiation-countermeasure drugs...gamma-tocotrienol, a naturally occurring vitamin E analog, protected mice from radiation-induced pancytopenia...that protect against radiation-induced hematopoietic...30] in mouse model. Naturally occurring vitamin E......

Sanchita P. Ghosh; Shilpa Kulkarni; Michael W. Perkins; Kevin Hieber; Roli L. Pessu; Kristen Gambles; Manoj Maniar; Tzu-Cheg Kao; Thomas M. Seed; K. Sree Kumar

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hydrogen peroxide significantly contributes to radiation-induced genomic instability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- induced genomic instability Disha Dayal 1 , Sean M. Martin 1 , Sujatha Venkataraman 1 , Charles L. Limoli 2 , Douglas R Spitz 1 . 1 Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA- 52246, 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of California, Irvine, CA-92697 Chronic metabolic oxidative stress is associated with genomic instability following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Mitochondria have long been known to be a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of causing oxidative stress. We hypothesized that radiation damages mitochondria, leading to oxidative stress and eventually genomic instability. This hypothesis is based on preliminary studies in parental

29

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

30

Convergent evolution of behavior in an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian web-building spiders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convergent evolution of behavior in an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian web-building spiders Todd A independently evolve webs with similar architectures. Tetragnatha spiders are the only nocturnal orb- weaving-occur within mesic and wet forest habitats on each of the main islands. Therefore, comparison of web

Blackledge, Todd

31

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Control of Repair and Adaptive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Repair and Adaptive Responses to Low-level DNA Damage Repair and Adaptive Responses to Low-level DNA Damage James E. Haber Brandeis University Why This Project In order to fully understand mechanisms resulting in effects of low dose, whole system rather than cells must be examined. Although not identical to mammalian systems, simple systems usually have many similarities and give direction for further study of more complex systems. We use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a model system because it is easy to manipulate and its genome is simple and well characterized. Project Goals Examine mechanisms and effects of low dose radiation response for: Genetic recombination mechanisms that lead to genomic instability Genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low-dose radiation The adaptive response

32

Radiation Induced Nanocrystal Formation in Metallic Glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The irradiation of metallic glasses to induce nanocrystallization was studied in two metallic glass compositions, Cu50Zr45Ti5 and Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5. Atomic mobility was described using a model based on localized excess free volume due to displace...

Carter, Jesse

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

33

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Mechanisms of Induced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Relationships with Radiation Tumorigenesis Robert Ullrich Colorado State University Why This Project A combination of epidemiological, experimental, animal, and cellular molecular data is used in the estimation of tumor risk after low doses of low-LET radiation. Uncertainties are recognized in the interpretation of all these data sets, and recent findings concerning genomic instability in irradiated cells challenge the conventional view that induced DNA damage is expressed during the immediate post-irradiation cell cycle. These data on genomic instability are based largely upon studies of cell cultures the mechanisms involved and implications for tumor formation in living organisms remain unclear. Nevertheless, if induced genomic instability were

34

CRASH: A BLOCK-ADAPTIVE-MESH CODE FOR RADIATIVE SHOCK HYDRODYNAMICS-IMPLEMENTATION AND VERIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code, a block-adaptive-mesh code for multi-material radiation hydrodynamics. The implementation solves the radiation diffusion model with a gray or multi-group method and uses a flux-limited diffusion approximation to recover the free-streaming limit. Electrons and ions are allowed to have different temperatures and we include flux-limited electron heat conduction. The radiation hydrodynamic equations are solved in the Eulerian frame by means of a conservative finite-volume discretization in either one-, two-, or three-dimensional slab geometry or in two-dimensional cylindrical symmetry. An operator-split method is used to solve these equations in three substeps: (1) an explicit step of a shock-capturing hydrodynamic solver; (2) a linear advection of the radiation in frequency-logarithm space; and (3) an implicit solution of the stiff radiation diffusion, heat conduction, and energy exchange. We present a suite of verification test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. The applications are for astrophysics and laboratory astrophysics. The CRASH code is an extension of the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a new radiation transfer and heat conduction library and equation-of-state and multi-group opacity solvers. Both CRASH and BATS-R-US are part of the publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework.

Van der Holst, B.; Toth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Myra, E. S.; Fryxell, B.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Powell, K. G. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Holloway, J. P. [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stout, Q. [Computer Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Karni, S. [Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

ENZO+MORAY: radiation hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement simulations with adaptive ray tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure, which are related to energy, flux and radiation pressure...closure relation (Gonzalez, Audit Huynh 2007; Aubert Teyssier...specific intensity in units of energy per time t per solid angle per...Photon time-step E ph Photon energy E i Ionization energy of the......

John H. Wise; Tom Abel

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Low dose ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in stress-induced premature senescent fibroblasts David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Recent evidence suggest that the causes of cancer development are not limited to mutations within cancer cells, but also involve in alterations of cancer microenvironment. Senescent cells are irreversibly growth arrested, but remain metabolically active. Senescent cells, especially senescent fibroblasts in the stroma may provide a beneficial environment for tumor growth through secretion of certain factors. Accumulation of senescent cells in the stroma of patients repeatedly exposed to low doses of IR or low dose rates of IR, could be an important factor, causing alteration of the microenvironment that ultimately benefits tumor

37

Solution of the equation of radiative transfer using a NewtonKrylov approach and adaptive mesh refinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution of the equation of radiative transfer using a Newton­Krylov approach and adaptive mesh Available online 25 November 2011 Keywords: Radiation transport Discrete ordinates method Finite ordinates method (DOM) and finite-volume method (FVM) are used exten- sively to solve the radiative transfer

Groth, Clinton P. T.

38

Modeling radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis studies radiation-induced mixing at interfaces between low solubility metals using molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. It provides original contributions on the fundamental mechanisms of radiation-induced ...

Zhang, Liang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

PP2A regulates ionizing radiationinduced apoptosis through Ser46 phosphorylation of p53  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Articles PP2A regulates ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis through Ser46...virginia.edu 1 Department of Radiation Oncology and 2 Center for Cell...and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan). Radiation Treatment Cell cultures were irradiated...

Jun Mi; Elzbieta Bolesta; David L. Brautigan; and James M. Larner

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

An Extract of Phyllanthus amarus Protects Mouse Chromosomes and Intestine from Radiation Induced Damages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......using Graphpad Instat 3 Software (San Diego, USA...Effect of P.amarus on radiation induced changes in the...Mr. M. Muthuvel, Radiation safety Officer, Amala Cancer...Withers, H. R. (1999) Radiation biology and treatment......

Kuzhuvelil Bhaskaran Nair Harikumar; Ramadasan Kuttan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Authors: B.E. Lehnert, R. Cary, D. Gadbois, and G. Gupta. Institutions: Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The scientific literature presents a confusing picture concerning health risks due to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), e.g., <1-10 cGy. Some effects of LDIR such as enhanced rates of cell proliferation and the induction of radioadaptation may be benign under some circumstances. Other evidence suggests LDIR can be hazardous and that a threshold for potentially detrimental responses, e.g., increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), increases in sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), alterations in gene or protein expression profiles, and increased

42

Hybrid Characteristics: 3D radiative transfer for parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a three-dimensional radiative transfer method designed specifically for use with parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics codes. This new algorithm, which we call hybrid characteristics, introduces a novel form of ray tracing that can neither be classified as long, nor as short characteristics, but which applies the underlying principles, i.e. efficient execution through interpolation and parallelizability, of both. Primary applications of the hybrid characteristics method are radiation hydrodynamics problems that take into account the effects of photoionization and heating due to point sources of radiation. The method is implemented in the hydrodynamics package FLASH. The ionization, heating, and cooling processes are modelled using the DORIC ionization package. Upon comparison with the long characteristics method, we find that our method calculates the column density with a similarly high accuracy and produces sharp and well defined shadows. We show the quality of the new algorithm in an application to the photoevaporation of multiple over-dense clumps. We present several test problems demonstrating the feasibility of our method for performing high resolution three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics calculations that span a large range of scales. Initial performance tests show that the ray tracing part of our method takes less time to execute than other parts of the calculation (e.g. hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh refinement), and that a high degree of efficiency is obtained in parallel execution. Although the hybrid characteristics method is developed for problems involving photoionization due to point sources, the algorithm can be easily adapted to the case of more general radiation fields.

Erik-Jan Rijkhorst; Tomasz Plewa; Anshu Dubey; Garrelt Mellema

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Use of radiation-induced polymers as friction reducing agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drag reduction of fluids containing a water phase, e.g. hydrocarbon-in-water mixture, flowing through a conduit, is reduced by incorporating within the water phase a polymer obtained by radiation-induced polymerization of acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, alkali metal salts thereof, or mixtures thereof. The polymerization is preferably carried out in 10-60% aqueous monomer solution with gamma radiation. The mixture of monomers, before radiation, preferably contains 25-99% acrylamide and 75-1% sodium acrylate. The polymer preferably shows viscoelastic effects at high concentrations in a solvent. Concentrations of about 1-10,000 ppm of the polymer in the water phase is desired. Examples of fluids useful with this invention include hydrocarbon-in-water and water -in-hydrocarbon slurries, the hydrocarbon is preferably comminuted oil shale or coal, congealed particles of crude oil and/or wax, viscous crude oil, etc.

Gogarty, W.B.; Knight, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

1980-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

A 5-Year Investigation of Children's Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Radiation Therapy for Localized Ependymoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies have the potential to preserve cognitive outcomes in children with ependymoma; however, functional behavior remains uninvestigated. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intelligence quotient (IQ) and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years after irradiation in children diagnosed with ependymoma. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 123 children with intracranial ependymoma. Mean age at irradiation was 4.60 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.85-5.35). Serial neurocognitive evaluations, including an age-appropriate IQ measure and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), were completed before irradiation, 6 months after treatment, and annually for 5 years. A total of 579 neurocognitive evaluations were included in these analyses. Results: Baseline IQ and VABS were below normative means (P<.05), although within the average range. Linear mixed models revealed stable IQ and VABS across the follow-up period, except for the VABS Communication Index, which declined significantly (P=.015). Annual change in IQ (-.04 points) did not correlate with annual change in VABS (-.90 to +.44 points). Clinical factors associated with poorer baseline performance (P<.05) included preirradiation chemotherapy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement, number and extent of surgical resections, and younger age at treatment. No clinical factors significantly affected the rate of change in scores. Conclusions: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies provided relative sparing of functional outcomes including IQ and adaptive behaviors, even in very young children. Communication skills remained vulnerable and should be the target of preventive and rehabilitative interventions.

Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

Cotrim, Ana P. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yoshikawa, Masanobu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J., E-mail: bbaum@dir.nidcr.nih.gov [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Developing Quality Assurance Processes for Image-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quality assurance has long been implemented in radiation treatment as systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that the radiation oncology service will satisfy the given requirements for quality care. The existing reports from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 have provided highly detailed QA guidelines for conventional radiotherapy and treatment planning. However, advanced treatment processes recently developed with emerging high technology have introduced new QA requirements that have not been addressed previously in the conventional QA program. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the existing QA guidelines to also include new considerations. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) is a closed-loop treatment process that is designed to include the individual treatment information, such as patient-specific anatomic variation and delivered dose assessed during the therapy course in treatment evaluation and planning optimization. Clinical implementation of IGART requires high levels of automation in image acquisition, registration, segmentation, treatment dose construction, and adaptive planning optimization, which brings new challenges to the conventional QA program. In this article, clinical QA procedures for IGART are outlined. The discussion focuses on the dynamic or four-dimensional aspects of the IGART process, avoiding overlap with conventional QA guidelines.

Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)], E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Detection of DNA Damage Induced by Space Radiation in Mir and Space Shuttle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced...American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced...studied in Go human lymphocytes using the comet assay. J. Radiat. Res. 42: 91101......

Takeo Ohnishi; Ken Ohnishi; Akihisa Takahashi; Yoshitaka Taniguchi; Masaru Sato; Tamotsu Nakano; Shunji Nagaoka

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hypothesized that the relative radiation sensitivity of hippocampal...therapies to reduce radiation-induced normal tissue...cells has potential safety concerns such as teratoma...could safely attenuate radiation-induced cognitive...employing Ethovision XT software (v5.0; Noldus Information...

Munjal M. Acharya; Lori-Ann Christie; Mary L. Lan; Erich Giedzinski; John R. Fike; Susanna Rosi; and Charles L. Limoli

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

Preston, Eric F. (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO); Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube P. Ravindran clear of unphysical values due to linearization. One-, two- and three-dimensional detonation simu results, providing new insights in detonation wave propagation. Nomenclature Ar j , Af j Pre

Texas at Arlington, University of

52

Covariance of phenotypically plastic traits induces an adaptive shift in host selection behaviour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Covariance of phenotypically plastic traits induces an adaptive shift in host selection behaviour efficiency. In the present study, we investigated covariance of two plastic traits--size at pupation and host; evolution 1. INTRODUCTION Phenotypic plasticity is defined as the ability of an organism to change its

Dukas, Reuven

53

Review of research on use of radiation-induced mutations in crop breeding in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Japan, the research on radiation-induced mutation has been conducted as one...32P, we now have various kinds of radiation facilities available for mutation breeding. The fundamental...

Takane Matsuo; Hikoyuki Yamaguchi

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates ionizing radiation-induced Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

silica optical Summary: measurements and the so-called radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) measured in dBm. TSL measurements have been... measurements. Connections between...

55

Motion-induced radiation from electrons moving in Maxwell's fish-eye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In \\u{C}erenkov radiation and transition radiation, evanescent wave from motion of charged particles transfers into radiation coherently. However, such dissipative motion-induced radiations require particles to move faster than light in medium or to encounter velocity transition to pump energy. Inspired by a method to detect cloak by observing radiation of a fast-moving electron bunch going through it by Zhang {\\itshape et al.}, we study the generation of electron-induced radiation from electrons' interaction with Maxwell's fish-eye sphere. Our calculation shows that the radiation is due to a combination of \\u{C}erenkov radiation and transition radiation, which may pave the way to investigate new schemes of transferring evanescent wave to radiation.

Liu, Yangjie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Radiation induced recombination centers in organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prolonged x-ray exposure of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells induces deep trap states that are observed in measurements of the photocurrent spectral response. The density of induced trap states is proportional to the density of recombination centers as measured by the voltage dependence of the photocurrent, therefore identifying the traps as primary recombination centers. The states are reversible by thermal annealing to about 100?C, which implies a metastable structural change with binding energy 11.2 eV. However, the annealing kinetics reveal three different annealing processes, although for defect states with essentially the same electronic character. Analysis of the radiation damage indicates that defects are formed by hydrogen release from C-H bonds due to electronic excitation by the energetic secondary electrons created by the x rays. Theoretical structure calculations of possible hydrogen-related defects find specific defect states that match the experimental observations and provide values for hydrogen migration energies that are consistent with the annealing kinetics. The effects of prolonged white light exposure are very similar to x-ray exposure, although the annealing kinetics are significantly different. Measurements of the spectral response with bias illumination provide information about the energy level of the localized states.

R. A. Street; J. E. Northrup; B. S. Krusor

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ionizing Radiation Induces Delayed Hyperrecombination in Mammalian Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...instability is critical to radiation risk assessment and for determining...the many delayed effects of radiation, chromosomal instability is...detrimental effects over a range of doses of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, a rapid and...

Lei Huang; Suzanne Grim; Leslie E. Smith; Perry M. Kim; Jac A. Nickoloff; Olga G. Goloubeva; William F. Morgan

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

EXTRAPOLATING RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER RISKS FROM LOW DOSES TO VERY LOW DOSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Brenner* Abstract--There is strong evidence that ionizing radiation increases cancer risks at high doses. There exists a range of high radiation doses which demonstra- bly increase cancer risks, and a lower dose rangePaper EXTRAPOLATING RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER RISKS FROM LOW DOSES TO VERY LOW DOSES David J

Brenner, David Jonathan

59

Biological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in extrapolating radiation risk estimates from epidemi- ologically accessible doses down to very low doses where) and for assessing the risk from a low-dose exposure to a carcinogen such as ionizing radiation, where only a smallBiological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away Oleg V

60

NFkB in the Thiol-Induced Adaptive Response (A)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A) A) David Grdina The University of Chicago Abstract Exposure of cells to low non-lethal doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 10 cGy) or WR1065, the active free thiol form of amifostine, can induce pro-survival pathways that result in protection against the damaging effects of a 2 Gy dose of ionizing radiation. One such signaling pathway involves the activation of NFκB and the subsequent elevation of active manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2). SOD2 is a mitochondrial matrix protein that serves as the primary mitochondrial defense against superoxide formation. Its primary function is to facilitate the dismutation of two molecules of superoxide anion (O2-) produced by normal respiratory processes or following exposure to ionizing radiation into water and hydrogen peroxide. To characterize the role of SOD2 in the radiation- and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

High LET radiatSpace Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ InducedEpithelial-Mesenchymal Transitionion can enhance TGFβ induced EMT and cross-talk with ATM pathways  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Minli Wang 1 , Megumi Hada 1 , Janice Huff 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Jennifer Anderson 3 , Peter O'Neill 3 and Francis A. Cucinotta 4 1 USRA Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA, 3 Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology & Biology, University of Oxford, UK, 4 NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA TGFβ is a key modulator of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), important in cancer progression and metastasis, which involve classic Smad or non-Smad signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of epithelial genes and promoted expression of mesenchymal proteins. Ionizing radiation was found to specifically induce expression of

62

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology Abstract Both the ATM and TGFβ signal transduction pathways are essential for cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFβ signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. Numerous studies have linked the p38 MAPK signaling pathway with the ATM DNA damage response, and others have shown that TGFβ stimulation results in the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Our aim is to perturb potential crosstalk between ATM, TGFβ and p38 MAPK at the DNA damage level and

63

A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ?40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

Jones, Keith W.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Origins and consequences of radiation–induced centrosome aberrations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation–induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation–induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar New York University School of Medicine Abstract Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator of genomic surveillance by eliminating genomically unstable cells through p53-dependent apoptosis. While high dose radiation has been shown to cause centrosome aberrations

66

Investigation of Radiation-Induced Free Radicals and Luminescence Properties in Fresh Pomegranate Fruits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation-induced free radicals and luminescence properties were investigated in ?-irradiated (03 kGy) pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits. Photostimulated luminescence (PSL) analysis showed limited applicability, and only 3 kGy-irradiated ...

Hafiz M. Shahbaz; Kashif Akram; Jae-Jun Ahn; Joong-Ho Kwon

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

67

Photon-Induced Field Desorption Experiments with Laser and Synchroton Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photon-induced field desorption of hydrogen ions from a tungsten emitter has been observed using laser light (4.5 eV). Whereas the laser light leads to thermal desorption, the synchrotron radiation seems to sh...

W. Drachsel; U. Weigmann; S. Jaenicke

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Identification of radiation-induced microRNA transcriptome by next-generation massively parallel sequencing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......induction of DNA damage and repair, cell cycle perturbation...performed using Illumina processing pipeline software (version 1.5...homologous recombination-mediated repair, and renders cells hypersensitive...Chaudhry MA . Base excision repair of ionizing radiation-induced......

M. Ahmad Chaudhry; Romaica A. Omaruddin; Christopher D. Brumbaugh; Muhammad A. Tariq; Nader Pourmand

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Genomic instability and bystander effects induced by high-LET radiation Eric J Hall*,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genomic instability and bystander effects induced by high-LET radiation Eric J Hall*,1 and Tom K. There is a progressive increase in genomic instability, determined either by gene amplification or allelic imbalance

70

An investigation of solar radiation induced cell death in a human keratinocyte cell line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular Biology 64: Cell Death Regulators...investigation of solar radiation induced cell death in a human...Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland...basal and squamous cell carcinomas) accounting...radiation from non-solar type UV lamp sources...

Alanna Maguire; James Walsh; and Fiona M. Lyng

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Interleukin-12 Deficiency Is Permissive for Angiogenesis in UV Radiation-Induced Skin Tumors  

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...WTs. The proliferative capacity of tumor cells of the...angiogenesis| Introduction Solar UV radiation, particularly...and the proliferative capacity of the tumor cells using...higher proliferative capacity than cells obtained from...prevention and treatment of solar UV radiation-induced...

Syed M. Meeran; Suchitra Katiyar; Craig A. Elmets; and Santosh K. Katiyar

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91­100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Bystander effects; Genomic instability; Ionizing radiation 1. Introduction Exposure

73

Curvature-induced radiation of surface plasmon polaritons propagating around bends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of the curvature-induced radiation of surface plasmon polaritons propagating around bends at metal-dielectric interfaces. We explain qualitatively how the curvature leads to distortion of the phase front, causing the fields to radiate energy away from the metal-dielectric interface. We then quantify, both analytically and numerically, radiation losses and energy transmission efficiencies of surface plasmon polaritons propagating around bends with varying radii as well as sign of curvature.

Hasegawa, Keisuke; Noeckel, Jens U.; Deutsch, Miriam [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, 1371 East 13th Aveenue, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Marianne B. Sowa, Claere von Neubeck, R. Joe Robinson, Paula M. Koehler, Norman J. Karin, Xihai Wang, Katrina M. Waters and Harish Shankaran Ionizing radiation exposure triggers a cell signaling program which includes proliferation, the DNA damage response, and tissue remodeling. The activated signaling pathways lead to the induction of both protective effects as well as adverse consequences. A fundamental question is whether signaling cascades initiated by low doses are fundamentally different than those initiated by high doses. To address this question we have applied a systems biology approach to examine the radiation induced temporal responses of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model. Using microarray-

75

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells J illuminated with near-infrared NIR radiation at frequency nir and intense far-infrared FIR radiation from and quenching of photoluminescence PL .8,9 The nonlinear interaction of FIR and near-infrared NIR radiation

Kono, Junichiro

76

Assessment of Low Linear Energy Transfer RadiationInduced Bystander Mutagenesis in a Three-Dimensional Culture Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Energy cleanup operations...mutation was a measurement of changes...with low-energy protons (28...Puck TT. Measurement of mutagenesis...on Radiation Units and Measurements; 1984. 23...low linear energy transfer radiation-induced...

Rudranath Persaud; Hongning Zhou; Sarah E. Baker; Tom K. Hei; and Eric J. Hall

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Motion-Induced Radiation from a Dynamically Deforming Mirror  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A path integral formulation is developed to study the spectrum of radiation from a perfectly reflecting (conducting) surface. It allows us to study arbitrary deformations in space and time. The spectrum is calculated to second order in the height function. For a harmonic traveling wave on the surface, we find many different regimes in which the radiation is restricted to certain directions. It is shown that high frequency photons are emitted in a beam with relatively low angular dispersion whose direction can be controlled by the mechanical deformations of the plate.

Faez Miri; Ramin Golestanian

1998-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radioprotective Effects of Melatonin on Radiation-Induced Cataract  

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......of radiation bred at Atat rk University Medical School, Department of Pharma- cology...automatic tem- perature (22 1 C) and lighting controls (12 hr light / 12 hr dark...prolongation of survival at reasonable cost to cancer patients.24) But, cataract......

Ihsan Karslioglu; Mustafa Vecdi Ertekin; Seyithan Taysi; Ibrahim Koer; Orhan Sezen; Akahan Gepdiremen; Mehmet Ko; Nuri Bakan

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

Leinders, Suzanne M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Mndez Romero, Alejandra [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schaart, Dennis [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, Yvette, E-mail: y.seppenwoolde@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

LOW DOSE PHOTON RADIATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN T HELPER LYMPHOCYTES  

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LOW DOSE PHOTON RADIATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN T HELPER LYMPHOCYTES LOW DOSE PHOTON RADIATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN T HELPER LYMPHOCYTES Daila S. Gridley 1,2 , Asma Rizvi 2 , Xian Luo 1 , Adeola Y. Makinde 2 , Steve Rightnar 1 , Jian Tian 1 , Melba L. Andres 1 , James M. Slater 1 , and Michael J. Pecaut 1,2 Departments of 1 Radiation Medicine and 2 Biochemistry & Microbiology Loma Linda University and Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA 92354 USA Health risks due to protracted low dose irradiation remain unclear. This project investigates T helper (Th) lymphocyte function and the cellular milieu in which they reside under conditions of low dose, low- linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure. The Th cells are important because they secrete cytokines essential for generating optimal immune defenses against tumor, virus-infected, and other

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive radiation therapy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1. What is radiation ... Source: Hamza-Lup, Felix G. - School of Computing, Armstrong Atlantic State University Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

82

Harnessing a radiation inducible promoter of Deinococcus radiodurans for enhanced precipitation of uranium  

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Abstract Bioremediation is an attractive option for the treatment of radioactive waste. We provide a proof of principle for augmentation of uranium bioprecipitation using the radiation inducible promoter, Pssb from Deinococcus radiodurans. Recombinant cells of D. radiodurans carrying acid phosphatase gene, phoN under the regulation of Pssb when exposed to 7kGy gamma radiation at two different dose rates of 56.8Gy/min and 4Gy/min, showed 89 fold increase in acid phosphatase activity. Highest whole cell PhoN activity was obtained after 2h in post irradiation recovery following 8kGy of high dose rate radiation. Such cells showed faster removal of high concentrations of uranium than recombinant cells expressing PhoN under a radiation non-inducible deinococcal promoter, PgroESL and could precipitate uranium even after continuous exposure to 0.6Gy/min gamma radiation for 10 days. Radiation induced recombinant D. radiodurans cells when lyophilized retained high levels of PhoN activity and precipitated uranium efficiently. These results highlight the importance of using a suitable promoter for removal of radionuclides from solution.

