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1

Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

Jian Li

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Biological Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Epithelial Cell Transformation Wenshu Chen Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Abstract The major hypothesis in this project is that low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation stimulates an adaptive response that protects cells from neoplastic transformation involving modulation of paracrine factors (e.g., cytokines), cell survival/death signaling pathways, and reprogramming of the epigenome. To test this hypothesis, a validated, sensitive in vitro transformation model and a media transfer method were used to study the mechanisms of low-LET gamma radiation activated natural protection (ANP) against chemical carcinogen-induced bronchial cell transformation. Immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell

5

Adaptable radiation monitoring system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable radioactive-material detection system capable of detecting radioactive sources moving at high speeds. The system has at least one radiation detector capable of detecting gamma-radiation and coupled to an MCA capable of collecting spectral data in very small time bins of less than about 150 msec. A computer processor is connected to the MCA for determining from the spectral data if a triggering event has occurred. Spectral data is stored on a data storage device, and a power source supplies power to the detection system. Various configurations of the detection system may be adaptably arranged for various radiation detection scenarios. In a preferred embodiment, the computer processor operates as a server which receives spectral data from other networked detection systems, and communicates the collected data to a central data reporting system.

Archer, Daniel E. (Livermore, CA); Beauchamp, Brock R. (San Ramon, CA); Mauger, G. Joseph (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Karl E. (Livermore, CA); Mercer, Michael B. (Manteca, CA); Pletcher, David C. (Sacramento, CA); Riot, Vincent J. (Berkeley, CA); Schek, James L. (Tracy, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

Adaptive Implicit Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

We describe methods for accurate and efficient long term time integra- tion of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion systems: implicit time integration for effi- cient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while control- ling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Wang, Zhen [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel [ORNL; Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

8

An adaptive radiation model for the origin of new gene functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foster, P.L. Adaptive radiation of a frameshift mutation inThe Ecology of Adaptive Radiation, (Oxford University Press,18 th , 2004) An adaptive radiation model for the origin of

Francino, M. Pilar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Mechanism Underlying Cellular Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation Colette A. Sacksteder § , DJ Black ‡ , Heather Smallwood § , David G. Camp II † , and Thomas C. Squier § § Cell Biology and Biochemistry; † Biological Sciences Division Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 ‡ School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, Kansas City MO 64110 The goal of this research is to identify the molecular mechanisms by which cells adapt to low dose radiation exposure. Previously we have shown a radiation dependent increase of Calmodulin (CaM) in RAW 264.7 macrophages (RAW). Therefore we hypothesize that CaM and associated signaling complexes are sensors of low-dose radiation, resulting in alterations in energy metabolism and gene expression. The ultimate experimental goal

10

{sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Su Xiaoming [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Suzuki, Hiromi [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Omori, Katsunori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko [Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Advanced Engineering Services Company, Limited, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazu, Toru [Japan Space Forum, Tokyo (Japan); Ishioka, Noriaki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Space Environmental Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Ohnishi, Takeo, E-mail: tohnishi@naramed-u.ac.j [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

12

Effects of Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity Model Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity Model Gregory Nelson Loma Linda University Abstract It has long been appreciated that cells of the immune system are radiosensitive and use apoptosis as the primary mechanism of cell death following injury. The hypervariability of the immunoglobulin superfamily of genes expressed in lymphoid cells also led to the appreciation of the nonhomologous end joining mechanism of DNA repair. Clinically, whole body irradiation is used in treatment of some lymphomas and as an immunosuppressive agent for bone marrow transplants. Inflammation at sites of radiotherapy is a common side effect. Many studies with radiation have addressed the changes in cell populations following radiation exposure and have shown a reproducible pattern of relative sensitivities amongst

13

Medium-induced multi-photon radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the spectrum of multi-photon radiation off a fast quark in medium in the BDMPS/ASW approach. We reproduce the medium-induced one-photon radiation spectrum in dipole approximation, and go on to calculate the two-photon radiation in the Moli\\`{e}re limit. We find that in this limit the LPM effect holds for medium-induced two-photon ladder emission.

Ma, Hao; Tywoniuk, Konrad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radiation-induced gene responses  

SciTech Connect

In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Frequencies of Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Randomness of Chromosome Territory Locations Relative to One Another. Authors: RK Sachs,§ MN Cornforth,‡ KM Greulich-Bode,* L Hlatky, and DJ Brenner|| Institutions: §Department of Mathematics, University of California, ‡University of Texas Medical Branch, *Department of Skin Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center DFCI, Harvard Medical School, ||Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. Leukemogenesis, and perhaps carcinogenesis in general, often involves specific chromosome translocations. Radiation-induced chromosome translocation frequencies are strongly influenced by how close participating chromosomes are to one another in an interphase cell nucleus. We sought to determine whether chromosomes in human peripheral blood

16

Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

Rauch, Philipp J. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Park, Henry S. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Knisely, Jonathan P.S. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York (United States); Chiang, Veronica L. [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Vortmeyer, Alexander O., E-mail: alexander.vortmeyer@yale.edu [Departments of Pathology and Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radiation-Induced Effects on Microstructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irradiation of materials with particles that are sufficiently energetic to create atomic displacements can induce significant microstructural alteration, ranging from crystalline-to-amorphous phase transitions to the generation of large concentrations of point defect or solute aggregates in crystalline lattices. These microstructural changes typically cause significant changes in the physical and mechanical properties of the irradiated material. A variety of advanced microstructural characterization tools are available to examine the microstructural changes induced by particle irradiation, including electron microscopy, atom probe field ion microscopy, X-ray scattering and spectrometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and neutron scattering and spectrometry. Numerous reviews, which summarize the microstructural changes in materials associated with electron and heavy ion or neutron irradiation, have been published. These reviews have focused on pure metals as well as model alloys, steels, and ceramic materials. In this chapter, the commonly observed defect cluster morphologies produced by particle irradiation are summarized and an overview is presented on some of the key physical parameters that have a major influence on microstructural evolution of irradiated materials. The relationship between microstructural changes and evolution of physical and mechanical properties is then summarized, with particular emphasis on eight key radiation-induced property degradation phenomena. Typical examples of irradiated microstructures of metals and ceramic materials are presented. Radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of organic materials such as polymers are not discussed in this overview.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Radiation induced corrosion of steel; Strlningsinducerad korrosion av stl.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis was to investigate the influence of aqueous radiation induced oxidants on stainless steel. This was done by exposing the steel (more)

Nilsson, Oskar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Radiation-induced disruption of skeletal remodeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiation may be exacerbated by other skeletal challenges, such as those posed by aging and physical inactivity. Our central hypothesis is that radiation modulates subsequent...

20

Prevention of Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability with Clinically Relevant Non-Protein Thiols and Vitamin E.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prevention of Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability with Clinically Relevant Prevention of Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability with Clinically Relevant Non-Protein Thiols and Vitamin E. J.S. Murley 1 , Y. Kataoka 1 , W.F. Morgan 2 , and D.J. Grdina 1 . The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 1 , The University of Maryland Medical School, Baltimore, MD 2 Induced or delayed radioprotection is a novel phenomenon that shares many similarities with the low dose radiation-induced radiobiological phenomenon referred to as the adaptive response. Induced or delayed radioprotection is defined as an enhancement in the radiation resistance of cells at long times following their exposure to non-protein thiols (NPT) such as WR1065, the free thiol form of amifostine. This effect is the result of the induction of a cascade of intracellular

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Biological Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Epithelial Cell Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Basis for Radiation Adaptive Responses that Protect Against Bronchial Epithelial Cell Transformation Wenshu Chen, Xiuling Xu, Lang Bai, Mabel T. Padilla, Carmen Tellez, Katherine M. Gott, Shuguang Leng, Julie A. Wilder, Steven A. Belinsky, Bobby R. Scott and Yong Lin, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108 The major hypothesis in this project is that low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation stimulates an adaptive response that protects cells from neoplastic transformation involving modulation of paracrine factors (e.g., cytokines), cell survival/death signaling pathways, and reprogramming of the epigenome. To test this hypothesis, a validated, sensitive in vitro transformation model and a media transfer

22

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Ionizing Radiation-induced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

p53-directed, DNA damage response pathway. The p53 protein, activated indirectly by the ATM protein kinase, transactivates target genes and thus induces cell cycle progression...

23

Origins and consequences of radiation…induced centrosome aberrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation-induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar, Nisarg Shah, Ignacio Fernandez-Garcia, Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY. Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator

24

Low Dose Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations Found in Agouti...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations Found in Agouti Mouse Model Autumn Bernal Autumn Bernal Randy Jirtle Randy Jirtle In a paper published in The FASEB Journal, Low...

25

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Control of Repair and Adaptive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repair and Adaptive Responses to Low-level DNA Damage Repair and Adaptive Responses to Low-level DNA Damage James E. Haber Brandeis University Why This Project In order to fully understand mechanisms resulting in effects of low dose, whole system rather than cells must be examined. Although not identical to mammalian systems, simple systems usually have many similarities and give direction for further study of more complex systems. We use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a model system because it is easy to manipulate and its genome is simple and well characterized. Project Goals Examine mechanisms and effects of low dose radiation response for: Genetic recombination mechanisms that lead to genomic instability Genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low-dose radiation The adaptive response

26

Contrails and Induced Cirrus: Optics and Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the assessment of the current state of knowledge, areas of uncertainties, and recommendations for future efforts, regarding the optical and radiative properties of contrails and contrail cirrus, which have been reported in ...

Ping Yang; Gang Hong; Andrew E. Dessler; Steve S. C. Ou; Kuo-Nan Liou; Patrick Minnis; Harshvardhan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

CRASH: A BLOCK-ADAPTIVE-MESH CODE FOR RADIATIVE SHOCK HYDRODYNAMICS-IMPLEMENTATION AND VERIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

We describe the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code, a block-adaptive-mesh code for multi-material radiation hydrodynamics. The implementation solves the radiation diffusion model with a gray or multi-group method and uses a flux-limited diffusion approximation to recover the free-streaming limit. Electrons and ions are allowed to have different temperatures and we include flux-limited electron heat conduction. The radiation hydrodynamic equations are solved in the Eulerian frame by means of a conservative finite-volume discretization in either one-, two-, or three-dimensional slab geometry or in two-dimensional cylindrical symmetry. An operator-split method is used to solve these equations in three substeps: (1) an explicit step of a shock-capturing hydrodynamic solver; (2) a linear advection of the radiation in frequency-logarithm space; and (3) an implicit solution of the stiff radiation diffusion, heat conduction, and energy exchange. We present a suite of verification test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. The applications are for astrophysics and laboratory astrophysics. The CRASH code is an extension of the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a new radiation transfer and heat conduction library and equation-of-state and multi-group opacity solvers. Both CRASH and BATS-R-US are part of the publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework.

Van der Holst, B.; Toth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Myra, E. S.; Fryxell, B.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Powell, K. G. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Holloway, J. P. [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stout, Q. [Computer Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Karni, S. [Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hydrogen peroxide significantly contributes to radiation-induced genomic instability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- peroxide significantly contributes to radiation- induced genomic instability Disha Dayal 1 , Sean M. Martin 1 , Sujatha Venkataraman 1 , Charles L. Limoli 2 , Douglas R Spitz 1 . 1 Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA- 52246, 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of California, Irvine, CA-92697 Chronic metabolic oxidative stress is associated with genomic instability following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Mitochondria have long been known to be a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of causing oxidative stress. We hypothesized that radiation damages mitochondria, leading to oxidative stress and eventually genomic instability. This hypothesis is based on preliminary studies in parental

29

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

30

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Mechanisms of Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Relationships with Radiation Tumorigenesis Robert Ullrich Colorado State University Why This Project A combination of epidemiological, experimental, animal, and cellular molecular data is used in the estimation of tumor risk after low doses of low-LET radiation. Uncertainties are recognized in the interpretation of all these data sets, and recent findings concerning genomic instability in irradiated cells challenge the conventional view that induced DNA damage is expressed during the immediate post-irradiation cell cycle. These data on genomic instability are based largely upon studies of cell cultures the mechanisms involved and implications for tumor formation in living organisms remain unclear. Nevertheless, if induced genomic instability were

31

Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each 'planning scan' to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Kozak, Kevin [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Tolakanahalli, Ranjini [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ramasubramanian, V. [School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Paliwal, Bhudatt R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Low dose ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in ionizing radiation induces tumor growth promoting factors in stress-induced premature senescent fibroblasts David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Recent evidence suggest that the causes of cancer development are not limited to mutations within cancer cells, but also involve in alterations of cancer microenvironment. Senescent cells are irreversibly growth arrested, but remain metabolically active. Senescent cells, especially senescent fibroblasts in the stroma may provide a beneficial environment for tumor growth through secretion of certain factors. Accumulation of senescent cells in the stroma of patients repeatedly exposed to low doses of IR or low dose rates of IR, could be an important factor, causing alteration of the microenvironment that ultimately benefits tumor

33

Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Oxidative Stress Mediates Radiation Lung Injury by Inducing Apoptosis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Apoptosis in irradiated normal lung tissue has been observed several weeks after radiation. However, the signaling pathway propagating cell death after radiation remains unknown. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax. Pro-apoptotic signaling was evaluated 6 weeks after radiation with or without administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Results: Apoptosis was observed primarily in type I and type II pneumocytes and endothelium. Apoptosis correlated with increased PTEN expression, inhibition of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling, and increased p53 and Bax protein levels. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1, Nox4, and oxidative stress were also increased 6 weeks after radiation. Therapeutic administration of AEOL10150 suppressed pro-apoptotic signaling and dramatically reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Increased PTEN signaling after radiation results in apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. We hypothesize that upregulation of PTEN is influenced by Nox4-derived oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the role of PTEN in radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity.

Zhang Yu; Zhang Xiuwu; Rabbani, Zahid N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Jackson, Isabel L. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Vujaskovic, Zeljko, E-mail: vujas@radonc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Authors: B.E. Lehnert, R. Cary, D. Gadbois, and G. Gupta. Institutions: Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The scientific literature presents a confusing picture concerning health risks due to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), e.g., <1-10 cGy. Some effects of LDIR such as enhanced rates of cell proliferation and the induction of radioadaptation may be benign under some circumstances. Other evidence suggests LDIR can be hazardous and that a threshold for potentially detrimental responses, e.g., increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), increases in sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), alterations in gene or protein expression profiles, and increased

36

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Dimensional Adaptive Simulation of Shock-Induced Detonation in a Shock Tube P. Ravindran applications, primarily in propulsion.1 Detonations use a reacting flow mechanism wherein a strong shock wave of intense chemical re- actions. The leading shock causes a compression of the combustible mixture, which

Texas at Arlington, University of

37

Interlaboratory comparison of radiation-induced attenuation in optical fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of the losses induced in step index multimode, graded index multimode and single mode fibers by pulsed radiation exposure has been made among 12 laboratories over a period of 5 years. The recoveries of the incremental attenuations from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup 1} s are reported. Although a standard set of measurement parameters was attempted, differences between the laboratories are evident; possible origins for these are discussed. 18 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

Friebele, E.J.; Lyons, P.B.; Blackburn, J.C.; Henschel, H.; Johan, A.; Krinsky, J.A.; Robinson, A.; Schneider, W.; Smith, D.; Taylor, E.W. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (USA); Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Harry Diamond Labs., Adelphi, MD (USA); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Trendanalysen (INT), Euskirchen (Germany, F.R.); Direction des Recherches, Etudes et Techni

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Adaptive Breast Radiation Therapy Using Modeling of Tissue Mechanics: A Breast Tissue Segmentation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To validate and compare the accuracy of breast tissue segmentation methods applied to computed tomography (CT) scans used for radiation therapy planning and to study the effect of tissue distribution on the segmentation accuracy for the purpose of developing models for use in adaptive breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients receiving postlumpectomy radiation therapy for breast cancer underwent CT imaging in prone and supine positions. The whole-breast clinical target volume was outlined. Clinical target volumes were segmented into fibroglandular and fatty tissue using the following algorithms: physical density thresholding; interactive thresholding; fuzzy c-means with 3 classes (FCM3) and 4 classes (FCM4); and k-means. The segmentation algorithms were evaluated in 2 stages: first, an approach based on the assumption that the breast composition should be the same in both prone and supine position; and second, comparison of segmentation with tissue outlines from 3 experts using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Breast datasets were grouped into nonsparse and sparse fibroglandular tissue distributions according to expert assessment and used to assess the accuracy of the segmentation methods and the agreement between experts. Results: Prone and supine breast composition analysis showed differences between the methods. Validation against expert outlines found significant differences (P<.001) between FCM3 and FCM4. Fuzzy c-means with 3 classes generated segmentation results (mean DSC = 0.70) closest to the experts' outlines. There was good agreement (mean DSC = 0.85) among experts for breast tissue outlining. Segmentation accuracy and expert agreement was significantly higher (P<.005) in the nonsparse group than in the sparse group. Conclusions: The FCM3 gave the most accurate segmentation of breast tissues on CT data and could therefore be used in adaptive radiation therapy-based on tissue modeling. Breast tissue segmentation methods should be used with caution in patients with sparse fibroglandular tissue distribution.

Juneja, Prabhjot, E-mail: Prabhjot.Juneja@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Harris, Emma J. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kirby, Anna M. [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Evans, Philip M. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient absorption in optical fibers has been studied with emphasis on fast absorption components. Radiation damage was induced with a Febetron 706 electron accelerator, modified to deliver an electron pulse width of 1.1 ns. Dye lasers were synchronized to the accelerator to provide a light pulse through the fiber during the radiation pulse. The output light pulse was detected with a biplanar vacuum photodiode. Four scope traces were used on each electron pulse to monitor the Febetron output, the input drive pulse, and two records of the output pulse on two sweep speeds. Detailed data were acquired for times less than 100 ns after irradiation. An insulated enslosure was used to vary fiber temperature from -30/sup 0/C to + 250/sup 0/C. Several fibers were studied with emphasis on ITT T303 PCS fiber. Data were acquired at 600 and 850 nm. Theoretical modeling of the data is presented.

Looner, L.D.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Lyons, P.B.; Kelly, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).  

SciTech Connect

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E. [ITT Exelis Mission Systems, Colorado Springs, CO

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.  

SciTech Connect

We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

Preston, Eric F. (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO); Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur (ITT Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

NFkB in the Thiol-Induced Adaptive Response (A)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A) A) David Grdina The University of Chicago Abstract Exposure of cells to low non-lethal doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 10 cGy) or WR1065, the active free thiol form of amifostine, can induce pro-survival pathways that result in protection against the damaging effects of a 2 Gy dose of ionizing radiation. One such signaling pathway involves the activation of NFκB and the subsequent elevation of active manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2). SOD2 is a mitochondrial matrix protein that serves as the primary mitochondrial defense against superoxide formation. Its primary function is to facilitate the dismutation of two molecules of superoxide anion (O2-) produced by normal respiratory processes or following exposure to ionizing radiation into water and hydrogen peroxide. To characterize the role of SOD2 in the radiation- and

44

Radiation-induced solitary waves in hot plasmas of accretion disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the existence of radiation-induced solitary waves in hot plasmas of accretion disks depends on the radial temperature profile.

Fedor V. Prigara

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Role of ATM kinase in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATM kinase in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage response in human neural stemprogenitor cells and differentiated cell types Adayabalam Balajee Columbia University Medical...

46

NFkB-mediated Prosurvival Network in Low Dose Radiation-induced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approaches to improve normal tissue protection in caner radiation therapy. We found that ATM, a DNA damage sensor, is induced by LDR and responsible for activation of transcription...

47

Motion-induced radiation from electrons moving in Maxwell's fish-eye  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In \\u{C}erenkov radiation and transition radiation, evanescent wave from motion of charged particles transfers into radiation coherently. However, such dissipative motion-induced radiations require particles to move faster than light in medium or to encounter velocity transition to pump energy. Inspired by a method to detect cloak by observing radiation of a fast-moving electron bunch going through it by Zhang {\\itshape et al.}, we study the generation of electron-induced radiation from electrons' interaction with Maxwell's fish-eye sphere. Our calculation shows that the radiation is due to a combination of \\u{C}erenkov radiation and transition radiation, which may pave the way to investigate new schemes of transferring evanescent wave to radiation.