Chitra Seetharam Misra; Rita Mukhopadhyaya; Shree Kumar Apte

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Sorafenib Enhances Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inhibiting STAT3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and lethal human malignancies. Lack of efficient therapy for advanced HCC is a pressing problem worldwide. This study aimed to determine the efficacy and mechanism of combined sorafenib and radiation therapy treatment for HCC. Methods and Materials: HCC cell lines (PLC5, Huh-7, Sk-Hep1, and Hep3B) were treated with sorafenib, radiation, or both, and apoptosis and signal transduction were analyzed. Results: All 4 HCC cell lines showed resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis; however, this resistance could be reversed in the presence of sorafenib. Inhibition of phospho-STAT3 was found in cells treated with sorafenib or sorafenib plus radiation and subsequently reduced the expression levels of STAT3-related proteins, Mcl-1, cyclin D1, and survivin. Silencing STAT3 by RNA interference overcame apoptotic resistance to radiation in HCC cells, and the ectopic expression of STAT3 in HCC cells abolished the radiosensitizing effect of sorafenib. Moreover, sorafenib plus radiation significantly suppressed PLC5 xenograft tumor growth. Conclusions: These results indicate that sorafenib sensitizes resistant HCC cells to radiation-induced apoptosis via downregulating phosphorylation of STAT3 in vitro and in vivo.

Huang, Chao-Yuan [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiological Technology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chen-Si [School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tai, Wei-Tien; Hsieh, Chi-Ying [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiau, Chung-Wai [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Ann-Lii [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuen-Feng, E-mail: kfchen1970@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Adapting to an invasive species: Toxic cane toads induce morphological change in Australian snakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of adaptive evolution in populations as a consequence of overfishing (10), global warming (11), and heavy-metal pollution (12). These studies highlight the importance of examining the potential for adaptive change

Shine, Rick

85

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

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Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

86

Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Adaptive Responses to Radiation, UV light, and Heat  

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......B. (2002) The role of UV-B radiation in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems-an experimental and functional analysis of...Takahashi, A. and Okaichi, K. (1999) Restoration of mutant TP53 to normal TP53 function by glycerol......

Akihisa Takahashi; Takeo Ohnishi

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Solar simulated radiation induced cell death depends on spectral distribution and irradiance but not output delivery  

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......research-article Papers Solar simulated radiation induced cell death depends...Dublin Institute of Technology, 13 Camden Row...with a second solar simulator and...Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8, Ireland...S. Gov't | Cell Death Cells...effects Photobiology Solar Energy Ultraviolet......

Alanna Maguire; Fiona M. Lyng; James E. Walsh

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases  

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...Research Animal Resources, University of...induced using a solar UV irradiation system. The solar UV radiation source...mice exposed to solar UV. The inhibition...Center for Research Resources at the NIH. Use...Department of Energy, Office of Basic...

Jixia Li; Margarita Malakhova; Madhusoodanan Mottamal; Kanamata Reddy; Igor Kurinov; Andria Carper; Alyssa Langfald; Naomi Oi; Myoung Ok Kim; Feng Zhu; Carlos P. Sosa; Keyuan Zhou; Ann M. Bode; and Zigang Dong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo  

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Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Wenrong Li 1, , Fang Li 1 , Qian Huang 1 , Jingping Shen 1 , Frank Wolf 1 , Yujun He 1 , Xinjian Liu 1 , Y. Angela Hu 1 , Joel. S. Bedford 5 , and Chuan-Yuan Li 1,2,* Departments of 1 Radiation Oncology, 2 Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA; 3 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA DNA double strand breaks are a major form of DNA damage and a key mechanism through which radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells. Despite its importance, measuring DNA double strand breaks is still a tedious task that is normally carried out by gel electrophoresis or immunofluorescence staining. Here we report a novel approach to image and

90

Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets  

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LS-290 LS-290 Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets J. Alderman and P.K. Job APS Operations Division Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory R.C. Martin, C.M. Simmons, and G.D. Owen Californium User Facility for Neutron Science Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory J. Puhl Ionizing Radiation Division National Institute of Standards and Technology November 2000 work sponsored by U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Research 1 Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets J. Alderman and P.K. Job APS Operations Division Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory R.C. Martin, C.M. Simmons, and G. D. Owen Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

91

Artificial and Solar UV Radiation Induces Strand Breaks and Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers in Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ECOLOGY Artificial and Solar UV Radiation Induces Strand Breaks and Cyclobutane...to solar UV-B and UV-A radiation (Y. Xue and W. L. Nicholson...monitoring studies at Tokyo, Japan. . N. Munakata Biologically...effective dose of solar ultraviolet radiation estimated by spore dosimetry...

Tony A. Slieman; Wayne L. Nicholson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Action Spectrum for Growth Delay Induced in Escherichia coli B/r by Far-Ultraviolet Radiation  

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...by Far-Ultraviolet Radiation Hiraku Takebe 1 John...University, Osaka 530, Japan. An action spectrum...by far-ultraviolet radiation (230 to 295 nm) was...suspension. Near-UV radiation induces extensive growth...University, Osaka 530, Japan. ducing little killing...

Hiraku Takebe; John Jagger

1969-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Terahertz photovoltaic detection of cyclotron resonance in the regime of radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations  

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We examine and compare the diagonal magnetoresistance, Rxx, and the photovoltage induced by microwave (42?f<300 GHz) and terahertz (f?300 GHz) photoexcitation in the high mobility quasi-two-dimensional GaAs/AlGaAs system. The data demonstrate strong radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in Rxx to 360 GHz. In addition, cyclotron resonance is observed in the photovoltage to 725 GHz. These results show that our high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron system (2DES) specimens remain photoactive in magnetotransport into the terahertz band.

R. G. Mani, A. N. Ramanayaka, Tianyu Ye, M. S. Heimbeck, H. O. Everitt, and W. Wegscheider

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System Yanrong Su, Jarah Meador and Adayabalam S. Balajee Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West, 168th Street, New York, NY 10032. Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) inflicts a wide variety of lesions in the genomic DNA. Among them, DNA double strand break (DSB) is considered to be the critical lesion for most of the deleterious radiation effects including carcinogenesis. Much of our knowledge on induction and repair kinetics of DSB has come from studies in two dimensional cell culture systems. However, the damage signaling and repair responses to DSB in tissue microenvironment are largely unknown. Knowledge of tissue responses to

95

Comparison of radiation exposure and associated radiation-induced cancer risks from mammography and molecular imaging of the breast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Recent studies have raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. Little has been published regarding the relative exposure and risks associated with breast imaging techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI), molecular breast imaging (MBI), or positron emission mammography (PEM). The purpose of this article was to estimate and compare the risks of radiation-induced cancer from mammography and techniques such as PEM, BSGI, and MBI in a screening environment. Methods: The authors used a common scheme for all estimates of cancer incidence and mortality based on the excess absolute risk model from the BEIR VII report. The lifetime attributable risk model was used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality. All estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were based on a population of 100 000 females followed from birth to age 80 and adjusted for the fraction that survives to various ages between 0 and 80. Assuming annual screening from ages 40 to 80 and from ages 50 to 80, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality attributed to digital mammography, screen-film mammography, MBI, BSGI, and PEM was calculated. The corresponding cancer incidence and mortality from natural background radiation was calculated as a useful reference. Assuming a 15%-32% reduction in mortality from screening, the benefit/risk ratio for the different imaging modalities was evaluated. Results: Using conventional doses of 925 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi for MBI and BSGI and 370 MBq F-18 FDG for PEM, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality were found to be 15-30 times higher than digital mammography. The benefit/risk ratio for annual digital mammography was >50:1 for both the 40-80 and 50-80 screening groups, but dropped to 3:1 for the 40-49 age group. If the primary use of MBI, BSGI, and PEM is in women with dense breast tissue, then the administered doses need to be in the range 75-150 MBq for Tc-99m sestamibi and 35 MBq-70 MBq for F-18 FDG in order to obtain benefit/risk ratios comparable to those of mammography in these age groups. These dose ranges should be achievable with enhancements to current technology while maintaining a reasonable examination time. Conclusions: The results of the dose estimates in this study clearly indicate that if molecular imaging techniques are to be of value in screening for breast cancer, then the administered doses need to be substantially reduced to better match the effective doses of mammography.

O'Connor, Michael K.; Li Hua; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Clancy, Conor B.; Vetter, Richard J. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, St. James's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Radiation Safety, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Radiation Induced Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Late-S/G2  

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Induced Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Late-S/G2 Induced Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Late-S/G2 Cells: Roles of Homologous Recombination and Non-Homologous End Joining Joel Bedford Colorado State University Abstract There has been considerable discussion, with some data reported, addressing the question of the relative contributions of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR) on the repair or rejoining of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks, especially in relation to their operation during the cell cycle. Reports have included studies on chromosomal aberration induction in G1/G0 cells defective in NHEJ or A-T cells, for example, but relatively little on S/G2 cells and especially on mutants defective in HRR. The broad biological importance of

97

Terahertz radiation and second-harmonic generation from InAs: Bulk versus surface electric-field-induced contributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terahertz radiation and second-harmonic generation from InAs: Bulk versus surface electric-harmonic generation and terahertz radiation emission indicates that the observed dominant surface electric-field-induced contributions Matthew Reid, Igor V. Cravetchi, and Robert Fedosejevs Department of Electrical and Computer

Reid, Matthew

98

Molecular Characterization of New Melanoma Cell Lines from C3H Mice Induced by Ethanol plus Ultraviolet Radiation  

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...treated with a combination of ethanol, aloe emodin, and UV radiation...from two tumors induced by ethanol and UV radiation. The availability...Twinsburg, OH). The energy emitted from these lamps consists...with 25% U.S.P. grade ethanol/water (1 ml/mouse) applied...

Faith M. Strickland; Sen Pathak; Asha S. Multani; Ronald P. Pelley; and Cherrie K. Donawho

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Photoconductivity of graphene devices induced by terahertz radiation at various photon energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of a magnetic field on Landau levels (LLs) in graphene-based devices is described via the magneto-optical response induced by terahertz (THz) radiation. For single-layer graphene, the resonance energies of the transitions between the on Landau levels (LLs) such as L{sub 1}, L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} fit quite well to the terahertz spectral range at low magnetic fields. Also, the calculations for the terahertz photoresponse (photoconductivity) in the presence of low magnetic fields, the reported calculations for the scattering rate of LLs, recent and our experimental results of photoresponse measurements yield that single-layer graphene is suitable for the detection of terahertz radiation.

Salman, M.; Nachtwei, G. [NTH School for Contacts in Nanosystems, Germany and Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Gouider, F.; Gthlich, M. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Friedemann, M.; Ahlers, F. J. [Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Schmidt, H.; Haug, R. J. [NTH School for Contacts in Nanosystems, Germany and Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fanconi Anemia FANCG Protein in Mitigating Radiation- and Enzyme-Induced DNA Double-Strand Breaks by Homologous Recombination in Vertebrate Cells  

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...Protein in Mitigating Radiation- and Enzyme-Induced...Okayama 701-0192, Japan. Phone: 81-86-462-1111...exhibit increased MMC and radiation-induced chromosome...Okayama 701-0192, Japan. | Journal Article...pharmacology DNA drug effects radiation effects DNA Damage DNA...

Kazuhiko Yamamoto; Masamichi Ishiai; Nobuko Matsushita; Hiroshi Arakawa; Jane E. Lamerdin; Jean-Marie Buerstedde; Mitsune Tanimoto; Mine Harada; Larry H. Thompson; Minoru Takata

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The effect of different adaptation strengths on image quality and radiation dose using Siemens Care Dose 4D  

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......undertaking strategies for CT radiation dose optimisation...supported by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSI P 1579...4D new technique for radiation dose reduction. SOMATOM...Application Guide. Software Version syngo CT 2005A......

Marcus Sderberg; Mikael Gunnarsson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Natural and Radiation Carcinogenesis in Man. III. Radiation Carcinogenesis  

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...mice. NATURAL AND RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN MAN. 3. RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS. | Journal Article | Japan Neoplasms etiology Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced Radiation Genetics | JAPAN NEOPLASM ETIOLOGY NEOPLASMS, RADIATION-INDUCED RADIATION...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Adaptive governance and institutional strategies for climate-induced community relocations in Alaska  

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...funds from a climate-change lawsuit against...and gas companies have been unsuccessful...community leaders, and government...of these climate changes (42, 43...Conclusion Climate-induced biophysical change threatens...insurance companies may not be...

Robin Bronen; F. Stuart Chapin III

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Radiation-Induced Decomposition of U(VI) Phase to Nanocrystals of UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products, under oxidizing conditions, of uraninite and the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel. These U{sup 6+}-phases are subjected to a radiation field caused by the {alpha}-decay of U, or in the case of spent nuclear fuel, incorporated actinides, such as {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np. In order to evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) of U{sup 6+}-phases. The heavy-particle irradiations are used to simulate the ballistic interactions of the recoil-nucleus of an {alpha}-decay event with the surrounding structure. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to UO{sub 2} nanocrystals at doses as low as 0.006 displacements per atom (dpa). U{sup 6+}-phases accumulate substantial radiation doses ({approx}1.0 displacement per atom) within 100,000 years if the concentration of incorporated {sup 239}Pu is as high as 1 wt%. Similar nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} were observed in samples from the natural fission reactors at Oklo, Gabon. Multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases provide a mechanism for the remobilization of incorporated radionuclides.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing; L. Wang

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

European Integrated Project RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Project RISC-RAD Integrated Project RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiations Laure Sabatier 1 , L.H.F Mullenders 2 , Mike Atkinson 3 , Simon Bouffler 4 , Herwig Paretzke 5 1 Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, CEA, 18 route du panorama BP6 92265 Fontenay-aux- Roses, France 2 LUMC, Department of Toxicogenetics, Postal Zone S-4-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands 3 GSF- Institute of Pathology, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg Germany 4 HPA Radiation Protection Division, Centre for Radiation Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, UK 5 GSF- Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, Neuherberg, D-85764 Germany In radiological protection, the risks of inducing stochastic health effects (largely cancer) by a

108

A Survey of Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy in Japan  

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Purpose We observed a rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were called radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. We surveyed major hospitals in Japan to review their findings of radiation-induced BOOP, in particular the clinical and pictorial characteristics of the entity. Methods and Materials We reviewed surveys completed and returned by 20 institutions. The survey responses were based on a total of 37 cases of BOOP syndrome. We also reviewed X-ray and computed tomography scans provided by these institutions. We discussed the information derived from the questionnaire and analyzed patients' characteristics, methods used in the treatment of BOOP syndrome, and prognosis. Results The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was about 1.8% (37 of 2,056). We did not find a relationship between the characteristics of patients and the occurrence of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. The pulmonary findings were classified into four patterns on chest computed tomography scans. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray was classified into three patterns. Pneumonitis appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy was completed and disappeared within 612 months after its onset. At 5-year follow-up, 2 patients had died, 1 of breast cancer and the other of interstitial pneumonitis, which seemed to be idiopathic and unrelated to the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. Conclusions Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, the patients' clinical condition must be carefully followed.

Etsuyo Ogo; Ritsuko Komaki; Kiminori Fujimoto; Masafumi Uchida; Toshi Abe; Katsumasa Nakamura; Michihide Mitsumori; Kenji Sekiguchi; Yuko Kaneyasu; Naofumi Hayabuchi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Moros, Eduardo G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Zheng, Junying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgical Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Boerma, Marjan, E-mail: mboerma@uams.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A parallel adaptive method for simulating shock-induced combustion with detailed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in practically relevant cases since real detonations never remain planar. In- stead, detonations exhibit, parallelisation 1 Introduction A detonation wave is a self-sustained, violent form of shock-induced com- bustion that is characterised by a subtle interplay between the processes of hydrodynamic shock propagation and chemical

Deiterding, Ralf

111

Radiation damage induced by GeV electrons in W-Re and Cu targets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 UCRL-JC-148049 July 2002 Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes Radiation Damage Induced by GeV Electrons in W-Re Targets for Next Generation Linear Colliders M.-J. Caturla 1* , S. Roesler 2 , V. K. Bharadwaj 3 , D. C. Schultz 3 , J. C. Sheppard 3 , J. Marian 1 , B. D. Wirth 1 , W. Stein 1 and A. Sunwoo 1 1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA 2 CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland 3 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Menlo Park, California s: We have studied the structural damage of W-Re targets produced by electrons with energies of several GeV and under different conditions of total number of electrons, beam shape and target depth. We report the differences in damage levels for different designs considered in the construction of the next generation of linear accelerators, and discuss the possible effects in the lifetime

112

Effect of surface tension on the acoustic radiation pressure-induced motion of the water-air interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of surface tension on the acoustic radiation pressure-induced motion of the water to be a function of the surface tension. The time of mound formation measurementsin cleanwaterat low.Our objectiveisto investigatetheeffectsof surface tension on mound formation. We usea boundaryintegralmethodto

Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

113

Retrospective Cohort Study of Bronchial Doses and Radiation-Induced Atelectasis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors Located Close to the Bronchial Tree  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the doseresponse relationship between radiation-induced atelectasis after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and bronchial dose. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients treated with SBRT for tumors close to main, lobar, or segmental bronchi were selected. The association between incidence of atelectasis and bronchial dose parameters (maximum point-dose and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volume [ranging from 0.1 cm{sup 3} up to 2.0 cm{sup 3}]) was statistically evaluated with survival analysis models. Results: Prescribed doses varied between 4 and 20 Gy per fraction in 2-5 fractions. Eighteen patients (24.3%) developed atelectasis considered to be radiation-induced. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between the incidence of radiation-induced atelectasis and minimum dose to the high-dose bronchial volumes, of which 0.1 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 0.1cm3}) was used for further analysis. The median value of D{sub 0.1cm3} (?/? = 3 Gy) was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 147 Gy{sub 3} (range, 20-293 Gy{sub 3}). For patients who developed atelectasis the median value was EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 210 Gy{sub 3}, and for patients who did not develop atelectasis, EQD{sub 2,LQ} = 105 Gy{sub 3}. Median time from treatment to development of atelectasis was 8.0 months (range, 1.1-30.1 months). Conclusion: In this retrospective study a significant doseresponse relationship between the incidence of atelectasis and the dose to the high-dose volume of the bronchi is shown.

Karlsson, Kristin, E-mail: kristin.karlsson@karolinska.se [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Nyman, Jan [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Baumann, Pia; Wersll, Peter [Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Drugge, Ninni [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gagliardi, Giovanna [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Persson, Jan-Olov [Statistical Research Group, Mathematical Statistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Rutkowska, Eva [Physics Department, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral (United Kingdom); Tullgren, Owe [Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Lax, Ingmar [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Regulation of NF-kB and MnSOD in Low  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NF-kB and MnSOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive NF-kB and MnSOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana Why this Project? To determine if low dose ionizing radiation-induced adaptive responses in skin cells are mediated by activation of signaling networks. Project Goals To evaluate the signaling networks involving transcription factor NF-kB and the mitochondrial antioxidant protein MnSOD. To determine if NF-kB is activated by low dose radiation in vivo. To determine if NF-kB activation is critical in the pathways that produce adaptive responses. Experimental Approach Cells transfected with NF-kB luciferase responder genes will be used to define a dose-response relationship for activation of the NF-kB gene. NF-kB

115

CXC Receptor 1 and 2 and Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors Alter Radiation-induced Lung Disease in the Mouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We previously reported increased numbers of neutrophils to be associated with the development of the radiation-induced lung responses of alveolitis (pneumonitis) and fibrosis in mice. In the present study we investigated whether CXC receptor 1 and 2 antagonism with DF2156A, a small molecule inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis, or the neutrophil elastase inhibitor sivelestat decreases the lung response to irradiation. Methods and Materials: KK/HIJ mice received 14 Gy whole-thorax irradiation, and a subset of them received drug treatment 3 times per week from the day of irradiation until they were killed because of respiratory distress symptoms. Results: Irradiated mice receiving sivelestat survived 18% longer than did mice receiving radiation alone (73 vs 60 days for female mice, 91 vs 79 days for male mice), whereas postirradiation survival times did not differ between the group of mice receiving DF2156A and the radiation-only group. The numbers of neutrophils in lung tissue and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid did not differ among groups of irradiated mice, but they significantly exceeded the levels in unirradiated control mice. The extent of alveolitis, assessed histologically, did not differ between irradiated mice treated with either drug and those receiving radiation alone, when assessed at the end of the experiment, but it was significantly reduced, as were the neutrophil measures, in sivelestat-treated mice at the common kill time of 60 days after irradiation. Mice treated with radiation and DF2156A developed significantly less fibrosis than did mice receiving radiation alone, and this difference was associated with decreased expression of interleukin-13 in lung tissue. Conclusions: We conclude that neutrophil elastase inhibition affects alveolitis and prolongs survival, whereas CXCR1/2 antagonism reduces radiation-induced fibrotic lung disease in mice without affecting the onset of distress.

Fox, Jessica [Department of Medicine and the Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Department of Medicine and the Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Haston, Christina K., E-mail: christina.haston@mcgill.ca [Department of Medicine and the Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Right-left asymmetry of radiation from fission induced by polarised neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of the right-left asymmetry is considered in the angular distribution of gamma quanta from fission of U-235 by polarised thermal neutrons, which depends on the polarisation of the neutrons with respect to the gamma-fission plane. Electric dipole radiation from fission fragments arising due to the Strutinsky-Denisov induced polarisation mechanism may give rise to such an effect. Earlier, this mechanism was shown to fit the non-statistical part observed in the gamma spectrum from spontaneous fission of Cf-252. The calculated value of the magnitude of the asymmetry parameter is on the level of 10$^{-4}$. That is in agreement with the current experimental data. A crucial experiment to give a more definite picture of the concrete mechanism would be determination of the energy of the quanta responsible for the asymmetry. Detection of the quanta with the energy of ~5 MeV approaching the giant dipole resonance is needed in order to identify prompt gamma rays emitted at the stage of fissioning.

F. F. Karpeshin

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Right-left asymmetry of radiation from fission induced by polarised neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of the right-left asymmetry is considered in the angular distribution of gamma quanta from fission of U-235 by polarised thermal neutrons, which depends on the polarisation of the neutrons with respect to the gamma-fission plane. Electric dipole radiation from fission fragments arising due to the Strutinsky-Denisov induced polarisation mechanism may give rise to such an effect. Earlier, this mechanism was shown to fit the non-statistical part observed in the gamma spectrum from spontaneous fission of Cf-252. The calculated value of the magnitude of the asymmetry parameter is on the level of 10$^{-4}$. That is in agreement with the current experimental data. A crucial experiment to give a more definite picture of the concrete mechanism would be determination of the energy of the quanta responsible for the asymmetry. Detection of the quanta with the energy of ~5 MeV approaching the giant dipole resonance is needed in order to identify prompt gamma rays emitted at the stage of fissioning.

Karpeshin, F F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effect of solvents on the radiation-induced polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of solvents on the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers (EVE and IPVE, respectively) was investigated. EVE and IPVE polymerizations were carried out in bulk and in solution under superdry conditions in which polar impurities, especially water, have been reduced to negligible levels. This was accomplished by means of a sodium mirror technique using joint free baked out glass equipment and high vacuum. Plots of the monomer conversions and irradiation times were obtained for EVE and IPVE polymerizations in bulk and in benzene solution at constant monomer concentrations. The monomer concentration dependence of the polymerization rate was studied for EVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene, diethlyl ether, diglyme and methylene chloride, and for IPVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene. Solvent effect on the estimated propagating rate constants was examined for EVE and IPVE polymerization in bulk and in solution. The effect of temperature on the polymerization rate was also investigated for EVE polymerization in bulk ad in benzene, diethyl and diisopropyl ethers, methylene chloride and nitromethane, and for IPVE ploymerization in bulk and in benzene.

Hsieh, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ionizing Radiation-induced, Mitochondria-dependent Generation of Reactive Oxygen/Nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exposing cells to ionizing radiation. In the 1-10 Gy dose range, the amount...demonstrated that ionizing radiation in the therapeutic dose range stimulates a...exposing cells to ionizing radiation. In the 1-10 Gy dose range, the amount...