Liu, Yangjie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Radiation-induced attenuation of high-OH optical fibers after hydrogen treatment in the presence of ionizing radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High purity, high-OH, optical fibers were irradiated in a hydrogen atmosphere to explore hydrogen binding into defects created by the ionizing radiation. Significant improvements in subsequent measurements of radiation-induced attenuation were observed. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Lyons, P.B; Looney, L.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man  

SciTech Connect

We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

Haas, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Radiation induced strand breakage analyzed by tunel technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to fully characterize the effectiveness and limits of using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) technique for analysis of radiation induced strand breakage. If the TUNEL technique is found valuable, it could be applied to develop a biodosimetry protocol, primarily useful for individuals exposed in radiological accidents. Several techniques currently in use include fluorescent in-situ hybridization, the comet assay and the dicentric assay, yet each has drawbacks such as limited sensitivity or considerable preparation time. Recently, the TUNEL assay has been used in studies by Harvey and Ford (1997) to investigate chromatid breaks due to restriction enzymes. This research uses similar protocols to examine breaks due to radiation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cultured and exposed to X rays, receiving a dose ranging from 0 to 2 Gy. Slides were created using a standard metaphase chromosome preparation technique, followed by the TUNEL reaction to highlight chromosome breaks. The results were used to build a dose response curve. Although the expected increase in TUNEL positives per metaphase cell with increased x-ray dose was seen, large errors were associated with the results rendering TUNEL assay less than ideal for biodosimetry purposes. Additionally, TUNEL is not very effective at high doses because each TUNEL positive becomes indistinguishable from neighboring positives due to the high number of positives on each chromosome.

Reynolds, Marissa Dawn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

High LET radiatSpace Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ InducedEpithelial-Mesenchymal Transitionion can enhance TGFβ induced EMT and cross-talk with ATM pathways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Radiation Can Enhance the TGFβ Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Minli Wang 1 , Megumi Hada 1 , Janice Huff 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Jennifer Anderson 3 , Peter O'Neill 3 and Francis A. Cucinotta 4 1 USRA Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA, 3 Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology & Biology, University of Oxford, UK, 4 NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA TGFβ is a key modulator of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), important in cancer progression and metastasis, which involve classic Smad or non-Smad signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of epithelial genes and promoted expression of mesenchymal proteins. Ionizing radiation was found to specifically induce expression of

52

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology Abstract Both the ATM and TGFβ signal transduction pathways are essential for cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFβ signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. Numerous studies have linked the p38 MAPK signaling pathway with the ATM DNA damage response, and others have shown that TGFβ stimulation results in the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Our aim is to perturb potential crosstalk between ATM, TGFβ and p38 MAPK at the DNA damage level and

53

Transient radiation-induced absorption in the materials for a GSGG laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials used in the optical elements of a 1,061 m GSGG (gadolinium scandium gallium garnet) laser have been tested for transient radiation-induced absorption. The transient radiation-induced absorption in KK1, Schott S7005 and S7010, and M382 glasses have been determined for discrete wavelengths in the range 440--750 nm. Also, the transient radiation-induced absorption in {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} and MgO doped LiNbO{sub 3} has been measured at 1,061 nm. Mathematical expressions composed of exponentials are fitted to the data.

Brannon, P.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Origins and consequences of radiation–induced centrosome aberrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins and consequences of radiation–induced centrosome aberrations Origins and consequences of radiation–induced centrosome aberrations Sangeetha Vijayakumar New York University School of Medicine Abstract Centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in pre-neoplastic breast lesions and are known to drive chromosomal instability (Lingle et al., 2002). Previous studies from our lab have shown that human mammary epithelial cells exposed to low doses of radiation exhibit centrosome aberrations (CAs) in a dose dependent manner from 10-200 cGy (Maxwell et al., 2008). These data demonstrated that radiation-induced CAs actually precede and generate genomic instability and that TGFβ is a key mediator of genomic surveillance by eliminating genomically unstable cells through p53-dependent apoptosis. While high dose radiation has been shown to cause centrosome aberrations

55

Core-Collapse Supernovae Induced by Anisotropic Neutrino Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the important role of anisotropic neutrino radiation on the mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions. Through a new parameter study with a fixed radiation field of neutrinos, we show that prolate explosions caused by globally anisotropic neutrino radiation is the most effective mechanism of increasing the explosion energy when the total neutrino luminosity is given. This is suggestive of the fact that the expanding materials of SN 1987A has a prolate geometry.

Yuko Motizuki; Hideki Madokoro; Tetsuya Shimizu

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

56

Analysis of low dose radiation induced epigenetic modifications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

levels ofbiological organization when organisms are exposed to low doses (<0.1Gy) of irradiation.Recent work in determining the exact effects of low dose radiation have shown that...

57

Modulating radiation induced TGFB and ATM signaling in the DNA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TGF and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson 1 , Francis A. Cucinotta 2 and Peter O'Neill 1 1 Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology,...

58

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Cell type dependent radiation induced signaling and its effect on tissue regulation Marianne B. Sowa, Claere von Neubeck, R. Joe Robinson, Paula M. Koehler, Norman J. Karin, Xihai Wang, Katrina M. Waters and Harish Shankaran Ionizing radiation exposure triggers a cell signaling program which includes proliferation, the DNA damage response, and tissue remodeling. The activated signaling pathways lead to the induction of both protective effects as well as adverse consequences. A fundamental question is whether signaling cascades initiated by low doses are fundamentally different than those initiated by high doses. To address this question we have applied a systems biology approach to examine the radiation induced temporal responses of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model. Using microarray-

59

Characteristics of Radiation-Induced Basal Cell Skin Cancer in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in human hematopoietic cell transplant patients had shown that total body irradiation selectively induced basal cell carcinoma but not squamous cell carcinoma or...

60

Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs  

SciTech Connect

A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Profiling of MnSOD Interaction Proteins in Low-Dose Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proteins in Low-Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Response Angela Eldridge 1 , Ming Fan 1 , Demet Candas 1 , Brett Chromy, and Jian Jian Li 1 1 Department of Radiation...

62

A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism: Development of an NTCP Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Results: Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroid gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm{sup 3}). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. Conclusions: This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume.

Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Oosting, Sjoukje F. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A., E-mail: j.a.langendijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Radiation hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement and application to prestellar core collapse. I Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiative transfer has a strong impact on the collapse and the fragmentation of prestellar dense cores. We present the radiation-hydrodynamics solver we designed for the RAMSES code. The method is designed for astrophysical purposes, and in particular for protostellar collapse. We present the solver, using the co-moving frame to evaluate the radiative quantities. We use the popular flux limited diffusion approximation, under the grey approximation (one group of photon). The solver is based on the second-order Godunov scheme of RAMSES for its hyperbolic part, and on an implicit scheme for the radiation diffusion and the coupling between radiation and matter. We report in details our methodology to integrate the RHD solver into RAMSES. We test successfully the method against several conventional tests. For validation in 3D, we perform calculations of the collapse of an isolated 1 M_sun prestellar dense core, without rotation. We compare successfully the results with previous studies using different models for r...

Commercon, Benoit; Audit, Edouard; Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

LOW DOSE PHOTON RADIATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN T HELPER LYMPHOCYTES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LOW DOSE PHOTON RADIATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN T HELPER LYMPHOCYTES LOW DOSE PHOTON RADIATION-INDUCED CHANGES IN T HELPER LYMPHOCYTES Daila S. Gridley 1,2 , Asma Rizvi 2 , Xian Luo 1 , Adeola Y. Makinde 2 , Steve Rightnar 1 , Jian Tian 1 , Melba L. Andres 1 , James M. Slater 1 , and Michael J. Pecaut 1,2 Departments of 1 Radiation Medicine and 2 Biochemistry & Microbiology Loma Linda University and Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA 92354 USA Health risks due to protracted low dose irradiation remain unclear. This project investigates T helper (Th) lymphocyte function and the cellular milieu in which they reside under conditions of low dose, low- linear energy transfer (LET) radiation exposure. The Th cells are important because they secrete cytokines essential for generating optimal immune defenses against tumor, virus-infected, and other

65

Origin, adaptive radiation and diversification of the Hawaiian lobeliads (Asterales: Campanulaceae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provides corroboration for biogeo- graphic hypotheses, including (1) colonization of Kauai by Hawaiian that Platynini colonized the oldest high island of Kauai, with subsequent radiation throughout the present of Polynesia and Melanesia, plus New Zealand, New Caledonia, Australia, Indone- sia, the Philippines, and Japan

Sytsma, Kenneth J.

66

Implementing initial state radiation for lepton induced processes in AMEGIC++.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm 15 B. Program Parameters 17 1. Introduction Initial State Radiation (ISR) is the most important QED correction to the Born cross section. For instance, in the case of electron positron annihilations at energies beyond the Zthreshold it leads... . In this way, the correction term becomes several times as large as the Born term at the initial center of mass energy. Evidently, the effect of ISR is of great significance for the interpretation of experimental results. However, since initial state photons...

Schalicke, A; Krauss, F; Kuhn, R; Soff, G

67

Transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for the DOI laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report on a series of experiments concerned with transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for a Cr,Nd:GSGG laser. Both the Sandia National Laboratories SPR III pulsed reactor and the Hermes III pulsed X-ray machine are used as radiation sources. The time dependence and the magnitude of the induced absorption in filter glasses and in doped and undoped LiNbO{sub 3} Q-switch materials have been measured. Gain has been observed in Cr,Nd:GSGG, the laser medium, when it is irradiated by X-rays.

Brannon, P.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Stress-related phenomena in transient radiation-induced absorption in optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

The optical properties of materials can be modified by exposure to radiation and research to investigate these radiation-induced phenomena has intensified over the last several decades. The advent of optical fiber technology and the many applications of optical fiber for information transmission have sharply increased the interest in these investigations. Optical fibers present a long optical transmission path and that path may traverse different adverse environments, including radiation areas. The long tranmission path provides increased potential for interactions between the optical information signal and the optical medium. 10 refs., 10 figs.

Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.; Kelly, R.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Adaptive/Nonadaptive Proton Radiation Planning and Outcomes in a Phase II Trial for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze dosimetric variables and outcomes after adaptive replanning of radiation therapy during concurrent high-dose protons and chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Nine of 44 patients with stage III NSCLC in a prospective phase II trial of concurrent paclitaxel/carboplatin with proton radiation [74 Gy(RBE) in 37 fractions] had modifications to their original treatment plans after re-evaluation revealed changes that would compromise coverage of the target volume or violate dose constraints; plans for the other 35 patients were not changed. We compared patients with adaptive plans with those with nonadaptive plans in terms of dosimetry and outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up of 21.2 months (median overall survival, 29.6 months), no differences were found in local, regional, or distant failure or overall survival between groups. Adaptive planning was used more often for large tumors that shrank to a greater extent (median, 107.1 cm{sup 3} adaptive and 86.4 cm{sup 3} nonadaptive; median changes in volume, 25.3% adaptive and 1.2% nonadaptive; P<.01). The median number of fractions delivered using adaptive planning was 13 (range, 4-22). Adaptive planning generally improved sparing of the esophagus (median absolute decrease in V{sub 70}, 1.8%; range, 0%-22.9%) and spinal cord (median absolute change in maximum dose, 3.7 Gy; range, 0-13.8 Gy). Without adaptive replanning, target coverage would have been compromised in 2 cases (57% and 82% coverage without adaptation vs 100% for both with adaptation); neither patient experienced local failure. Radiation-related grade 3 toxicity rates were similar between groups. Conclusions: Adaptive planning can reduce normal tissue doses and prevent target misses, particularly for patients with large tumors that shrink substantially during therapy. Adaptive plans seem to have acceptable toxicity and achieve similar local, regional, and distant control and overall survival, even in patients with larger tumors, vs nonadaptive plans.

Koay, Eugene J.; Lege, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A squeezed state source using radiation pressure induced rigidity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an experiment to extract ponderomotive squeezing from an interferometer with high circulating power and low mass mirrors. In this interferometer, optical resonances of the arm cavities are detuned from the laser frequency, creating a mechanical rigidity that dramatically suppresses displacement noise. After taking into account imperfection of optical elements, laser noise, and other technical noise consistent with existing laser and optical technologies and typical laboratory environments, we expect the output light from the interferometer to have measurable squeezing of ~5 dB, with a frequency-independent squeeze angle for frequencies below 1 kHz. This squeeze source is well suited for injection into a gravitational-wave interferometer, leading to improved sensitivity from reduction in the quantum noise. Furthermore, this design provides an experimental test of quantum-limited radiation pressure effects, which have not previously been tested.

T. Corbitt; Y. Chen; F. Khalili; D. Ottaway; S. Vyatchanin; S. Whitcomb; N. Mavalvala

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Role of the area postrema in radiation-induced taste aversion learning and emesis in cats  

SciTech Connect

The role of the area postrema in radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning and the relationship between these behaviors were studied in cats. The potential involvement of neural factors which might be independent of the area postrema was minimized by using low levels of ionizing radiation (100 rads at a dose rate of 40 rads/min) to elicit a taste aversion, and by using body-only exposures (4500 and 6000 rads at 450 rads/min) to produce emesis. Lesions of the area postrema disrupted both taste aversion learning and emesis following irradiation. These results, which indicate that the area postrema is involved in the mediation of both radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning in cats under these experimental conditions, are interpreted as being consistent with the hypotheses that similar mechanisms mediate both responses to exposure to ionizing radiation, and that the taste aversion learning paradigm can therefore serve as a model system for studying radiation-induced emesis.

Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Chedester, A.L.; Lee, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Dysfunction Results From p53-Dependent Apoptosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer causes adverse secondary side effects in the salivary glands and results in diminished quality of life for the patient. A previous in vivo study in parotid salivary glands demonstrated that targeted head-and-neck irradiation resulted in marked increases in phosphorylated p53 (serine{sup 18}) and apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active mutant of Akt1 (myr-Akt1). Methods and Materials: Transgenic and knockout mouse models were exposed to irradiation, and p53-mediated transcription, apoptosis, and salivary gland dysfunction were analyzed. Results: The proapoptotic p53 target genes PUMA and Bax were induced in parotid salivary glands of mice at early time points after therapeutic radiation. This dose-dependent induction requires expression of p53 because no radiation-induced expression of PUMA and Bax was observed in p53-/- mice. Radiation also induced apoptosis in the parotid gland in a dose-dependent manner, which was p53 dependent. Furthermore, expression of p53 was required for the acute and chronic loss of salivary function after irradiation. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced in p53-/- mice, and their salivary function was preserved after radiation exposure. Conclusions: Apoptosis in the salivary glands after therapeutic head-and-neck irradiation is mediated by p53 and corresponds to salivary gland dysfunction in vivo.

Avila, Jennifer L. [Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Grundmann, Oliver; Burd, Randy [Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Limesand, Kirsten H. [Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)], E-mail: limesank@u.arizona.edu

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

74

Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LS-290 LS-290 Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets J. Alderman and P.K. Job APS Operations Division Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory R.C. Martin, C.M. Simmons, and G.D. Owen Californium User Facility for Neutron Science Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory J. Puhl Ionizing Radiation Division National Institute of Standards and Technology November 2000 work sponsored by U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Research 1 Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets J. Alderman and P.K. Job APS Operations Division Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory R.C. Martin, C.M. Simmons, and G. D. Owen Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

75

Radiation-induced transient attenuation of optical fibers at 800 and 1300 nm  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced absorption in optical fibers has been a subject of considerable interest throughout the world. As availability and applications of fibers have evolved from ''first window'' systems operating near 850 nm to ''second window'' systems near 1300 nm, interest in wavelength dependence of radiation effects in optical fibers has similarly evolved. The present work summarizes second-window, radiation-induced transient absorption measurements in optical fibers for times shorter than 5 ..mu..s. Comparisons to first window data for these fibers are also presented. Only high purity silica fibers with low-OH concentrations were used in the present study to avoid the large OH absorption band in this region. This paper also collects first window data on several high-OH optical fibers.

Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Wenrong Li 1, , Fang Li 1 , Qian Huang 1 , Jingping Shen 1 , Frank Wolf 1 , Yujun He 1 , Xinjian Liu 1 , Y. Angela Hu 1 , Joel. S. Bedford 5 , and Chuan-Yuan Li 1,2,* Departments of 1 Radiation Oncology, 2 Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA; 3 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA DNA double strand breaks are a major form of DNA damage and a key mechanism through which radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells. Despite its importance, measuring DNA double strand breaks is still a tedious task that is normally carried out by gel electrophoresis or immunofluorescence staining. Here we report a novel approach to image and

77

Effects of estrogen and gender on cataractogenesis induced by high-LET radiation  

SciTech Connect

Planning for long-duration manned lunar and interplanetary missions requires an understanding of radiation-induced cataractogenesis. Previously, it was demonstrated that low-linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation with 10 Gy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays resulted in an increased incidence of cataracts in male rats compared to female rats. This gender difference was not due to differences in estrogen, since male rats treated with the major secreted estrogen 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) showed an identical increase compared to untreated males. We now compare the incidence and rate of progression of cataracts induced by high-LET radiation in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received a single dose of 1 Gy of 600 MeV {sup 56}Fe ions. Lens opacification was measured at 2-4 week intervals with a slit lamp. The incidence and rate of progression of radiation-induced cataracts was significantly increased in the animals in which estrogen was available from endogenous or exogenous sources. Male rats with E2 capsules implanted had significantly higher rates of progression compared to male rats with empty capsules implanted (P = 0.025) but not compared to the intact female rats. These results contrast with data obtained after low-LET irradiation and suggest the possibility that the different types of damage caused by high- and low-LET radiation may be influenced differentially by steroid sex hormones.

Henderson, M.A.; Rusek, A.; Valluri, S.; Garrett, J.; Lopez, J.; Caperell-Grant, A.; Mendonca, M.; Bigsby, R.; Dynlacht, J.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Late Tissue Toxicity: Pilot Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the use of advanced ultrasonic imaging to quantitatively evaluate normal-tissue toxicity in breast-cancer radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighteen breast cancer patients who received radiation treatment were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical study. Radiotherapy involved a radiation dose of 50.0 to 50.4 Gy delivered to the entire breast, followed by an electron boost of 10.0 to 16.0 Gy delivered to the tumor bed. Patients underwent scanning with ultrasound during follow-up, which ranged from 6 to 94 months (median, 22 months) postradiotherapy. Conventional ultrasound images and radio-frequency (RF) echo signals were acquired from treated and untreated breasts. Three ultrasound parameters, namely, skin thickness, Pearson coefficient, and spectral midband fit, were computed from RF signals to measure radiation-induced changes in dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue, respectively. Ultrasound parameter values of the treated breast were compared with those of the untreated breast. Ultrasound findings were compared with clinical assessment using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late-toxicity scores. Results: Significant changes were observed in ultrasonic parameter values of the treated vs. untreated breasts. Average skin thickness increased by 27.3%, from 2.05 {+-} 0.22mm to 2.61 {+-} 0.52mm; Pearson coefficient decreased by 31.7%, from 0.41 {+-} 0.07 to 0.28 {+-} 0.05; and midband fit increased by 94.6%, from -0.92 {+-} 7.35 dB to 0.87 {+-} 6.70 dB. Ultrasound evaluations were consistent with RTOG scores. Conclusions: Quantitative ultrasound provides a noninvasive, objective means of assessing radiation-induced changes to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. This imaging tool will become increasingly valuable as we continue to improve radiation therapy technique.