J. Kevin Leach; Glenn Van Tuyle; Peck-Sun Lin; Rupert Schmidt-Ullrich; and Ross B. Mikkelsen

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

[Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair in human cells]. Progress report, [April 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The excision of radiation-induced lesions in DNA by a DNA repair enzyme complex, namely the UvrABC nuclease complex, has been investigated. Irradiated DNA was treated with the enzyme complex. DNA fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. The results showed that a number pyrimidine- and purine-derived lesions in DNA were excised by the UvrABC nuclease complex and that the enzyme complex does not act on radiation-induced DNA lesions as a glycosylase. This means that it does not excise individual base products, but it excises oligomers containing these lesions. A number of pyrimidine-derived lesions that were no substrates for other DNA repair enzymes investigated in our laboratory were substrates for the UvrABC nuclease complex.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

PM2 DNA, Forms I and I: a quantitative comparison of strand breakage induced by ionizing radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Advisory Committee: Dr R. D. Neff A quantitative comparison of strand breakage production rates, induced by 250 kvP X-rays, was examined for PM2 DNA, Form I and Form I . Assay of the irrad. iated DNA samples was 0 accomplished by tube gel... AND METHODS DNA Preparation Radiation Protocol Azarose 1 Buffer ~garose Gels Tube Gel Electrophoresis Spectrofluorometry with Electronic Quantif'ication RESULTS DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION REFERENCES APPENDIX 1 APPENDIX 2 VITA ~Pa e ~ 22 22 24...

Myers, Peter Hall

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a ??Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Quantification of radiation induced crosslinking in a commercial, toughened silicone rubber, TR-55, by 1H MQ-NMR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation induced degradation in a commercial, filled silicone composite has been studied by SPME/GC-MS, DMA, DSC, swelling, and Multiple Quantum NMR. Analysis of volatile and semivolatile species indicates degradation via decomposition of the peroxide curing catalyst and radiation induced backbiting reactions. DMA, swelling, and spin-echo NMR analysis indicate a increase in crosslink density of near 100% upon exposure to a cumulative dose of 250 kGray. Analysis of the sol-fraction via Charlseby-Pinner analysis indicates a ratio of chain scission to crosslinking yields of 0.38, consistent with the dominance of the crosslinking observed by DMA, swelling and spin-echo NMR and the chain scissioning reactions observed by MS analysis. Multiple Quantum NMR has revealed a bimodal distribution of residual dipolar couplings near 1 krad/sec and 5 krad/sec in an approximately 90:10 ratio, consistent with bulk network chains and chains associated with the filler surface. Upon exposure to radiation, the mean {Omega}{sub d} for both domains and the width of both domains both increased. The MQ NMR analysis provided increase insight into the effects of ionizing radiation on the network structure of silicone polymers.

Maxwell, R; Chinn, S; Alviso, C; Harvey, C A; Giuliani, J; Wilson, T; Cohenour, R

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Low-Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Bobby R. Scott, Ph.D. and Jennifer D. Di Palma Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE Albuquerque, NM 87108 USA Life on earth evolved in a low-level ionizing radiation environment comprised of terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays. Today we all reside in an ionizing radiation environment comprised of both natural background radiation and radiation from human activities (e.g., Chernobyl accident). An evolutionary benefit of the interaction of low-level, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) ionizing radiation with mammalian life forms on earth is adapted protection. Adapted protection involves low-dose/dose-rate, low-LET radiation induced high-fidelity DNA repair in cooperation with normal apoptosis (presumed p53

125

Studies on Pentoxifylline and Tocopherol Combination for Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in Rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate whether the application of pentoxifylline (PTX) and tocopherol l (Vit. E) could modify the development of radiation-induced heart disease and downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1mRNA in rats. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups: control group, irradiated group, experimental group 1, and experiment group 2. Supplementation was started 3 days before irradiation; in experimental group 1, injection of PTX (15 mg/kg/d) and Vit. E (5.5 mg/kg/d) continued till the 12th week postirradiation, whereas in experimental group 2 it was continued until the 24th week postirradiation. All rats were administrated a single dose of 20 Gy irradiation to the heart except the control group. Histopathologic evaluation was performed at various time points (Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 and 24th week) up to 24 weeks after irradiation. Changes of levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were also investigated at the same time points using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Results: Compared with the irradiated group, levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA of the rat hearts were relatively low in the two experimental groups on the 12th week postirradiation. In experimental group 1, there was a rebound expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA on the 24th week postirradiation, whereas that of the experimental group 2 remained low (p < 0.05). The proportions of collagen fibers of the two experimental groups were lower than that of irradiated group (p < 0.05). A rebound could be observed in the experimental group 1. Conclusion: PTX and Vit. E downregulated the expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA. The irradiated rat hearts showed a marked pathologic response to the drugs. The withdrawal of drugs in the 12th week postirradiation could cause rebound effects of the development of fibrosis.

Liu Hui [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xiong Mai [Department of Cardiac Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xia Yunfei; Cui Nianji; Lu Rubiao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Deng Ling [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Lin Yuehao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Clinical Laboratory, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Rong Tiehua [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)], E-mail: esophagus2003@yahoo.com.cn

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Abstract 2511: Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta inhibitors protect hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced apoptosis by regulating MDM2/p53 pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...kinase 3 beta inhibitors protect hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced apoptosis by regulating MDM2/p53 pathway Dinesh Kumar Thotala 1 Dennis E. Hallahan 1 Eugenia M. Yazlovitskaya 2 1Washington Univ. School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO...

Dinesh Kumar Thotala; Dennis E. Hallahan; and Eugenia M. Yazlovitskaya

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

Abstract #2293: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta inhibitors protect hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced apoptosis by regulating MDM2/p53 pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...kinase-3 beta inhibitors protect hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced apoptosis by regulating MDM2/p53 pathway Dinesh Kumar Thotala Dennis Hallahan Eugenia Yazlovitskaya Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN 100th AACR Annual Meeting-- Apr 18-22...

Dinesh Kumar Thotala; Dennis Hallahan; and Eugenia Yazlovitskaya

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Adaptability and human genetics.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...parts of the system follow logically...desiccating winds, and extreme solar radiation...inclusive population system, is a major...Chung, 1966). Hybrid studies are...with population systems, dynamic population...adaptive traits. Hybrid individuals...

W S Laughlin

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

Radiation-induced ICAM-1 Expression via TGF-?1 Pathway on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells; Comparison between X-ray and Carbon-ion Beam Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......expression in cells irradiated with car- bon-ion beam and the same...HUVE cells at 48 hours after car- bon beam irradiation. ICAM-1...human lymphoblasts and mice are defective in radiation- induced apoptosis...endothelial growth factor in lung car- cinoma cells. Int J Radiat......

Hiroki Kiyohara; Yasuki Ishizaki; Yoshiyuki Suzuki; Hiroyuki Katoh; Nobuyuki Hamada; Tatsuya Ohno; Takeo Takahashi; Yasuhiko Kobayashi; Takashi Nakano

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

arXiv:cond-mat/0301569v325Aug2003 Radiation-Induced Magnetoresistance Oscillations in a 2D Electron Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at = c due to heating at the cyclotron resonance. Interest in this phenomenon was heightened when, using on the ratio of radiation frequency to cyclotron frequency. We perform a diagrammatic calculation and find, µ, to the cyclotron frequency, c, these radiation-induced oscillations are controlled by the ratio

132

Preconceptional paternal exposure to radiation or heavy metals like cadmium can induce cancer in unexposed offspring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Volume 47, 2006 Depleted uranium - induced malignant...Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern...Volume 47, 2006] 5215 Depleted uranium (DU) has been used...cells can be induced by depleted uranium. This work was supported...

Alexandra C. Miller; Rafael Rivas; Robert J. Merlot; and Paul Lison

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Inactivation of 14-3-3? Influences Telomere Behavior and Ionizing Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...per dish was chosen to ensure that about 50 colonies would survive a particular radiation dose treatment. Cells were exposed to ionizing radiation in the dose range of 0 to 8 Gy at room temperature using a 137Cs ray at a dose rate of 1.1 Gy...

Sonu Dhar; Jeremy A. Squire; M. Prakash Hande; Raymund J. Wellinger; Tej K. Pandita

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

RADIATION-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF U(VI) ALTERATION PHASES OF UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products of spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions, and they may potentially incorporate actinides, such as long-lived {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np, delaying their transport to the biosphere. In order to evaluate the ballistic effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) for six different structures of U{sup 6+}-phases: uranophane, kasolite, boltwoodite, saleeite, carnotite, and liebigite. The target uranyl-minerals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and identification confirmed by SAED (selected area electron diffraction) in TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The TEM observation revealed no initial contamination of uraninite in these U{sup 6+} phases. All of the samples were irradiated with in situ TEM observation using 1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+} in the IVEM (intermediate-voltage electron microscope) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The ion flux was 6.3 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}/sec. The specimen temperatures during irradiation were 298 and 673 K, respectively. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} at doses as low as 0.006 dpa. The cumulative doses for the pure U{sup 6+}-phases, e.g., uranophane, at 0.1 and 1 million years (m.y.) are calculated to be 0.009 and 0.09 dpa using SRIM2003. However, with the incorporation of 1 wt.% {sup 239}Pu, the calculated doses reach 0.27 and {approx}1.00 dpa in ten thousand and one hundred thousand years, respectively. Under oxidizing conditions, multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases should be further investigated to determine the fate of trace elements that may have been incorporated in the U{sup 6+}-phases.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response Aris Alexandrou and Jian Jian Li Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of California Davis, Sacramento, California, 95817 The initiation of the circadian rhythm field occurred when the Takahashi group defined a mutation in the mouse gene "Clock" and cloned the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) in the mid- 1990's (1-3). Currently more than a dozen clock genes have been identified (3-4). Disruptions in the circadian rhythm via changes in environmental conditions, such as, diet, temperature, and night/day hours lead to the pathogenesis of a multitude of diseases, such as, cancer, diabetes mellitus,

136

X-ray lithography induced radiation damage in CMOS and bipolar devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation effects from a synchroton x-ray lithography source on the performance degradation and long term reliability of high performance self-aligned bipolar devices and deep sub-micron CMOS devices are studi...

L. K. Wang

137

Space radiation-induced bystander signaling in 2D and 3D skin tissue models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space radiation poses a significant hazard to astronauts on long-duration missions, and the low fluences of charged particles characteristic of this field suggest that bystander effects, the phenomenon in which a greater ...

Lumpkins, Sarah B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Tryptophan Cluster Protects Human ?D-Crystallin from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Photoaggregation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a significant risk factor for age-related cataract, a disease of the human lens and the most prevalent cause of blindness in the world. Cataract pathology involves protein misfolding ...

Schafheimer, Steven Nathaniel

139

Rearrangement of a phosphosilicate glass network induced by the 193-nm radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IR absorption and Raman spectra of phosphosilicate glass (PSG) are measured during its exposure to radiation at a wavelength of 193 nm. The obtained data demonstrate the complicated rearrangement dynamics of the glass network around phosphor atoms and of the glass network as a whole. The experimental dependences are explained by the model of the PSG network based on the concepts of the theory of rigidity percolation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Larionov, Yu V [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Numerical Algorithm to Calculate the Pressure Distribution of the TPS Front End Due to Desorption Induced by Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pressure distribution is an important aspect of a UHV subsystem in either a storage ring or a front end. The design of the 3-GeV, 400-mA Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) foresees outgassing induced by photons and due to a bending magnet and an insertion device. An algorithm to calculate the photon-stimulated absorption (PSD) due to highly energetic radiation from a synchrotron source is presented. Several results using undulator sources such as IU20 are also presented, and the pressure distribution is illustrated.

Sheng, I. C.; Kuan, C. K.; Chen, Y. T.; Yang, J. Y.; Hsiung, G. Y.; Chen, J. R. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 20076, Taiwan (China)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Novel detection methods for radiation-induced electron-hole pairs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most common ionizing radiation detectors typically rely on one of two general methods: collection of charge generated by the radiation, or collection of light produced by recombination of excited species. Substantial efforts have been made to improve the performance of materials used in these types of detectors, e.g. to raise the operating temperature, to improve the energy resolution, timing or tracking ability. However, regardless of the material used, all these detectors are limited in performance by statistical variation in the collection efficiency, for charge or photons. We examine three alternative schemes for detecting ionizing radiation that do not rely on traditional direct collection of the carriers or photons produced by the radiation. The first method detects refractive index changes in a resonator structure. The second looks at alternative means to sense the chemical changes caused by radiation on a scintillator-type material. The final method examines the possibilities of sensing the perturbation caused by radiation on the transmission of a RF transmission line structure. Aspects of the feasibility of each approach are examined and recommendations made for further work.

Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Derzon, Mark Steven; Martinez, Marino John

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Preconceptional paternal exposure to radiation or heavy metals like cadmium can induce cancer in unexposed offspring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...American Association for Cancer Research 15 April 2010...mechanism is involved in depleted uranium-induced transformation...Maine, Portland, ME. Depleted uranium (DU) is commonly...American Association for Cancer Research; 2010 Apr 17-21...

Alexandra C. Miller; Rafael Rivas; Robert J. Merlot; and Paul Lison

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Involvement of Peroxiredoxin I in Protecting Cells from Radiation-Induced Death  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......measured at 532 nm. The total antioxidant capability (T-AOC) of SW480Con and SW480SiPrxI cells was assayed with a...SW480SiPrxI cells by radiation was due to its decreased T-AOC. T-AOC of SW480Con and SW480SiPrxI cells was deter- mined. As......

Bo Zhang; Yongping Su; Guoping Ai; Yan Wang; Tao Wang; Fengchao Wang

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Radiation-induced melting in coherent X-ray diffractive imaging at the nanoscale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coherent X-ray diffraction techniques play an increasingly significant role in imaging nanoscale structures which range from metallic and semiconductor samples to biological objects. The conventional knowledge about radiation damage effects caused by ever higher brilliance X-ray sources has to be critically revised while studying nanostructured materials.

Ponomarenko, O.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

148

The effects of diet and ionizing radiation on azoxymethane induced colon carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancer, by suppressing apoptosis and upregulating proliferation in colonocytes. Diets contained a combination of fish oil or corn oil and either pectin or cellulose. We exposed 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats to 1 Gy ionizing radiation (1 GeV Fe) 10 d prior...

Mann, John Clifford

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...UVB (5% of the total solar UV radiation) is mainly...norathyriol strongly suppresses solar UVinduced mouse skin...structure was subjected to energy minimization using the...hairless mice exposed to solar UV. The inhibition by...U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy...

Jixia Li; Margarita Malakhova; Madhusoodanan Mottamal; Kanamata Reddy; Igor Kurinov; Andria Carper; Alyssa Langfald; Naomi Oi; Myoung Ok Kim; Feng Zhu; Carlos P. Sosa; Keyuan Zhou; Ann M. Bode; and Zigang Dong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS APPLICATIONS MOODY T. CHU \\Lambda Abstract. The wavefront aberrations induced by atmospheric turbulence can severely degrade the performance of an optical imaging system. Adaptive optics refers to the process of removing unwanted wave front distortions

151

ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS APPLICATIONS MOODY T. CHU Abstract. The wavefront aberrations induced by atmospheric turbulence can severely degrade the performance of an optical imaging system. Adaptive optics refers to the process of removing unwanted wave front distortions

152

A Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damagein Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism Björn E. Rydberg, Torsten Groesser, Antoine Snijders, Kelly Trego, Ju Han, Do Yup Lee, Bahram Parvin, Trent Northen, Andrew J. Wyrobek, and Priscilla K. Cooper Berkeley Lab SFA P.I.: Gary Karpen Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Goal: Task 1 of the Berkeley Lab SFA is designed to identify adaptive response (AR) mechanisms that may affect risk of developing radiation-induced cancer and to assess the linearity with dose of processes that influence mammary gland carcinogenesis. We use both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems in a parallelogram strategy. Our human cell culture

153

Low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation alters carcinogen-induced splenic cytokine production and immune cell phenotype of A/J mice  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dose, low-LET γ-radiation alters carcinogen-induced splenic cytokine production and immune cell dose, low-LET γ-radiation alters carcinogen-induced splenic cytokine production and immune cell phenotype of A/J mice. V. Gonzales, K. Gott, M. Makvandi, N. Kikendall, A. Monier, E. Maloy, C. Rietz, B. Scott and J. Wilder. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM. Introduction: Low-dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (LDR; < 100 mGy) activates the immune response, presumably via epigenetic pathways (Scott et al. 2009) and may lead to cancer suppression (Nowosielska et al. 2006). One of the mechanisms by which it might do so is by altering the cytokines produced after carcinogen and/or radiation exposure. Alternatively, LDR may activate

154

Impurity enrichment and radiative enhancement using induced SOL ow in DIII-D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments where Journal of Nuclear Materials 266±269 (1999) 44±50 * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1-619 455 Laboratories, Albuquer- que, New Mexico 0022-3115/99/$ ± see front matter ? 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. AllYSOL is the radiated power in the divertor and SOL region, respectively, sE is the energy con®nement time, and s

California at San Diego, University of

155

Radiation-induced risk of resettling Bikini atoll. Final report, November 7, 1981-May 28, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that the Bikini atoll is unsafe for resettlement. In response to the Bikinians' request for an independent review, we have examined the following DOE findings: (a) radionuclide contamination of Eneu and Bikini Islands, (b) radiation dosage to those who might resettle the islands, and (c) risks to the health of such settlers. We are in practical agreement with the DOE estimates. Resettlement of either island in 1983 would lead to a range of annual or 30-year cumulative doses that exceed the Federal Radiation Council (FRC) guides for the general population, but not those for occupation exposure. By 2013 resettlement of Eneu probably would be permissible. The principal source of radiation dose is local food, especially coconut, owing to contamination of the soil by cesium-137. A precise estimate of dose is impossible. The availability of imported foods would lessen local food consumption, but not sufficiently to meet the FRC guides for the general population. The 30-year cumulative index dose is 61 (25-122) rem for Bikini, and about 8 (3-16) rem for Eneu.

Kohn, H.I.; Dreyer, N.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Photoreactivation of Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Skin and Eye Tumors of Monodelphis domestica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Foundation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108. | Journal Article Research...Foundation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 [R. D. L., L, A...induced by the UVR portion of the solar spectrum. Received 7/25...653-658, 1990. 33. Jagger, J. Solar-UV actions on living cells...

Ronald D. Ley; Lee A. Applegate; R. J. Michael Fry; and Anne B. Sanchez

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Embrittlement of Stainless Steels and Nickel-Based Alloys at High Temperature Induced by Neutron Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... not recovered15. Thus, the precipitation effects are not the prime cause of the embrittlement.Boron-10 appeared the most likely isotope because of its high thermal neutron cross-section. Rather ... metallurgical changes induced) a constant amount of boron was added in the form of either boron-10 or boron-11. Irradiation of these chemically and metallurgically similar steels clearly showed that ...

R. S. BARNES

1965-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evaluation of radiation-induced myocardial damage using iodine-123 ?-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid scintigraphy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......short follow-up period after completion of RT for cardiac dysfunction...most useful as a prognostic index for RT-induced cardiac events...has become a widely accepted index of heart failure or heart remodeling...The median interval from completion of RT to I-123 BMIPP scintigraphy......

Rei Umezawa; Kei Takase; Keiichi Jingu; Kentaro Takanami; Hideki Ota; Tomohiro Kaneta; Ken Takeda; Haruo Matsushita; Hisanori Ariga; Shoki Takahashi; Shogo Yamada

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: William F. Morgan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

William F. Morgan William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999 Richland, Washington About this Project Projects Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Mechanisms of Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose/ Low Dose Rate Radiation Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation

160

Notes: Role of the Nfo and ExoA Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases in Radiation Resistance and Radiation-Induced Mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis Spores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Aerospace Medicine, Radiation Biology Department...Group, Chiba-shi, Japan 5 University of Florida...to different types of radiation have been studied...of spore samples for radiation exposure has been described...NIRS) in Chiba, Japan, under the aegis of...

Ralf Moeller; Peter Setlow; Mario Pedraza-Reyes; Ryuichi Okayasu; Gnther Reitz; Wayne L. Nicholson

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radiation-induced gain degradation in lateral PNP BJTs with lightly and heavily doped emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionizing radiation may cause failures in ICs due to gain degradation of individual devices. The base current of irradiated bipolar devices increases with total dose, while the collector current remains relatively constant. This results in a decrease in the current gain. Lateral PNP (LPNP) transistors typically exhibit more degradation than vertical PNP devices at the same total dose, and have been blamed as the cause of early IC failures at low dose rates. It is important to understand the differences in total-dose response between devices with heavily- and lightly-doped emitters in order to compare different technologies and evaluate the applicability of proposed low-dose-rate hardness-assurance methods. This paper addresses these differences by comparing two different LPNP devices from the same process: one with a heavily-doped emitter and one with a lightly-doped emitter. Experimental results demonstrate that the lightly-doped devices are more sensitive to ionizing radiation and simulations illustrate that increased recombination on the emitter side of the junction is responsible for the higher sensitivity.

Wu, A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Schrimpf, R.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kosier, S.L. [VTC Inc., Bloomington, MN (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal damage. Therefore, Q40P/S47I/H93G is pharmacologically one of the most promising candidates for clinical applications for radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.

Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland)] [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism Björn E. Rydberg Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Task 1 of the Berkeley Lab SFA is designed to identify adaptive response (AR) mechanisms that may affect risk of developing radiation-induced cancer and to assess the linearity with dose of processes that influence mammary gland carcinogenesis. We use both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems in a parallelogram strategy. Our human cell culture model will elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the AR and investigate the relationships in target vs. non-target cells between a range of cancer-relevant endpoints potentially affected by adaptation such

164

Estimation of organs doses and radiation-induced secondary cancer risk from scattered photons for conventional radiation therapy of nasopharynx: a Monte Carlo study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We used Monte Carlo modeling to calculate the organs doses due to out-of field photons during radiation therapy of the nasopharynx.

Asghar Mesbahi; Farshad Seyednejad; Amir Gasemi-Jangjoo

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Time dependence of FEL-induced surface photovoltage on semiconductor interfaces measured with synchroton radiation photoemission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last year, the first surface science experiments simultaneously using a Free Electron Laser (FEL) and Synchrotron Radiation (SR) have been performed on SuperACO at LURE (Orsay, France). These {open_quotes}two color{close_quotes} experiments studied the surface photovoltage (SPV) induced on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces by the SuperACO FEL, a storage ring FEL delivering 350 nm photons which am naturally synchronized with the SR; the SPV was measured by synchrotron radiation core-level photoemission spectroscopy on the high-resolution SU3 undulator beamline. We will describe the experimental setup, which allowed us to convey the FEL light onto the samples sitting in the SU3 experimental station by means of a series of mirrors, and show the results we obtained for prototypical systems such as Ag/GaAs(110) and Si(111) 2 x 1. The dependence of the SPV was studied in function of various parameters, changing sample doping and photon flux; but our efforts were mainly devoted to studying its dependence on the time delay between the FEL pump and the SR probe. On SuperACO, such delay can be varied between 1 and 120 ns, the limits being given by the time duration of a SR pulse and by the interval between two consecutive positron bunches, respectively. The results show a clear temporal dependence of the amount of SPV on cleaved Si surfaces, where as the Ag/GaAs(110) does not show any difference on the ns time scale. We will discuss these results in terms of the role of surface recombination in the dynamics of the photoinduced electron-hole pairs. These studies follow the evolution of the density of electrostatic charge at surfaces and interfaces on a nanosecond time scale, and might pave the way for a new series of experiments: for example, one might explore what are the physical mechanisms limiting the time response of Schottky diodes.

Marsi, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Delboulbe, A.; Garzella, D. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Risk, Outcomes, and Costs of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Malignancies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the risk, outcomes, and costs of radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) among patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to head and neck primary cancers. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort consisting of 204 consecutive head-and-neck cancer patients who received RT with or without chemotherapy during 2002 was formed; their records were reviewed for clinical and resource use information. Patients who had received prior therapy, had second primary cancers, or received palliative radiation therapy were excluded. The risk of OM was analyzed by multiple variable logistic regression. The cost of care was computed from the provider's perspective in 2006 U.S. dollars and compared among patients with and without OM. Results: Oral mucositis occurred in 91% of patients; in 66% it was severe (Grade 3-4). Oral mucositis was more common among patients with oral cavity or oropharynx primaries (odds ratio [OR], 44.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2 to >100; p < 0.001), those who received chemotherapy (OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.5-41.6; p 0.02), and those who were treated with altered fractionation schedules (OR 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-35.1; p = 0.03). Patients with OM were significantly more likely to have severe pain (54% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) and a weight loss of {>=}5% (60% vs. 17%; p < 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with an incremental cost of $1700-$6000, depending on the grade. Conclusions: Head-and-neck RT causes OM in virtually all patients. Oral mucositis is associated with severe pain, significant weight loss, increased resource use, and excess cost. Preventive strategies are needed.

Elting, Linda S. [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: lelting@mdanderson.org; Cooksley, Catherine D. [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Proteasome Structures Affected by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effect of ionizing radiation on 26S but...radiation doses, and immediately...the dose range 1 to 20 Gy...ionizing radiation induced a...38), ionizing radiation (39...over a wide range of radiation doses and further...

Milena Pervan; Keisuke S. Iwamoto; and William H. McBride

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Saturation of radiation-induced parametric instabilities by excitation of Langmuir turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made in the last few years in the calculation of the saturation spectra of parametric instabilities which involve Langmuir daughter waves will be reviewed. These instabilities include the ion acoustic decay instability, the two plasmon decay instability (TPDI), and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In particular I will emphasize spectral signatures which can be directly compared with experiment. The calculations are based on reduced models of driven Laugmuir turbulence. Thomson scattering from hf-induced Langmuir turbulence in the unpreconditioned ionosphere has resulted in detailed agreement between theory and experiment at early times. Strong turbulence signatures dominate in this regime where the weak turbulence approximation fails completely. Recent experimental studies of the TPDI have measured the Fourier spectra of Langmuir waves as well as the angular and frequency, spectra of light emitted near 3/2 of the pump frequency again permitting some detailed comparisons with theory. The experiments on SRS are less detailed but by Thomson scattering the secondary decay of the daughter Langmuir wave has been observed. Scaling laws derived from a local model of SRS saturation are compared with full simulations and recent Nova experiments.

Dubois, D.F.; Rose, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Russell, D. [Lodestar Research Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Low Dose Radiation Program: Workshop VI Abstracts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Anderson, Carl Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation. Averbeck, Dietrich Cellular Responses at Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Azzam, Edouard Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate ?-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism. Bailey, Susan The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability. Balajee, Adayabalam Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Imaging Bioinformatics for Mapping Multidimensional Responses. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Biological Response to Radiation Mediated through the Microenvironment and

170

Neutron radiation can activate K-ras via a point mutation in codon 146 and induces a different spectrum of ras mutations than does gamma radiation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

research-article Research Article Neutron radiation can activate K-ras via a point...School of Medicine, New York 10016. Neutron radiation is known to produce tumors in...RF/J mice by a single acute dose of neutron irradiation. Activated ras genes were...

S R Sloan; E W Newcomb; A Pellicer

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein components using gel electrophoresis, and by absorption spectral analysis. GeneraUy, the RNA content was <5% of the amount of DNA, and the ratio of the amount of protein to that of DNA was =1. 8-2 (w/w). Having developed a suitable methodology for routine isolation of chromatin from mammalian cells, studies of DNA damage in chromatin in vitro and in cultured human cells were pursued.

Dizdaroglu, Miral

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids II. Imidazolium cations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through 'ionization of the ions': oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) {sigma}{sigma}*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C{sub {alpha}}-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 {+-} 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium trifluorosulfonate). Gradual generation of this polymer accounts for the steady increase in the viscosity of the ILs upon irradiation. Previous studies at lower dose have missed this species due to its wide mass distribution (stretching out to m/z 1600) and broad NMR lines, which make it harder to detect at lower concentrations. Among other observed changes is the formation of water immiscible fractions in hydrophilic ILs and water miscible fractions in hydrophobic ILs. The latter is due to anion fragmentation. The import of these observations for use of ILs as extraction solvents in nuclear cycle separations is discussed.

Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. W.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Hatcher, J.; Wishart, J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (BNL)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to other sites as determined. In 2007 the AMF operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. COPS was endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading.

174

Improvement of Radiation-Induced Degradation in MOSFET by Using Glass Fiber/Epoxy/Silica Nanoparticles/?-APTES Composite as Shielding Materials for High-Energy Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our recent study showed that the trapping charges of the polysilicon wire sensor caused by ?-ray radiation primarily concentrated in the ?-APTES/silica nanoparticles composite layer covered on the sensor. In this...

Po-Yen Hsu; Shou-Sheu Lin; Cheng-Fu Yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Telomere Targeting with a New G4 Ligand Enhances Radiation-Induced Killing of Human Glioblastoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitivity to ionizing radiation of 2 human telomerase-positive...Coulter) using CellQuest software. Apoptosis assessment...of TAC combined with radiation on GBM cells in vitro...trials with acceptable safety (49). In conclusion...sensitivity to ionizing radiation of 2 human hTERT-positive...

Patrick Merle; Bertrand Evrard; Anne Petitjean; Jean-Marie Lehn; Marie-Paule Teulade-Fichou; Emmanuel Chautard; Anne De Cian; Lionel Guittat; Phong Lan Thao Tran; Jean-Louis Mergny; Pierre Verrelle; and Andre Tchirkov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 476 (2002) 758764 Observation of radiation induced latchup in the readout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to high levels of radiation resulting in an ionizing radiation dose of more than 200 krad and displacement with a radia- tion hard technology that can resist up to radiation dose levels greater than 1 Mrad. Both chips were fabricated according to almost identical designs. 2. Estimation of dose and fluence NA50

Ramello, Luciano

177

Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Libing [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Hua, E-mail: wanghua@nic.bmi.ac.c [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Lisheng [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Modeling of plasma-controlled evaporation and surface condensation of Al induced by 1.06 and 0.248 {mu}m laser radiations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase transition on the surface of an aluminum target and vapor plasma induced by laser irradiation in the nanosecond regime at the wavelengths of 1.06 {mu}m in the infrared range and 0.248 {mu}m in the ultraviolet range with an intensity of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2} in vacuum are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the wavelength dependence of the observed phenomena and the non-one-dimensional effects caused by the nonuniform (Gaussian) laser intensity distribution and the lateral expansion of the plasma plume. A transient two-dimensional model is used which includes conductive heat transfer in the condensed phase, radiative gas dynamics, and laser radiation transfer in the plasma as well as surface evaporation and back condensation at the phase interface. It was shown that distinctions in phase transition dynamics for the 1.06 and 0.248 {mu}m radiations result from essentially different characteristics of the laser-induced plasmas. For the 1.06 {mu}m radiation, evaporation stops after the formation of hot optically thick plasma, can occasionally resume at a later stage of the pulse, and proceeds nonuniformly in the spot area, and the major contribution to the mass removal occurs in the outer part of the irradiated region. Plasma induced by the 0.248 {mu}m laser is colder and partially transparent since it transmits 30%-70% of the incident radiation; therefore evaporation does not stop but continues in the subsonic regime with the Mach number of about 0.1. The amount of evaporated matter that condenses back to the surface is as high as 15%-20% and less than 10% for the 1.06 and 0.248 {mu}m radiations, respectively. For a beam radius smaller than {approx}100 {mu}m, the screening and retarding effect of the plasma weakens because of the lateral expansion, thickness of the removed layer increases, and condensation after the end of the pulse is not observed. Comparison of the numerical and experimental results on the removed layer thickness has shown, in particular, the importance of accounting for the plasma effect to predict the correct trends for radiation intensity and beam radius.

Mazhukin, V. I.; Nossov, V. V.; Smurov, I. [Institute of Mathematical Modeling of RAS, 4a Miusskaya Square, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ecole Nationale d'Ingenieurs de Saint-Etienne, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Direct photo-etching of poly(methyl methacrylate) using focused extreme ultraviolet radiation from a table-top laser-induced plasma source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to perform material interaction studies with intense extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation, a Schwarzschild mirror objective coated with Mo/Si multilayers was adapted to a compact laser-based EUV plasma source (pulse energy 3 mJ at {lambda}=13.5 nm, plasma diameter {approx}300 {mu}m). By 10x demagnified imaging of the plasma a pulse energy density of {approx}75 mJ/cm{sup 2} at a pulse length of 6 ns can be achieved in the image plane of the objective. As demonstrated for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), photoetching of polymer surfaces is possible at this EUV fluence level. This paper presents first results, including a systematic determination of PMMA etching rates under EUV irradiation. Furthermore, the contribution of out-of-band radiation to the surface etching of PMMA was investigated by conducting a diffraction experiment for spectral discrimination from higher wavelength radiation. Imaging of a pinhole positioned behind the plasma accomplished the generation of an EUV spot of 1 {mu}m diameter, which was employed for direct writing of surface structures in PMMA.

Barkusky, Frank; Peth, Christian; Bayer, Armin; Mann, Klaus [Laser-Laboratorium-Goettingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Direct photo-etching of poly(methyl methacrylate) using focused extreme ultraviolet radiation from a table-top laser-induced plasma source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to perform material interaction studies with intense extreme ultraviolet(EUV)radiation a Schwarzschild mirror objective coated with Mo/Si multilayers was adapted to a compact laser-based EUVplasma source (pulse energy 3 ? mJ ? at ? ? = 13.5 ? nm plasma diameter ? 300 ? ? m ). By 10 demagnified imaging of the plasma a pulse energy density of ? 75 ? mJ ? cm 2 at a pulse length of 6 ns can be achieved in the image plane of the objective. As demonstrated for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) photoetching of polymer surfaces is possible at this EUV fluence level. This paper presents first results including a systematic determination of PMMA etching rates under EUVirradiation. Furthermore the contribution of out-of-band radiation to the surface etching of PMMA was investigated by conducting a diffraction experiment for spectral discrimination from higher wavelength radiation. Imaging of a pinhole positioned behind the plasma accomplished the generation of an EUV spot of 1 ? ? m diameter which was employed for direct writing of surface structures in PMMA.

Frank Barkusky; Christian Peth; Armin Bayer; Klaus Mann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Simulation of Infrared Laser Heating of Silica Using Heat Conduction and Multifrequency Radiation Diffusion Equations Adapted for Homogeneous Refractive Lossy Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized, transient heating of materials using micro-scale, highly absorbing laser light has been used in many industries to anneal, melt and ablate material with high precision. Accurate modeling of the relative contributions of conductive, convective and radiative losses as a function of laser parameters is essential to optimizing micro-scale laser processing of materials. In bulk semi-transparent materials such as silicate glass melts, radiation transport is known to play a significantly larger role as the temperature increases. Conventionally, radiation is treated in the frequency-averaged diffusive limit (Rosseland approximation). However, the role and proper treatment of radiative processes under rapidly heated, high thermal gradient conditions, often created through laser-matter interactions, is at present not clear. Starting from the radiation transport equation for homogeneous, refractive lossy media, they derive the corresponding time-dependent multi-frequency diffusion equations. Zeroth and first moments of the transport equation couple the energy density, flux and pressure tensor. The system is closed by neglecting the temporal derivative of the flux and replacing the pressure tensor by its diagonal analogue. The radiation equations are coupled to a diffusion equation for the matter temperature. They are interested in modeling infrared laser heating of silica over sub-millimeter length scales, and at possibly rapid rates. Hence, in contrast to related work, they retain the temporal derivative of the radiation field. They derive boundary conditions at a planar air-silica interface taking account of reflectivities obtained from the Fresnel relations that include absorption. The effect of a temperature-dependent absorption index is explored through construction of a multi-phonon dielectric function that includes mode dispersion. The spectral dimension is discretized into a finite number of intervals yielding a system of multigroup diffusion equations. Simulations are presented. To demonstrate the bulk heat loss due to radiation and the effect of the radiation's temporal derivative, they model cooling of a silica slab, initially at 2500 K, for 10 s. Retaining the derivative enables correctly modeling the loss of photons initially present in the slab. Other simulations model irradiating silica discs (of approximately 5 mm radii and thickness) with a CO2 laser: {lambda} = 10.59 and 4.6 um, Gaussian profile, r{sub 0} = 0.5 mm for 1/e decay. By surrounding the disks in room-temperature air, they make use of the boundary conditions described above.

Shestakov, A I; Matthews, M J; Vignes, R M; Stolken, J S

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Universities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Universities Universities | Duke University | Loma Linda University | Northwestern University | University of Chicago | University of California Davis | Northwestern University University of Chicago University of California Davis Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on NF-κB Signaling Networks and Mitochondria Principal Investigator: Dr. Gayle Woloschak DOE Low Dose Research Program Projects Low dose-low dose rate irradiation leads to long term changes in numbers of mitochondria and mitochondrial genomes - Principal Investigator: Gayle Woloschak, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA NF-κB-mediated pro-survival network in low dose radiation-induced adaptive protection - Principal Investigator: Jian Jian Li, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Davis,

183

Studies on Induced Variation in the Rhizobia: II. Radiation Sensitivity and Induction of Antibiotic-resistance Markers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0.I 0 1 2 DOSE (ergs/mm2...quantitative estimations, as in the...DISCUSSION Radiation dose-survival...an ionizing radiation, i.e...more accurate estimation of mutation...ergs/mm2XIO3 DOSE FIG. 3. Effect...

E. A. Schwinghamer; R. L. Dalmas

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

IONIZING RADIATION RISKS TO SATELLITE POWER SYSTEMS (SPS) WORKERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dose-Response Relationships for Radiation-Induced Cancer EstimationDose-Response Relationships for Radiation-Induced Cancer A general hypothesis for estimationof the total dose. Estimation of Space Radiation Induced

Lyman, J.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Effect of silver nanoparticle and glycyrrhizic acid (SN-GLY) complex on repair of whole body radiation-induced cellular DNA damage and genomic instability in mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silver nanoparticles (SN) were redispersed in aqueous solution of Pluronic F127 and complexed with the phytoceutical, glycyrrhizic acid (GLY) to obtain SN-GLY complex. The ability of the SN-GLY complex to offer protection against ionising radiation in post-irradiation scenarios was evaluated in ex vivo and in vivo models using Swiss albino mice. Treatment of mouse blood leucocytes with SN-GLY immediately after 4 Gy gamma radiation exposure, ex vivo, enhanced the rate of repair of cellular DNA damages as revealed by comet assay. Exposure of mice to 4 Gy whole body gamma radiation induced formation of strand breaks in cellular DNA and the unrepaired double strand breaks eventually caused the formation of micronuclei. The post-irradiation administration of SN-GLY resulted in a faster decrease in the comet parameters indicating enhanced cellular DNA repair process and reduction in micronucleus formation. Thus the studies showed effective radiation protection by SN-GLY in post-irradiation conditions.

Dhanya K. Chandrasekharan; Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan Nair

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Inhibition of Repair of Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Enhances Gene Expression from Replication-Defective Adenoviral Vectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...those related to increased expression of CAR and integrin are responsible for the enhanced...of gene expression from replication-defective adenoviral vectors: implications for...enhances gene expression from replication-defective adenoviral vectors. | Radiation has been...

Mohan Hingorani; Christine L. White; Andrew Merron; Inge Peerlinck; Martin E. Gore; Andrew Slade; Simon D. Scott; Christopher M. Nutting; Hardev S. Pandha; Alan A. Melcher; Richard G. Vile; Georges Vassaux; and Kevin J. Harrington

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), a potent mitigator of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system in mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......laboratories, military units and nuclear power plants. Uncontrolled exposure to radiation from nuclear accidents or potential terrorism incidents will present...on the radiobiology of nuclear terrorism. Molecular and cellular......

Bing Wang; Kaoru Tanaka; Akinori Morita; Yasuharu Ninomiya; Kouichi Maruyama; Kazuko Fujita; Yoshio Hosoi; Mitsuru Nenoi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), a potent mitigator of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system in mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Risk Reduction...units and nuclear power plants. Uncontrolled...potential terrorism incidents...microscopic assessment of bone marrow...genotoxic assessment. Residual...persons at risk would be...radiobiology of nuclear terrorism. Molecular......

Bing Wang; Kaoru Tanaka; Akinori Morita; Yasuharu Ninomiya; Kouichi Maruyama; Kazuko Fujita; Yoshio Hosoi; Mitsuru Nenoi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Curcumin Regulates Low-Linear Energy Transfer {gamma}-Radiation-Induced NF{kappa}B-Dependent Telomerase Activity in Human Neuroblastoma Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We recently reported that curcumin attenuates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced survival signaling and proliferation in human neuroblastoma cells. Also, in the endothelial system, we have demonstrated that NF{kappa}B regulates IR-induced telomerase activity (TA). Accordingly, we investigated the effect of curcumin in inhibiting IR-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent hTERT transcription, TA, and cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. Methods and Materials: SK-N-MC or SH-SY5Y cells exposed to IR and treated with curcumin (10-100 nM) with or without IR were harvested after 1 h through 24 h. NF{kappa}B-dependent regulation was investigated either by luciferase reporter assays using pNF{kappa}B-, pGL3-354-, pGL3-347-, or pUSE-I{kappa}B{alpha}-Luc, p50/p65, or RelA siRNA-transfected cells. NF{kappa}B activity was analyzed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hTERT expression using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. TA was determined using the telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay and cell survival using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide and clonogenic assay. Results: Curcumin profoundly inhibited IR-induced NF{kappa}B. Consequently, curcumin significantly inhibited IR-induced TA and hTERT mRNA at all points investigated. Furthermore, IR-induced TA is regulated at the transcriptional level by triggering telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter activation. Moreover, NF{kappa}B becomes functionally activated after IR and mediates TA upregulation by binding to the {kappa}B-binding region in the promoter region of the TERT gene. Consistently, elimination of the NF{kappa}B-recognition site on the telomerase promoter or inhibition of NF{kappa}B by the I{kappa}B{alpha} mutant compromises IR-induced telomerase promoter activation. Significantly, curcumin inhibited IR-induced TERT transcription. Consequently, curcumin inhibited hTERT mRNA and TA in NF{kappa}B overexpressed cells. Furthermore, curcumin enhanced the IR-induced inhibition of cell survival. Conclusions: These results strongly suggest that curcumin inhibits IR-induced TA in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner in human neuroblastoma cells.

Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Herman, Terence S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

UV light-induced survival response in a highly radiation-resistant isolate of the Moraxella-Acinetobacter group.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dose. This response was inhibited...ofchloramphenicol. Frequencies of mutation...the inducible response ofisolate 4...affect the frequency of mutation...extended cold storage. Iftrue...International Atomic Energy Agency, Vien...LIGHT-INDUCED SURVIVAL RESPONSE IN BACTERIA...and length of storage on the microbi...

L C Keller; T L Thompson; R B Maxcy

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Chaun-Yuan Li  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chaun-Yuan Li Chaun-Yuan Li Radiation Biology Research, Duke University Medical Center Funded Projects Molecular Characterization of the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Roles of Superoxide Dismutage (SOD) in Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Response Yang, Z., Chuang, E., Batinic-Haberle, I., and Li, C.-Y. 2005 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y., Guo, Z., Yang, Z., and Chuang, E. 2003 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y. and Chuang, E. Publications Li, F., Sonveaux, P., Rabbani, Z.N., Liu, S., Yan, B., Huang, Q.,

192

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Jian Jian Li  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jian Jian Li Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University Newly Funded Projects Regulation of NF-kB and Mn SOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshops: NF-kB Mediated Signaling Network in Low Dose X-Ray Induced Adaptive Protection on Mouse and Human Skin Epithelial Cells Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Spitz, and Li, J.J. 2005 Workshops: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1. Li, J.J., Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Dong, S., Spitz, D.R., and Yu, C.-R. 2003 Workshops: Gene Expression Profiles of Human Skin Keratinocytes Exposed to Acute and Chronic Ionizing Radiation Li, J.J., Ozeki, M., Wang, T., Tamae, D., Nelson, D., Wyrobek, A., and

193

Development and adaptation of conduction and radiation heat-transfer computer codes for the CFTL. [Core Flow Test Loop; RODCON; HOTTEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RODCON and HOTTEL are two computational methods used to calculate thermal and radiation heat transfer for the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) analysis efforts. RODCON was developed at ORNL to calculate the internal temperature distribution of the fuel rod simulator (FRS) for the CFTL. RODCON solves the time-dependent heat transfer equation in two-dimensional (R angle) cylindrical coordinates at an axial plane with user-specified radial material zones and time- and position-variant surface conditions at the FRS periphery. Symmetry of the FRS periphery boundary conditions is not necessary. The governing elliptic, partial differential heat equation is cast into a fully implicit, finite-difference form by approximating the derivatives with a forward-differencing scheme with variable mesh spacing. The heat conduction path is circumferentially complete, and the potential mathematical problem at the rod center can be effectively ignored. HOTTEL is a revision of an algorithm developed by C.B. Baxi at the General Atomic Company (GAC) to be used in calculating radiation heat transfer in a rod bundle enclosed in a hexagonal duct. HOTTEL uses geometric view factors, surface emissivities, and surface areas to calculate the gray-body or composite view factors in an enclosure having multiple reflections in a nonparticipating medium.

Conklin, J.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Molecular Characterization of New Melanoma Cell Lines from C3H Mice Induced by Ethanol plus Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...78550 R. P. P. A major obstacle in understanding the...4 , 5) . But whereas solar UV exposure is clearly...is essential. A major obstacle to understanding the...Twinsburg, OH). The energy emitted from these lamps...radiation. | A major obstacle in understanding the...

Faith M. Strickland; Sen Pathak; Asha S. Multani; Ronald P. Pelley; and Cherrie K. Donawho

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Adaptation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment ? Natural Environment ? People FIVE STRATEGIES Copyright 2011, City of Chicago ADAPTATION ESL-KT-11-11-16 9 CCAP Adaptation Evolution 2007 2008 2009 2010 ? Understood the climate science: Assess climate impacts ? Assessed economic... E xi st in g Tr un k Existing on Rogers Rogers Ave CIP Stormwater management: Chicago?s comprehensive sewer model Climate impacts Example actions to prepare the built environment Copyright 2011, City of Chicago ESL-KT-11-11-16 13 CCAP...

Durnbaugh, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

Niazi, Tamim M. [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Vuong, Te, E-mail: tvuong@jgh.mcgill.ca [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Azoulay, Laurant [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Marijnen, Corrie [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bujko, Kryzstof [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland)] [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland); Nasr, Elie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon); Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Cummings, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Note on the Radiatively Induced Lorentz and CPT Violated Chern-Simons-like Term in the Extended Quantum Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the ambiguity for the Chern-Simons-like term induced from quantum correction in the extended QED should have nothing to do with the approximation on the exact fermionic propagator, contradictory to the claim in Ref.[19]. Further, we investigate the induced Chern-Simons-like term using the original 't Hooft-Veltman dimensional regularization and reproduce the result obtained by gauge symmetry analysis. This fact demonstrates that the origin of the ambiguity should lie in different choices on regularization schemes.

W. F. Chen

2007-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

198

Swift heavy ion irradiation of ZnO nanoparticles embedded in silica: Radiation-induced deoxidation and shape elongation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in amorphous SiO{sub 2} were irradiated with 200 MeV Xe{sup 14+} swift heavy ions (SHIs) to a fluence of 5.0 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Optical linear dichroism was induced in the samples by the irradiation, indicating shape transformation of the NPs from spheres to anisotropic ones. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that some NPs were elongated to prolate shapes; the elongated NPs consisted not of ZnO but of Zn metal. The SHI irradiation induced deoxidation of small ZnO NPs and successive shape elongation of the deoxidized metal NPs.

Amekura, H.; Tsuya, D.; Mitsuishi, K.; Nakayama, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0003 (Japan)] [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0003 (Japan); Okubo, N.; Ishikawa, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Singh, U. B.; Khan, S. A.; Avasthi, D. K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi (India)] [Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi (India); Mohapatra, S. [Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi (India)] [Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi (India)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

Synthesis and characterization of superabsorbent polymer prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylamide onto carboxymethyl cellulose for controlled release of agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Superabsorbent polymer (SAP) was synthesized by radiation-induced grafting of acrylamide (AM) onto carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in the presence of a crosslinking agent, N,N?-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA). The effects of various parameters, such as dose, the amount of CMC, AM, MBA and ionic strength on the swelling ratio were investigated. In order to evaluate its controlled release potential, SAP was loaded with potassium nitrate (KNO3) as an agrochemical model and its potential for controlled release of KNO3 was studied. The amount of released KNO3 was analyzed by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The results from controlled release experiment agreed very well with the results from swelling experiment. The synthesized SAP was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The obtained SAP exhibited a swelling ratio of 190g/g of dry gel.

Kasinee Hemvichian; Auraruk Chanthawong; Phiriyatorn Suwanmala

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Microsoft PowerPoint - Powerpoint_Adaptive.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Response Response to Low Dose Radiation Adaptive Response Adaptive Response When large radiation When large radiation exposure is preceded by a ll " i kl " d h small "tickle" dose, the effect of the large dose is effect of the large dose is sometimes diminished The first time you go to the beach in the summer you don't usually spend 8 hours in summer, you don t usually spend 8 hours in the sun. You begin by being out an hour or d dd ddi i l i h i ki two and add additional time as their skin adapts to the sunny condition and develops protective mechanisms.... Adaptive Response Adaptive Response In some cases, cells also show an "adaptive response" to radiation, although researchers p , g are still trying to understand how the protective mechanisms work. Small doses p

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201

Rapid assessment of high-dose radiation exposures through scoring of cell-fusion-induced premature chromosome condensation and ring chromosomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Analysis of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) mediated by fusion of G0-lymphocytes with mitotic CHO cells in combination with rapid visualization and quantification of rings (PCC-Rf) is proposed as an alternative technique for dose assessment of radiation-exposed individuals. Isolated lymphocytes or whole blood from six individuals were ?-irradiated with 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy at a dose rate of 0.5Gy/min. Following either 8- or 24-h post-exposure incubation of irradiated samples at 37C, chromosome spreads were prepared by standard PCC cytogenetic procedures. The protocol for PCC fusion proved to be effective at doses as high as 20Gy, enabling the analysis of ring chromosomes and excess PCC fragments. The ring frequencies remained constant during the 824-h repair time; the pooled dose relationship between ring frequency (Y) and dose (D) was linear: Y=(0.0880.005)נD. During the repair time, excess fragments decreased from 0.91 to 0.59 chromatid pieces per Gy, revealing the importance of information about the exact time of exposure for dose assessment on the basis of fragments. Compared with other cytogenetic assays to estimate radiation dose, the PCC-Rf method has the following benefits: a 48-h culture time is not required, allowing a much faster assessment of dose in comparison with conventional scoring of dicentrics and rings in assays for chemically-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC-Rch), and it allows the analysis of heavily irradiated lymphocytes that are delayed or never reach mitosis, thus avoiding the problem of saturation at high doses. In conclusion, the use of the PCC fusion assay in conjunction with scoring of rings in G0-lymphocytes offers a suitable alternative for fast dose estimation following accidental exposure to high radiation doses.