Liu Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhou Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Yoshida, Emi J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Woodhouse, Shermian A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Schiff, Peter B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Wang, Tony J.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Lu Zhengfeng; Pile-Spellman, Eliza [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zhang Pengpeng [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kutcher, Gerald J. [Department of History, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

High and Low LET Radiation Differentially Induce Normal Tissue Damage Signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiotherapy using high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is aimed at efficiently killing tumor cells while minimizing dose (biological effective) to normal tissues to prevent toxicity. It is well established that high LET radiation results in lower cell survival per absorbed dose than low LET radiation. However, whether various mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be regulated differentially is not known. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate whether two actions related to normal tissue toxicity, p53-induced apoptosis and expression of the profibrotic gene PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1), are differentially induced by high and low LET radiation. Methods and Materials: Cells were irradiated with high LET carbon ions or low LET photons. Cell survival assays were performed, profibrotic PAI-1 expression was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and apoptosis was assayed by annexin V staining. Activation of p53 by phosphorylation at serine 315 and serine 37 was monitored by Western blotting. Transfections of plasmids expressing p53 mutated at serines 315 and 37 were used to test the requirement of these residues for apoptosis and expression of PAI-1. Results: As expected, cell survival was lower and induction of apoptosis was higher in high -LET irradiated cells. Interestingly, induction of the profibrotic PAI-1 gene was similar with high and low LET radiation. In agreement with this finding, phosphorylation of p53 at serine 315 involved in PAI-1 expression was similar with high and low LET radiation, whereas phosphorylation of p53 at serine 37, involved in apoptosis induction, was much higher after high LET irradiation. Conclusions: Our results indicate that diverse mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be differentially affected by high and low LET radiation. This may have consequences for the development and manifestation of normal tissue damage.

Niemantsverdriet, Maarten [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Goethem, Marc-Jan van [Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bron, Reinier; Hogewerf, Wytse [Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A.; Luijk, Peter van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P., E-mail: r.p.coppes@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Relation between measurable and principal characteristics of radiation-induced shape-change of graphite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of studies of radiation-induced shape-change of reactor graphite GR-280, through the series of measurements of samples with different orientation of cutting with respect to the direction of extrusion, a conclusion is made about the existence of polycrystal substructural elements - domains. Domains, like graphite as a whole, possess the property of transverse isotropy, but have different amplitudes of shape-change and random orientations of the axes of axial symmetry. The model of graphite, constructed on the basis of the concept of domains allowed to explain from a unified point of view most of existing experimental data. It is shown that the presence of the disoriented domain structure leads to the development of radiation-induced stresses and to the dependence of the shape-change on the size of graphite samples. We derive the relation between the shape-change of finite size samples and the actual shape-change of macro-graphite.

M. V. Arjakov; A. V. Subbotin; S. V. Panyukov; O. V. Ivanov; A. S. Pokrovskii; D. V. Kharkov

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System Yanrong Su, Jarah Meador and Adayabalam S. Balajee Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West, 168th Street, New York, NY 10032. Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) inflicts a wide variety of lesions in the genomic DNA. Among them, DNA double strand break (DSB) is considered to be the critical lesion for most of the deleterious radiation effects including carcinogenesis. Much of our knowledge on induction and repair kinetics of DSB has come from studies in two dimensional cell culture systems. However, the damage signaling and repair responses to DSB in tissue microenvironment are largely unknown. Knowledge of tissue responses to

82

Prepulse effect on laser-induced water-window radiation from a liquid nitrogen jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is schematically shown in Fig. 1. A high-purity nitrogen gas was cooled and liquefied through the cooling stagesPrepulse effect on laser-induced water-window radiation from a liquid nitrogen jet J. Son,a M. Cho.3­4.4 nm x ray from a liquid nitrogen jet. It is observed that a prepulse of only 2 mJ enhances

Kim, Jae-Hoon

83

Gamma knife radiosurgery of radiation-induced intracranial tumors: Local control, outcomes, and complications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine local control (LC) and complication rates for patients who underwent radiosurgery for radiation-induced intracranial tumors. Methods and Materials: Review of a prospectively maintained database (2,714 patients) identified 16 patients (20 tumors) with radiation-induced tumors treated with radiosurgery between 1990 and 2004. Tumor types included typical meningioma (n = 17), atypical meningioma (n = 2), and schwannoma (n 1). Median patient age at radiosurgery was 47.5 years (range, 27-70 years). The median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-20 Gy). Median follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 10.8-146.2 months). Time-to-event outcomes were calculated with Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Three-year and 5-year LC rates were 100%. Three-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 92% and 80%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 100%. Three patients died: 1 had in-field progression 65.1 months after radiosurgery and later died of the tumor, 1 died of progression of a preexisting brain malignancy, and 1 died of an unrelated cause. One patient had increased seizure activity that correlated with development of edema seen on neuroimaging. Conclusions: LC, survival, and complication rates in our series are comparable to those in previous reports of radiosurgery for intracranial meningiomas. Also, LC rates with radiosurgery are at least comparable to those of surgical series for radiation-induced meningiomas. Radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for radiation-induced intracranial tumors, most of which are typical meningiomas.

Jensen, Ashley W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Garces, Yolanda I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Foote, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Gorman, Deborah A. [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Schomberg, Paula J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

Hausladen, Paul [ORNL; Blessinger, Christopher S [ORNL; Guzzardo, Tyler [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Introduction of bifunctional group onto MWNT by radiation-induced graft polymerization and its use as biosensor-supporting materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A biosensor comprising tyrosinase immobilized on bifunctionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) supports was prepared for the detection of phenolic compounds in drinks such as red wine and juices. The MWNT supports were prepared by radiation-induced ...

Yu-Jin Lee; Da-Jung Chung; Sang-Hyub Oh; Seong-Ho Choi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Radiation Induced Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Late-S/G2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Late-S/G2 Induced Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Late-S/G2 Cells: Roles of Homologous Recombination and Non-Homologous End Joining Joel Bedford Colorado State University Abstract There has been considerable discussion, with some data reported, addressing the question of the relative contributions of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR) on the repair or rejoining of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks, especially in relation to their operation during the cell cycle. Reports have included studies on chromosomal aberration induction in G1/G0 cells defective in NHEJ or A-T cells, for example, but relatively little on S/G2 cells and especially on mutants defective in HRR. The broad biological importance of

87

Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Influence of induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches  

SciTech Connect

The influence of an induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches is investigated. An axial magnetic field was induced in a novel Z-pinch load: a double planar wire array with skewed wires (DPWAsk), which represents a planar wire array in an open magnetic configuration. The induced axial magnetic field suppressed magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities (with m = 0 and m = 1 instability modes) in the Z-pinch plasma. The influence of the initial axial magnetic field on the structure of the plasma column at stagnation was manifested through the formation of a more uniform plasma column compared to a standard double planar wire array (DPWA) load [V. L. Kantsyrev et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 030704 (2008)]. The DPWAsk load is characterized by suppression of MRT instabilities and by the formation of the sub-keV radiation pulse that occurs before the main x-ray peak. Gradients in plasma parameters along the cathode-anode gap were observed and analyzed for DPWAsk loads made from low atomic number Z (Al) and mid-Z (brass) wires.

Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Velikovich, A. L. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Rudakov, L. I. [Icarus Research Inc., Bethesda, Maryland 20824 (United States); Williamson, K. M. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory, Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi, TX 78412 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

ORIGINAL PAPER A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incidence among the Chernobyl emergency workers residing in Russia: estimation of radiation risks. Radiat

90

Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Radiation-induced cancer and its modifying factor among A-bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, have conducted a long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 120,000 atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors and non-exposed controls since 1950. The most recent findings regarding cancer mortality and incidence in this cohort can be briefly summarized as follows: 1) An increase in leukemia mortality among A-bomb survivors peaked 5-6 years after the bombing and has decreased with time thereafter. In addition to leukemia, the incidence of cancer of the lung, breast, esophagus, stomach, colon, thyroid, ovary, urinary tract, and multiple myeloma increases with dose. At present, there is no indication of an increase in cancer of the rectum or uterus among A-bomb survivors. In general, radiation-induced solid cancers begin to appear after the age at which they are normally prone to develop, and have continued to increase with time in proportion to the natural increase in mortality of the control group. 2) There are factors which modify the effects of radiation, such as age at the time of bombing (ATB) and sex. Sensitivity to radiation, in terms of cancer induction, is higher for persons who were young ATB in general, than for those who were older ATB. 3) There was no increase in childhood cancer among those exposed while in utero, but there is a recent indication of an increase in cancer incidence among these persons as they age. 4) There seems to be no interaction in a multiplicative way between radiation and smoking and lung cancer induction.

Kato, H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Cherenkov Radiation from e+e- Pairs and Its Effect on nu e Induced Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5] J. V. Jelley, Cherenkov Radiation and its applications (calculated the Cherenkov radiation from e + e ? pairs as a? 2 [1?? 2 ?(?)]), the radiation is suppressed compared to

Mandal, Sourav K.; Klein, Spencer R.; Jackson, J. David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Mechanism underlying mTOR-associated Protection in Low Dose Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low-dose radiation-induced adaptive resistance. Oncogene 27: 6738-6748. 2. Gwinn DM, Shackelford DB, Egan DF, Mihaylova MM, Mery A, Vasquez DS, Turk BE, and Shaw RJ. (2008). AMPK...

94

TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan, E-mail: gsunav@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Schrott, Lisa [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)] [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Caldito, Gloria [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

European Integrated Project RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Project RISC-RAD Integrated Project RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiations Laure Sabatier 1 , L.H.F Mullenders 2 , Mike Atkinson 3 , Simon Bouffler 4 , Herwig Paretzke 5 1 Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, CEA, 18 route du panorama BP6 92265 Fontenay-aux- Roses, France 2 LUMC, Department of Toxicogenetics, Postal Zone S-4-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands 3 GSF- Institute of Pathology, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg Germany 4 HPA Radiation Protection Division, Centre for Radiation Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Chilton, UK 5 GSF- Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, Neuherberg, D-85764 Germany In radiological protection, the risks of inducing stochastic health effects (largely cancer) by a

96

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Slide Shows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Health Effects of Radiation Health Effects of Radiation Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation PDF Background Radiation PDF Bystander Effects PDF Dirty Bombs PDF DNA Damage...

97

Pilot Study Of Impedance-controlled Microcurrent Therapy For Managing Radiation-induced Fibrosis In Head-and-neck Cancer Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pilot Study Of Impedance-controlled Microcurrent Therapy For Managing Radiation-induced Fibrosis In Head-and-neck Cancer Patients

Lennox, A J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization  

SciTech Connect

In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ortho-para forms of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium: radiation and self-induced conversion kinetics and equilibria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The theory of the ortho-para transitions in H/sub 2/, D/sub 2/, and T/sub 2/ is developed. Experimental and calculated values of the ortho-para compositions of the three hydrogen isotopes mentioned in the literature are correlated as a function of temperature, and are discussed critically. The kinetics of the radiation and self-induced ortho-para transitions are reviewed. In general, the radiation-induced transitions are more rapid than the self-induced transitions. We estimate (based on data for other systems) that the ..beta..-ray-induced ortho-para transitions in liquid D/sub 2/ or T/sub 2/ would be fast, with a half time on the order of a few minutes. Experiments are proposed to study these transitions in the liquid phase using infrared spectroscopy.

Pyper, J.W.; Briggs, C.K.

1977-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mechanisms of Low Dose Radiation-induced T helper Cell Function  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to radiation above levels normally encountered on Earth can occur during wartime, accidents such as those at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, and detonation of dirty bombs by terrorists. Relatively high levels of radiation exposure can also occur in certain occupations (low-level waste sites, nuclear power plants, nuclear medicine facilities, airline industry, and space agencies). Depression or dysfunction of the highly radiosensitive cells of the immune system can lead to serious consequences, including increased risk for infections, cancer, hypersensitivity reactions, poor wound healing, and other pathologies. The focus of this research was on the T helper (Th) subset of lymphocytes that secrete cytokines (proteins), and thus control many actions and interactions of other cell types that make up what is collectively known as the immune system. The Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Program is concerned with mechanisms altered by exposure to high energy photons (x- and gamma-rays), protons and electrons. This study compared, for the first time, the low-dose effects of two of these radiation forms, photons and protons, on the response of Th cells, as well as other cell types with which they communicate. The research provided insights regarding gene expression patterns and capacity to secrete potent immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive cytokines, some of which are implicated in pathophysiological processes. Furthermore, the photon versus proton comparison was important not only to healthy individuals who may be exposed, but also to patients undergoing radiotherapy, since many medical centers in the United States, as well as worldwide, are now building proton accelerators. The overall hypothesis of this study was that whole-body exposure to low-dose photons (gamma-rays) will alter CD4+ Th cell function. We further proposed that exposure to low-dose proton radiation will induce a different pattern of gene and functional changes compared to photons. Over the course of this research, tissues other than spleens were archived and with funding obtained from other sources, including the Department of Radiation Medicine at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, some additional assays were performed. Furthermore, groups of additional mice were included that were pre-exposed to low-dose photons before irradiating with acute photons, protons, and simulated solar particle event (SPE) protons. Hence, the original support together with the additional funding for our research led to generation of much valuable information that was originally not anticipated. Some of the data has already resulted in published articles, manuscripts in review, and a number of presentations at scientific conferences and workshops. Difficulties in reliable and reproducible quantification of secreted cytokines using multi-plex technology delayed completion of this study for a period of time. However, final analyses of the remaining data are currently being performed and should result in additional publications and presentations in the near future. Some of the most notable conclusions, thus far, are briefly summarized below: - Distribution of leukocytes were dependent upon cell type, radiation quality, body compartment analyzed, and time after exposure. Low-dose protons tended to have less effect on numbers of major leukocyte populations and T cell subsets compared to low-dose photons. - The patterns of gene and cytokine expression in CD4+ T cells after protracted low-dose irradiation were significantly modified and highly dependent upon the total dose and time after exposure. - Patterns of gene and cytokine expression differed substantially among groups exposed to low-dose photons versus low-dose protons; differences were also noted among groups exposed to much higher doses of photons, protons, and simulated SPE protons. - Some measurements indicated that exposure to low-dose photon radiation, especially 0.01 Gy, significantly normalized at least some adverse effects of simulated SPE protons, thereby suggesting that this l

Gridley, Daila S.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Radiation damage induced by GeV electrons in W-Re and Cu targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 UCRL-JC-148049 July 2002 Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes Radiation Damage Induced by GeV Electrons in W-Re Targets for Next Generation Linear Colliders M.-J. Caturla 1* , S. Roesler 2 , V. K. Bharadwaj 3 , D. C. Schultz 3 , J. C. Sheppard 3 , J. Marian 1 , B. D. Wirth 1 , W. Stein 1 and A. Sunwoo 1 1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA 2 CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland 3 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Menlo Park, California s: We have studied the structural damage of W-Re targets produced by electrons with energies of several GeV and under different conditions of total number of electrons, beam shape and target depth. We report the differences in damage levels for different designs considered in the construction of the next generation of linear accelerators, and discuss the possible effects in the lifetime

102

Picosecond radiation-induced current transients in digital GaAs MESFETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Picosecond-resolution measurements of the current transients produced when energetic ions (alpha particles) interact with high-speed digital GaAs MESFETs are presented. Measurements as a function of device bias and temperature reveal the presence of several different contributions to the charge-collection transients, ranging in time scale from picoseconds to microseconds. The effects of permanent radiation damage are found to degrade device performance to the extent that reliable measurement of the ion-induced transients is difficult and, in many cases, impossible. The use of above-bandgap picosecond laser excitation is revealed to be a viable alternative to the use of heavy ions for characterization of the charge-collection dynamics in semiconductor devices.

McMorrow, D.; Campbell, A.B.; Knudson, A.R.; Weatherford, T.R.

1992-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

103

Radiation-induced surface degradation of GaAs and high electron mobility transistor structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transistor heterostructures with high-carrier-mobility have been studied. It is shown that, as the {gamma}-irradiation dose {Phi} increases, their degradation occurs in the following sequence. (i) At {Phi} 0.2-eV decrease in the diffusion energy of intrinsic defects and, probably, atmospheric oxygen. (ii) At {Phi} > 10{sup 7} rad, highly structurally disordered regions larger than 1 {mu}m are formed near microscopic defects or dislocations. (iii) At {Phi} > 10{sup 8} rad, there occurs degradation of the internal AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs interfaces and the working channel. An effective method for studying the degradation processes in heterostructures is to employ a set of structural diagnostic methods to analyze processes of radiation-induced and aging degradation, in combination with theoretical simulation of the occurring processes.

Bobyl, A. V.; Konnikov, S. G.; Ustinov, V. M.; Baidakova, M. V.; Maleev, N. A.; Sakseev, D. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Konakova, R. V., E-mail: konakova@isp.kiev.ua; Milenin, V. V.; Prokopenko, I. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Analysis of time-dependent radiation-induced conductivity in dielectrics and effect on cable SGEMP  

SciTech Connect

Analytic and numerical solutions are presented for a simple time-dependent solid-state band model of radiation-induced conductivity in polyethelene and Teflon. The analytic solution is found to provide insight to physical processes dominant in various intervals of time throughout the radiation pulse. The numerical solution provides a representation for the dose-dependent proportionality factor F(..gamma..), proposed by van Lint et al, used to calculate prompt conductivity from sigma/rho/ = F(..gamma..)..gamma... At high doses, F(..gamma..) is an order of magnitude smaller than at low doses. This decrease of F(..gamma..) is due to bimolecular recombination, an effect apparently not previously reported experimentally. The reduction in F(..gamma..) at high doses is shown to enhance the short circuit current for a cable SGEMP model of residual gaps by a factor of three. In addition, the dose-dependent behavior of F(..gamma..) can significantly alter the shape and time of occurrence of the peak of the waveform of this short circuit current compared to corresponding results for a dose-independent factor.

Shaeffer, D.L.; Siegel, J.M.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Radiation-induced lung injury using a pig model: Evaluation by high-resolution computed tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the early phase of radiation-induced lung injury using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) under experimental conditions and to perform precise CT-pathologic correlation. Five Yorkshire pigs received a single dose of 12.5 Gy to the right lower lung. Computed tomographic images were obtained at 2-week intervals. The animals were killed after follow-up periods of 4-16 weeks. The lungs were removed, inflated, fixed, dried, and sliced corresponding to the CT sections. Computed tomography, specimen radiography, and histologic findings were correlated. Various CT findings were observed during the first 16 weeks, including ground-glass opacity, discrete consolidation, patchy consolidation, thickened interlobular septum, and bronchovascular bundle. Ground-glass opacity was associated with thickened alveolar wall and scattered tiny fibrotic foci. Thickened interlobular septum and bronchovascular bundle were the results of fibrosis adjacent to these structures. Discrete consolidation correlated with intraalveolar edema with hemorrhage and infiltration of inflammatory cells. High-resolution CT correlated well with pathology of the lung due to radiation injury as verified by precise radiologic-pathologic correlation. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Takahashi, Masashi; Balazs, G.; Moskowitz, G.W.; Palestro, C.J.; Eacobacci, T.; Khan, A.; Herman, P.G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations after Low and High LET Irradiations  

SciTech Connect

Epigenetics, including DNA methylation and microRNA (miRNA) expression, could be the missing link in understanding the delayed, non-targeted effects of radiation including radiationinduced genomic instability (RIGI). This study tests the hypothesis that irradiation induces epigenetic aberrations, which could eventually lead to RIGI, and that the epigenetic aberrations induced by low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation are different than those induced by high LET irradiations. GM10115 cells were irradiated with low LET x-rays and high LET iron (Fe) ions and evaluated for DNA damage, cell survival and chromosomal instability. The cells were also evaluated for specific locus methylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF?B), tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) and cadherin 1 (CDH1) gene promoter regions, long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and Alu repeat element methylation, CpG and non-CpG global methylation and miRNA expression levels. Irradiated cells showed increased micronucleus induction and cell killing immediately following exposure, but were chromosomally stable at delayed times post-irradiation. At this same delayed time, alterations in repeat element and global DNA methylation and miRNA expression were observed. Analyses of DNA methylation predominantly showed hypomethylation, however hypermethylation was also observed. MiRNA shown to be altered in expression level after x-ray irradiation are involved in chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. Different and higher incidence of epigenetic changes were observed after exposure to low LET x-rays than high LET Fe ions even though Fe ions elicited more chromosomal damage and cell killing. This study also shows that the irradiated cells acquire epigenetic changes even though they are chromosomally stable suggesting that epigenetic aberrations may arise in the cell without initiating RIGI.

Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

Yoon, Myonggeun, E-mail: mxy131@ncc.re.k [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Space-radiation-induced point defect formation in optical materials. Ph.D. Thesis  

SciTech Connect

One of the central problems man has faced in his exploration of space is the long and short term effects of the space environment on the performance of spacecraft systems. The results presented in this dissertation represent the first time a definite connection has been made between the space-induced damage of optical systems and the microscopic mechanisms of point defect formation that lead to the damage. Point defect formation was observed in two, and possibly three different optical materials subjected to short-duration space exposure. Three calcium fluoride, two lithium fluoride, and three magnesium fluoride samples were flown on Space Shuttle flight STS-46 as part of the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials - Third Phase experiment. Pre-flight and post-flight optical absorption measurements were performed on all of the samples. With the possible exception of the magnesium fluoride samples, every sample clearly showed the formation of F-centers in that section of the sample that was exposed to the low earth orbit environment. Analysis of the flight samples and laboratory experiments on control samples identify solar vacuum ultraviolet radiation as the most probable primary cause of the defect formation.

Allen, J.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Ionizing radiation induces IL-6-production by human fibroblasts involving activation of nuclear factor-. kappa. B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report that human lung fibroblasts respond to X-ray treatment with release of interleukin (IL) -6. Synthesis of IL-6 upon ionizing radiation is preceded by an increase of IL-6 transcript levels resulting from transcriptional activation of the IL-6 gene. Analysis of deleted fragments of the IL-6 promoter revealed that transcriptional induction of the IL-6 promoter is due to enhanced binding activity of the transcription factor NF-kB. Although AP-1 does not participate in the rapid induction of the IL-6 promoter its binding activity is also enhanced upon XRT. In contrast to binding kinetics observed with NF-kB, AP-1 binding upon XRT. In contrast to binding kinetics observed with NF-kB- and the AP-1 recognition sequence, conferred inducibility by XRT to a heterologous promoter, with reporter gene activity being maximal 24 hours or 48 hours upon XRT, respectively. Sequential activation of two distinct transcription factors might thus contribute to synchronize transcriptional activation of different genes participating in the X-ray response.

Brach, M.A.; Gruss, H.J.; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Asano, Yoshinobu; Vos, Sven de; Mertelsmann, R.; Hirano, Toshio; Herrmann, F. (Univ. of Freiburg (Germany) Osaka Univ. (Japan))

1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cloud-Induced Infrared Radiative Heating and Its Implications for Large-Scale Tropical Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional global distributions of longwave radiative cooling for the summer of 1988 and the winter of 1989 are generated from radiative transfer calculations using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts temperature and ...

Byung-Ju Sohn

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Regulation of NF-kB and MnSOD in Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NF-kB and MnSOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive NF-kB and MnSOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana Why this Project? To determine if low dose ionizing radiation-induced adaptive responses in skin cells are mediated by activation of signaling networks. Project Goals To evaluate the signaling networks involving transcription factor NF-kB and the mitochondrial antioxidant protein MnSOD. To determine if NF-kB is activated by low dose radiation in vivo. To determine if NF-kB activation is critical in the pathways that produce adaptive responses. Experimental Approach Cells transfected with NF-kB luciferase responder genes will be used to define a dose-response relationship for activation of the NF-kB gene. NF-kB

114

Combining Physical and Biologic Parameters to Predict Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the plasma dynamics of 5 proinflammatory/fibrogenic cytokines, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-{beta}1) to ascertain their value in predicting radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), both individually and in combination with physical dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatments of patients receiving definitive conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) on clinical trial for inoperable stages I-III lung cancer were prospectively evaluated. Circulating cytokine levels were measured prior to and at weeks 2 and 4 during RT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT, defined as grade 2 and higher radiation pneumonitis or symptomatic pulmonary fibrosis. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Results: Of 58 eligible patients, 10 (17.2%) patients developed RILT. Lower pretreatment IL-8 levels were significantly correlated with development of RILT, while radiation-induced elevations of TGF-ss1 were weakly correlated with RILT. Significant correlations were not found for any of the remaining 3 cytokines or for any clinical or dosimetric parameters. Using receiver operator characteristic curves for predictive risk assessment modeling, we found both individual cytokines and dosimetric parameters were poor independent predictors of RILT. However, combining IL-8, TGF-ss1, and mean lung dose into a single model yielded an improved predictive ability (P<.001) compared to either variable alone. Conclusions: Combining inflammatory cytokines with physical dosimetric factors may provide a more accurate model for RILT prediction. Future study with a larger number of cases and events is needed to validate such findings.

Stenmark, Matthew H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shangdong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China); Ritter, Timothy [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Radiation-induced changes in the cuticular hydrocarbons of the granary weevil and their relationship to desiccation and adult mortality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation from the nuclear waste products, such as Cesium-137, offers a scope and could be used for large scale disinfestation of grain. It is known that 0.15 to 0.20 kGy dose of gamma radiation is sufficient to kill insects in grain and grain products. However, the mode of action (in terms of lethal effects) is not understood. The purpose of this project, therefore, is to study the ways in which gamma radiation causes death in the granary weevil. Sitophilus granarius (L.) is a major and cosmopolitan pest of stored grain all over the world. Radiation damage, in particular the specific effects on the physiology of the insects exposed to radiation has been elucidated. In stored grain insects, conservation of water is a critical factor for their survival. Epicuticular hydrocarbons play an important role in water proofing. The laboratory rearing of the granary weevil was standardized so that large numbers of weevils of known ages could be produced for experimentation. Stock cultures were maintained at 27 {plus minus} 2{degree}C and 65 {plus minus} 5% R.H. Tests with various age groups (adults) and different doses of gamma radiation indicate that lethal effects are both age and dose related. Younger weevils, in general, survive for a longer period after irradiation compared to older weevils. Complete mortality results within about two weeks after exposure to gamma radiation at dose of 0.15 kGy or above. Data on wet and dry weights of the weevils kept at different (low, medium and higher) levels of humidity after irradiation indicate that gamma radiation induces greater water loss leading to desiccation and early death. Low humidity environment (17% R.H.) greatly accelerates lethal effects.

Sriharan, S. (Selma Univ., AL (USA). Div. of Natural and Applied Sciences)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Quantification of radiation induced crosslinking in a commercial, toughened silicone rubber, TR-55, by 1H MQ-NMR  

SciTech Connect

Radiation induced degradation in a commercial, filled silicone composite has been studied by SPME/GC-MS, DMA, DSC, swelling, and Multiple Quantum NMR. Analysis of volatile and semivolatile species indicates degradation via decomposition of the peroxide curing catalyst and radiation induced backbiting reactions. DMA, swelling, and spin-echo NMR analysis indicate a increase in crosslink density of near 100% upon exposure to a cumulative dose of 250 kGray. Analysis of the sol-fraction via Charlseby-Pinner analysis indicates a ratio of chain scission to crosslinking yields of 0.38, consistent with the dominance of the crosslinking observed by DMA, swelling and spin-echo NMR and the chain scissioning reactions observed by MS analysis. Multiple Quantum NMR has revealed a bimodal distribution of residual dipolar couplings near 1 krad/sec and 5 krad/sec in an approximately 90:10 ratio, consistent with bulk network chains and chains associated with the filler surface. Upon exposure to radiation, the mean {Omega}{sub d} for both domains and the width of both domains both increased. The MQ NMR analysis provided increase insight into the effects of ionizing radiation on the network structure of silicone polymers.

Maxwell, R; Chinn, S; Alviso, C; Harvey, C A; Giuliani, J; Wilson, T; Cohenour, R

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Reproductive Status at First Diagnosis Influences Risk of Radiation-Induced Second Primary Contralateral Breast Cancer in the WECARE Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Our study examined whether reproductive and hormonal factors before, at the time of, or after radiation treatment for a first primary breast cancer modify the risk of radiation-induced second primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The Women's Environmental, Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) Study is a multicenter, population-based study of 708 women (cases) with asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and 1399 women (controls) with unilateral breast cancer. Radiotherapy (RT) records, coupled with anthropomorphic phantom simulations, were used to estimate quadrant-specific radiation dose to the contralateral breast for each patient. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed to assess the relationship between reproductive factors and risk of CBC. Results: Women who were nulliparous at diagnosis and exposed to {>=}1 Gy to the contralateral breast had a greater risk for CBC than did matched unexposed nulliparous women (RR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0). No increased risk was seen in RT-exposed parous women (RR = 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8-1.4). Women treated with RT who later became pregnant (8 cases and 9 controls) had a greater risk for CBC (RR = 6.0; 95% CI, 1.3-28.4) than unexposed women (4 cases and 7 controls) who also became pregnant. The association of radiation with risk of CBC did not vary by number of pregnancies, history of breastfeeding, or menopausal status at the time of first breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusion: Nulliparous women treated with RT were at an increased risk for CBC. Although based on small numbers, women who become pregnant after first diagnosis also seem to be at an increased risk for radiation-induced CBC.

Brooks, Jennifer D., E-mail: brooksj@mskcc.org [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Boice, John D. [International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD and Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD and Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Reiner, Anne S. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bernstein, Leslie [Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute and City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States)] [Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute and City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA (United States); John, Esther M. [Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, and Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, and Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA (United States); Lynch, Charles F. [Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Mellemkjaer, Lene [Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark); Knight, Julia A. [Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto and Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto and Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Thomas, Duncan C.; Haile, Robert W. [Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Capanu, Marinela; Bernstein, Jonine L. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shore, Roy E. [Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University, New York, NY (United States) [Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University, New York, NY (United States); Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Studies on Pentoxifylline and Tocopherol Combination for Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in Rats  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate whether the application of pentoxifylline (PTX) and tocopherol l (Vit. E) could modify the development of radiation-induced heart disease and downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1mRNA in rats. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups: control group, irradiated group, experimental group 1, and experiment group 2. Supplementation was started 3 days before irradiation; in experimental group 1, injection of PTX (15 mg/kg/d) and Vit. E (5.5 mg/kg/d) continued till the 12th week postirradiation, whereas in experimental group 2 it was continued until the 24th week postirradiation. All rats were administrated a single dose of 20 Gy irradiation to the heart except the control group. Histopathologic evaluation was performed at various time points (Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 and 24th week) up to 24 weeks after irradiation. Changes of levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were also investigated at the same time points using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Results: Compared with the irradiated group, levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA of the rat hearts were relatively low in the two experimental groups on the 12th week postirradiation. In experimental group 1, there was a rebound expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA on the 24th week postirradiation, whereas that of the experimental group 2 remained low (p < 0.05). The proportions of collagen fibers of the two experimental groups were lower than that of irradiated group (p < 0.05). A rebound could be observed in the experimental group 1. Conclusion: PTX and Vit. E downregulated the expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA. The irradiated rat hearts showed a marked pathologic response to the drugs. The withdrawal of drugs in the 12th week postirradiation could cause rebound effects of the development of fibrosis.

Liu Hui [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xiong Mai [Department of Cardiac Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xia Yunfei; Cui Nianji; Lu Rubiao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Deng Ling [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Lin Yuehao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Clinical Laboratory, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Rong Tiehua [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)], E-mail: esophagus2003@yahoo.com.cn

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ATM Polymorphisms Are Associated With Risk of Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Since the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein plays crucial roles in repair of double-stranded DNA breaks, control of cell cycle checkpoints, and radiosensitivity, we hypothesized that variations in this gene might be associated with radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 253 lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation between 2004 and 2006 were included in this study. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to grade RP. Five haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ATM gene were genotyped using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of RP for genotypes were computed by the Cox model, adjusted for clinical factors. The function of the ATM SNP associated with RP was examined by biochemical assays. Results: During the median 22-month follow-up, 44 (17.4%) patients developed grade {>=} 2 RP. In multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for other clinical predictors, we found two ATM variants were independently associated with increased RP risk. They were an 111G > A) polymorphism (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.07-5.80) and an ATM 126713G > A polymorphism (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.16-5.28). Furthermore, genotype-dependent differences in ATM expression were demonstrated both in cell lines (p < 0.001) and in individual lung tissue samples (p = 0.003), which supported the results of the association study. Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms of ATM are significantly associated with RP risk. These variants might exert their effect through regulation of ATM expression and serve as independent biomarkers for prediction of RP in patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy.

Zhang Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Yang Ming [Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Bi Nan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Fang Mingjing; Sun Tong [Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Ji Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tan Wen [Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhao Lujun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Yu Dianke [Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Lin Dongxin, E-mail: dlin@public.bta.net.c [Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Wang Luhua, E-mail: wlhwq@yahoo.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Low-Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Bobby R. Scott, Ph.D. and Jennifer D. Di Palma Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE Albuquerque, NM 87108 USA Life on earth evolved in a low-level ionizing radiation environment comprised of terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays. Today we all reside in an ionizing radiation environment comprised of both natural background radiation and radiation from human activities (e.g., Chernobyl accident). An evolutionary benefit of the interaction of low-level, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) ionizing radiation with mammalian life forms on earth is adapted protection. Adapted protection involves low-dose/dose-rate, low-LET radiation induced high-fidelity DNA repair in cooperation with normal apoptosis (presumed p53

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121

An adaptive approach to metal artifact reduction in helical computed tomography for radiation therapy treatment planning: Experimental and clinical studies  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In this article, an approach to metal artifact reduction is proposed that is practical for clinical use in radiation therapy. It is based on a new interpolation scheme of the projections associated with metal implants in helical computed tomography (CT) scanners. Methods and Materials: A three-step approach was developed consisting of an automatic algorithm for metal implant detection, a correction algorithm for helical projections, and a new, efficient algorithm for projection interpolation. The modified raw projection data are transferred back to the CT scanner device where CT slices are regenerated using the built-in reconstruction operator. The algorithm was tested on a CT calibration phantom in which the density of inserted objects are known and on clinical prostate cases with two hip prostheses. The results are evaluated using the CT number and shape of the objects. Results: The validations on a CT calibration phantom with various inserts of known densities show that the algorithm improved the overall image quality by restoring the shape and the representative CT number of the objects in the image. For the clinical hip replacement cases, a large fraction of the bladder, rectum, and prostate that were not visible on the original CT slices were recovered using the algorithm. Precise contouring of the target volume was thus feasible. Without this enhancement, physicians would have drawn bigger margins to be sure to include the target and, at the same time, could have prescribed a lower dose to keep the same level of normal tissue toxicity. Conclusions: In both phantom experiment and patient studies, the algorithm resulted in significant artifact reduction with increases in the reliability of planning procedure for the case of metallic hip prostheses. This algorithm is now clinically used as a preprocessing before treatment planning for metal artifact reduction.

Yazdia, Mehran [Departement de radio-onoclogie and Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Gingras, Luc [Departement de radio-onoclogie and Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Departement de Physique, Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de radio-onoclogie and Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada) and Departement de Physique, Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Protein Kinase CK2 Regulates Cytoskeletal Reorganization during Ionizing Radiation-Induced Senescence of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells  

SciTech Connect

Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are critical for tissue regeneration. How hMSC respond to genotoxic stresses and potentially contribute to aging and cancer remain underexplored. We demonstrated that ionizing radiation induced cellular senescence of hMSC over a period of 10 days, showing a critical transition between day 3 and day 6. This was confirmed by senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, protein expression profiles of key cell cycle regulators (retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, p53, p21{sup waf1/Cip1}, and p16{sup INK4A}), and senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) (IL-8, IL-12, GRO, and MDC). We observed dramatic cytoskeletal reorganization of hMSC through reduction of myosin-10, redistribution of myosin-9, and secretion of profilin-1. Using a SILAC-based phosphoproteomics method, we detected significant reduction of myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, coinciding with its redistribution. Importantly, through treatment with cell permeable inhibitors (4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzotriazole (TBB) and 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT)), and gene knockdown using RNA interference, we identified CK2, a kinase responsible for myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, as a key factor contributing to the radiation-induced senescence of hMSC. We showed that individual knockdown of CK2 catalytic subunits CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} induced hMSC senescence. However, only knockdown of CK2{alpha} resulted in morphological phenotypes resembling those of radiation-induced senescence. These results suggest that CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} play differential roles in hMSC senescence progression, and their relative expression might represent a novel regulatory mechanism for CK2 activity.

Wang, Daojing; Jang, Deok-Jin

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

Monte-Carlo Simulations of Radiation-Induced Activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma- Based Cargo Inspection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron and gamma radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. The induced activity was determined by analyzing the gamma spectra. Based on the calculated radioactive inventory in the container, the dose levels due to the induced gamma radiation were calculated at several distances from the container and in relevant time windows after the irradiation, in order to evaluate the radiation exposure of the cargo handling staff, air crew and passengers during flight. The possibility of remanent long-lived radioactive inventory after cargo is delivered to the client is also of concern and was evaluated.

B. Bromberger; D. Bar; M. Brandis; V. Dangendorf; M. B. Goldberg; F. Kaufmann; I. Mor; R. Nolte; M. Schmiedel; K. Tittelmeier; D. Vartsky; H. Wershofen

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Circadian Rhythm, A Continuous Transcription-Translation Feedback Loop, Contributes to Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Radioadaptive Response Aris Alexandrou and Jian Jian Li Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of California Davis, Sacramento, California, 95817 The initiation of the circadian rhythm field occurred when the Takahashi group defined a mutation in the mouse gene "Clock" and cloned the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) in the mid- 1990's (1-3). Currently more than a dozen clock genes have been identified (3-4). Disruptions in the circadian rhythm via changes in environmental conditions, such as, diet, temperature, and night/day hours lead to the pathogenesis of a multitude of diseases, such as, cancer, diabetes mellitus,

125

LET dependence of radiation-induced bystander effects using human prostate tumor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past fifteen years, evidence provided by many independent research groups have indicated higher numbers of cells exhibiting damage than expected based on the number of cells traversed by the radiation. This phenomenon ...

Anzenberg, Vered

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Space radiation-induced bystander signaling in 2D and 3D skin tissue models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space radiation poses a significant hazard to astronauts on long-duration missions, and the low fluences of charged particles characteristic of this field suggest that bystander effects, the phenomenon in which a greater ...

Lumpkins, Sarah B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damagein Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism Björn E. Rydberg, Torsten Groesser, Antoine Snijders, Kelly Trego, Ju Han, Do Yup Lee, Bahram Parvin, Trent Northen, Andrew J. Wyrobek, and Priscilla K. Cooper Berkeley Lab SFA P.I.: Gary Karpen Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Goal: Task 1 of the Berkeley Lab SFA is designed to identify adaptive response (AR) mechanisms that may affect risk of developing radiation-induced cancer and to assess the linearity with dose of processes that influence mammary gland carcinogenesis. We use both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems in a parallelogram strategy. Our human cell culture

129

Estimation of radiation-induced cancer from three-dimensional dose distributions: Concept of organ equivalent dose  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Estimates of secondary cancer risk after radiotherapy are becoming more important for comparative treatment planning. Modern treatment planning systems provide accurate three-dimensional dose distributions for each individual patient. These data open up new possibilities for more precise estimates of secondary cancer incidence rates in the irradiated organs. We report a new method to estimate organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates. The concept of an organ equivalent dose (OED) for radiation-induced cancer assumes that any two dose distributions in an organ are equivalent if they cause the same radiation-induced cancer incidence. Methods and Materials: The two operational parameters of the OED concept are the organ-specific cancer incidence rate at low doses, which is taken from the data of the atomic bomb survivors, and cell sterilization at higher doses. The effect of cell sterilization in various organs was estimated by analyzing the secondary cancer incidence data of patients with Hodgkin's disease who were treated with radiotherapy in between 1962 and 1993. The radiotherapy plans used at the time the patients had been treated were reconstructed on a fully segmented whole body CT scan. The dose distributions were calculated in individual organs for which cancer incidence data were available. The model parameter that described cell sterilization was obtained by analyzing the dose and cancer incidence rates for the individual organs. Results: We found organ-specific cell radiosensitivities that varied from 0.017 for the mouth and pharynx up to 1.592 for the bladder. Using the two model parameters (organ-specific cancer incidence rate and the parameter characterizing cell sterilization), the OED concept can be applied to any three-dimensional dose distribution to analyze cancer incidence. Conclusion: We believe that the concept of OED presented in this investigation represents a first step in assessing the potential risk of secondary cancer induction after the clinical application of radiotherapy.