A.I. Lamadrid Boada; I. Romero Aguilera; G.I. Terzoudi; J.E. Gonzlez Mesa; G. Pantelias; O. Garca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Molecular Pathways: Targeted ?-Particle Radiation Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and profibrotic cytokines. Radiation-induced malignancy can...1-5 Gy). Kyoji Furukawa (Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan) reviewed the Japanese atomic...late effects of ionizing radiation exposure at low/moderate...

Kwamena E. Baidoo; Kwon Yong; and Martin W. Brechbiel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gray Cancer Institute has pioneered the use of X ray focussing techniques to develop systems for micro irradiating individual cells and sub cellular targets in vitro. Cellular micro irradiation is now recognised as a highly versatile technique for understanding how ionising radiation interacts with living cells and tissues. The strength of the technique lies in its ability to deliver precise doses of radiation to selected individual cells (or sub cellular targets). The application of this technique in the field of radiation biology continues to be of great interest for investigating a number of phenomena currently of concern to the radiobiological community. One important phenomenon is the so called bystander effect where it is observed that unirradiated cells can also respond to signals transmitted by irradiated neighbours. Clearly, the ability of a microbeam to irradiate just a single cell or selected cells within a population is well suited to studying this effect. Our prototype tabletop X-ray microprobe was optimised for focusing 278 eV C-K X rays and has been used successfully for a number of years. However, we have sought to develop a new variable energy soft X-ray microprobe capable of delivering focused CK (0.28 keV), Al-K (1.48 keV) and notably, Ti-K (4.5 keV) X rays. Ti-K X rays are capable of penetrating several cell layers and are therefore much better suited to studies involving tissues and multi cellular layers. In our new design, X-rays are generated by the focussed electron bombardment of a material whose characteristic-K radiation is required. The source is mounted on a 1.5 x 1.0 metre optical table. Electrons are generated by a custom built gun, designed to operate up to 15 kV. The electrons are focused using a permanent neodymium iron boron magnet assembly. Focusing is achieved by adjusting the accelerating voltage and by fine tuning the target position via a vacuum position feedthrough. To analyze the electron beam properties, a custom built microscope is used to image the focussed beam on the target, through a vacuum window. The X-rays are focussed by a zone plate optical assembly mounted to the end of a hollow vertical tube that can be precisely positioned above the X ray source. The cell finding and positioning stage comprises an epi-fluorescence microscope and a feedback controlled 3 axis cell positioning stage, also mounted on the optical table. Independent vertical micro positioning of the microscope objective turret allows the focus of the microscope and the X ray focus to coincide in space (i.e. at the point where the cell should be positioned for exposure). The whole microscope stage assembly can be precisely raised or lowered, to cater for large differences in the focal length of the X ray zone plates. The facility is controlled by PC and the software provides full status and control of the source and makes use of a dual-screen for control and display during the automated cell finding and irradiation procedures.

Folkard, Melvyn; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Schettino, Giuseppe; Atkinson, Kirk; Prise, Kevin, M.; Michael, Barry, D.

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

Adaptive sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive data compression device for compressing data having variable frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

Watson, Bobby L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Aeby, Ian (Fremont, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Adaptive sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

1980-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating short- and long-term processes. Part II: second cancer risk estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation dose calculations. An important goal of our model development is second cancer risk estimation

Shuryak, Igor; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radiative Muon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The theory of radiative muon capture is developed. The discussion includes both parity conserving and nonconserving effects. The Gell-Mann weak magnetic term and the induced pseudoscalar are included, along with comparable relativistic effects in the nucleons. The theory is applied to light nuclei and especially to the radiative Godfrey reaction ?-+C126??+?+B125. An experiment to detect the induced pseudoscalar directly is proposed.

Jeremy Bernstein

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Normal-Appearing White Matter as Biomarker for Radiation-Induced Late Delayed Cognitive Decline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine whether early assessment of cerebral white matter degradation can predict late delayed cognitive decline after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients undergoing conformal fractionated brain RT participated in a prospective diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were acquired before RT, at 3 and 6 weeks during RT, and 10, 30, and 78 weeks after starting RT. The diffusivity variables in the parahippocampal cingulum bundle and temporal lobe white matter were computed. A quality-of-life survey and neurocognitive function tests were administered before and after RT at the magnetic resonance imaging follow-up visits. Results: In both structures, longitudinal diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line }) decreased and perpendicular diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Up-Tack }) increased after RT, with early changes correlating to later changes (p < .05). The radiation dose correlated with an increase in cingulum {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 weeks, and patients with >50% of cingula volume receiving >12 Gy had a greater increase in {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 and 6 weeks (p < .05). The post-RT changes in verbal recall scores correlated linearly with the late changes in cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} (30 weeks, p < .02). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, early cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} changes predicted for post-RT changes in verbal recall scores (3 and 6 weeks, p < .05). The neurocognitive test scores correlated significantly with the quality-of-life survey results. Conclusions: The correlation between early diffusivity changes in the parahippocampal cingulum and the late decline in verbal recall suggests that diffusion tensor imaging might be useful as a biomarker for predicting late delayed cognitive decline.

Chapman, Christopher H., E-mail: chchap@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nagesh, Vijaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sundgren, Pia C. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Buchtel, Henry [Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chenevert, Thomas L. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Junck, Larry [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Influence of adaptive mesh refinement and the hydro solver on shear-induced mass stripping in a minor-merger scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare two different codes for simulations of cosmological structure formation to investigate the sensitivity of hydrodynamical instabilities to numerics, in particular, the hydro solver and the application of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). As a simple test problem, we consider an initially spherical gas cloud in a wind, which is an idealized model for the merger of a subcluster or galaxy with a big cluster. Based on an entropy criterion, we calculate the mass stripping from the subcluster as a function of time. Moreover, the turbulent velocity field is analyzed with a multi-scale filtering technique. We find remarkable differences between the commonly used PPM solver with directional splitting in the Enzo code and an unsplit variant of PPM in the Nyx code, which demonstrates that different codes can converge to systematically different solutions even when using uniform grids. For the test case of an unbound cloud, AMR simulations reproduce uniform-grid results for the mass stripping quite well, although...

Schmidt, W; Iapichino, L; Vazza, F; Almgren, A S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Ion cyclotron emission due to the newly-born fusion products induced fast Alfven wave radiative instabilities in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The velocity distribution functions of the newly born (t = 0) charged fusion products of tokamak discharges can be approximated by a monoenergetic ring distribution with a finite v{sub {parallel}} such that v{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} v{sub {parallel}} {approx} v{sub j} where (M{sub j}V{sub j}{sup 2}/2) = E{sub j}, the directed birth energy of the charged fusion product species j of mass M{sub j}. As the time t progresses these distribution functions will evolve into a Gaussian in velocity with thermal spreadings given by the perpendicular and parallel temperatures T{sub {perpendicular}j}(t) = T{sub {parallel}j}(t) with T{sub j}(t) increasing as t increases and finally reaches an isotropic saturation value of T{sub {perpendicular}j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) = T{sub {parallel}j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) = T{sub j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) {approx} [M{sub j}T{sub d}E{sub j}/(M{sub j} + M)]{sup 1/2}, where T{sub d} is the temperature of the background deuterium plasma ions, M is the mass of a triton or a neutron for j = protons and alpha particles, respectively, and {tau}{sub j} {approx} {tau}{sub sj}/4 is the thermalization time of the fusion product species j in the background deuterium plasma and {tau}{sub sj} is the slowing-down time. For times t of the order of {tau}{sub j} their distributions can be approximated by a Gaussian in their total energy. Then for times t {ge} {tau}{sub sj} the velocity distributions of these fusion products will relax towards their appropriate slowing-down distributions. Here the authors will examine the radiative stability of all these distributions. The ion cyclotron emission from energetic ion produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic tool.

Arunasalam, V.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

[Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

NONE

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Wide Expression of LLIR and the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences David J. Chen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project It is known that changes in gene expression alter biological effects. It is necessary to identify the specific genes that demonstrate altered expression after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and to determine pathways involved in DNA damage recognition, signaling, and repair that are associated with radiation-induced adaptive and bystander effects. Project Goals Identification of genes whose transcription is regulated in response to low levels of ionizing radiation Identification of the genes and communication pathways that control these responses to low dose radiation Identification of the cellular and molecular targets that influence

213

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

214

Study Shows Roles of Receptor, Thiol on Adaptive Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Study Shows Roles of Receptor, Thiol on Adaptive Response Study Shows Roles of Receptor, Thiol on Adaptive Response Jeffrey Murley Jeffrey Murley, Ph.D. David Grdina, Ph.D. Low Dose program-supported scientists at The University of Chicago have gained more insight into adaptive protective responses indicating the role of oxidative stress, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the induction of SOD2 (manganese Superoxide Dismutase) activity. These changes are central to the production of adaptive protective responses. Why Study Adaptive Response? Exposing cells to low doses of ionizing radiation has been reported to elevate resistance to genomic damage when the same cells are subsequently exposed to a much higher dose of radiation. This phenomenon, called adaptive response, is characterized by an increase

215

Radiation Induced Instability Patrick Hagerty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an oscillator coupled to a string describes the free vibrations of a nucleus in an extended medium. The oscillator transfers energy to the string by generating waves as it moves; see also [12]. A model

Bloch, Anthony

216

Patient radiation exposure during different kyphoplasty techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......could reduce dose and radiation-associated risk...the risk of developing radiation-induced stochastic...specific computer software is available, providing...developed at the Medical Radiation Laboratory of the Finnish...Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK)(12). The......

Denis Panizza; Massimo Barbieri; Francesco Parisoli; Luca Moro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Repair of Radiation Damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid in Germinating Spores of Bacillus subtilis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Metabolism Repair of Radiation Damage to Deoxyribonucleic...Tsukijii, Tokyo, Japan 1 Present address...in vegetative cells. Radiation-induced single-strand...Tsukijii, Tokyo, Japan Received for publication...in vegetative cells. Radiation-induced single-strand...

Hiroshi Terano; Hiroshi Tanooka; Hajime Kadota

1971-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Medical management of radiation accidents: capabilities and deployment principles of the Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiation-induced health impairments can be misinterpreted...of radiation-induced health impairments resulted...detection and treatment of health hazards after exposure...environment (e.g. depleted uranium), to ultraviolet radiation......

Harald Drr; Viktor Meineke

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Prevention of Ultraviolet RadiationInduced Immunosuppression by (?)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate in Mice Is Mediated through Interleukin 12Dependent DNA Repair  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...immunosuppressive effects of solar UV radiation, in particular...Many of the adverse effects of solar UV radiation on human health...UVB (280-320 nm; of total energy) and UVA (320-375 nm; of total energy) with UVC emission being insignificant...

Syed M. Meeran; Sudheer K. Mantena; and Santosh K. Katiyar

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Effect of low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary immunity in A/J mice K. Gott Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Abstract Introduction: Low-dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (LDR; < 100 mGy) activates the immune response (Nowosielska et al., 2006), presumably via epigenetic pathways (Scott et al., 2009) and has been implicated as suppressing both alpha-radiation-induced and smoking-related lung cancer (Scott et al. 2009). One of the hypothesized adaptive-response mechanisms by which LDR does so is by activating immune cell function in the lung, which would then increase their anti-cancer surveillance function (Liu, 2007; Bogdandi et al., 2010). One measure of activated immune cell function is their expression of markers on their cell surface that are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Alpha Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

222

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

223

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Generalized Adaptive A* Xiaoxun Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized Adaptive A* Xiaoxun Sun USC Computer Science Los Angeles, California xiaoxuns spaces changes. Adaptive A* [7] is a Cite as: Generalized Adaptive A*, Xiaoxun Sun, Sven Koenig

Yeoh, William

225

The genomics of adaptation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...introduction Special feature 1001 70 197 198 The genomics of adaptation Jacek Radwan 1 * Wieslaw...One contribution to a Special Feature Genomics of adaptation. The amount and nature...aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effect of low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary immunity in A/J mice  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary immunity in A/J mice low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary immunity in A/J mice K. Gott, V. Gonzales, M. Makvandi, N. Kikendall, A. Monier, E. Maloy, C. Rietz, B. Scott and J. Wilder. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM Introduction: Low-dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (LDR; < 100 mGy) activates the immune response (Nowosielska et al., 2006), presumably via epigenetic pathways (Scott et al., 2009) and has been implicated as suppressing both alpha-radiation-induced and smoking-related lung cancer (Scott et al. 2009). One of the hypothesized adaptive-response mechanisms by which LDR does so is by activating immune cell function in the lung, which would then increase their anti-cancer surveillance

228

Vitamin E and L-carnitine, Separately or in Combination, in The Prevention of Radiation-induced Oral Mucositis and Myelosuppression: a Controlled Study in A Rat Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......increased hospitalization stays and the costs, and these complications may have adverse...radiation, bred at Atat rk University Medical School, Department of Pharma- cology...automatic tempera- ture (22 1 C) and lighting controls (12 hr light / 12 hr dark......

Harun nc; Mustafa Vecdi Ertekin; zgr Yrk; Orhan Sezen; Asuman zkan; Fazli Erdogan; Ahmet Kiziltun; Cemal Gndogdu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pattern of Radiation-induced RET and NTRK1 Rearrangements in 191 Post-Chernobyl Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas: Biological, Phenotypic, and Clinical Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as a result of fallout from thermonuclear explosions at the Marshall...genes. PTC1 consists of the fusion of the RET TK domain with...to fallout radiation from a thermonuclear explosion. Stem Cells (Dayton...transforming sequence formed by the fusion of ret tyrosine kinase and...

Hartmut M. Rabes; Evgenij P. Demidchik; Juri D. Sidorow; Edmund Lengfelder; Claudia Beimfohr; Dieter Hoelzel; and Sabine Klugbauer

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

On adaptive grid computations of variable stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the use of an implicit adaptive-grid technique is an efficient and up-to-date approach for the calculations of radial oscillations in variable stars. We chose as an illustrative example the radiative envelope of an RR Lyrae variable. For the hydrostatic initial model we compare the Lagrangean ratioed zoning with an adaptive-grid rezoning. We show that the adaptive-grid yields an optimal distribution of the mesh points in the sense that the relevant physical features, the H{minus} and He 1{minus}, He 2{minus} ionization zones, are well resolved. For the hydrodynamical evolution we present the full-amplitude model for both the Lagrangean and adaptive-grid computations. We perform a detailed comparison and show that the adaptive-grid method yields limit cycle solutions that are substantially improved over the Lagrangean grid model. This is due to the fact that the Lagrangean mesh sweeps through the ionization zones twice during one oscillation period, whereas the adaptive-mesh resolves them and tracks them continuously. The results are, in particular, smooth radial velocity and light curves. Beyond a physically better defined solution we also observe larger time steps for the convergence towards the limit cycle and for the evolution during one period. 12 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

Cox, A.N.; Deupree, R.G.; Gehmeyr, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

On the Phenomenology of Tachyon Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a brief overview of the different kinds of electromagnetic radiations expected to come from (or to be induced by) space-like sources (tachyons). New domains of radiation are here considered; and the possibility of experimental observation of tachyons via electromagnetic radiation is discussed.

Ron Folman; Erasmo Recami

1995-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

About Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

233

Induction by ionizing radiation of the gadd45 gene in cultured human cells: lack of mediation by protein kinase C.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coordinately induced by UV radiation and alkylating agents...rapidly after X rays at doses as low as 2 Gy. After...isolation & purification radiation effects DNA Damage Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation Genes radiation effects...

M A Papathanasiou; N C Kerr; J H Robbins; O W McBride; I Alamo Jr; S F Barrett; I D Hickson; A J Fornace Jr

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Adaptive Video Retrieval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hopfgartner,F. Villa,R. Urban,J. Jose,J.M. Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Adaptive Information Retrieval pp 28-29

Hopfgartner, F.

235

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le confrencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrle des zones et les prcautions prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

236

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Institutions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institutions Institutions Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung-Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM USA Contact: Dr. Bobby R. Scott Program Objective Our research focuses on elucidating the biological bases for radiation adaptive responses in the lung and for suppressing lung cancer, and to use the knowledge gained to produce an improved systems-biology-based, risk model for lung cancer induction by low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation. Research was initiated in October 2009. This research should help foster a new era of low-dose radiation risk/benefit assessment. It will have important implications for possible use of low-dose diagnostic radiation (e.g., X-rays) in cancer therapy. It

237

Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

Cossairt, J.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

End group characterization in DNA of thymocytes after low doses of ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations into the configuration of the radiation induced strand breaks in the low dose range are presented. DNA sections containing the radiation induced strand breaks were separated from the undamaged s...

Th. Coquerelle; C. Sexauer

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Leak test adapter for containers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

Hallett, Brian H. (Elizabeth, PA); Hartley, Michael S. (Canonsburg, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pattern Recognition Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Siemens AG Healthcare, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiation Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Simon Bouffler Health Protection Agency Abstract Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation. The CBA mouse model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has been used extensively for both quantitative and mechanistic studies. Loss of genetic material from chromosome 2 (chr2) is known to be associated with most radiation-induced AMLs. AML develops in CBA mice exposed to X- or γ-radiation, after a mean latency period of 18 months, with a maximal incidence of approximately 25% at 3Gy. A strong candidate AML-suppressor gene located within the commonly deleted region of chr2 has been identified, Sƒpil/PU.1. This gene suffers hemizygous loss and specific

242

Molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and the linear, non-threshold dose response model of radiation risk estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent research in molecular radiation carcinogenesis is reviewed with the specific aim of exploring the implications this research may have on the dose response relationship of radiation-induced cancer at low...

K. R. Trott; M. Rosemann

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

BIODIVERSITY Incorporating sociocultural adaptive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY VIEWPOINT Incorporating sociocultural adaptive capacity in conservation hotspot of biodiversity threats. Conservation biogeography (Whittaker et al., 2005) has emerged as a critical area biodiversity (Mawdsley et al., 2009). Adjusting conservation strategies to maintain diversity in recognition

244

Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This two-partDOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components. In Part I, presenters Amy Olay of the City of...

245

Dynamic Adaptation using Xen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The topic of virtualization has received renewed attention. Xen is a popular open source type-I hypervisor. The Xen hypervisor currently has limited capabilities for runtime modification to the core hypervisor, which impairs research into dynamic adaptation for system-level virtualization. This paper discusses recent investigations into the feasibility of extending Xen to support runtime adaptation for core hypervisor service, e.g., scheduler.

Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Vallee, Geoffroy R [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Plasma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... JUST over ten years ago the first book on plasma physics as a subject in its own right appeared; in a gradually swelling stream ... been surprisingly few monographs. One topic which has had scant coverage in any form is plasma radiation (except for spectral-line radiation which has been dealt with very fully in ...

T. J. M. BOYD

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Modeling the Risk of Radiation-Induced Acute Esophagitis for Combined Washington University and RTOG Trial 93-11 Lung Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To construct a maximally predictive model of the risk of severe acute esophagitis (AE) for patients who receive definitive radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The dataset includes Washington University and RTOG 93-11 clinical trial data (events/patients: 120/374, WUSTL = 101/237, RTOG9311 = 19/137). Statistical model building was performed based on dosimetric and clinical parameters (patient age, sex, weight loss, pretreatment chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, fraction size). A wide range of dose-volume parameters were extracted from dearchived treatment plans, including Dx, Vx, MOHx (mean of hottest x% volume), MOCx (mean of coldest x% volume), and gEUD (generalized equivalent uniform dose) values. Results: The most significant single parameters for predicting acute esophagitis (RTOG Grade 2 or greater) were MOH85, mean esophagus dose (MED), and V30. A superior-inferior weighted dose-center position was derived but not found to be significant. Fraction size was found to be significant on univariate logistic analysis (Spearman R = 0.421, p < 0.00001) but not multivariate logistic modeling. Cross-validation model building was used to determine that an optimal model size needed only two parameters (MOH85 and concurrent chemotherapy, robustly selected on bootstrap model-rebuilding). Mean esophagus dose (MED) is preferred instead of MOH85, as it gives nearly the same statistical performance and is easier to compute. AE risk is given as a logistic function of (0.0688 Asterisk-Operator MED+1.50 Asterisk-Operator ConChemo-3.13), where MED is in Gy and ConChemo is either 1 (yes) if concurrent chemotherapy was given, or 0 (no). This model correlates to the observed risk of AE with a Spearman coefficient of 0.629 (p < 0.000001). Conclusions: Multivariate statistical model building with cross-validation suggests that a two-variable logistic model based on mean dose and the use of concurrent chemotherapy robustly predicts acute esophagitis risk in combined-data WUSTL and RTOG 93-11 trial datasets.

Huang, Ellen X.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia E. [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bosch, Walter R.; Matthews, John W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Sause, William T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Graham, Mary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Phelps County Regional Hospital, Rolla, MO (United States); Deasy, Joseph O., E-mail: deasyj@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Melvyn Folkard  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Melvyn Folkard Melvyn Folkard Gray Cancer Institute About this Project Currently Funded Projects A Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Technical Abstracts 2005 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investiage Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettiono, G., Atkinson, K., Prise, K.M., Michael, B.D. 2003 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation -Induced Bystander Effect. Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettino, G., Atkinson, K., Prise, K.M., Michael, B.D. 2002 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect. Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettino,

249

Adaptation and risk management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adaptation assessment methods are compatible with the international risk management standard ISO:31000. Risk management approaches are increasingly being recommended for adaptation assessments at both national and local levels. Two orientations to assessments can commonly be identified: top-down and bottom-up, and prescriptive and diagnostic. Combinations of these orientations favor different types of assessments. The choice of orientation can be related to uncertainties in prediction and taking action, in the type of adaptation and in the degree of system stress. Adopting multiple viewpoints is to be encouraged, especially in complex situations. The bulk of current guidance material is consistent with top-down and predictive approaches, thus is most suitable for risk scoping and identification. Abroad range ofmaterial fromwithin and beyond the climate change literature can be used to select methods to be used in assessing and implementing adaptation. The framing of risk, correct formulation of the questions being investigated and assessment methodology are critical aspects of the scoping phase. Only when these issues have been addressed should be issue of specific methods and tools be addressed. The reorientation of adaptation from an assessment focused solely on anthropogenic climate change to broader issues of vulnerability/resilience, sustainable development and disaster risk, especially through a risk management framework, can draw from existing policy and management understanding in communities, professions and agencies, incorporating existing agendas, knowledge, risks, and issues they already face.

Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Integration of video and radiation analysis data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have introduced a new method to integrate spatial (digital video) and time (radiation monitoring) information. This technology is based on pattern recognition by neural networks, provides significant capability to analyze complex data, and has the ability to learn and adapt to changing situations. This technique could significantly reduce the frequency of inspection visits to key facilities without a loss of safeguards effectiveness.

Menlove, H.O.; Howell, J.A.; Rodriguez, C.A.; Eccleston, G.W.; Beddingfield, D.; Smith, J.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Baumgart, C.W. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

254

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project The short-term effects of high doses of ionizing radiation on cellular responses are relatively well understood. Less clear are the long-term consequences of exposure to low dose/low dose-rate radiation and the effects of radiation exposure on the progeny of surviving cells. If a cell survives radiation, it is generally thought to have repaired all the radiation-induced insults and be capable of a "normal healthy life". At a certain frequency, however, we have found that some cells surviving radiation grow normally, but will rearrange their genetic material during time in culture. We call this radiation-induced genomic instability. Many

255

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 21201 2 Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 We have recently installed a low LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure including induced genomic instability and

256

Climate Change Adaptation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Colorado Law School #12;What is Climate Change Adaptation? "Adjustment in natural or human systems: Vulnerability and Risk Assessments - Current Example - Golden Eagles on the Colorado Plateau Current impact: Golden eagle populations have been declining in portions of the western U.S. Source: BLM Colorado Plateau

Neff, Jason

257

Adaptive sequential controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Xing, Jian (Seattle, WA); Butler, Nicholas G. (Newberg, OR); Rodriguez, Alonso (Pasadena, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Low Dose Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Joe Gray Priscilla Cooper Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The radiation Adaptive Response (adaptation, or AR) is a well documented, although evidently highly variable, protective phenomenon in which exposures to low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation result in reduced deleterious effects of subsequent higher exposures. Protection has been reported against a variety of biologically important endpoints, but its variability as a function of cell and tissue type and its genetic control are not well understood. The adaptive response is predicted to result in a non-linear dose response for cancer risk in the low dose range. However, the molecular mechanism(s) remain unknown, and such information is

259

Climate Change Adaptation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Climate Change Adaptation Climate Change Adaptation Mission The Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) team affirms the overall DOE commitment to plan for and manage the short and...

260

Telomerase-Dependent Oncolytic Adenovirus Sensitizes Human Cancer Cells to Ionizing Radiation via Inhibition of DNA Repair Machinery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surgical resection, radiation, and cytotoxic...the threshold for radiation-induced tumor cell death; the safety and efficacy of...1-3). Ionizing radiation primarily targets...with the CalcuSyn software (BioSoft), and...

Shinji Kuroda; Toshiya Fujiwara; Yasuhiro Shirakawa; Yasumoto Yamasaki; Shuya Yano; Futoshi Uno; Hiroshi Tazawa; Yuuri Hashimoto; Yuichi Watanabe; Kazuhiro Noma; Yasuo Urata; Shunsuke Kagawa; and Toshiyoshi Fujiwara

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solving radiation problems at particle accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At high-intensity high-energy particle accelerators, consequences of a beam-induced radiation impact on machine and detector components, people, environment and complex performance can range from negligible to severe. The specifics, general approach and tools used at such machines for radiation analysis are described. In particular, the world leader Fermilab accelerator complex is considered, with its fixed target and collider experiments, as well as new challenging projects such as LHC, VLHC, muon collider and neutrino factory. The emphasis is on mitigation of deleterious beam-induced radiation effects and on the key role of effective computer simulations.

Nikolai V. Mokhov

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Adaptation of Microvasculature to Pulsatility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adaptation has not yet been fully characterized. In fact, standard mathematical models using the common assumption that vessels solely adapt to steady flow do not reproduce normal vascular structure. Therefore, we developed a simple, mathematical model of a...

Bimal, Tia

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

High-let radiation carcinogenesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent results for neutron radiation-induced tumors are presented to illustrate the complexities of the dose-response curves for high-LET radiation. It is suggested that in order to derive an appropriate model for dose-response curves for the induction of tumors by high-LET radiation it is necessary to take into account dose distribution, cell killing and the susceptibility of the tissue under study. Preliminary results for the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice exposed to various heavy ion beams are presented. The results suggest that the effectiveness of the heavy ion beams increases with increasing LET. The slopes of the dose-response curves for the different high-LET radiations decrease between 20 and 40 rads and therefore comparisons of the relative effectiveness should be made from data obtained at doses below about 20 to 30 rads.

Fry, R.J.M.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E.L.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Ullrich, R.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Diversification in a fluctuating island setting: rapid radiation of Ohomopterus ground beetles in the Japanese Islands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...setting: rapid radiation of Ohomopterus ground...Kyoto 606-8502, Japan The Japanese Islands...isolation. This radiation was achieved without...morphology). beetles|Japan|divergence time...ecology of adaptive radiation. In Oxford University...District, western Japan. Kontyu Tokyo...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Project: (version of January 28, 2009) Sparse tensor product methods for radiative transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulating a dense gas at very high temperatures, energy transport by means of radiation has to be taken into account. However, as even the non-scattering stationary monochromatic radiative transfer equation s · x. Applying an adaptive sparse discretiza- tion to the radiative transfer equation [1] allows to significantly

Hiptmair, Ralf

266

A MATHEMATICAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE LINEAR RECONSTRUCTOR PROBLEM IN ADAPTIVE OPTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MATHEMATICAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE LINEAR RECONSTRUCTOR PROBLEM IN ADAPTIVE OPTICS MOODY T. CHU induced by atmospheric turbulence can severely de- grade the performance of an optical imaging system. Adaptive optics refers to the process of removing unwanted wave front distortions in real time, i

267

A MATHEMATICAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE LINEAR RECONSTRUCTOR PROBLEM IN ADAPTIVE OPTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MATHEMATICAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE LINEAR RECONSTRUCTOR PROBLEM IN ADAPTIVE OPTICS MOODY T. CHU aberrations induced by atmospheric turbulence can severely de­ grade the performance of an optical imaging system. Adaptive optics refers to the process of removing unwanted wave front distortions in real time, i

268

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

269

Combination Bcl-2 Antisense and Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...G3139 has a favorable safety profile, its efficacy...survival and inhibit radiation-induced apoptosis...either 0, 3, or 6 Gy radiation. Fresh medium containing...3, or 6 hours after radiation. Twenty-four hours...analyzed using CellQuest software (Becton Dickinson...

Kenneth W. Yip; Joseph D. Mocanu; P.Y. Billie Au; Gillian T. Sleep; Dolly Huang; Pierre Busson; Wen-Chen Yeh; Ralph Gilbert; Brian O'Sullivan; Patrick Gullane; Carlo Bastianutto; and Fei-Fei Liu

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia Universitys Kellogg Center in New York City on March 1517, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (15). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and non-targeted responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

6 options spring '00 understanding adaptation in natural systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Fisheries scientists and mana- gers have increasingly6 options spring '00 understanding adaptation in natural systems Shrinking Cod: Fishery-Induced Change in an Oceanic Stock Fishing is a major source of food and other resources for humankind. Today

Dieckmann, Ulf

272

Interactions between predator- and diet-induced phenotypic changes in body shape of crucian carp  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...grids using the Tps-Spline software (Rohlf 2003 c). In order...and C Bronmark1993Trading off safety against food: state dependent...Schluter, D 1993Adaptive radiation in sticklebacks: size, shape...Schluter, D 1995Adaptive radiation in sticklebacks: trade-offs...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

274

Diversification and the adaptive radiation of the vangas of Madagascar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...We also thank Associate Editor Trevor Price, Per Alstrom, and an anonymous reviewer...10.1098/rspb.1997.0094 ) 22 Wit, M. J. 2003 Madagascar: heads it's...54 Phillimore, A. B. , and T. D. Price 2008 Density-dependent cladogenesis...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radiation protection: Natural radiation risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... radiation to which humans are exposed consists of four components - cosmic, gamma, internal, radon. The relative contribution that each makes to the sum is shown in the chart. ... but exposure of the whole body to terrestrial gamma rays and of the lungs to radon daughters are influenced by the nature and location of housing. Gamma rays are emitted ...

M. C. O'Riordan

1983-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Transforming Growth Factor ?-1 (TGF-?1) Is a Serum Biomarker of Radiation Induced Fibrosis in Patients Treated With Intracavitary Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: Preliminary Results of a Prospective Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine a relationship between serum transforming growth factor ? -1 (TGF-?1) values and radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective analysis of the development of RIF in 39 women with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0-I breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and accelerated partial breast irradiation via intracavitary brachytherapy (IBAPBI). An enzyme-linked immunoassay (Quantikine, R and D, Minneapolis, MN) was used to measure serum TGF-?1 before surgery, before IBAPBI, and during IBAPBI. Blood samples for TGF-?1 were also collected from 15 healthy, nontreated women (controls). The previously validated tissue compliance meter (TCM) was used to objectively assess RIF. Results: The median time to follow-up for 39 patients was 44 months (range, 5-59 months). RIF was graded by the TCM scale as 0, 1, 2, and 3 in 5 of 20 patients (25%), 6 of 20 patients (30%), 5 of 20 patients (25%), and 4 of 20 patients (20%), respectively. The mean serum TGF-?1 values were significantly higher in patients before surgery than in disease-free controls, as follows: all cancer patients (30,201 5889 pg/mL, P=.02); patients with any type of RIF (32,273 5016 pg/mL, P<.0001); and women with moderate to severe RIF (34,462 4713 pg/mL, P<0.0001). Patients with moderate to severe RIF had significantly elevated TGF-?1 levels when compared with those with none to mild RIF before surgery (P=.0014) during IBAPBI (P?0001), and the elevation persisted at 6 months (P?.001), 12 months (P?.001), 18 months (P?.001), and 24 months (P=.12). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of TGF-?1 values predicting moderate to severe RIF was generated with an area under the curve (AUC){sub ROC} of 0.867 (95% confidence interval 0.700-1.000). The TGF-?1 threshold cutoff was determined to be 31,000 pg/mL, with associated sensitivity and specificity of 77.8% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusions: TGF-?1 levels correlate with the development of moderate to severe RIF. The pre-IBAPBI mean TGF-?1 levels can serve as an early biomarker for the development of moderate to severe RIF after IBAPBI.

Boothe, Dustin L. [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Coplowitz, Shana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Greenwood, Eleni [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Barney, Christian L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Christos, Paul J. [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K. S. Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9008@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Bruce E. Lehnert  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

E. Lehnert E. Lehnert Los Alamos National Laboratory Past Project Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Lehnert, B.E., Cary, R., Gadbois, D. and Gupta G. 2001 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. 1999 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. Publications Lehnert, B.E., Radiation bystander effects. U.S.Department of Energy Research News (March 6 issue) Goldberg, Z. and Lehnert, B.E. (2002). Radiation-induced effects in

278

Adaptive control for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate the use of adaptive control concepts in buildings with solar-assisted heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems to maintain occupant comfort conditions while minimizing auxiliary energy use. Accomplishing this objective requires an energy management system capable of making sound tradeoffs. Optimal control theory is used along with a system identification technique to provide an adaptable stratgy. The resulting overall approach is known as adaptive optimal control (AOC).

Farris, D.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Adaptive capacity and its assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

Engle, Nathan L.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

280

Radiative muon absorption in oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The photon spectrum from radiative absorption of negative muons in O16 has been measured with a high-resolution pair spectrometer. The integrated branching ratio for photons with energies greater than 57 MeV relative to the total muon absorption rate is (3.80.4)10-5. The data are consistent with nuclear model calculations for a value of the induced pseudoscalar coupling in O16 of gP/gA=13.51.5.

A. Frischknecht; M. Dbeli; W. Stehling; G. Strassner; P. Trul; J. C. Alder; C. Joseph; J. F. Loude; J. P. Perroud; D. Ruegger; M. T. Tran; H. Panke

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiating gravastars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considering a Vaidya exterior spacetime, we study dynamical models of prototype gravastars, made of an infinitely thin spherical shell of a perfect fluid with the equation of state p = ?, enclosing an interior de Sitter spacetime. We show explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, an unstable gravastar, a stable gravastar or a 'bounded excursion' gravastar, depending on how the mass of the shell evolves in time, the cosmological constant and the initial position of the dynamical shell. This work presents, for the first time in the literature, a gravastar that emits radiation.

Chan, R. [Coordenao de Astronomia e Astrofsica, Observatrio Nacional, Rua General Jos Cristino, 77, So Cristvo 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, M.F.A. da [Departamento de Fsica Terica, Instituto de Fsica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua So Francisco Xavier 524, Maracan 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Jaime F. Villas da [Instituto de Biocincias, Departamento de Cincias Naturais, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Pasteur 458, Urca, CEP 22290-240, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wang, Anzhong, E-mail: chan@on.br, E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com, E-mail: jfvroch@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu [GCAP-CASPER, Department of Physics, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

BRIDGING NAVIGATION, SEARCH AND ADAPTATION. Adaptive Hypermedia Models Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corpus, Dexter Model, AHAM, GAF. Abstract: Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHS) have long been concentrating The most referenced (but certainly not only) Adaptive Hypermedia (AH) model dates back to 1999. Since AHAM/Hypermedia modelling from Dexter Model through AHAM to the proposed GAF model, out- line advantages of each framework

De Bra, Paul

283

Personalized video adaptation framework (PIAF): high-level semantic adaptation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite much work on Universal Multimedia Experience (UME), existing video adaptation approaches cannot yet be considered as truly user-centric, mostly due to their poor handling of semantic user preferences. Indeed, these works mainly concentrate on ... Keywords: MPEG-21, MPEG-7, Personalized video, Semantic adaptation, Semantic constraint, Universal multimedia experience

Vanessa El-Khoury, David Coquil, Nadia Bennani, Lionel Brunie

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Cell Cycle Disturbances and Mitotic Catastrophes in HeLa Hep2 Cells following 2.5 to 10 Gy of Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...death (2-5). Radiation is known to exert...molecules involved in this radiation-induced cellular safety machinery is p53...different doses of radiation at the molecular and...using the CellQuest software program, setting...

David Eriksson; Per-Olov Lfroth; Lennart Johansson; Katrine hlstrm Riklund; and Torgny Stigbrand

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Adaptive Medical Information Delivery Combining User, Task and Situation Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., in their model for adaptive hypermedia AHAM [2], distinguish content­adaptation from link­ adaptation

286

Introduction Adaptive LBM Realistic computations Conclusions A block-structured parallel adaptive Lattice-Boltzmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lattice-Boltzmann method for rotating geometries Ralf Deiterding & Stephen Wood+ Deutsches Zentrum f Conclusions Outline Introduction AMROC software Adaptive LBM Lattice Boltzmann method Structured adaptive mesh Introduction AMROC software Adaptive LBM Lattice Boltzmann method Structured adaptive mesh refinement

Deiterding, Ralf

287

Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H. Sayed University of California at Los 2014 A. H. Sayed DOI: 10.1561/2200000051 Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.6 Notation and Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 Optimization by Single Agents

California at Los Angeles, University of

288

Organizational Adaptation Kathleen M. Carley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-humans. For example, they suggest that organizational learning resides not just in the minds of the personnel withinOrganizational Adaptation Kathleen M. Carley Dept. of Social and Decision Sciences Carnegie Mellon: Kathleen M. Carley, 1998, "Organizational Adaptation." Annals of Operations Research. 75: 25-47. #12

Sadeh, Norman M.

289

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Gregory A. Kimmel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gregory A. Kimmel Gregory A. Kimmel Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Past Project A Novel Spatially Resolved Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander and Adaptive Responses to Low-LET Radiation. Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Spatially Resolved Single Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander Responses to Low LET Radiation. Resat, M.S., Kimmel, G.A., Miller, J.H., McDonald, J.C., Murphy, M.K., Strom, D.J., Thrall, B.D., and Colson, S.D. 2001 Workshop: Spatially Resolved Single Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander Responses to Low LET Radiation. Resat, M.S., Kimmel, G.A., Miller, J.H., McDonald, J.C., Murphy, M.K., Strom, D.J., Thrall, B.D., Metting, N.F., and Colson, S.D 1999 Workshop: A Novel, Spatially Resolved Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander and Adaptive Responses to Low-LET Radiation.

290

Radiative Decay Engineering of Direct Bandgap Emission in Silver Ion-Implanted Polarized Silicon Quantum Dots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emission from low energy Silver ion implanted crystalline silicon quantum dots can be enhanced due to enhanced radiative recombination induced by polarization of the dots and metal...

Singh, Akhilesh; Gryczynski, Karol; Neogi, Arup; Kim, Moon

291

Radiation Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

292

Verifying a nuclear weapon`s response to radiation environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process described in the paper is being applied as part of the design verification of a replacement component designed for a nuclear weapon currently in the active stockpile. This process is an adaptation of the process successfully used in nuclear weapon development programs. The verification process concentrates on evaluating system response to radiation environments, verifying system performance during and after exposure to radiation environments, and assessing system survivability.

Dean, F.F.; Barrett, W.H.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

African Adaptation Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptation Programme Adaptation Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: African Adaptations Programme Name African Adaptations Programme Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme, Government of Japan Topics Adaptation, Finance, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.undp-adaptation.org References AAP[1] Overview "UNDP, with funding from the Government of Japan, recently launched a new programme that uses an innovative approach to climate change adaptation in Africa. Under this programme, UNDP will assist 21 African countries in implementing integrated and comprehensive adaptation actions and resilience plans. The projects will ensure that national development processes incorporate climate change risks and opportunities to secure development gains under a

294

Adaptive Materials Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan Zip: MI 48108 Product: Adaptive Materials Inc (AMI) is a developer of portable fuel cell technology. References: Adaptive Materials Inc1 This article is a stub. You...

295

Energy Efficiency Limits of Load Adaptive Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on traffic models the energy consumption of adaptive networks is compared to networks with constant power consumption. The results show that adaptive network resource...

Lange, Christoph; Gladisch, Andreas

296

Effects of radiation on materials: twelfth international symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication provides information on irradiation creep of structural metals; microstructural development, neutron-induced swelling and charged particle irradiation. The theory of swelling is discussed along with mechanical properties, pressure vessel steels and irradiation facilities. The influence of helium on radiation-induced microstructural development, and radiation-induced changes in fracture toughness of iron-based austenitic and ferrite alloys are presented. The final section on other radiation studies covers the following: a modified method of helium introduction into alloys via the tritium trick, radiation damage aspects of a novel method for providing safe storage of Krypton-85 from fuel re-processing, and radiation effects on resins and zeolites forming part of the waste stream from the clean-up effort at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant.

Garner, F.A. (ed.); Perrin, J.S. (ed)

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Authors: Howard L. Liber1 and Jeffrey L. Schwartz2. Institutions: 1Colorado State University and 2University of Washington. Knowledge of the signal and target through which radiation induces genomic instability, which we propose to investigate herein, will allow us to model effects at low doses. Such knowledge will aid in understanding variations in the induction of this genomic instability, both among cells and among individuals. This information could also lead to more sensitive measures of instability that could yield accurate measures of instability induction at low doses. We have developed an in-vitro cell model, in which radiation-induced chromosome instability develops in a two-stage process.

298

Oligonucleotide microarray analysis of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...health risk due to low-dose ionizing radiation is still debated. Functional...pathways that are induced by ionizing irradiation (IR...transcriptionally regulated by low-dose IR in occupationally...and showed different ranges of accumulated doses...

Paola Silingardi; Elena Morandi; Cinzia Severini; Daniele Quercioli; Monica Vaccari; Wolfango Horn; Maria Concetta Nucci; Vittorio Lodi; Francesco Violante; Sandro Grilli; and Annmaria Colacci

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

WeADAPT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WeADAPT WeADAPT Jump to: navigation, search Name WeADAPT Agency/Company /Organization weADAPT Sector Energy, Land, Water, Climate Resource Type Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.weadapt.org/ References weADAPT[1] "weADAPT.org is an online 'open space' on climate adaptation issues (including the synergies between adaptation and mitigation) which allows practitioners, researchers and policy makers to access credible, high quality information and to share experiences and lessons learnt with the weADAPT community. It is designed to facilitate learning, exchange, collaboration and knowledge integration to build a professional community of practice on adaptation issues while developing policy-relevant tools and guidance for adaptation planning and decision-making.

302

AfricaAdapt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AfricaAdapt AfricaAdapt Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Africa Adapt Name Africa Adapt Agency/Company /Organization AfricaAdapt Resource Type Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.africa-adapt.net/AA UN Region Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa References AfricaAdapt[1] Abstract AfricaAdapt is an independent bilingual network (French/English) focused exclusively on Africa. The Network's aim is to facilitate the flow of climate change adaptation knowledge for sustainable livelihoods between researchers, policy makers, civil society organisations and communities who are vulnerable to climate variability and change across the continent. Africa Adapt Screenshot "AfricaAdapt is an independent bilingual network (French/English) focused

303

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2003 Molecular Characterization of the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li,1 Eric Chuang2 Institutions: 1Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore, internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

304

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li, Zhanjun Guo, Zhonghui Yang, and Eric Chuang Institutions: Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland Background The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

305

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Identification of Mouse Genetic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Allan Balmain University of California, San Francisco San Francisco, CA. (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Why this Project? To identify pathways that control genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage and tumor development using novel developments in genomics together with mouse genetics. Project Goals To identify genetic loci that trigger rapid tumor development of mice after radiation. To characterize new genes at these loci that act as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. Experimental Approach New candidate-radiation susceptibility genes will be identified using a unique haplotyping approach. Using DNA from radiation-induced lymphoma, changes in the gene copy number can be detected using BAC microarrays. The

306

Autonomous adaptive acoustic relay positioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of maximizing underwater acoustic data transmission by adaptively positioning an autonomous mobile relay so as to learn and exploit spatial variations in channel performance. The acoustic channel ...

Cheung, Mei Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Adaptive and Temporallydependent Document Filtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive and Temporally­dependent Document Filtering een wetenschappelijke proeve op het gebied van . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Document Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Filtering Filtering Track 57 5.1 What is TREC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 5

Arampatzis, Avi

308

Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

309

Phase II study of radiation therapy combined with weekly nedaplatin in locally advanced uterine cervical carcinoma: Kitasato Gynecologic Radiation Oncology Group (KGROG 0501) - an initial analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Medicine, Chiba, Japan, The University of...induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and can be repaired...of the character and radiation survival ratio of cancer...Hemagglutinating Virus of Japan envelope vector (HVJ-E...clonogenic assay to evaluate radiation sensitivity. Furthermore...

Yuzuru Niibe; Shimpei Tsunoda; Toshiko Jobo; Yukihiro Hamada; and Kazushige Hayakawa

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

311

Toxicity of Pasteurella tularensis Killed by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to 106 r of y-radiation. When injected...suspension. Lethal doses of newly prepared...by exposure to ionizing radia- tion induced...to 106 r of y-radiation from a 60Co source at a dose rate of approximately...only in a limited range of dilutions...

Marshall E. Landay; George G. Wright; James D. Pulliam; Milton J. Finegold

1968-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 97, No. 1, pp. 6973 (2001)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ionising radiations such as alpha particles (e.g. radon, plutonium workers, individuals exposed to depleted uranium is not well known(1) , there is considerable uncertainty concerning the proportion of the excess cancer risk for radiation-induced human cancer(6) suggested that identification of a radi- ation `signature' was a key

Brenner, David Jonathan

313

A Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in Bangladesh Jump to: navigation, search Name A Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in Bangladesh Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank, World Bank Topics Adaptation, Finance, Implementation Website http://prod-http-80-800498448. Country Bangladesh UN Region South-Eastern Asia References A Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in Bangladesh[1] Overview "There is a growing scientific consensus on the impact of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on global warming as well agreement that it is causing increased weather volatility with the effects increasing in intensity in coming years. Warming may induce sudden shifts in regional weather patterns

314

Molecular Pathways: BRAF Induces Bioenergetic Adaptation by Attenuating Oxidative Phosphorylation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will result in an energy deficiency that...with concomitant conversion of ADP to ATP...central role in energy metabolism, NAD...surface area dosage conversion factor (65), this hu...4079 TUMOR CELL ENERGY MODULATION i...

Rizwan Haq; David E. Fisher; and Hans R. Widlund

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Molecular Pathways: BRAF Induces Bioenergetic Adaptation by Attenuating Oxidative Phosphorylation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...their metabolism to balance energy production with their augmented...insights toward developing sustainable treatment against BRAF-mutant...quintessential nutrient for energy production (Fig. 1). Metabolic...water (H2O), and chemical energy. The released chemical energy...

Rizwan Haq; David E. Fisher; and Hans R. Widlund

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Induced and Spontaneous Emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of induced and spontaneous emission is investigated for an atomic two?level system with incident beams of radiation which are either in a coherent state or in a stationary state (contain a definite number of photons). The treatment is fully quantum?mechanical and is confined to the case where the frequency spectrum of the incident beam is narrow compared to the natural linewidth of the system. It is shown that under such conditions the spontaneous emission for frequencies within the narrow band of the incident radiation is sharply reduced compared to the prediction of the natural lineshape. It is shown that a hole is burned in the natural lineshape within the narrow frequency band thus effectively quenching the spontaneous emission at some frequency within the band. This effect is shown to occur both for the coherent and stationary beams. Quantities proportional to the induced and spontaneous probability amplitudes and the lifetimes are computed for times comparable to and long compared to the free lifetime of the state. An expression is found for the spectrum of the emergent radiation in terms of these quantities. Its physical meaning is briefly discussed. The density operator of the field for all times is given.

Saul M. Bergmann

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water Supply and Demand Jim Schneider, Ph · How Nebraska manages water · Dealing with uncertain water supplies: adaptive management #12;Regional-wide, systematic approach · Flexible--Adaptive Management Adaptive Manageme nt #12;Integrated Water Management

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

318

An Adaptive Optimal Control Design for a Bolus Chasing Computed Tomography Angiography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

imaging quality and to reduce contrast dose and radiation exposure, an optimal adaptive bolus chasing controller is proposed and tested based on actual patient data. The controller estimates and predicts errors are mathematically quantified in terms of estimation errors. The test results not only support

Virginia Tech

319

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

320

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Roles of the Major, Small, Acid-Soluble Spore Proteins and Spore-Specific and Universal DNA Repair Mechanisms in Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spores to Ionizing Radiation from X Rays and High-Energy Charged-Particle Bombardment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mutagenic effects induced by ionizing radiation are thought to be the result...of DNA damage caused by given doses of ionizing radiation for different bacteria are very similar, although the range of ionizing-radiation resistance...

Ralf Moeller; Peter Setlow; Gerda Horneck; Thomas Berger; Gnther Reitz; Petra Rettberg; Aidan J. Doherty; Ryuichi Okayasu; Wayne L. Nicholson

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Radiative muon absorption in calcium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The photon spectrum from radiative absorption of negative muons in Ca40 has been measured with a high-resolution pair spectrometer. The data are analyzed in order to determine the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant gp in nuclear matter. When compared to models which use a realistic nuclear response function and avoid the closure approximation, a value of gp/gA=4.01.5 is obtained, which indicates a quenching of this coupling compared to the nucleonic value by a factor 0.570.25.