Schneider, Uwe [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: uwe.schneider@psi.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland); Ross, Dieter [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaser-Hotz, Barbara [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radio-Oncology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Study of the effect of EHF radiation on induced potentials in the cerebral cortex  

SciTech Connect

Changes in the induced-potential components with direct EHF action on the cerebral cortex are shown in experiments with cats.

Abakarov, A.T.; Mal`tsev, A.E.; Istomin, V.S. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The effects of diet and ionizing radiation on azoxymethane induced colon carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability of ionizing radiation to enhance colon carcinogenesis and the role of diet in this process has not been documented. We hypothesized that radiation would enhance the formation of aberrant crypt foci, ACF, known precursor lesions to colon cancer, by suppressing apoptosis and upregulating proliferation in colonocytes. Diets contained a combination of fish oil or corn oil and either pectin or cellulose. We exposed 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats to 1 Gy ionizing radiation (1 GeV Fe) 10 d prior to injection with AOM. Colons were resected at the promotion stage of carcinogenesis (7 wk post initial injection) and assayed for ACF and apoptosis. Radiation treatment increased (P=0.0327) the incidence of high multiplicity ACF (foci with four or more aberrant crypts) and decreased (P=0.0340) the apoptotic index compared to non-irradiated rats. Radiation also resulted in an increase (PACF compared to the corn oil treatment. Dietary pectin significantly increased (P=0.0204) the apoptotic index compared to cellulose treatment. These data suggest that ionizing radiation can work synergistically with AOM and increase the formation of high-multiplicity ACF, upregulate cellular proliferation and decrease apoptosis in colonocytes. The data also suggest that diets containing fish oil and pectin may protect against colon cancer by increasing apoptosis and reducing the formation of high multiplicity ACF.

Mann, John Clifford

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a significant materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power reactors that will use water as coolant. A new metallurgical process is proposed that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of minor impurity elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. MnS-type precipitates, which contain most of the sulfur in stainless steels, are thought to be unstable under irradiation. First, Mn transmutes strongly to Fe in thermalized neutron spectra. Second, cascade-induced disordering and the inverse Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates are thought to act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow sulfur, which is known to exert a deleterious influence on intergranular cracking, to re-enter the matrix. To test this hypothesis, compositions of MnS-type precipitates contained in several unirradiated and irradiated heats of Type 304, 316, and 348 stainless steels (SSs) were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Evidence is presented that shows a progressive compositional modification of MnS precipitates as exposure to neutrons increases in boiling water reactors. As the fluence increases, the Mn level in MnS decreases, whereas the Fe level increases. The S level also decreases relative to the combined level of Mn and Fe. MnS precipitates were also found to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as F and O which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates.

Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

ORIGINAL PAPER A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- induced second malignancies, on Japanese atomic bomb survivors, and on background US cancer incidence and carcin- ogenic agent. As such, it is effective as a treatment for cancer, but can also induce secondary (&) Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th St., New York, NY

Brenner, David Jonathan

134

DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair  

SciTech Connect

For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Collision-induced amplification of radiation in inversionless two-level systems  

SciTech Connect

Amplification of probe radiation by an inversionless two-level system in the 'red' wing of its spectral line is studied theoretically during the resonance absorption of intense cw laser radiation. The effect is caused by the inequality of the spectral densities of the Einstein coefficients for absorption and stimulated emission outside the absorption line under conditions when homogeneous broadening, due to the interaction of particles with the buffer gas, significantly exceeds the natural broadening (at high pressures of the buffer gas). It is found that the larger the inversionless gain, the higher the buffer gas pressure and the pump radiation intensity. It is established that at high enough pump intensity, the probe field is amplified along the entire region of the 'red' wing of the line (at any negative detunings of the probe field frequency). (nonlinear optical phenomena)

Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, Anatolii M [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Lightning-induced coupling of the radiation belts to geomagnetically conjugate ionospheric regions  

SciTech Connect

Very low frequency (VLF) radio observations in Antarctica and North America provide the first evidence that bursts of energetic electrons from the earth's radiation belts commonly precipitate into geomagnetically conjugate ionospheric regions in response to lightning. The electrons, with energies ranging from tens of keV to over one MeV, appear to be scattered out of their otherwise stable trap in the earth's magnetic field by magnetospheric interactions with a regularly observed class of transient, lightning-generated VLF radio waves known as ducted whistlers. The precipitating electrons ionize atmospheric molecules at altitudes between 40 and 90 km, creating transient enhancements of ionization levels in conjugate locations. These ionospheric disturbances can be detected by their characteristic perturbations, sometimes called 'Trimpi events,' of the amplitude and phase of VLF transmitter signals propagating subionospherically within 200 to 250 km of the disturbed areas. The first detailed, one-to-one comparison of such signal perturbations, monitored in conjugate regions, with the multipath structure, arrival azimuths, and predicted electron scattering of simultaneously observed ducted whistlers suggests that every ducted whistler precipitates bursts of radiation belt electrons. If so, the estimated rate at which ducted whistlers contribute to radiation belt losses is comparable to that predicted for plasmaspheric hiss, a different class of magnetospheric wave that is often considered to control the structure of the belts. Lightning could therefore play a significant role in the maintenance of radiation belt equilibrium.

Burgess, W.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation alters carcinogen-induced splenic cytokine production and immune cell phenotype of A/J mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dose, low-LET γ-radiation alters carcinogen-induced splenic cytokine production and immune cell dose, low-LET γ-radiation alters carcinogen-induced splenic cytokine production and immune cell phenotype of A/J mice. V. Gonzales, K. Gott, M. Makvandi, N. Kikendall, A. Monier, E. Maloy, C. Rietz, B. Scott and J. Wilder. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM. Introduction: Low-dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (LDR; < 100 mGy) activates the immune response, presumably via epigenetic pathways (Scott et al. 2009) and may lead to cancer suppression (Nowosielska et al. 2006). One of the mechanisms by which it might do so is by altering the cytokines produced after carcinogen and/or radiation exposure. Alternatively, LDR may activate

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141

A test protocol to screen capacitors for radiation-induced charge loss.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a test protocol for screening capacitors dielectrics for charge loss due to ionizing radiation. The test protocol minimizes experimental error and provides a test method that allows comparisons of different dielectric types if exposed to the same environment and if the same experimental technique is used. The test acceptance or screening method is fully described in this report. A discussion of technical issues and possible errors and uncertainties is included in this report also.

Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Hartman, E. Frederick

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism Björn E. Rydberg Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Task 1 of the Berkeley Lab SFA is designed to identify adaptive response (AR) mechanisms that may affect risk of developing radiation-induced cancer and to assess the linearity with dose of processes that influence mammary gland carcinogenesis. We use both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems in a parallelogram strategy. Our human cell culture model will elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the AR and investigate the relationships in target vs. non-target cells between a range of cancer-relevant endpoints potentially affected by adaptation such

143

RADIATION-INDUCED CONDITIONED AVOIDANCE BEVIOR IN RATS, MICE, AND CATS  

SciTech Connect

Association of a distinctive taste stimulus with exposure to x rays results in a conditioned aversion toward the stimulus in rats, mice, and cats. This is manifested by a progressive reduction in the amount of flavored fluid consumed during a series of x-ray exposures and subsequently by the acquired value of the flavored fluid to act as a con- ditioned stiraulus for aversive behavior in the absence of radiation. Saccharin-flavored water was effective as a conditioned stimulus for rats and mice, and chocolateflavored milk was effective for cats. Some implications of these observations for the study of behavior are discussed. (auth)

Kimeldorf, D.J.; Garcia, J.; Rubadeau, D.O.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective trials with high-dose radiation therapy for unresectable lung cancer.

Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McBurney, Michelle L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erasmus, Jeremy [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man. Annual performance report, June 1, 1991--October 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable? Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells? What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate? During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

Haas, M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

Kan, Tomoko, E-mail: tkan@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide [Department of Radiology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: William F. Morgan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William F. Morgan William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999 Richland, Washington About this Project Projects Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Mechanisms of Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose/ Low Dose Rate Radiation Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation

148

Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal damage. Therefore, Q40P/S47I/H93G is pharmacologically one of the most promising candidates for clinical applications for radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.

Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland)] [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Acute Radiation-Induced Nocturia in Prostate Cancer Patients Is Associated With Pretreatment Symptoms, Radical Prostatectomy, and Genetic Markers in the TGF{beta}1 Gene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: After radiation therapy for prostate cancer, approximately 50% of the patients experience acute genitourinary symptoms, mostly nocturia. This may be highly bothersome with a major impact on the patient's quality of life. In the past, nocturia is seldom reported as a single, physiologically distinct endpoint, and little is known about its etiology. It is assumed that in addition to dose-volume parameters and patient- and therapy-related factors, a genetic component contributes to the development of radiation-induced damage. In this study, we investigated the association among dosimetric, clinical, and TGF{beta}1 polymorphisms and the development of acute radiation-induced nocturia in prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Data were available for 322 prostate cancer patients treated with primary or postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Five genetic markers in the TGF{beta}1 gene (-800 G>A, -509 C>T, codon 10 T>C, codon 25 G>C, g.10780 T>G), and a high number of clinical and dosimetric parameters were considered. Toxicity was scored using an symptom scale developed in-house. Results: Radical prostatectomy (PT and codon 10 T>C are identified as factors involved in the development of acute radiation-induced nocturia. These findings may contribute to the research on prediction of late nocturia after IMRT for prostate cancer.

De Langhe, Sofie, E-mail: Sofie.DeLanghe@UGent.be [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Gent (Belgium); De Ruyck, Kim [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Gent (Belgium)] [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Gent (Belgium); Ost, Piet; Fonteyne, Valerie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Gent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Werbrouck, Joke [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Gent (Belgium)] [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Gent (Belgium); De Meerleer, Gert; De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Gent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Thierens, Hubert [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Gent (Belgium)] [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Gent (Belgium)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Low Dose Radiation Program: Workshop VI Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Workshop VI Principal Investigator and Abstracts Anderson, Carl Whole Genome Analysis of Functional Protein Binding Sites and DNA Methylation: Application to p53 and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation. Averbeck, Dietrich Cellular Responses at Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Azzam, Edouard Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate ?-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism. Bailey, Susan The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability. Balajee, Adayabalam Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Imaging Bioinformatics for Mapping Multidimensional Responses. Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen Biological Response to Radiation Mediated through the Microenvironment and

151

THE RADIATION CHEMISTRY OP AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS IN RELATION TO THE RADIATION STERILIZATION OF HIGH-PROTEIN FOODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Various Ionizing Radiations. Radiat. Res. , 22, 694 (1968). W. M. Garrison, Radiation Induced Reactions of AminoFrozen Aqueous Solutions, in Radiation Chemistry of Aqueous

Garrison, W.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Does oxygen enhance the radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase. Progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The radiation-induced inactivation of penicillinase in dilute aqueous solutions buffered with phosphate was studied, by examining enzyme radiosensitivity in the presence of various gases (He, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O, N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/). The introduction of either N/sub 2/O or O/sub 2/ was found to reduce the radiodamage. On the other hand H/sub 2/ or N/sub 2/O + O/sub 2/ gas-mixture enhanced the radiosensitivity. In the presence of formate and oxygen, no enzyme inactivation was detected. The results indicated that the specific damaging efficiency of H atoms is almost four-fold higher than that of OH radical; therefore in phosphate buffer, where more than half of the free radicals are H atoms, it is the H radicals that are responsible for the majority of the damage. The superoxide radicals appeared to be completely inactive and did not contribute toward enzyme inactivation. Oxygen was shown to affect the radiosensitivity in two ways. On one side, it protected by converting e/sup -//sub aq/ and H radicals into harmless O/sub 2//sup -/ radicals. On the other side it increased the inactivation by enhancing the damage brought about by OH radicals (OER = 2.8). In the present case the oxygen effect of protection exceeded that of sensitization, thus giving rise to a moderate overall protection effect.

Samuni, A.; Kalkstein, A.; Czapski, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Radiation Effects in Nanoporous Gold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foams with filament and porous sizes in the range of nanometers could be unusually resistant to radiation because radiation induced point defects cannot...

154

Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Libing [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang [Department of Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Hua, E-mail: wanghua@nic.bmi.ac.c [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang Lisheng [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Universities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universities Universities | Duke University | Loma Linda University | Northwestern University | University of Chicago | University of California Davis | Northwestern University University of Chicago University of California Davis Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on NF-κB Signaling Networks and Mitochondria Principal Investigator: Dr. Gayle Woloschak DOE Low Dose Research Program Projects Low dose-low dose rate irradiation leads to long term changes in numbers of mitochondria and mitochondrial genomes - Principal Investigator: Gayle Woloschak, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA NF-κB-mediated pro-survival network in low dose radiation-induced adaptive protection - Principal Investigator: Jian Jian Li, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Davis,

156

On Hawking radiation of 2d Liouville black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We adapt the method of complex paths to the study of the radiation of Hawking of Liouville black holes.

Chabab, M; Sedra, M B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Radiation-induced changes in glomerular and tubular cell kinetics and morphology following irradiation of a single kidney in the pig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation-induced changes in glomerular and tubular cell kinetics and morphology following irradiation of a single pig kidney were assessed. Irradiation of the right kidney alone resulted in a significant increase in renal cell labeling index (LI) in both the irradiated and the contralateral unirradiated kidney within 2 weeks of irradiation; peak values of 1.57 {plus_minus} 0.32% and 1.04 {plus_minus} 0.13%, respectively, were seen 4 weeks PI, significantly greater (p tab.

Robbins, M.E.C.; Bonsib, S.M.; Ikeda, A. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Portable instrument for inspecting irradiated nuclear-fuel assemblies in a water-filled storage pond by measurement of induced Cerenkov radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable instrument for measuring induced Cerenkov radiation associated with irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in a water-filled storage pond is disclosed. The instrument includes a photomultiplier tube and an image intensifier which are operable in parallel and simultaneously by means of a field lens assembly and an associated beam splitter. The image intensifier permits an operator to aim and focus the apparatus on a submerged fuel assembly. Once the instrument is aimed and focused, an illumination reading can be obtained with the photomultiplier tube. The instrument includes a lens cap with a carbon-14/phosphor light source for calibrating the apparatus in the field.

Nicholson, N.; Dowdy, E.J.; Holt, D.M.; Stump, C.J. Jr.

1982-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

Adaptive sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An adaptive data compression device for compressing data having variable frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

Watson, Bobby L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Aeby, Ian (Fremont, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Adaptive sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

1980-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brook Why This Project Genomic instability is an important step in radiation-induced cancer. We will investigate one potential repair mechanism involved in radiation-induced...

162

Association of P53 and ATM Polymorphisms With Risk of Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis in Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP) is the most common dose-limiting complication in lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that P53 and the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM)-dependent signaling response cascade play a crucial role in radiation-induced diseases. Consistent with this, our previous study showed that a functional genetic ATM polymorphism was associated with increased RP risk. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the role of genetic P53 polymorphism in RP, we analyzed the P53 Arg72Pro polymorphism in a cohort including 253 lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Results: We found that the P53 72Arg/Arg genotype was associated with increased RP risk compared with the 72Pro/Pro genotype. Furthermore, the P53 Arg72Pro and ATM -111G>A polymorphisms display an additive combination effect in intensifying the risk of developing RP. The cross-validation test showed that 63.2% of RP cases can be identified by P53 and ATM genotypes. Conclusions: These results indicate that genetic polymorphisms in the ATM-P53 pathway influence susceptibility to RP and genotyping P53 and ATM polymorphisms might help to identify patients susceptible to developing RP when receiving radiotherapy.

Yang Ming [Departments of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhang Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Bi Nan; Ji Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tan Wen [Departments of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhao Lujun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Yu Dianke; Wu Chen [Departments of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Wang Luhua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dislocation vs. production bias revisited with account of radiation-induced emission bias I. Void swelling under electron and light ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Early experimental data on void swelling in electron-irradiated materials disagree with the dislocation bias models based on the dislocation-point defect elastic interactions. Later this became one of the reasons that prompted the development of models based on production bias (PBM) as the main driver for swelling, which assumed that the dislocation bias was much lower than that predicted by theory. However, the PBM in its present form fails to account for important and common observations: the indefinite void growth often observed under cascade irradiation and the swelling saturation observed under high dose irradiation and in void lattices. In this paper we show that these contradictions can be naturally resolved in the framework of the rate theory modified with account of the radiation-induced vacancy emission from extended defects, such as voids, dislocations and grain boundaries. The modified rate theory agrees well with the experimental data, which proves that original dislocation bias should be used in rate theory models in different irradiation. The modified theory predictions include (but not limited to) the radiation-induced annealing of voids, swelling saturation under high dose irradiation, generally, and in void lattices, in particular.

Dubinko, Volodymyr; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Microsoft PowerPoint - Powerpoint_Adaptive.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Response to Low Dose Radiation Adaptive Response Adaptive Response When large radiation When large radiation exposure is preceded by a ll " i kl " d h small "tickle" dose, the effect of the large dose is effect of the large dose is sometimes diminished The first time you go to the beach in the summer you don't usually spend 8 hours in summer, you don t usually spend 8 hours in the sun. You begin by being out an hour or d dd ddi i l i h i ki two and add additional time as their skin adapts to the sunny condition and develops protective mechanisms.... Adaptive Response Adaptive Response In some cases, cells also show an "adaptive response" to radiation, although researchers p , g are still trying to understand how the protective mechanisms work. Small doses p

165

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Chaun-Yuan Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chaun-Yuan Li Chaun-Yuan Li Radiation Biology Research, Duke University Medical Center Funded Projects Molecular Characterization of the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Roles of Superoxide Dismutage (SOD) in Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Response Yang, Z., Chuang, E., Batinic-Haberle, I., and Li, C.-Y. 2005 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y., Guo, Z., Yang, Z., and Chuang, E. 2003 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y. and Chuang, E. Publications Li, F., Sonveaux, P., Rabbani, Z.N., Liu, S., Yan, B., Huang, Q.,

166

Quantitative effect of combined chemotherapy and fractionated radiotherapy on the incidence of radiation-induced lung damage: A prospective clinical study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to assess the incidence of radiological changes compatible with radiation-induced lung damage as determined by computed tomography (CT), and subsequently calculate the dose effect factors (DEF) for specified chemotherapeutic regimens. Radiation treatments were administered once daily, 5 days-per-week. Six clinical protocols were evaluated: ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and DTIC) followed by 35 Gy in 20 fractions; MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) followed by 35 Gy in 20; MOPP/ABVD followed by 35 Gy in 20; CAV (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and vincristine) followed by 25 Gy in 10; and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) concurrent with either 50-52 Gy in 20-21 or 30-36 Gy in 10-15 fractions. CT examinations were taken before and at predetermined intervals following radiotherapy. CT evidence for the development of radiation-induced damage was defined as an increase in lung density within the irradiated volume. The radiation dose to lung was calculated using a CT-based algorithm to account for tissue inhomogeneities. Different fractionation schedules were converted using two isoeffect models, the estimated single dose (ED) and the normalized total dose (NTD). The actuarial incidence of radiological pneumonitis was 71% for the ABVD, 49% for MOPP, 52% for MOPP/ABVD, 67% for CAV, 73% for 5-FU radical, and 58% for 5-FU palliative protocols. Depending on the isoeffect model selected and the method of analysis, the DEF was 1.11-1.14 for the ABVD, 0.96-0.97 for the MOPP, 0.96-1.02 for the MOPP/ABVD, 1.03-1.10 for the CAV, 0.74-0.79 for the 5-FU radical, and 0.94 for the 5-FU palliative protocols. DEF were measured by comparing the incidence of CT-observed lung damage in patients receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy to those receiving radiotherapy alone. The addition of ABVD or CAV appeared to reduce the tolerance of lung to radiation. 40 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Mah, K.; Van Dyk, J.; Braban, L.E.; Hao, Y.; Keane, T.J. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Poon, P.Y. (Univ. of British Columbia (Canada))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Jian Jian Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jian Jian Li Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University Newly Funded Projects Regulation of NF-kB and Mn SOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshops: NF-kB Mediated Signaling Network in Low Dose X-Ray Induced Adaptive Protection on Mouse and Human Skin Epithelial Cells Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Spitz, and Li, J.J. 2005 Workshops: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1. Li, J.J., Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Dong, S., Spitz, D.R., and Yu, C.-R. 2003 Workshops: Gene Expression Profiles of Human Skin Keratinocytes Exposed to Acute and Chronic Ionizing Radiation Li, J.J., Ozeki, M., Wang, T., Tamae, D., Nelson, D., Wyrobek, A., and

168

IN-SITU PROBING OF RADIATION-INDUCED PROCESSING OF ORGANICS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ICE ANALOGS-NOVEL LASER DESORPTION LASER IONIZATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the evolution of organic molecules in ice grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) under cosmic rays, stellar radiation, and local electrons and ions is critical to our understanding of the connection between ISM and solar systems. Our study is aimed at reaching this goal of looking directly into radiation-induced processing in these ice grains. We developed a two-color laser-desorption laser-ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopic method (2C-MALDI-TOF), similar to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results presented here with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) probe molecules embedded in water-ice at 5 K show for the first time that hydrogenation and oxygenation are the primary chemical reactions that occur in astrophysical ice analogs when subjected to Ly{alpha} radiation. We found that hydrogenation can occur over several unsaturated bonds and the product distribution corresponds to their stabilities. Multiple hydrogenation efficiency is found to be higher at higher temperatures (100 K) compared to 5 K-close to the interstellar ice temperatures. Hydroxylation is shown to have similar efficiencies at 5 K or 100 K, indicating that addition of O atoms or OH radicals to pre-ionized PAHs is a barrierless process. These studies-the first glimpses into interstellar ice chemistry through analog studies-show that once accreted onto ice grains PAHs lose their PAH spectroscopic signatures through radiation chemistry, which could be one of the reason for the lack of PAH detection in interstellar ice grains, particularly the outer regions of cold, dense clouds or the upper molecular layers of protoplanetary disks.