A. Frischknecht; W. Stehling; G. Strassner; P. Trul; J. C. Alder; C. Joseph; J. F. Loude; J. P. Perroud; D. Ruegger; T. M. Tran; W. Dahme; H. Panke; R. Kopp

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

RADIATION EFFECTS IN MATERIAL MICROSTRUCTURE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next generation nuclear power systems, high-power particle accelerators and space technology will inevitably rely on higher performance materials that will be able to function in the extreme environments of high irradiation, high temperatures, corrosion and stress. The ability of any material to maintain its functionality under exposure to harsh conditions is directly linked to the material structure at the nano- and micro-scales. Understanding of the underlying processes is key to the success of such undertakings. This paper presents experimental results of the effects of radiation exposure on several unique alloys, composites and crystals through induced changes in the physio-mechanical macroscopic properties.

SIMOS,N.

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of ionizing radiation protection and safety. The course curriculum combines...

325

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiation emitted by the earth. This instrument is onboard a European Union geostationary weather satellite launched in December 2005; it is collecting data over Niamey and the...

326

Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

327

Training Adaptive Decision-Making.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adaptive Thinking has been defined here as the capacity to recognize when a course of action that may have previously been effective is no longer effective and there is need to adjust strategy. Research was undertaken with human test subjects to identify the factors that contribute to adaptive thinking. It was discovered that those most effective in settings that call for adaptive thinking tend to possess a superior capacity to quickly and effectively generate possible courses of action, as measured using the Category Generation test. Software developed for this research has been applied to develop capabilities enabling analysts to identify crucial factors that are predictive of outcomes in fore-on-force simulation exercises.

Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James C.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

329

Ultrafast transient grating radiation to optical image converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high sensitivity transient grating ultrafast radiation to optical image converter is based on a fixed transmission grating adjacent to a semiconductor substrate. X-rays or optical radiation passing through the fixed transmission grating is thereby modulated and produces a small periodic variation of refractive index or transient grating in the semiconductor through carrier induced refractive index shifts. An optical or infrared probe beam tuned just below the semiconductor band gap is reflected off a high reflectivity mirror on the semiconductor so that it double passes therethrough and interacts with the radiation induced phase grating therein. A small portion of the optical beam is diffracted out of the probe beam by the radiation induced transient grating to become the converted signal that is imaged onto a detector.

Stewart, Richard E; Vernon, Stephen P; Steel, Paul T; Lowry, Mark E

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Adaptive constructive processes 1 Running head: Adaptive constructive processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a current environmental demand when automatic, learned responses are not elicited. Bartlett argued further of Psychology Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 phone: (617) 495-3856 fax: (617) 496-3122 e to be operating in any well-adapted organic response (1932, p. 201)". He further emphasized the importance of "the

Schacter, Daniel

331

Straddle Carrier Radiation Portal Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the primary enforcement agency protecting the nations ports of entry. CBP is enhancing its capability to interdict the illicit import of nuclear and radiological materials and devices that may be used by terrorists. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing scientific and technical support to CBP in their goal to enable rapid deployment of nuclear and radiation detection systems at U. S. ports of entry to monitor 100% of the incoming international traffic and cargo while not adversely impacting the operations or throughput of the ports. The U.S. ports of entry include the following vectors: land border crossings, seaports, airports, rail crossings, and mail and express consignment courier facilities. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) determined that a screening solution was needed for Seaport cargo containers being transported by Straddle Carriers (straddle carriers). A stationary Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) for Straddle Carriers (SCRPM) is needed so that cargo containers can be scanned while in transit under a Straddle Carrier. The Straddle Carrier Portal operational impacts were minimized by conducting a time-motion study at the Port, and adaptation of a Remotely Operated RPM (RO-RPM) booth concept that uses logical lighting schemes for traffic control, cameras, Optical Character Recognition, and wireless technology.

Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.; Mullen, O Dennis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

333

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................10 AREA RADIATION SURVEYS AND CONTAMINATION CONTROL...........................................11.....................................................................................................13 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT meetings of the Radiation Safety Committee where new users and uses of radioactive materials, radiation

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

334

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

335

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

337

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

338

Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

339

Investigating Intrusiveness of Workload Adaptation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate how an automatic task assistant which can detect and react to a user's workload level is able to support the user in a complex, dynamic task. In a user study, we design a dispatcher scenario with low and high workload conditions ... Keywords: brain computer interface, intrusiveness, user study, workload adaptive assistance

Felix Putze, Tanja Schultz

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air- tantly, what radiation dose people may have received. An independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP, additionalProjectworkcouldresultin revisions of these dose estimates. April 21, 1994 Companion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

342

WI Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

343

Radiation Survivors: Understanding and Exploiting the Phenotype following Fractionated Radiation Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radionuclide release from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant disaster...radiation-induced stress, we put forward and tested a hypothesis that...radionuclide distributions from the Fukushima nuclear accident covering...Japanese soils due to the Fukushima nuclear accident.Proc Natl...

Adeola Y. Makinde; Molykutty John-Aryankalayil; Sanjeewani T. Palayoor; David Cerna; and C. Norman Coleman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

estimation of the carcinogenic of low-dose, low-LET radiationradiation uoses, close rates, and LET to enable risk tions occur estimation at doses,radiation-induced cancer necessarily be based primarily on human dose-incidence data. in man must However, risk estimation

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

346

Climate Change Adaptation Planning | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Change Adaptation Planning Climate Change Adaptation Planning October 7, 2014 6:00AM CDT to October 9, 2014 3:00PM CDT Norman, Oklahoma This course provides an introduction to...

347

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive systems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adaptive systems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Summary: 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Peter...

348

Brief Supervision of adaptive control algorithms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An adaptive controller needs supervisory functions in order to function well in an industrial environment. This paper describes these needs, and provides examples of supervisory functions that presently are used in industrial adaptive controllers. These ... Keywords: Adaptive control, Detection, Industrial control, Supervision

Tore HGglund; Karl Johan StrM

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Entropy Adaptive On-Line Compression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Self-Organization is based on adaptivity. Adaptivity should start with the very basic fundamental communication tasks such as encoding the information to be transmitted or stored. Obviously, the less signal transmitted the less energy in transmission ... Keywords: On-line compression, adaptive compression

Shlomi Dolev, Sergey Frenkel, Marina Kopeetsky

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Radioactivity and Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

351

Perceived community-based flood adaptation strategies under climate change in Nepal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate induced natural disasters and extreme events are escalating with the increased variability of climatic parameters due to climate change. This study assesses the flood adaptation strategies that are applicable at the community level in two Terai districts of Nepal. The data were collected through three focus group discussions and 210 household surveys. The study revealed that flood forecasting practices at community level included monitoring the extent of rainfall in upper catchments and identifying the position of clouds. 'Initiate communication', 'take care the affected people', and 'select the appropriate location to stay' were most preferred strategies during the flood. Similarly, 'exchanging helps with each other', 'preparing temporary settlement plan' and 'co-ordinating with government and other agencies' are most preferred post-flood adaptation strategies. Identification and assessment of locally-relevant flood adaptation strategies will help governments to choose adaptation strategies that are both effective and preferred by local people in vulnerable communities.

Rohini Prasad Devkota; Geoff Cockfield; Tek Narayan Maraseni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Global methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure Pamela J Sykes, Michelle R Newman, Benjamin J Blyth and Rebecca J Ormsby Haematology and Genetic Pathology, Flinders University and Medical Centre, Flinders Centre for Cancer Prevention and Control, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 Australia. (pam.sykes@flinders.edu.au). Our goal is to study the mechanisms involved in biological responses to low doses of radiation in vivo in the dose range that is relevant to population and occupational exposures. At high radiation doses, DNA double-strand breaks are considered the critical lesion underlying the initiation of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. However, at the very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of DNA double-strand breaks

353

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Americans' Average Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

NA

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

Radiation: Facts, Risks and Realities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Radiation 3 Understanding Radiation Risks 6 Naturally Occurring (Background) Radiation 7 Man-Made Radiation, beta particles and gamma rays. Other types, such as x-rays, can occur naturally or be machine-produced. Scientists have also learned that radiation sources are naturally all around us. Radiation can come from

356

Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Adaptive Comfort Model: Simulations & Future Directions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adaptive Comfort Model: Simulations & Future Directions Adaptive Comfort Model: Simulations & Future Directions Speaker(s): Richard de Dear Date: February 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Philip Haves The last 20 years of thermal comfort have witnessed a shift away from the "static" approach (exemplified by the PMV/PPD model) towards the adaptive approach (exemplified by the adaptive models in ASHRAE's Standard 55 (2004, 2010) and the European Union's counterpart standard, EN15251 (2007). - the basis and derivation of the adaptive comfort model - adaptive comfort standards (ASHRAE 55 and EN15251) - new developments and directions (reporting back from the January 2011 ASHRAE Meeting of SSPC-55 in Las Vegas) - environmental variables other than dry bulb, in the adaptive model

358

Differential Role of Transcription-Coupled Repair in UVBInduced Response of Human Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy Most solar radiation-induced skin cancers...cellular components by the higher-energy shorter solar wavelengths comprising the UVB spectra...learn more about the response to solar radiation of the target cells for...

Mariarosaria D'Errico; Massimo Teson; Angelo Calcagnile; Tiziana Nardo; Naomi De Luca; Chiara Lazzari; Silvia Soddu; Giovanna Zambruno; Miria Stefanini; and Eugenia Dogliotti

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Center for Adaptive Optics* Santa Cruz,CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Adaptive Optics* Santa Cruz,CA The Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) will concentrate on astronomical and vision science applications of adaptive optics and will reach out to other adaptive optics communities to share technologies. It will develop new instruments optimized for adaptive optics. Adaptive

Grether, Gregory

360

Ionizing Radiation Damage to the Folded Chromosome of Escherichia coli K-12: Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in Deoxyribonucleic Acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cell survival Dose (krad) % Recovery...it is in the range of sedimentation...that direct, radiation-induced cross-linking...during repair of ionizing radiation damage (3...is within the range ofsedimentation...biologically significant dose range. Unfortu...

Kevin M. Ulmer; Reinaldo F. Gomez; Anthony J. Sinskey

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure of the DUF2233 Domain in Bacteria and the Stuttering-associated UCE Glycoprotein July 2013 SSRL Science Summary (adapted from SLAC News Feature by Glennda Chui) Figure...

362

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Climate Change Basics: Science, Adaptation, & Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is Radiative Imbalance, Anthropogenic Big. #12;But, Feedbacks are Important! The most powerful greenhouse gas

Fox-Kemper, Baylor

364

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Howard L. Liber  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Howard L. Liber Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: Delayed genomic instability in human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs y-rays radiation Schwartz, J.L., Jordan, R., Lenarczyk, M. and Liber, H.L. 2002 Workshop: Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Liber, H.L. and Schwartz, J.L. Publications Zhang, Y., Zhou, J., Held, K.D., Redmond, R.W., Prise, K.M., and Liber, H.L. (2008). Deficiencies of double-strand break repair factors and effects on mutagenesis in directly [gamma]-irradiated and medium-mediated bystander human lymphoblastoid cells. Radiation Research 169(2):197-206.

365

Apoptosis as a Mechanism for Low Dose Radiation-and Amifostine-Mediated  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apoptosis as a Mechanism for Low Dose Radiation- and Amifostine-Mediated Apoptosis as a Mechanism for Low Dose Radiation- and Amifostine-Mediated Chromosomal Inversion Responses Pam Sykes Flinders University and Medical Centre Abstract Low dose radiation and the chemical radioprotector amifostine have both been shown to protect cells from the immediate and delayed effects of radiation exposure. They display a number of distinct similarities including their ability to protect cells against radiation-induced DNA damage, radiation-induced cell death and metastases formation. Amifostine, which protects cells from the toxic effects of ionizing radiation, has a broad range of activities including free radical scavenging, polyamine-like DNA binding, and induction of hypoxia and redox-regulated genes. Amifostine’s ability to protect cells is often

366

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

367

The flying radiation case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Applied Theoretical and Computational Physics Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

370

Radiation.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An average American's exposure is about 620 millirems per year from naturally occurring and other sources. Other Factors Background radiation varies with location....

371

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

372

Radiation Safety September 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 8 2.6 RUA Holder........................................................................................................ 11 3.3 Radiation Use Authorization (RUA).......................................................................................... 11 3.4 Review of RUA Applications

California at Irvine, University of

373

Radiative polarization of electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a new method of calculating the radiative polarization of electrons in homogeneous magnetic fields, using the modified electron propagation function.

Julian Schwinger and Wu-yang Tsai

1974-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Influence of Insulin Resistance on Contractile Activity-Induced Anabolic Response of Skeletal Muscle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the long-term therapeutic benefits of exercise are indisputable, contractile activity may induce divergent adaptations in insulin-resistant vs. insulin-sensitive skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to elucidate if the anabolic...

Nilsson, Mats I.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

Smith, D. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

The muc genes of pKM101 are induced by DNA damage.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...beta-galactosidase activity was induced by UV radiation and other DNA-damaging agents...beta-galactosidase activity was induced by UV radiation and other DNA-damaging agents...repressor for genes found on naturally occuring plasmids: the mucA and mucB...

S J Elledge; G C Walker

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for understanding

Pennycook, Steve

378

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM

Pennycook, Steve

379

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposedAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 Fig. F.1. The hydrogen atom and its

Pennycook, Steve

380

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation G-3 Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

382

Issues in adaptive mesh refinement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an approach for a patch-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for multi-physics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, and management of patches. Among the special features of this patch-based AMR are symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement, special implementation offlux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. Here, higher efficiency of refinement means less unnecessarily refined cells for a given set of cells to be refined. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement are shown in both two- and three-dimensions.

Dai, William Wenlong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The literature is reviewed to identify the main clinical and dose-volume predictors for acute and late radiation-induced heart disease. A clear quantitative dose and/or volume dependence for most cardiac toxicity has not yet been shown, primarily because of the scarcity of the data. Several clinical factors, such as age, comorbidities and doxorubicin use, appear to increase the risk of injury. The existing dose-volume data is presented, as well as suggestions for future investigations to better define radiation-induced cardiac injury.

Gagliardi, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.gagliardi@karolinska.s [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Cancer Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali [Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Correa, Candace; Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Allen, Aaron M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana- Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Rabin Medical Center Petach Tikvah (Israel); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Solar radiation and human health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

Asta Juzeniene; Pl Brekke; Arne Dahlback; Stefan Andersson-Engels; Jrg Reichrath; Kristin Moan; Michael F Holick; William B Grant; Johan Moan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Climate adaptation planning in practice: an evaluation of adaptation plans from three developed nations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formal planning for climate change adaptation is emerging rapidly at a range of geo-political scales. This first generation of adaptation plans provides useful information regarding how institutions are framing the issue of adaptation and the range of processes that are recognized as being part of an adaptation response. To better understand adaptation planning among developed nations, a set of 57 adaptation plans from Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States was evaluated against a suite of 19 planning processes identified from existing guidance instruments for adaptation planning. Total scores among evaluated plans ranged from 16% of the maximum possible score to 61%, with an average of 37%. These results suggest adaptation plans are largely under-developed. Critical weaknesses in adaptation planning are related to limited consideration for non-climatic factors as well as neglect for issues of adaptive capacity including entitlements to various forms of capital needed for effective adaptation. Such gaps in planning suggest there are opportunities for institutions to make better use of existing guidance for adaptation planning and the need to consider the broader governance context in which adaptation will occur. In addition, the adaptation options prescribed by adaptation plans reflect a preferential bias toward low-risk capacity-building (72% of identified options) over the delivery of specific actions to reduce vulnerability. To the extent these findings are representative of the state of developed nation adaptation planning, there appear to be significant deficiencies in climate change preparedness, even among those nations often assumed to have the greatest adaptive capacity.

Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL; Westaway, Richard M. [IMS Consulting, Bristol, Avon, England; Yuen, Emma J. [CSIRO Climate Adaptation Flagship, Aspendale, Vic, Australia

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent-living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials: Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21-17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20-19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at preirradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. Five hundred eighty-eight evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results: Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and preirradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r=0.34; P=.01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (P<.05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions: There was relative sparing of postirradiation functional outcomes over time in this sample. Baseline differences in functional abilities before the initiation of irradiation suggested that other factors influence functional outcomes above and beyond the effects of irradiation.

Netson, Kelli L. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Kansas University School of MedicineWichita, Kansas (United States)] [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Kansas University School of MedicineWichita, Kansas (United States); Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Psychology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DDE ESTIMATED DOSE FROM CONCEPTION TO DECLARATION: DDE Radiation Safety Officer Signature for increased protection from ionizing radiation for declared pregnant radiation workers. The radiation dose of the occupational dose limit of 50 mSv (5.0 rem). The CPMC Radiation Safety Office will provide education

Jia, Songtao

388

RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. · Radiation therapist - a health professional who designs, calculates (plans) and provides the radiation dose and monitors the delivery of radiation therapy, taking into account the protection and safety of patientsRADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE #12;A Career in Radiation Oncology YOUR CHOICE SAVE LIVES

Tobar, Michael

389

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......occupational illness to personnel, major damage...acceptable levels. Selection of control measures...or equipment operating correctly in...99 103 to 104 Personnel life safety...and abnormal operating conditions under...radiation risk to personnel, public and...worker radiation training) reduces the......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disable this safety function and...circuits and software. Other required...source in case of radiation monitors. Feedback...from other non-safety systems to prevent...write and check software. The expected...logic systems for safety functions can...levels of prompt radiation hazard. ACS......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Risks from ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... RADON indoors now accounts for nearly half of the average UK population exposure to ionizing radiation ... exposure to ionizing radiation. We believe that the extent of the variation in exposure to radon in the United Kingdom and else-where and its magnitude in relation to exposures from ...

R. H. Clarke; T. R. E. Southwood

1989-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

T violation in radiative $\\beta$ decay and electric dipole moments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In radiative $\\beta$ decay, $T$ violation can be studied through a spin-independent $T$-odd correlation. We consider contributions to this correlation by beyond the standard model (BSM) sources of $T$-violation, arising above the electroweak scale. At the same time such sources, parametrized by dimension-6 operators, can induce electric dipole moments (EDMs). As a consequence, the manifestations of the $T$-odd BSM physics in radiative $\\beta$ decay and EDMs are not independent. Here we exploit this connection to show that current EDM bounds already strongly constrain the spin-independent $T$-odd correlation in radiative $\\beta$ decay.

Dekens, W G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan, Pat Concannon & John H.J. Petrini The goal of this program is to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the NBS1 gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. Patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage. It is unclear whether humans heterozygous for the mutations associated with NBS are radiation sensitive and results from cell culture experiments give conflicting results. In collaboration with John Petrini at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City we developed a mouse model of this disorder and are directly testing the hypothesis

394

Low dose radiation combines with the Src oncoprotein to transform  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiation combines with the Src oncoprotein to transform radiation combines with the Src oncoprotein to transform pre-malignant human breast cells Paul Yaswen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Determine whether low dose radiation exerts persistent epigenetic effects that promote malignancy. Background and Significance: Some persistent carcinogenic effects of radiation may not be traceable to specific DNA sequence alterations and may not be linearly related to dose. Through the biochemical initiation of positive feedback loops, ionization-induced events may have heritable non-linear effects on cellular behavior. Inflammatory responses involving the transcription factor NFκB may be subject to such effects. Increased NFκB activity has been strongly linked to carcinogenesis in a number of published in vitro and in vivo studies (reviewed in [1]). Since radiation

395

ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical Education  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Radiation Medicine Advanced Radiation Medicine Dates Scheduled Register Online March 24-28, 2014 August 18-22, 2014 Fee: $250 Maximum enrollment: 28 30 hours AMA PRA Category 1 Credits(tm) This 4½-day course includes more advanced information for medical practitioners. This program is academically more rigorous than the Radiation Emergency Medicine course and is primarily for Physicians, Clinical Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants desiring an advanced level of information on the diagnosis and management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses. Advanced topics in the diagnosis and management of radiation-induced injuries and illnesses includes the use of cytokines, stem cell transplants, antimicrobials, wound care and other advanced techniques. Group problem-solving is used to thoroughly orient attendees to the

396

Forecasting with adaptive extended exponential smoothing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Much of product level forecasting is based upon time series techniques. However, traditional time series forecasting techniques have offered either smoothing constant adaptability or consideration of various t...

John T. Mentzer Ph.D.

397

ChapterTitle ADAPTIVE EXPONENTIAL SMOOTHING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The single exponential smoothing forecasting model requires the specification of a ... ?, which determines the degree of model smoothing. Proper selection of the coefficient ? is...adaptive exponential smoothing,...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Training for Climate Adaptation in Conservation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wildlife Conservation Society and the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science are hosting this two-day training for climate adaptation.

399

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

400

Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning: A Guide for Practitioners Agency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Machine Learning for Adaptive Computer Game Opponents .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates the use of machine learning techniques in computer games to create a computer player that adapts to its opponent's game-play. This includes (more)

Miles, Jonathan David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Adaptive Barrier Strategies for Nonlinear Interior Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 25, 2005 ... that adaptive choices, such as Mehrotra's probing procedure, outperform ... focus on the effects of merit functions or filters, and on regularization...

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in the ability to access, characterize, predict, and adaptively manipulate fracture and flow processes over scales from nanometers to kilometers. This town hall...

404

2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems face increasing risks from shifting disease vectors, temperature increases and health care system infrastructure from a changing climate DOE Climate Change Adaptation...

405

Radiation Weighting Factors and High Energy Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......generally inadequate for high energy radiation. In order to determine...appropriate wR values in the high energy region, several criteria are...are proposed for neutrons of energy above 100 MeV and for protons above 10 MeV. The wR value for muons is confirmed to be practically......

M. Pelliccioni

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Radiation effects on humans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

407

Enhancing photovoltaic power by Fano-induced coherence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that coherence induced by Fano interference can enhance power generated by a photovoltaic device as compared to the same system with no coherence. No additional external energy source is necessary to create such induced coherence. In the present model, coherence increases the flow of electrons through the load, which reduces radiative recombination and enhances cell power.

Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Scully, Marlan O. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA and Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward 10.1126/science.331.6024...radiation, workers at the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant wear protective gear...Candidate radiation drugs inch forward. | News | 0 (E)-4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone...

Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

EOLSS ADAPTATIONS TO LIFE IN MARINE CAVES PAGE 1 ADAPTATIONS TO LIFE IN MARINE CAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EOLSS ­ ADAPTATIONS TO LIFE IN MARINE CAVES PAGE 1 ADAPTATIONS TO LIFE IN MARINE CAVES Thomas M. Iliffe, Department of Marine Biology, Texas A&M University at Galveston, USA Renée E. Bishop, Department, biodiversity, ecology, adaptation, evolution, behavior, conservation, endangered species, cave diving

Iliffe, Thomas M.

410

Diffusion of fission products and radiation damage in SiC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A major problem with most of the present nuclear reactors is their safety in terms of the release of radioactivity into the environment during accidents. In some of the future nuclear reactor designs, i.e. Generation IV reactors, the fuel is in the form of coated spherical particles, i.e. TRISO (acronym for triple coated isotropic) particles. The main function of these coating layers is to act as diffusion barriers for radioactive fission products, thereby keeping these fission products within the fuel particles, even under accident conditions. The most important coating layer is composed of polycrystalline 3CSiC. This paper reviews the diffusion of the important fission products (silver, caesium, iodine and strontium) in SiC. Because radiation damage can induce and enhance diffusion, the paper also briefly reviews damage created by energetic neutrons and ions at elevated temperatures, i.e. the temperatures at which the modern reactors will operate, and the annealing of the damage. The interaction between SiC and some fission products (such as Pd and I) is also briefly discussed. As shown, one of the key advantages of SiC is its radiation hardness at elevated temperatures, i.e. SiC is not amorphized by neutrons or bombardment at substrate temperatures above 350C. Based on the diffusion coefficients of the fission products considered, the review shows that at the normal operating temperatures of these new reactors (i.e. less than 950C) the SiC coating layer is a good diffusion barrier for these fission products. However, at higher temperatures the design of the coated particles needs to be adapted, possibly by adding a thin layer of ZrC.

Johan B Malherbe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Unsteady hydromagnetic free-convection flow with radiative heat transfer in a rotating fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the buoyancy-induced flow of an electrically-conducting fluid with radiative heat transfer past a vertical flat plate of infinite ... vary with temperature, that is a compressible fluid. If the temper...

A. R. Bestman; S. K. Adjepong

412

Problems and Solutions in the Estimation of Genetic Risks from Radiation and Chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extensive investigations with mice on the effects of various physical and biological factors, such as dose rate, sex and cell stage, on radiation-induced mutation have provided an evaluation of the genetics hazar...