Gudipati, Murthy S.; Yang Rui, E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: ryang73@ustc.edu [University of Maryland (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

Niazi, Tamim M. [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Vuong, Te, E-mail: tvuong@jgh.mcgill.ca [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Segal Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Azoulay, Laurant [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada)] [Department of Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University (Canada); Marijnen, Corrie [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bujko, Kryzstof [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland)] [Department of Radiotherapy, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre, Warsaw (Poland); Nasr, Elie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital (Lebanon); Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal-General-Hospital, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Cummings, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Relationship Between Grain Boundary Structure and Radiation Induced Segregation in a Neutron Irradiated 9 wt. % Cr Model Ferritic/Martensitic Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs but has only been demonstrated in ion irradiated specimens. A 9 wt. % Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of neutron radiation environment on the RIS-GB structure dependence. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

Field, Kevin G [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, Brandon [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Chichester, Heather J.M. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Sridharan, K. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A new time-dependent analytic model for radiation-induced photocurrent in finite 1D epitaxial diodes.  

SciTech Connect

Photocurrent generated by ionizing radiation represents a threat to microelectronics in radiation environments. Circuit simulation tools such as SPICE [1] can be used to analyze these threats, and typically rely on compact models for individual electrical components such as transistors and diodes. Compact models consist of a handful of differential and/or algebraic equations, and are derived by making simplifying assumptions to any of the many semiconductor transport equations. Historically, many photocurrent compact models have suffered from accuracy issues due to the use of qualitative approximation, rather than mathematically correct solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation. A practical consequence of this inaccuracy is that a given model calibration is trustworthy over only a narrow range of operating conditions. This report describes work to produce improved compact models for photocurrent. Specifically, an analytic model is developed for epitaxial diode structures that have a highly doped subcollector. The analytic model is compared with both numerical TCAD calculations, as well as the compact model described in reference [2]. The new analytic model compares well against TCAD over a wide range of operating conditions, and is shown to be superior to the compact model from reference [2].

Verley, Jason C.; Axness, Carl L.; Hembree, Charles Edward; Keiter, Eric Richard; Kerr, Bert (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Monte-Carlo Simulations of Radiation-Induced Activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma- Based Cargo Inspection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron and gamma radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. T...

Bromberger, B; Brandis, M; Dangendorf, V; Goldberg, M B; Kaufmann, F; Mor, I; Nolte, R; Schmiedel, M; Tittelmeier, K; Vartsky, D; Wershofen, H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division 1999 - Current Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... effect relationships for radiation-induced stochastic ... validate the EPR dose assessment methods ... Calibration of Low-Energy Photon Brachytherapy ...

174

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation Response in Normal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genes. Using rigorous computational methods, we characterized the dose-dependent, radiation-induced gene expression of HSF-42, a primary cell culture. Our preliminary results...

175

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

176

Thyroid V30 Predicts Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism in Patients Treated With Sequential Chemo-Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Hypothyroidism (HT) is a frequent late side effect of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) therapy. The purpose of this study is to determine dose-volume constraints that correlate with functional impairment of the thyroid gland in HL patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 consecutive patients undergoing antiblastic chemotherapy and involved field radiation treatment (median dose, 32 Gy; range, 30-36 Gy) for HL were retrospectively considered. Their median age was 28 years (range, 14-70 years). Blood levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodo-thyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroglobulin antibody (ATG) were recorded basally and at different times after the end of therapy. For the thyroid gland, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), dosimetric parameters, and the percentage of thyroid volume exceeding 10, 20, and 30 Gy (V10, V20, and V30) were calculated in all patients. To evaluate clinical and dosimetric factors possibly associated with HT, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: Eight of 61 (13.1%) patients had HT before treatment and were excluded from further evaluation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 6-99 months), 41.5% (22/53) of patients developed HT after treatment. Univariate analyses showed that all dosimetric factors were associated with HT (p 62.5%, the risk was 70.8% (p < 0.0001). A Cox regression curve stratified by two levels of V30 value was created (odds ratio, 12.6). Conclusions: The thyroid V30 predicts the risk of developing HT after sequential chemo-radiotherapy and defines a useful constraint to consider for more accurate HL treatment planning.

Cella, Laura [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Conson, Manuel; Caterino, Michele; De Rosa, Nicola [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Liuzzi, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Picardi, Marco; Grimaldi, Francesco [Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Solla, Raffaele [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Farella, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy); Pacelli, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.pacelli@cnr.it [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research (CNR), Naples (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Federico II University School of Medicine, Naples (Italy)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Ion cyclotron emission due to the newly-born fusion products induced fast Alfven wave radiative instabilities in tokamaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity distribution functions of the newly born (t = 0) charged fusion products of tokamak discharges can be approximated by a monoenergetic ring distribution with a finite v{sub {parallel}} such that v{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} v{sub {parallel}} {approx} v{sub j} where (M{sub j}V{sub j}{sup 2}/2) = E{sub j}, the directed birth energy of the charged fusion product species j of mass M{sub j}. As the time t progresses these distribution functions will evolve into a Gaussian in velocity with thermal spreadings given by the perpendicular and parallel temperatures T{sub {perpendicular}j}(t) = T{sub {parallel}j}(t) with T{sub j}(t) increasing as t increases and finally reaches an isotropic saturation value of T{sub {perpendicular}j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) = T{sub {parallel}j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) = T{sub j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) {approx} [M{sub j}T{sub d}E{sub j}/(M{sub j} + M)]{sup 1/2}, where T{sub d} is the temperature of the background deuterium plasma ions, M is the mass of a triton or a neutron for j = protons and alpha particles, respectively, and {tau}{sub j} {approx} {tau}{sub sj}/4 is the thermalization time of the fusion product species j in the background deuterium plasma and {tau}{sub sj} is the slowing-down time. For times t of the order of {tau}{sub j} their distributions can be approximated by a Gaussian in their total energy. Then for times t {ge} {tau}{sub sj} the velocity distributions of these fusion products will relax towards their appropriate slowing-down distributions. Here the authors will examine the radiative stability of all these distributions. The ion cyclotron emission from energetic ion produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic tool.

Arunasalam, V.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ARM maintains three major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. In 2007 the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. See the COPS home at https://www.uni-hohenheim.de/spp-iop/index.htm and the QPF homepage at http://www.meteo.uni-bonn.de/projekte/SPPMeteo/ Information obtained during COPS will not only aid regional weather forecasts to help protect people and land, but will also help scientists determine how clouds affect the climate in complex terrain around the world. Because of its relevance to society, COPS has been endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. [Taken from http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/blackforest/] A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading. The URL to go directly to the ARM Archive, bypassing the information pages, is http://www.archive.arm.gov/ The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

179

Study Shows Roles of Receptor, Thiol on Adaptive Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study Shows Roles of Receptor, Thiol on Adaptive Response Study Shows Roles of Receptor, Thiol on Adaptive Response Jeffrey Murley Jeffrey Murley, Ph.D. David Grdina, Ph.D. Low Dose program-supported scientists at The University of Chicago have gained more insight into adaptive protective responses indicating the role of oxidative stress, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the induction of SOD2 (manganese Superoxide Dismutase) activity. These changes are central to the production of adaptive protective responses. Why Study Adaptive Response? Exposing cells to low doses of ionizing radiation has been reported to elevate resistance to genomic damage when the same cells are subsequently exposed to a much higher dose of radiation. This phenomenon, called adaptive response, is characterized by an increase

180

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Wide Expression of LLIR and the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences David J. Chen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project It is known that changes in gene expression alter biological effects. It is necessary to identify the specific genes that demonstrate altered expression after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and to determine pathways involved in DNA damage recognition, signaling, and repair that are associated with radiation-induced adaptive and bystander effects. Project Goals Identification of genes whose transcription is regulated in response to low levels of ionizing radiation Identification of the genes and communication pathways that control these responses to low dose radiation Identification of the cellular and molecular targets that influence

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Experimental Adaptive Bayesian Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experimental realization of an adaptive quantum state tomography protocol. Our method takes advantage of a Bayesian approach to statistical inference and is naturally tailored for adaptive strategies. For pure states we observe close to 1/N scaling of infidelity with overall number of registered events, while best non-adaptive protocols allow for $1/\\sqrt{N}$ scaling only. Experiments are performed for polarization qubits, but the approach is readily adapted to any dimension.

Konstantin Kravtsov; Stanislav Straupe; Igor Radchenko; Neil Houlsby; Sergey Kulik

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R.B. Mikkelsen, Ionizing radiation-induced, mitochondria-W.K. Rorrer, P.B. Chen, Radiation-induced proliferation ofresponse genes to ionizing radiation in human lymphoblastoid

Wyrobek, A. J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

184

Verification and operation of adaptive materials in space.  

SciTech Connect

Piezoelectric polymers based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) are of interest as smart materials for novel space-based telescope applications. Dimensional adjustments of adaptive thin polymer films are achieved via controlled charge deposition. Predicting their long-term performance requires a detailed understanding of the piezoelectric property changes that develop during space environmental exposure. The overall materials performance is governed by a combination of chemical and physical degradation processes occurring in low Earth orbit as established by our past laboratory-based materials performance experiments (see report SAND 2005-6846). Molecular changes are primarily induced via radiative damage, and physical damage from temperature and atomic oxygen exposure is evident as depoling, loss of orientation and surface erosion. The current project extension has allowed us to design and fabricate small experimental units to be exposed to low Earth orbit environments as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiments program. The space exposure of these piezoelectric polymers will verify the observed trends and their degradation pathways, and provide feedback on using piezoelectric polymer films in space. This will be the first time that PVDF-based adaptive polymer films will be operated and exposed to combined atomic oxygen, solar UV and temperature variations in an actual space environment. The experiments are designed to be fully autonomous, involving cyclic application of excitation voltages, sensitive film position sensors and remote data logging. This mission will provide critically needed feedback on the long-term performance and degradation of such materials, and ultimately the feasibility of large adaptive and low weight optical systems utilizing these polymers in space.

Dargaville, Tim Richard; Elliott, Julie M.; Jones, Gary D.; Celina, Mathias Christopher

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

186

SU?FF?T?465: Relating Changes in Pulmonary Functin Tests (PFTs) to Changes in Radiation?Induced Regional Lung Perfusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To further assess if RT?induced changes in pulmonary function tests (PFTs) can be prospectively predicted based on the sum of predicted RT?induced changes in regional lung perfusion. Method and Materials: Between 1991 and 2005

J Mao; S Zhou; R Folz; T Wong; L Marks

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Adaptive Discrete Cosine Transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory and performance of the adaptive discrete cosine transform filter is examined. The discrete cosine transform filter is a realization of an FIR filter as the cascade of an all-zero FIR filter with a bank of IIR digital resonators. Each bank ... Keywords: FIR filter, IIR digital resonators, LMS algorithm, adaptive discrete cosine transform filter, adaptive filters, all-zero FIR filter, filter coefficient, frequency, magnitude, phase, transfer function, update method

S. J. Bukowinski; L. Gerhardt; M. Fargues; G. Coutu

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Adaptive Video Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hopfgartner,F. Villa,R. Urban,J. Jose,J.M. Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Adaptive Information Retrieval pp 28-29

Hopfgartner, F.

189

Effect of low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary immunity in A/J mice K. Gott Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Abstract Introduction: Low-dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (LDR; < 100 mGy) activates the immune response (Nowosielska et al., 2006), presumably via epigenetic pathways (Scott et al., 2009) and has been implicated as suppressing both alpha-radiation-induced and smoking-related lung cancer (Scott et al. 2009). One of the hypothesized adaptive-response mechanisms by which LDR does so is by activating immune cell function in the lung, which would then increase their anti-cancer surveillance function (Liu, 2007; Bogdandi et al., 2010). One measure of activated immune cell function is their expression of markers on their cell surface that are

190

Radiative Effects of Cloud-Type Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative flux changes induced by the occurrence of different cloud types are investigated using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud data and a refined radiative transfer model from National Aeronautics and Space ...

Ting Chen; William B. Rossow; Yuanchong Zhang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

192

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

193

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced Precipitation Study The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile Facility...

195

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

196

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: Composition of Accelerator Radiation Fields; Shielding of Electrons and Photons at Accelerators; Shielding of Hadrons at Accelerators; Low Energy Prompt Radiation Phenomena; Induced Radioactivity at Accelerators; Topics in Radiation Protection Instrumentation at Accelerators; and Accelerator Radiation Protection Program Elements.

Cossairt, J.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Leak test adapter for containers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container`s penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter. The present invention relates generally to leak test adapters, and more particularly to leak test adapters used with containers such as radioactive material shipping containers.

Hallett, B.H.; Hartley, M.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Optical Military Systems Adaptive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence in ground-based telescopes or to improve the spatial mode and power of lasers. More recently, Sandia has led the innovation of using adaptive elements, such as...

200

The Climate Adaptation Frontier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate adaptation has emerged as a mainstream risk management strategy for assisting in maintaining socio-ecological systems within the boundaries of a safe operating space. Yet, there are limits to the ability of systems to adapt. Here, we introduce the concept of an adaptation frontier , which is defined as a socio-ecological system s transitional adaptive operating space between safe and unsafe domains. A number of driving forces are responsible for determining the sustainability of systems on the frontier. These include path dependence, adaptation/development deficits, values conflicts and discounting of future loss and damage. The cumulative implications of these driving forces are highly uncertain. Nevertheless, the fact that a broad range of systems already persist at the edge of their frontiers suggests a high likelihood that some limits will eventually be exceeded. The resulting system transformation is likely to manifest as anticipatory modification of management objectives or loss and damage. These outcomes vary significantly with respect to their ethical implications. Successful navigation of the adaptation frontier will necessitate new paradigms of risk governance to elicit knowledge that encourages reflexive reevaluation of societal values that enable or constrain sustainability.

Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effect of low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary immunity in A/J mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary immunity in A/J mice low-dose, low-LET γ-radiation and BaP injection on pulmonary immunity in A/J mice K. Gott, V. Gonzales, M. Makvandi, N. Kikendall, A. Monier, E. Maloy, C. Rietz, B. Scott and J. Wilder. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM Introduction: Low-dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (LDR; < 100 mGy) activates the immune response (Nowosielska et al., 2006), presumably via epigenetic pathways (Scott et al., 2009) and has been implicated as suppressing both alpha-radiation-induced and smoking-related lung cancer (Scott et al. 2009). One of the hypothesized adaptive-response mechanisms by which LDR does so is by activating immune cell function in the lung, which would then increase their anti-cancer surveillance

204

Phototoxic effect of conjugates of plasmon-resonance nanoparticles with indocyanine green dye on Staphylococcus aureus induced by IR laser radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of IR laser radiation ({lambda} = 805 - 808 nm) on the bacteria of the strain Staphylococcus aureus 209 P, incubated in indocyanine green solutions, is studied, as well as that of colloid gold nanoshells, nanocages and their conjugates with indocyanine green. It is found that the S. aureus 209 P cells are equally subjected to the IR laser radiation ({lambda} = 805 nm) after preliminary sensitisation with indocyanine green and gold nanoparticles separately and with conjugates of nanoparticles and indocyanine green. The enhancement of photodynamic and photothermal effects by 5 % is observed after 30 min of laser illumination ({lambda} = 808 nm) of bacteria, treated with conjugates of indocyanine green and nanocages. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

Tuchina, E S; Tuchin, Valerii V; Khlebtsov, B N; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

206

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

Raman spectroscopy of tumour cells exposed to clinically relevant doses of ionizing radiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improvements to radiation therapy treatment outcomes rely, in part, on consideration of patient specific radiosensitivity. Therefore an assay which quantifies radiation-induced biochemical changes, and subsequently (more)

Harder, Samantha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

Verification of Adaptive Systems  

SciTech Connect

Adaptive systems are critical for future space and other unmanned and intelligent systems. Verification of these systems is also critical for their use in systems with potential harm to human life or with large financial investments. Due to their nondeterministic nature and extremely large state space, current methods for verification of software systems are not adequate to provide a high level of assurance for them. The combination of stabilization science, high performance computing simulations, compositional verification and traditional verification techniques, plus operational monitors, provides a complete approach to verification and deployment of adaptive systems that has not been used before. This paper gives an overview of this approach.

Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Cui, Xiaohui [New York Institute of Technology (NYIT); Vassev, Emil [Lero The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre; Hinchey, Mike [Lero The Irish Software Engineering Research Centre; Rouff, Christopher [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Buskens, Richard [Lockheed Martin Corporation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Adaptive sequential controller  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adaptive sequential controller for controlling a circuit breaker or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer. 15 figs.

El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Xing, J.; Butler, N.G.; Rodriguez, A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Plants remember drought, adapt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research carried out at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL; USA) shows that plants subjected to a previous period of drought learn to deal with the stress owing to their memories of the experience. Plants remember drought, adapt Inform Magazine

212

Adaptive sequential controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Xing, Jian (Seattle, WA); Butler, Nicholas G. (Newberg, OR); Rodriguez, Alonso (Pasadena, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Institutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institutions Institutions Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung-Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM USA Contact: Dr. Bobby R. Scott Program Objective Our research focuses on elucidating the biological bases for radiation adaptive responses in the lung and for suppressing lung cancer, and to use the knowledge gained to produce an improved systems-biology-based, risk model for lung cancer induction by low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation. Research was initiated in October 2009. This research should help foster a new era of low-dose radiation risk/benefit assessment. It will have important implications for possible use of low-dose diagnostic radiation (e.g., X-rays) in cancer therapy. It

214

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

215

X-ray induced Sm{sup 3+} to Sm{sup 2+} conversion in fluorophosphate and fluoroaluminate glasses for the monitoring of high-doses in microbeam radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Fluorophosphate and fluoroaluminate glasses doped with trivalent samarium were evaluated as sensors of x-ray radiation for microbeam radiation therapy at the Canadian Light Source using the conversion of trivalent Sm{sup 3+} to the divalent form Sm{sup 2+}. Both types of glasses show similar conversion rates and may be used as a linear sensor up to {approx}150 Gy and as a nonlinear sensor up to {approx}2400 Gy, where saturation is reached. Experiments with a multi-slit collimator show high spatial resolution of the conversion pattern; the pattern was acquired by a confocal fluorescence microscopy technique. The effects of previous x-ray exposure may be erased by annealing at temperatures exceeding the glass transition temperature T{sub g} while annealing at T{sub A} < T{sub g} enhances the Sm conversion. This enhancement is explained by a thermally stimulated relaxation of host glass ionic matrix surrounding x-ray induced Sm{sup 2+} ions. In addition, some of the Sm{sup 3+}-doped glasses were codoped with Eu{sup 2+}-ions but the results show that there is no marked improvement in the conversion efficiency by the introduction of Eu{sup 2+}.

Vahedi, Shahrzad; Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Muzar, Edward; Koughia, Cyril; Kasap, Safa [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5A9 (Canada); Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences and MacDiarmid Institute, Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn Parade (New Zealand); Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz [Canadian Light Source, Inc., University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 0X4 (Canada); Chapman, Dean [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E5 (Canada)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Evidence of radiation-induced reduction of height and body weight from repeated measurements of adults exposed in childhood to the atomic bombs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduction of growth from exposure to atomic bomb radiation has been examined using individuals under 10 years old at the time of the bombing (ATB) and a growth curve analysis based on measurements of height and weight made in the course of the 4th-7th cycles of the Adult Health Study examinations (1964-1972). As expected, the largest difference in growth to emerge is between males and females. However, a highly significant reduction of growth associated with dose (DS86) was observed among those survivors for whom four repeated measurements of height and weight were available. Longitudinal analysis of a more extended data set (n = 821), using expected values based on simple linear regression models fitted to the three available sets of measurements of height and weight on the 254 individuals with a missing measurement, also indicates a significant radiation-related growth reduction. The possible contribution of such factors as poor nutrition and disruption of normal family life in the years immediately after the war is difficult to evaluate, but the effects of socioeconomic factors on the analysis of these data are discussed. 33 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Otake, Masanori; Funamoto, Sachiyo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Fujikoshi, Yasunori [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Schull, W.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Adaptation and adaptability : expectant design for resilience in coastal urbanity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is the nature of and possibility for urban resiliency through adaptation? Adaptation implies responsiveness to phenomena that are disruptive to a system's functioning; it is a willful evolution in response to changed ...

Ruskeep, Laura A. Delaney (Laura Ashley Delaney)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

Cossairt, J.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Development of a New Analysis Tool for Evaluating and Correcting for Weather Conditions that Constrain Radiation Portal Monitor Performance  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed the Adaptable, Multiplatform, Real-Time Analysis Package (AMRAP) for the continuous measurement of environmental radionuclide decay. AMRAP is a completely open source visualization and analysis package capable of combining a variety of data streams into an array of real-time plots. Once acquired, data streams are analyzed to store static images and extract data based on previously defined thresholds. AMRAP is currently used at ORNL to combine data streams from an Ortec Detective high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, a TSA Systems radiation portal monitor (RPM), and an Orion weather station. The combined data are used to study the rain-induced increase in RPM background radiation levels. RPMs experience an increase in background radiation during precipitation due to the deposition of atmospheric radionuclides on the ground. Using AMRAP results in a real-time analysis workstation specifically dedicated to the study of RPM background radiation levels. By means of an editable library of common inputs, AMRAP is adaptable to remote monitoring applications that would benefit from the real-time visualization and analysis of radiation measurements. To study rain-induced increases in background radiation levels observed in radiation portal monitors (RPMs), researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a software package that allows data with different formats to be analyzed and plotted in near real time. The Adaptable, Multiplatform, Real-Time Analysis Package (AMRAP) was developed to operate in the background and capture plots of important data based on previously defined thresholds. After executing AMRAP, segments of a data stream can be captured without additional post-processing. AMRAP can also display previously recorded data to facilitate a detailed offline analysis. Without access to these capabilities in a single software package, analyzing multiple continuously recorded data streams with different formats is impractical. Commercially available acquisition software packages record and analyze radiation measurements but are not designed to perform real-time analysis in conjunction with data from other vendors. The lack of collaboration between vendors is problematic when research requires different data streams to be correlated in time and immediately analyzed. AMRAP was specifically developed to provide a solution to this problem. AMRAP is a completely open source visualization and analysis package capable of plotting and analyzing data from different vendors in near real time.

Guzzardo, Tyler [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Adaptive Constraints for Feature Tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper extensions to an existing tracking algorithm are described. These extensions implement adaptive tracking constraints in the form of regional upper-bound displacements and an adaptive track smoothness constraint. Together, these ...

K. I. Hodges

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Beam power and angle adaptation in multibeam 2.5 Gbit/s spot diffusing mobile optical wireless system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobility can induce significant signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance degradation in optical wireless (OW) systems based on diffuse as well as spot-diffusing configurations. Two methods (beam angle and beam power adaptation) are introduced to the design ... Keywords: beam angle adaptation, diversity receiver, optical wireless communication, transmit power adaptation

Fuad E. Alsaadi; Jaafar M. H. Elmirghani

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: James D. Tucker  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of the Adaptive Response in determining health risks from in vivo exposures to low dose of ionizing radiation Tucker, J. Publications Christian, A.T., Patte, M.S., Attix,...

223

Corrosion of Metals and Alloys in High Radiation Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper rationalizes the impact of high radiation fields on corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion fatigue and relates that impact to radiation induced changes in chemical reactivity, hydrogen fugacity, and surface chemistry.

Sindelar, R.L.

1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Radiation Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Simon Bouffler Health Protection Agency Abstract Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation. The CBA mouse model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has been used extensively for both quantitative and mechanistic studies. Loss of genetic material from chromosome 2 (chr2) is known to be associated with most radiation-induced AMLs. AML develops in CBA mice exposed to X- or γ-radiation, after a mean latency period of 18 months, with a maximal incidence of approximately 25% at 3Gy. A strong candidate AML-suppressor gene located within the commonly deleted region of chr2 has been identified, Sƒpil/PU.1. This gene suffers hemizygous loss and specific

225

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

226

Low Dose Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Responses in Human Cells and Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation Joe Gray Priscilla Cooper Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The radiation Adaptive Response (adaptation, or AR) is a well documented, although evidently highly variable, protective phenomenon in which exposures to low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation result in reduced deleterious effects of subsequent higher exposures. Protection has been reported against a variety of biologically important endpoints, but its variability as a function of cell and tissue type and its genetic control are not well understood. The adaptive response is predicted to result in a non-linear dose response for cancer risk in the low dose range. However, the molecular mechanism(s) remain unknown, and such information is

227

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Electron Emission From Slightly Oxidized Delta-stabilized Plutonium Generated by its Radioactivity, and Radiation Induced Ionization and Dissociation of Hydrogen at its Surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy dependent electron emission between zero and 1.4 keV generated by the natural reactivity of plutonium was measured by an electrostatic spectrometer with known acceptance angle and acceptance area. The electron spectral intensity decreases continuously except for a distinctive feature of unknown origin at approximately 180eV. The spectrum was converted to energy dependent electron flux (e/cm{sup 2} s) using the assumption that the emission has a cosine angular distribution. The energy dependent electron mean free path in gases and literature cross sections for electron induced reactions were used to determine the number of ionization and dissociation reactions per cm{sup 2} second, found to be about 8*10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.5*10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively, for hydrogen. These results are to be used with caution until complementary measurements can be made, e.g. independent measurement of the total emitted electron current, since the results here are based on the assumption that the electron emission has a cosine angular distribution. That is unlikely to be correct.

Siekhaus, W J; Nelson, A J

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: James E. Morris  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northwest National Laboratories Past Funded Project Sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer in hemachromatosis. Publications Stevens, R.G., Morris, J.E., and Anderson, L.E....

230

Diffusion, Radiation Damage, and Interaction with Point Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... In nuclear reactors,radiation induced void swelling can cause significant dimensional instability of structural materials and degrade their...

231

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

232

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

233

Emittance Adapter for a Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Radiation Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the possibility of reaching very small horizontal and vertical emittances inside an undulator in a storage ring, by means of a local exchange of the apparent horizontal and vertical emittances, performed with a combination of skew quadrupoles and one solenoid in a dedicated insertion line in the storage ring. The insertion leaves the ring parameters and its optical properties unaffected. This scheme could greatly relax the emittance requirements for a diffraction limited synchrotron light source. The lattice derivation and design is described.

Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC; Raimondi, Pantaleo; /Frascati

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effects of Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the nonhomologous end joining mechanism of DNA repair. Clinically, whole body irradiation is used in treatment of some lymphomas and as an immunosuppressive agent for bone...

235

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Adaptive Response in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dolling,1 Ron E Mitchel,2 and Douglas R Boreham1 Institutions: 1McMaster University, Canada,2 Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canada The Trp53 gene is clearly associated with...

236

Adaptive control for energy conservation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate the use of adaptive control concepts in buildings with solar-assisted heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems to maintain occupant comfort conditions while minimizing auxiliary energy use. Accomplishing this objective requires an energy management system capable of making sound tradeoffs. Optimal control theory is used along with a system identification technique to provide an adaptable stratgy. The resulting overall approach is known as adaptive optimal control (AOC).

Farris, D.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Melvyn Folkard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melvyn Folkard Melvyn Folkard Gray Cancer Institute About this Project Currently Funded Projects A Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Technical Abstracts 2005 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investiage Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettiono, G., Atkinson, K., Prise, K.M., Michael, B.D. 2003 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation -Induced Bystander Effect. Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettino, G., Atkinson, K., Prise, K.M., Michael, B.D. 2002 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect. Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettino,

238

Adaptive capacity and its assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

Engle, Nathan L.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

239

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Profile-Based Adaption . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cache decay is a set of leakage-reduction mechanisms that put cache lines that have not been accessed for a specific duration into a low-leakage standby mode. This duration is called the decay interval, and its optimal value varies across applications. This paper provides an extended discussion of the results previously presented in our journal paper [13]. It describes an adaptation technique that analytically finds the optimal decay interval through profiling, and shows that the most important variables required for finding the optimal decay interval can be estimated with a reasonable degree of accuracy using profiling. This work explicitly trades off the leakage power saved in putting both the live and dead lines into standby mode, against its performance and energy costs. It achieves energy savings close to what can be obtained with an omniscient choice of per-benchmark optimal decay interval.

Karthik Sankaranarayanan; Kevin Skadron

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Adaptive neuro fuzzy controller for adaptive compliant robotic gripper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The requirement for new flexible adaptive grippers is the ability to detect and recognize objects in their environments. It is known that robotic manipulators are highly nonlinear systems, and an accurate mathematical model is difficult to obtain, thus ... Keywords: ANFIS controller, Adaptive compliant gripper, Embedded sensors, Fuzzy logic, Object recognizing

Dalibor Petkovi?; Mirna Issa; Nenad D. Pavlovi?; Lena Zentner; Arko OjbaI?

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

246

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

Adaptive navigation for autonomous robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many robotic exploration missions, robots have to learn specific policies that allow them to: (i) select high level goals (e.g., identify specific destinations), (ii) navigate (reach those destinations), (iii) and adapt to their environment (e.g., ... Keywords: Learning, evolution, Learning, neural networks, Learning, single agent, Robotics, adaptation

Matt Knudson; Kagan Tumer

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Tightfit: adaptive parallelization with foresight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irregular applications often exhibit data-dependent parallelism: Different inputs, and sometimes also different execution phases, enable different levels of parallelism. These changes in available parallelism have motivated work on adaptive concurrency ... Keywords: STM, adaptive software parallelization, data-dependent parallelism, irregular applications, offline learning

Omer Tripp; Noam Rinetzky

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Adaptive kernel principal component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adaptive kernel principal component analysis (AKPCA) method, which has the flexibility to accurately track the kernel principal components (KPC), is presented. The contribution of this paper may be divided into two parts. First, KPC are recursively ... Keywords: Adaptive method, Kernel principal component, Kernel principal component analysis, Non-stationary data, Recursive algorithm

Mingtao Ding; Zheng Tian; Haixia Xu

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The Significance of CloudRadiative Forcing to the General Circulation on Climate Time ScalesA Satellite Interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloudradiative forcing calculations based on Nimbus-7 radiation budget and cloudiness measurements reveal that cloud-induced longwave (LW) warming (cloud greenhouse influence) is dominant over the tropics, whereas cloud-induced shortwave (SW) ...

Byung-Ju Sohn; Eric A. Smith

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement - theory, implementation and application  

SciTech Connect

Structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) techniques can enable cutting-edge simulations of problems governed by conservation laws. Focusing on the strictly hyperbolic case, these notes explain all algorithmic and mathematical details of a technically relevant implementation tailored for distributed memory computers. An overview of the background of commonly used finite volume discretizations for gas dynamics is included and typical benchmarks to quantify accuracy and performance of the dynamically adaptive code are discussed. Large-scale simulations of shock-induced realistic combustion in non-Cartesian geometry and shock-driven fluid-structure interaction with fully coupled dynamic boundary motion demonstrate the applicability of the discussed techniques for complex scenarios.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

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Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project The short-term effects of high doses of ionizing radiation on cellular responses are relatively well understood. Less clear are the long-term consequences of exposure to low dose/low dose-rate radiation and the effects of radiation exposure on the progeny of surviving cells. If a cell survives radiation, it is generally thought to have repaired all the radiation-induced insults and be capable of a "normal healthy life". At a certain frequency, however, we have found that some cells surviving radiation grow normally, but will rearrange their genetic material during time in culture. We call this radiation-induced genomic instability. Many

253

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 21201 2 Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 We have recently installed a low LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure including induced genomic instability and

254

High-let radiation carcinogenesis  

SciTech Connect

Recent results for neutron radiation-induced tumors are presented to illustrate the complexities of the dose-response curves for high-LET radiation. It is suggested that in order to derive an appropriate model for dose-response curves for the induction of tumors by high-LET radiation it is necessary to take into account dose distribution, cell killing and the susceptibility of the tissue under study. Preliminary results for the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice exposed to various heavy ion beams are presented. The results suggest that the effectiveness of the heavy ion beams increases with increasing LET. The slopes of the dose-response curves for the different high-LET radiations decrease between 20 and 40 rads and therefore comparisons of the relative effectiveness should be made from data obtained at doses below about 20 to 30 rads.

Fry, R.J.M.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E.L.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Ullrich, R.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radiation damage in optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

While plastic-clad-silica (PCS) fiber shows the greatest radiation resistance, PCS fiber has been difficult to reliably connectorize for routine field operations. For this reason, all-glass fibers have been studied as an alternative to PCS. Based on available literature and some preliminary tests at Los Alamos, we have concentrated on fluorosilicate clad, step index, pure silica core fibers. This paper reviews recent laboratory data for these fibers relative to the PCS fibers. This paper also discusses use of a fiber (or any optical medium) on a Cerenkov radiation-to-light transducer. Since the radiation induces attenuation in the medium, the light output is not proportional to the radiation input. The nonlinearity introduced by this attenuation is calculated.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.; Ogle, J.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Computational phenotype prediction of ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria with a multiple-instance learning model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB) are important in biotechnology. The use of these bacteria for the treatment of radioactive wastes is determined by their surprising capacity of adaptation to radionuclides and a variety of toxic molecules. ... Keywords: ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria, ionizing-radiation-sensitive bacteria, multiple-instance learning, phenotypic prediction, protein sequences

Sabeur Aridhi; Mondher Maddouri; Haitham Sghaier; Engelbert Mephu Nguifo

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High energy neutron and charged particle radiation cause microstructural and mechanical degradation in structural metals and alloys, such as phase segregation, void swelling, embrittlement and creep. Radiation induced damages typically limit nuclear materials to a lifetime of about 40 years. Next generation nuclear reactors require materials that can sustain over 60 - 80 years. Therefore it is of great significance to explore new materials with better radiation resistance, to design metals with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe. Such systems obtain high volume fraction of boundaries, which are considered sinks to radiation induced defects. From the viewpoint of nanomechanics, it is of interest to investigate the plastic deformation mechanisms of nanostructured films, which typically show strong size dependence. By controlling the feature size (layer thickness, twin spacing and grain size), it is applicable to picture a deformation mechanism map which also provides prerequisite information for subsequent radiation hardening study. And from the viewpoint of radiation effects, it is of interest to explore the fundamentals of radiation response, to examine the microstructural and mechanical variations of irradiated nanometals and to enrich the design database. More importantly, with the assistance of in situ techniques, it is appealing to examine the defect generation, evolution, annihilation, absorption and interaction with internal interfaces (layer interfaces, twin boundaries and grain boundaries). Moreover, well-designed nanostructures can also verify the speculation that radiation induced defect density and hardening show clear size dependence. The focus of this thesis lies in the radiation response of Ag/Ni multilayers and nanotwinned Ag subjected to charged particles. The radiation effects in irradiated nanograined Fe are also investigated for comparison. Radiation responses in these nanostructured metallic films suggest that immiscible incoherent Ag/Ni multilayers are more resistant to radiation in comparison to their monolithic counterparts. Their mechanical properties and radiation response show strong layer thickness dependence in terms of radiation hardening and defect density. Coherent twin boundaries can interact with stacking fault tetrahedral and remove them effectively. Twin boundaries can actively absorb radiation induced defects and defect clusters resulting in boundary migration. Size dependence is also found in nanograins where fewer defects exhibit in films with smaller grains.

Yu, Kaiyuan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Nature of Thermal Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was shown recently that thermal radio emission has a stimulated character, and it is quite possible that thermal black body radiation in other spectral ranges also has an induced origin. The induced origin of thermal black body emission leads to important astrophysical consequences, such as the existence of laser type sources and thermal harmonics in stellar spectra.

F. V. Prigara

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

259

7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia Universitys Kellogg Center in New York City on March 1517, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (15). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and non-targeted responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiation receiver  

SciTech Connect

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

262

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Adaptive Markets and the New World Order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the adaptive markets hypothesis (AMH) intelligent but fallible investors learn from and adapt to changing economic environments. This implies that markets are not always efficient but are usually competitive and adaptive, ...

Lo, Andrew W.

264

COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF RADIATION-INDUCED GENE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with 0, 50 or 200 cGy gamma-rays and the cells harvested for RNA 48 hours post irradiation. The RNA was hybridized to RAE 230A Affymetrix microarrays and differences in gene...

265

Radiation Induced Redox Reactions 1. Anions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemerisov, and James F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 3872-3888 (2011). Find paper at ACS Publications Abstract: Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) find increasing use for...

266

Radiation Induced Fragmentation of Diamide Extraction Agents...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dale Rimmer, and James F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 2234-2243 (2012). Find paper at ACS Publications or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: N,N,N',N'-Tetraalkyldiglycolamid...

267

Radiation-induced leiomyosarcoma of the oropharynx  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 Pfeiffer et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Jens Pfeiffer; Carsten Christof Boedeker; Gerd Jrgen Ridder; Wolfgang Maier; Gian Kayser

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Radiation Induced Redox Reactions 2. Imidazolium Cations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

we analyzed stable radiolytic products using 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal...