W. L. Russell

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The parametric doppler effect upon oblique radiation incidence in quartz glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frequency and reflection angle of probe radiation from a refractive-index inhomogeneity induced by an intense pumping pulse in quartz glass and moving with a relativistic velocity are calculated. Conditions un...

N. V. Vysotina; N. N. Rosanov; V. B. Shilov

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Alternatives of non-threshold and threshold concepts of cancerogenic and mutagenic effects of low LET radiation: the analysis of postulates and arguments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The comparative analysis of radiation-induced stochastic effects in organisms and cells is given under the aspect of the comparison of non-threshold vs. threshold concepts of radiation effect induction including their postulate basis analysis. Most representative data of basic research areas of radiation-induced stochastic effects are considered, including data on radiation epidemiology and experimental and theoretical radiobiology. The main conclusion of the elaborated analysis consists in the principal difference of dose response patterns for radiation-induced, stochastic effects in the low dose range compared with those in the high dose range. The principal inadequacy of extrapolations from high to low dose ranges is noted, as well as the better justification and the corresponding preference attributed to the threshold concept of low LET radiation effects. The new approach principle of the approximate radiation-induced stochastic effect, quasi-threshold evaluation, is presented.

Lev M. Rozhdestvensky

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

Horn, Kevin M. (Albuquerque, NM); Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN ULTRARELATIVISTIC OUTFLOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for the equation of radiative transfer in ultrarelativistic opaque jets. The solution describes the initial trapping of radiation, its adiabatic cooling, and the transition to transparency. Two opposite regimes are examined. (1) Matter-dominated outflow. Surprisingly, radiation develops enormous anisotropy in the fluid frame before decoupling from the fluid. The radiation is strongly polarized. (2) Radiation-dominated outflow. The transfer occurs as if radiation propagated in vacuum, preserving the angular distribution and the blackbody shape of the spectrum. The escaping radiation has a blackbody spectrum if (and only if) the outflow energy is dominated by radiation up to the photospheric radius.

Beloborodov, Andrei M., E-mail: amb@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

419

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract Abstract Title: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair (PNNL Project # 42699) Authors: Eric J. Ackerman, Ph.D. Institutions: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA We developed a functional assay to measure the effects of LDR on repair of many different lesions representative of those found in cells as consequences of normal oxidative metabolism, as well as those caused by radiation. Currently only 1/10th attomole =105 damaged molecules/cell and 3000 cells/measurement are required. We have found that even low doses (10 rad) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. Interestingly, the amount of DNA repair increases at 10-50 rads, plateaus, and then increases even further at higher doses well below doses where radiation-induced lethality

420

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Radiation prevents much cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence reviewed here supports the concept that chronic exposure to ionising radiation can dramatically decrease cancer incidence and mortality. This evidence includes an inverse relationship between radiation levels and cancer induction and/or mortality in: over 200 million people in the USA; 200 million people in India; 10,000 residents of Taipei who live in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; high radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; almost 300,000 homes with radon in the USA; non-smokers in high radon areas of Saxony, Germany.

T.D. Luckey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Biophysics and synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book, contains contributions to the conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation held in July 1986 at Frascati. It is devoted to advances in the resolution of biological molecule structure obtainable through synchroton radiation studies. The use of synchroton radiation has firmly established x-ray spectroscopy of biological molecules. More detailed knowledge on the local structure of active sites of metalloproteins, as well as a number of studies on the interaction of metal ions with other important biological macromolecular systems are presented. This new method for protein structure analysis is a major improvement for the rapidly expanding field of protein engineering.

Bianconi, A.; Castellano, C.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

426

Adaptive Port Reduction in Static Condensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Port Reduction in Static Condensation JL Eftang DBP Huynh DJ Knezevic EM Rønquist a framework for adaptive reduction of the degrees of freedom associated with ports in static condensation (SC reduction for the interior of a component with model order reduction on the ports in order to rapidly

Rønquist, Einar M.

427

Adaptive Composite Map Projections Bernhard Jenny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Composite Map Projections Bernhard Jenny Abstract--All major web mapping services use.The proposed composite map projection combines several projections that are recommended in cartographic.The composite projection adapts the maps geometry to scale, to the maps height-to-width ratio

Jenny, Bernhard

428

Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change: The Role of NOAA Sea Grant Extension years and generations about how to adapt to a changing climate. Effective preparation for possible effects of climate change includes engagement of resource managers, planners, public works officials

429

A fuzzy-tuned adaptive Kalman filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, fuzzy processing is applied to the adaptive Kalman filter. The filter gain coefficients are adapted over a 50 dB range of unknown signal/noise dynamics, using fuzzy membership functions. Specific simulation results are shown for a...

Painter, John H.; Young Hwan Lho

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

WORKLOAD ADAPTATION IN AUTONOMIC DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Autonomic DBMSs", Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Self-Managing Database Systems (SMDB 2007 to meet its Service Level Objectives (SLOs). It is a challenge to adapt multiple workloads with complex scheduler that performs workload adaptation in a DBMS, as the test bed to prove the effectiveness

431

Proceedings of the International Workshop on Adaptation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Adaptation, Personalization and REcommendation. Carrero3 1 Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain {ivan.cantador, david.vallet}@uam.es 2 Yahoo! Research.carrero}@uem.es #12;#12;Preface The 1st International Workshop on Adaptation, Personalization and REcommendation

Cantador, Iván

432

Adaptive computations on conforming quadtree meshes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the quadtree data structure and conforming polygonal interpolants are used to develop an h-adaptive finite element method. Quadtree is a hierarchical data structure that is computationally attractive for adaptive numerical simulations. ... Keywords: Barycentric coordinates, Hanging nodes, Laplace interpolant, Meshfree methods, Natural neighbors, Quadtree data structure

A. Tabarraei; N. Sukumar

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Safety implementation of adaptive embedded control components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with dynamic reconfigurations of component-based adaptive embedded control systems to be automatically handled at run-time by intelligent agents. We define a Control Component as a software unit supporting control tasks of the system ... Keywords: adaptive embedded control system, dynamic reconfiguration, intelligent agent, semaphore, software control component

Atef Gharbi; Mohamed Khalgui; Samir Ben Ahmed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Adaptive performance support for fault diagnosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper introduces a strategy, a user model, and a methodology for utilising adaptive hypermedia in performance support domain and specifically for fault diagnosis. This utilisation is implemented by employing task-specific and user-centred hypermedia ... Keywords: adaptive hypermedia, diagnostic expert systems, performance support systems, semantic data modelling, user modelling

Ammar M. Huneiti

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Method and apparatus for measuring spatial uniformity of radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for measuring the spatial uniformity of the intensity of a radiation beam from a radiation source based on a single sampling time and/or a single pulse of radiation. The measuring apparatus includes a plurality of radiation detectors positioned on planar mounting plate to form a radiation receiving area that has a shape and size approximating the size and shape of the cross section of the radiation beam. The detectors concurrently receive portions of the radiation beam and transmit electrical signals representative of the intensity of impinging radiation to a signal processor circuit connected to each of the detectors and adapted to concurrently receive the electrical signals from the detectors and process with a central processing unit (CPU) the signals to determine intensities of the radiation impinging at each detector location. The CPU displays the determined intensities and relative intensity values corresponding to each detector location to an operator of the measuring apparatus on an included data display device. Concurrent sampling of each detector is achieved by connecting to each detector a sample and hold circuit that is configured to track the signal and store it upon receipt of a "capture" signal. A switching device then selectively retrieves the signals and transmits the signals to the CPU through a single analog to digital (A/D) converter. The "capture" signal. is then removed from the sample-and-hold circuits. Alternatively, concurrent sampling is achieved by providing an A/D converter for each detector, each of which transmits a corresponding digital signal to the CPU. The sampling or reading of the detector signals can be controlled by the CPU or level-detection and timing circuit.

Field, Halden (Boulder, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Petascale Adaptive Computational Fluid Dynamics | Argonne Leadership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Petascale Adaptive Computational Fluid Dynamics Petascale Adaptive Computational Fluid Dynamics PI Name: Kenneth Jansen PI Email: jansen@rpi.edu Institution: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute The specific aim of this request for resources is to examine scalability and robustness of our code on BG/P. We have confirmed that, during the flow solve phase, our CFD flow solver does exhibit perfect strong scaling to the full 32k cores on our local machine (CCNI-BG/L at RPI) but this will be our first access to BG/P. We are also eager to study the performance of the adaptive phase of our code. Some aspects have scaled well on BG/L (e.g., refinement has produced adaptive meshes that take a 17 million element mesh and perform local adaptivity on 16k cores to match a requested size field to produce a mesh exceeding 1 billion elements) but other aspects (e.g.,

437

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive systems theory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems theory Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Summary: 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Peter...

438

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

439

Low Dose Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

440

Radiation from accelerated branes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

Mohab Abou-Zeid and Miguel S. Costa

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

443

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

Dai, Pengcheng

444

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

Dai, Pengcheng

445

p53-Mediated Regulation of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Expression in Cells Exposed to Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exposed to increasing doses of IR at 24 h posttransfection...cellular response to ionizing radiation in which p53-mediated...IR at 12 Gy, a dose that induced maximal...the 1- to 4-Gy range does not effectively...because a high radiation dose is used and the...

Jin Xu; Gilbert F. Morris

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Chromosome translocations and cosmic sources of ionizing radiation: The NIOSH-NCI airline pilot biomarker study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and cosmic sources of ionizing radiation: The NIOSH-NCI airline...are exposed to cosmic ionizing radiation, an efficient inducer...bone marrow absorbed dose in cGy from personal...SD; 46.7 5.3, range 37-55 vs. 45.8...

Lee Yong; Alice Sigurdson; Elizabeth Ward; Martha Waters; Elizabeth Whelan; Martin Petersen; Elaine Ron; Marilyn Ramsey; Parveen Bhatti; and James Tucker

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE VARIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Cloud-induced climate change. Cloud-radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo are three key quantities

448

GRACE-2: integrating fine-grained application adaptation with global adaptation for saving energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy efficiency has become a primary design criterion for mobile multimedia devices. Prior work has proposed saving energy through coordinated adaptation in multiple system layers, in response to changing application demands and system resources. The scope and frequency of adaptation pose a fundamental conflict in such systems. The Illinois GRACE project addresses this conflict through a hierarchical solution which combines: 1) infrequent (expensive) global adaptation that optimises energy for all applications in the system, 2) frequent (cheap) per-application (or per-app) adaptation that optimises for a single application at a time. This paper demonstrates the benefits of the hierarchical adaptation through a second-generation prototype, GRACE-2. Specifically, it shows that in a network bandwidth constrained environment, per-app application adaptation yields significant energy benefits over and above global adaptation.

Vibhore Vardhan; Wanghong Yuan; Albert F. Harris; Sarita V. Adve; Robin H. Kravets; Klara Nahrstedt; Daniel G. Sachs; Douglas L. Jones

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

450

Effects of heat and radiation on mammalian cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although it is tempting to interpret the actions of heat on living cells as a way of oxidative stress, the well known naturally occuring antioxidant systems (reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) are not found to act as the main protective systems of the cell against hyperthermic cell killing. Evidence is presented that it is not the lipids of the membrane, but probably the membrane proteins which are critical primary molecular targets for hyperthermia. The readily peroxidizable polyunsaturated fatty acyl (PUFA) chains of phospholipids may be target molecules for radiation damage leading to interphase death but not leading to reproductive death. Repair of radiation-induced DNA lesions is probably the critical event in cell survival after radiation. This process is inhibited by hyperthermia. The synergism observed as a consequence of the interaction of heat and radiation may not always be explained by the rate of repair of DNA breaks. Especially in the case of fractioned heat treatments (inducing a state of thermotolerance) the situation seems more complicated. Heat-induced inactivation of DNA repair enzymes as well as heat-induced structural changes in chromatin (enhanced protein binding) may be processes that become critical. Thermotolerance does not always interfere with the process of heat radiosensitization.

A.W.T. Konings

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Radiation and viral DNA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

452

Radiative muon capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown by relating the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture to that of radiative pion capture, that the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture proposed recently by Hwang and Primakoff differs from the others mainly by Low's counter terms. Despite the fact that the "original" transition amplitude does not violate seriously the conservation of the hadronic electromagnetic current, Low's counter terms, as introduced via Low's prescription to secure the presence of small conservation-of-hadronic-electromagnetic-current-breaking terms, are confirmed to be of numerical importance. Further, it is found in the "elementary-particle" treatment of radiative muon capture that the uncertainty arising from the nuclear structure can be reduced to become negligible. Therefore, an exclusive radiative muon capture experiment can in principle differentiate the Hwang-Primakoff theory from the others and yet provide a comprehensive test of partial conservation of axial-vector current.RADIOACTIVITY Theories of radiative muon capture, linearity hypothesis versus Low's prescription; nuclear structure and PCAC.

W -Y. P. Hwang

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program Dynamical Seasonal Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program Dynamical Seasonal Forecasting Seasonal Prediction · POAMA · Issues for future Outline #12;Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program Major source Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program El Nino Mean State · Easterlies westward surface current upwelling

Lim, Eun-pa

454

2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan Document presents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2014 plan for adapting to climate change....

455

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Robert L. Ullrich  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Robert L. Ullrich Robert L. Ullrich Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates (NSCOR) Genetic Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Relationships with Radiation Tumorigenesis Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Bailey, S.M., Williams, E.S., and Ullrich, R.L. 2005 Workshop: Dsyfunctional Mammalian Telomeres in DNA-PKcs Deficient Backgrounds Bailey, S.M., Williams, E., Hagelstrom, T., and Ullrich, R.L. 2003 Workshop: Dysfunctional Mammalian Telomeres Join to Double-Strand Breaks Bailey, S.M., Goodwin, E.H., Williams, E., and Ullrich, R.L. 2002 Workshop: Dysfunctional Telomeres, Radiation-Induced Instability and Tumorigenesis Bailey, S.M., Goodwin, E.H., Cornforth, M.N., and Ullrich, R.L.

456

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction between Tissue and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of TGF-ß Depletion on Radiation-Induced p53 Response M.H. Barcellos-Hoff, S.A. Ravani, R.L. Henshall, K.B. Ewan, R.L. Warters,* B. Parvin Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *University of Utah One of the most widely studied cellular responses to radiation is the activation of the transcription factor, p53, whose abundance and action dictates individual cellular fate decisions regarding proliferation, differentiation and death. A cell's response to damage needs to be rapid. Thus, it is not surprising that the activation of the p53 stress response primarily involves post-translational changes in the p53 protein. Whereas intracellular radiation-induced mediators of p53 stability have been the subject of intense study, little is known about the extracellular factors

457

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Collateral  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collateral Damage Collateral Damage Using targeted irradiation to understand radiation-induced effects in bystander cells chromosomal A typical example of chromosomal instability induction measured by chromosome-type aberrations in primary human lymphocytes at delay time post-irradiation of a fraction of the cell population. Similar types of aberrations were observed in whole irradiated population but were not observed in untreated cells. Munira Kadhim Background: It has long been understood that radiation exposure can influence cellular changes. Studies indicate that even very low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha-particle irradiation, such as that from environmental radon, can affect cells. Radiation-induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells and as a

458

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

459

Appendix G: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix G: Radiation #12;#12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

460

Appendix A: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix A: Radiation #12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Gravitational Radiation and Very Long Baseline Interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves affect the observed direction of light from distant sources. At telescopes, this change in direction appears as periodic variations in the apparent positions of these sources on the sky; that is, as proper motion. A wave of a given phase, traveling in a given direction, produces a characteristic pattern of proper motions over the sky. Comparison of observed proper motions with this pattern serves to test for the presence of gravitational waves. A stochastic background of waves induces apparent proper motions with specific statistical properties, and so, may also be sought. In this paper we consider the effects of a cosmological background of gravitational radiation on astrometric observations. We derive an equation for the time delay measured by two antennae observing the same source in an Einstein-de Sitter spacetime containing gravitational radiation. We also show how to obtain similar expressions for curved Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes.

Ted Pyne; Carl R. Gwinn; Mark Birkinshaw; T. Marshall Eubanks; Demetrios N. Matsakis

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

Smith-Purcell Radiation from Rough Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation of a charged particle moving parallel to a inhomogeneous surface is considered. Within a single formalism periodic and random gratings are examined. For the periodically inhomogeneous surface we derive new expressions for the dispersion relation and the spectral-angular intensity. In particular, for a given observation direction two wavelengths are emitted instead of one wavelength of the standard Smith-Purcell effect. For a rough surface we show that the main contribution to the radiation intensity is given by surface polaritons induced on the interface between two media. These polaritons are multiply scattered on the roughness of surface and convert into real photons. The spectral-angular intensity is calculated and its dependence on different parameters is revealed.

Gevorkian, Zh S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

National Adaptation Forum Webinar Series: Out of Town, Not Out...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Adaptation Forum Webinar Series: Out of Town, Not Out of Trouble: Small Agriculture and Indigenous Communities National Adaptation Forum Webinar Series: Out of Town, Not Out of...

464

Burundi-National Adaptation Plan of Action to Climate Change...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burundi-National Adaptation Plan of Action to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Burundi-National Adaptation Plan of Action to Climate Change AgencyCompany...

465

GIZ Sourcebook Module 5f: Adapting Urban Transport to Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f: Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ Sourcebook Module 5f: Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change...

466

Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Environment Programme Topics Adaptation, Background analysis...

467

Software Adaptation Patterns for Service-Oriented Architectures .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis describes the concept of software adaptation patterns and how they can be used in software adaptation of service-oriented architectures. The patterns are described (more)

Hashimoto, Koji

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Adapting technology to keep the national infrastructure safe...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adapting technology to keep the national infrastructure safe and secure Identifying threats and responding to disasters September 1, 2013 Adapting Lab technology to help recover...

469

Development of an adaptive fuzzy logic controller for HVAC system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An adaptive approach to control a cooling coil chilled water valve operation, called adaptive fuzzy logic control (AFLC), is developed and validated in this study. (more)

Navale, Rahul Laxman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Adaptive Rejection of Narrow Band Disturbance in Hard Disk Drives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

feedback representation of the PAA for adapting narrow bandrepresentation of the PAA for stability analysis. .92adaptation algorithm (PAA). These identified parameters are

Zheng, Qixing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Titanates for Pu Disposition: Zirconolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second of two papers on the results of radiation-induced damage accumulation in titanate ceramics that potentially could be used for weapons grade plutonium disposition. In the first paper we discussed the results from pyrochlore (betafite) based ceramics. In this paper, we discuss the effects of radiation-induced damage on the density and crystal structure of a nominally phase-pure zirconolite and two other zirconolite-bearing ceramics from the alpha decay of 238Pu. Macro (bulk) and micro (X-ray diffraction) swelling were found to be temperature independent, whereas the density determined with He gas pycnometry was temperature dependent. It took approximately 740 days (2.6?1018 ?/g) for the specimens to become X-ray amorphouslonger for the swelling to saturate. Unlike what we observed for the pyrochlore-based ceramics, we did not observe any phase changes associated with storage temperature and damage ingrowth. The forward dissolution rate at a pH value of 2 for material containing essentially all zirconolite is 1.7(4)?10-3 g/(m2?d). Very little pH dependence was observed for zirconolite specimens and, like we observed for the pyrochlore-bearing ceramics in this study, there was no dependence on the amount of radiation-induced damage. As with the pyrochlore, these materials did not become substantially friable with increasing radiation-induced damage. Even after the radiation-induced swelling saturated, the specimens remained physically intact with no evidence for microcracking. Thus, the material remains physically a viable material for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade Pu.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Electroweak Radiative Corrections to Muon Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electroweak radiative corrections to muon capture on nuclei are computed and found to be sizable. They enhance the capture rates for hydrogen and helium by 2.8% and 3.0% respectively. As a result, the value of the induced pseudoscalar coupling, g_P^exp, extracted from a recent hydrogen 1S singlet capture experiment is increased by about 21% to g_P^exp = 7.3 +/- 1.2 and brought into good agreement with the prediction of chiral perturbation theory, g_P^theory=8.2 +/- 0.2. Implications for helium capture rate predictions are also discussed.

A. Czarnecki; W. J. Marciano; A. Sirlin

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

Reducing Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

475

Creating Adaptive Feedback designed for Improving Data Entry Accuracy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract- Data quality is a critical problem in modern databases. Data-entry forms present the first and arguably best opportunity for detecting and mitigating errors, but there has been little research into automatic methods for improving data quality at entry time. In this paper, we propose USHER, an end-to-end system for form design, entry, and data quality assurance. Using previous form submissions, USHER learns a probabilistic model over the questions of the form. USHER then applies this model at every step of the data-entry process to improve data quality. Before entry, it induces a form layout that captures the most important data values of a form instance as quickly as possible and reduces the complexity of error-prone questions. During entry, it dynamically adapts the form to the values being entered by providing real-time interface feedback, reasking questions with dubious responses, and simplifying questions by reformulating them. After entry, it revisits question responses that it deems likely to have been entered incorrectly by reasking the question or a reformulation thereof. We evaluate these components of USHER using two real-world data sets. Our results demonstrate that USHER can improve data quality considerably at a reduced cost when compared to current practice. Index Terms- Data quality, data entry, form design, adaptive form. O I.

P. Jaya Prakash; B. Venkateswarlu; S. Abdul Jeelan; Assistant Professors; Andhra Pradesh-india

476

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y rays, Authors: K. Rithidech1, E.B. Whorton2, M. Tungjai1, E. Ar-Bab1, S.R. Simon1, M. Tawde3 and C.W. Anderson3. Institutions: 1Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, NY 11794-8691, USA, 2University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77550-1047,3Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000. Information on potential health hazards of radiation at doses below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection (less than or equal to 10 cGy) is currently lacking. It is therefore important to characterize early and subsequent in vivo biological response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation because such data should provide information that can help determine whether radiation at this dose level

477

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of Survival  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Survival Advantage, Bystander Effect, and Survival Advantage, Bystander Effect, and Genomic Instability after Low-LET Low Dose Radiation Exposure Mohan Natarajan University of Texas Health Science Center Why this Project? To understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcomes such as better cell survival after low-LET radiation and to determine whether low dose radiation-induced NF-kB signaling can mediate telomerase activation and thus confer enhanced cell survival of normal aortic endothelial cells. Project Goals To determine whether low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can cause a positive feedback signal initiated by the activation of the NF-kB. To examine one of the mechanisms involving TNF-a as a signaling mediator, which could mediate the bystander effect through the generation

478

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Current Funded Project Descriptions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Funded Project Descriptions Funded Project Descriptions Effects Of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Jointly funded by NASA and DOE Eric J Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 Dr. Ackerman will study the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the repair of different types of damage to DNA, including damage from ionizing radiation and that produced by the normal internal operation of the cell. Using a very sensitive technique called host cell reactivation assay (HCR), he will quantitatively measure the repair of each type of DNA damage and thereby measure if the cellular repair system itself has been damaged. He will also determine if unique forms of DNA repair system damage are induced by low doses of cosmic radiation exposure present during space

479

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Janet E. Baulch  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Janet E. Baulch Janet E. Baulch University of California, Davis Currently Funded Projects Impact of Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: DNA damage in acutely irradiated F2 mice with a history of paternal F0 germline irradiation Baulch, J.E. and Raabe, O G. 2002 Workshop Impact of Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation, Baulch, J.E., Ph.D. and Raabe, O.G., Ph.D. Publications Kovalchuk, O. and Baulch, J.E. (2008). Epigenetic changes and nontargeted radiation effects - Is there a link? Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis 49(1):16-25 Laiakis, E.C., Baulch, J.E., and Morgan, W.F. (2008). Interleukin 8 exhibits a pro-mitogenic and pro-survival role in radiation induced

480

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Project Descriptions-Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Descriptions-Archive Project Descriptions-Archive Effects Of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Eric J Ackerman (former PNNL) (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA Dr. Ackerman will study the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the repair of different types of damage to DNA, including damage from ionizing radiation and that produced by the normal internal operation of the cell. Using a very sensitive technique called host cell reactivation assay (HCR), he will quantitatively measure the repair of each type of DNA damage and thereby measure if the cellular repair system itself has been damaged. He will also determine if unique forms of DNA repair system damage are induced by low doses of cosmic radiation exposure present during space

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

DNA damage: risk comparisons of low radiation vis-a-vis dietary micronutrient deficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micronutrients are the substances in minute amounts that are essential for human life. This study discusses laboratory and epidemiological evidence that dietary micronutrient deficiencies cause DNA damage. DNA damage comparisons are made between dietary micronutrient deficiencies and low dose radiation. Laboratory studies show that micronutrient deficiencies can cause greater DNA damage than radiation doses significantly above background environmental levels. Previous concerns that have been expressed about comparing endogenous DNA damages to radiation-induced DNA damages are discussed, in particular, the role of radiation clusters. It is shown that cluster damage does not preclude making comparisons of dietary micronutrient deficiencies vis-a-vis radiation, especially at background environmental levels. Such damage comparisons provide the public with a means of placing radiation risk in perspective by comparing a readily appreciated, everyday concept (dietary deficiencies) with that of radiation.

Daniel P. Hayes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Information Resources: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adaptive Street Lighting Controls Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with