269

Hierarchy-Direction Selective Approach for Locally Adaptive Sparse Grids  

SciTech Connect

We consider the problem of multidimensional adaptive hierarchical interpolation. We use sparse grids points and functions that are induced from a one dimensional hierarchical rule via tensor products. The classical locally adaptive sparse grid algorithm uses an isotropic refinement from the coarser to the denser levels of the hierarchy. However, the multidimensional hierarchy provides a more complex structure that allows for various anisotropic and hierarchy selective refinement techniques. We consider the more advanced refinement techniques and apply them to a number of simple test functions chosen to demonstrate the various advantages and disadvantages of each method. While there is no refinement scheme that is optimal for all functions, the fully adaptive family-direction-selective technique is usually more stable and requires fewer samples.

Stoyanov, Miroslav K [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

African Adaptation Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptation Programme Adaptation Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: African Adaptations Programme Name African Adaptations Programme Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme, Government of Japan Topics Adaptation, Finance, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.undp-adaptation.org References AAP[1] Overview "UNDP, with funding from the Government of Japan, recently launched a new programme that uses an innovative approach to climate change adaptation in Africa. Under this programme, UNDP will assist 21 African countries in implementing integrated and comprehensive adaptation actions and resilience plans. The projects will ensure that national development processes incorporate climate change risks and opportunities to secure development gains under a

271

Adaptive Materials Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip MI 48108 Product Adaptive Materials Inc (AMI) is a developer of portable fuel cell technology. References Adaptive Materials Inc1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

272

Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning: A Guide for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation...

273

A Dynamic Platform for Runtime Adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a middleware platform for assembling pervasive applications that demand fault-tolerance and adaptivity in distributed, dynamic environments. Unlike typical adaptive middleware approaches, in which sophisticated ...

Pham, Hubert

274

Optimal adaptive control with ?LQG.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis introduces ?LQG, the hyper extension of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian Regulator, for solving general purpose (locally optimal) nonlinear adaptive control on multiple-input multiple-output (more)

Wendt, Luke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation  

SciTech Connect

An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

277

Radiation Tolerant Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategies that can alleviate radiation damage may assist the design of radiation tolerant materials. We will summarize our recent studies on radiation damage in...

278

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Adaptive control for energy conservation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of adaptive control techniques is investigated in heating, ventilating, and air cnditioning (HVAC) systems in solar heated and cooled buildings to minimize the consumption of auxiliary energy. Optimal control theory is used in conjunction with the adaptive control techniques to accomplish the minimization of auxiliary energy. The resulting technique is referred to as adaptive optimal control (AOC). This study has been made by computer simulation and is centered on the National Security and Resources Study Center (NSRSC), a large solar heated and cooled building at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). Simplified models of the building and HVAC system have been developed for both the heating and cooling modes. The control strategies actually used in the NSRSC were simulated in the models and an adaptive optimal controller was developed and also simulated. Simulation runs were made with both the conventional controller and the adaptive controller and performance results of the two simulations were compared. In the first results (obtained using a partial derivative system identification method), the adaptive optimal controller model demonstrated a savings in auxiliary energy of 28.8% for the heating simulation and 18.3% for the cooling simulation when compared to the conventional controller simulation models.

Farris, D.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

WeADAPT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WeADAPT WeADAPT Jump to: navigation, search Name WeADAPT Agency/Company /Organization weADAPT Sector Energy, Land, Water, Climate Resource Type Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.weadapt.org/ References weADAPT[1] "weADAPT.org is an online 'open space' on climate adaptation issues (including the synergies between adaptation and mitigation) which allows practitioners, researchers and policy makers to access credible, high quality information and to share experiences and lessons learnt with the weADAPT community. It is designed to facilitate learning, exchange, collaboration and knowledge integration to build a professional community of practice on adaptation issues while developing policy-relevant tools and guidance for adaptation planning and decision-making.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

AfricaAdapt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AfricaAdapt AfricaAdapt Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Africa Adapt Name Africa Adapt Agency/Company /Organization AfricaAdapt Resource Type Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.africa-adapt.net/AA UN Region Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa References AfricaAdapt[1] Abstract AfricaAdapt is an independent bilingual network (French/English) focused exclusively on Africa. The Network's aim is to facilitate the flow of climate change adaptation knowledge for sustainable livelihoods between researchers, policy makers, civil society organisations and communities who are vulnerable to climate variability and change across the continent. Africa Adapt Screenshot "AfricaAdapt is an independent bilingual network (French/English) focused

282

Radiation damage considerations  

SciTech Connect

The designs of nuclear fission and fusion power plants do not, in general, appear to make unusual demands on materials in terms of mechanical- property requirements. Radiation environments produce unique effects on the composition, microstructure, and defect population of these alloys, resulting in time-dependent and time-independent changes in mechanical properties. To illustrate these problems, the materials needs of the core of a Liquid-Metal Fast- Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) and of the first wall of a fusion reactor are discussed. In the case of the LMFBR core, the phenomenon of void swelling causes serious design problems, and a search is being made for a low-swelling alloy that has adequate mechanical properties. The fusion reactor poses different problems because the neutron energy is high (14 MeV) and is accompanied by a high flux of charged particles. The long-term choices for a wall material have been narrowed to vanadium and niobium alloys. In the search for low-swelling alloys, it has become clear that minor elements play an important role in determining the nature of the radiation effects. The segregation of minor elements to void surfaces and the dispersion and reformation of second-phase precipitates are two important radiation-induced phenomena that require additional study in view of their influence on void swelling and high-temperature properties. (auth)

Frost, B.R.T.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Radiation properties of cavity Cerenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect

Cerenkov radiation from cavities has been analyzed by quantum electrodynamic theory. Analytical expressions of basic radiation properties such as the Einstein's A and B coefficients are derived and shown to be directly modified by the cavities. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the coherent radiation from the Cerenkov radiation devices is due to super radiance of spontaneous emission instead of stimulated emission. Coherent and incoherent radiations are analyzed in the THz radiation range.

Gao Ju; Shen Fang [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows  

SciTech Connect

Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft 1ft prototype panels for the worlds first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicrons patented e-Tint technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of power consumption by ALCWs allows for on-board power electronics for automatic matching of transmission through windows to varying climate conditions without drawing the power from the power grid. ALCWs are capable of transmitting more sunlight in winters to assist in heating and less sunlight in summers to minimize overheating. As such, they can change the window from being a source of energy loss to a source of energy gain. In addition, the scalable AMIs roll-to-roll process, proved by making 1ft 1ftALCW prototype panels, allows for cost-effective production of large-scale window panels along with capability to change easily their color and shape. In addition to architectural glazing in houses and commercial buildings, ALCWs can be used in other applications where control of sunlight is needed, such as green houses, used by commercial produce growers and botanical gardens, cars, aircrafts, etc.

Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

286

Radiation Effects In Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RADIATION MATERIALS SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II: Radiation Effects in Ceramics. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials...

287

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. ... OH. US Air Force Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Wright-Patterson - Base, OH [100548- 0] PA. ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

288

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

289

Adaptive vibration control using synchronous demodulation with ...  

Adaptive vibration control using synchronous demodulation with machine tool controller motor commutation United States Patent

290

Checking Properties of Adaptive Workflow Nets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider adaptive workflow nets, a class of nested nets that allows more comfort and expressive power for modeling adaptability and exception handling in workflow nets. We define two important behavioural properties of adaptive workflow ... Keywords: adaptive workflow, circumspectness, soundness, verification

Kees van Hee; Olivia Oanea; Alexander Serebrenik; Natalia Sidorova; Marc Voorhoeve; Irina A. Lomazova

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stars with masses of >~ 20 solar masses have short Kelvin times that enable them to reach the main sequence while still accreting from their natal clouds. The resulting nuclear burning produces a huge luminosity and a correspondingly large radiation pressure force on dust grains in the accreting gas. This effect may limit the upper mass of stars that can form by accretion. Indeed, simulations and analytic calculations to date have been unable to resolve the mystery of how stars of 50 solar masses and up form. We present two new ideas to solve the radiation pressure problem. First, we use three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations to study the collapse of massive cores. We find that in three dimensions a configuration in which radiation holds up an infalling envelope is Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, leading radiation driven bubbles to collapse and accretion to continue. We also present Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations showing that the cavities created by protostellar winds provides a valve that allow radiation to escape the accreting envelope, further reducing the ability of radiation pressure to inhibit accretion.

Mark R. Krumholz; Richard I. Klein; Christopher F. McKee

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

Adaptive hybrid impedance control of robot manipulators: a comparative study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: direct adaptive control, hybrid impedance control, passivity-based adaptive control, robotics

Lus F. Baptista; Jos M. G. S da Costa

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Einstein's coefficients and the nature of thermal blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that thermal radio emission has an induced character and argue that thermal blackbody radiation in other spectral ranges also has an induced origin. A new theory of thermal radio emission of non-uniform gas basing on the induced origin of emission and its astrophysical applications are considered. The nature of emission from various astrophysical objects is discussed.

F. V. Prigara

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Bruce E. Lehnert  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E. Lehnert E. Lehnert Los Alamos National Laboratory Past Project Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Lehnert, B.E., Cary, R., Gadbois, D. and Gupta G. 2001 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. 1999 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. Publications Lehnert, B.E., Radiation bystander effects. U.S.Department of Energy Research News (March 6 issue) Goldberg, Z. and Lehnert, B.E. (2002). Radiation-induced effects in

295

Integrated Experimental and Computational Approach to Understand the Effects of Heavy Ion Radiation on Skin Homeostasis.  

SciTech Connect

The effects of low dose high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on human health are of concern for both space and clinical exposures. As epidemiological data for such radiation exposures are scarce for making relevant predictions, we need to understand the mechanism of response especially in normal tissues. Our objective here is to understand the effects of heavy ion radiation on tissue homeostasis in a realistic model system. Towards this end, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional skin equivalent to low fluences of Neon (Ne) ions (300 MeV/u), and determined the differentiation profile as a function of time following exposure using immunohistochemistry. We found that Ne ion exposures resulted in transient increases in the tissue regions expressing the differentiation markers keratin 10, and filaggrin, and more subtle time-dependent effects on the number of basal cells in the epidermis. We analyzed the data using a mathematical model of the skin equivalent, to quantify the effect of radiation on cell proliferation and differentiation. The agent-based mathematical model for the epidermal layer treats the epidermis as a collection of heterogeneous cell types with different proliferation/differentiation properties. We obtained model parameters from the literature where available, and calibrated the unknown parameters to match the observed properties in unirradiated skin. We then used the model to rigorously examine alternate hypotheses regarding the effects of high LET radiation on the tissue. Our analysis indicates that Ne ion exposures induce rapid, but transient, changes in cell division, differentiation and proliferation. We have validated the modeling results by histology and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The integrated approach presented here can be used as a general framework to understand the responses of multicellular systems, and can be adapted to other epithelial tissues.

von Neubeck, Claere; Shankaran, Harish; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Robert J.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

296

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Synchrotron Radiation. What is Synchrotron Radiation? Synchrotron radiation ... known. Properties of Synchrotron Radiation. Schwinger ...

297

Radiation-hardened polymeric films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10/sup 15/ to 10/sup 21/ molecules of dopant/cm/sup 3/. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

Arnold, C. Jr.; Hughes, R.C.; Kepler, R.G.; Kurtz, S.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

298

Radiation-hardened polymeric films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10.sup.15 to 10.sup.21 molecules of dopant/cm.sup.3. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Kepler, R. Glen (Albuquerque, NM); Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Full-Spectrum Correlated-k Distribution for Shortwave Atmospheric Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The full-spectrum correlated k-distribution (FSCK) method, originally developed for applications in combustion systems, is adapted for use in shortwave atmospheric radiative transfer. By weighting k distributions by the solar source function, the ...

Daniel T. Pawlak; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Michael F. Modest; Jason N. S. Cole

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Attractive Optical Forces from Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blackbody radiation around hot objects induces ac Stark shifts of the energy levels of nearby atoms and molecules. These shifts are roughly proportional to the fourth power of the temperature and induce a force decaying with the third power of the distance from the object. We explicitly calculate the resulting attractive blackbody optical dipole force for ground state hydrogen atoms. Surprisingly, this force can surpass the repulsive radiation pressure and actually pull the atoms against the radiation energy flow towards the surface with a force stronger than gravity. We exemplify the dominance of the "blackbody force" over gravity for hydrogen in a cloud of hot dust particles. This overlooked force appears relevant in various astrophysical scenarios, in particular, since analogous results hold for a wide class of other broadband radiation sources.

Matthias Sonnleitner; Monika Ritsch-Marte; Helmut Ritsch

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in Bangladesh Jump to: navigation, search Name A Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in Bangladesh Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank, World Bank Topics Adaptation, Finance, Implementation Website http://prod-http-80-800498448. Country Bangladesh UN Region South-Eastern Asia References A Strategy to Engage the Private Sector in Climate Change Adaptation in Bangladesh[1] Overview "There is a growing scientific consensus on the impact of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on global warming as well agreement that it is causing increased weather volatility with the effects increasing in intensity in coming years. Warming may induce sudden shifts in regional weather patterns

302

Adaptation Space: Surviving Non-Maskable Failures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some failures cannot be masked by redundancies, because an unanticipated situation occurred, because fault-tolerance measures were not adequate, or because there was a security breach (which is not amenable to replication). Applications that wish to continue to offer some service despite nonmaskable failure must adapt to the loss of resources. When numerous combinations of non-maskable failure modes are considered, the set of possible adaptations becomes complex. This paper presents adaptation spaces, a formalism for navigating among combinations of adaptations. An adaptation space describes a collection of possible adaptations of a software component or system, and provides a uniform way of viewing a group of alternative software adaptations. Adaptation spaces describe the different means for monitoring the conditions that different adaptations depend on, and the particular configurations through which an adaptive application navigate. Our goal is to use adaptation spaces to provide survivable services to applications despite non-maskable failures such as malicious attacks. We present the basic concepts concerning adaptation spaces, with examples. We then present a formal model for reasoning about and selecting alternative adaptations, allowing developers of survivable application to automate their systems adaptive behavior. 1

Crispin Cowan; Lois Delcambre; Anne-francoise Le Meur; Ling Liu; David Maier; Dylan Mcnamee; Michael Miller; Calton Pu; Perry Wagle; Jonathan Walpole

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

304

Adaptive protection algorithm and system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adaptive protection algorithm and system for protecting electrical distribution systems traces the flow of power through a distribution system, assigns a value (or rank) to each circuit breaker in the system and then determines the appropriate trip set points based on the assigned rank.

Hedrick, Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Toms, Helen L. (Irwin, PA); Miller, Roger M. (Mars, PA)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Gregory A. Kimmel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gregory A. Kimmel Gregory A. Kimmel Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Past Project A Novel Spatially Resolved Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander and Adaptive Responses to Low-LET Radiation. Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Spatially Resolved Single Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander Responses to Low LET Radiation. Resat, M.S., Kimmel, G.A., Miller, J.H., McDonald, J.C., Murphy, M.K., Strom, D.J., Thrall, B.D., and Colson, S.D. 2001 Workshop: Spatially Resolved Single Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander Responses to Low LET Radiation. Resat, M.S., Kimmel, G.A., Miller, J.H., McDonald, J.C., Murphy, M.K., Strom, D.J., Thrall, B.D., Metting, N.F., and Colson, S.D 1999 Workshop: A Novel, Spatially Resolved Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander and Adaptive Responses to Low-LET Radiation.

306

DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)] [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

308

RADIATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

Goldsworthy, W.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

RADIATION DOSIMETER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

Separating Radiation and Thermal Effects on Lateral PNP Bipolar Junction Transistors Operating in the Space Environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Radiation-induced gain degradation in bipolar devices is considered to be the primary threat to linear bipolar circuits operating in the space environment. The damage is (more)

Campola, Michael Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Method and devices for performing stereotactic microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation delivery system generally includes either a synchrotron source or a support frame and a plurality of microbeam delivery devices supported on the support frame, both to deliver a beam in a hemispherical arrangement. Each of the microbeam delivery devices or synchrotron irradiation ports is adapted to deliver at least one microbeam of radiation along a microbeam delivery axis, wherein the microbeam delivery axes of the plurality of microbeam delivery devices cross within a common target volume.

Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

313

Hardware implementation of wireless bit rate adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a hardware implementation of the SoftRate bit-rate adaptation protocol. SoftRate is a new bit-rate adaptation protocol, which uses per-bit confidence hints generated by the convolutional decoder to ...

Gross, Samuel A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

An extensible monitoring and adaptation framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several techniques have been defined for the monitoring and adaptation of applications. However, such techniques usually work in isolation and cannot be easily integrated to tackle complex monitoring and adaptation scenarios. Furthermore, applications ...

Razvan Popescu; Athanasios Staikopoulos; Siobhn Clarke

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Adaptive control of Unmanned Aerial Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive control is considered to be one of the key enabling technologies for future high-performance, safety-critical systems such as air-breathing hypersonic vehicles. Adaptive flight control systems offer improved ...

Dydek, Zachary Thompson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) W. J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , Newand R. J. Berry, "Manual on Radiation Dosimetry" (New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (New

Perez-Mendez, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Boundedness of adaptive nets is decidable  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundedness is a relevant property for adaptive systems: creation, composition and destruction of components at runtime introduce different infiniteness dimensions. In this paper we show the decidability of the boundedness for adaptive nets, a subclass ... Keywords: Adaptive nets, Boundedness, Decidability, Theory of computation

Olivia Oanea

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Presented by Adaptive Hybrid Mesh Refinement for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

meters. · Orography plays an important role in determining the strength and location of the atmospheric on orographic field data Hybrid adapted geodesic mesh based on orographic field data Structured adapted spherical mesh based on orographic field data #12;7 Khamayseh_ITAPS_SC07 h-Adaptive hybrid mesh generation

319

Enhancing adaptability of distributed groupware applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed Groupware applications must be designed to cope with an increasingly diverse set of operational conditions. The available network bandwidth and latency, the network connectivity, the number of users, the type of devices, the system load, ... Keywords: adaptability, adaptive, adaptive layer, context awareness, groupware, mobile devices

Tebalo Tsoaeli; Judith Bishop

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A platform for developing adaptable multicore applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer systems are resource constrained. Application adaptation is a useful way to optimize system resource usage while satisfying the application performance constraints. Previous application adaptation efforts, however, were ad-hoc, time-consuming, ... Keywords: application adaptation, frequency scaling, multicore, parallelization, run-time systems

Dan Fay; Li Shang; Dirk Grunwald

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Adaptive Techniques for Homebased Software DSMs #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive Techniques for Home­based Software DSMs # Lauro Whately 1 , Raquel Pinto 1 , Muralidharan and evaluates Home­based Adaptive Protocol (HAP), a software distributed shared­memory system. HAP performs two with the adaptive system. Keywords---Software Distributed Shared Memory, Home­basedLazy Release Consistency, Home­based

Bianchini, Ricardo

322

Adapted Physical Education Handbook Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It would be very difficult to individually acknowledge all the contributors to this handbook. As I visited colleges around the state, I was always welcomed with open arms by the adapted physical education faculty and staff. Their willingness to take time from their very busy schedules to show me their adapted physical education programs, to fill-out and return a six-page survey, and to attend the regional workshops was most appreciated. This handbook would not have been possible without their contributions and daily efforts to improve programs and services for students with disabilities. I would like to acknowledge Scott Hamilton, Statewide DSP&S Coordinator for the California Community Colleges, for his thoughtful support and guidance throughout this project. I would also like to express my thanks to Noel Roberts, Statewide DSP&S Analyst, for her timely administrative assistance in making the handbook possible. I would especially like to acknowledge the professionalism and dedication of the Adapted Physical Education Handbook Project Task Group. The handbook would never have achieved the same impact and magnitude without the knowledge, experience, and expertise that Kathy Bell, Mark Clements, Jon James, Chuck Keller, Mark Lipe, Mary Martin, and Lee Miller Parks brought to this

Jim Haynes

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Authors: Howard L. Liber1 and Jeffrey L. Schwartz2. Institutions: 1Colorado State University and 2University of Washington. Knowledge of the signal and target through which radiation induces genomic instability, which we propose to investigate herein, will allow us to model effects at low doses. Such knowledge will aid in understanding variations in the induction of this genomic instability, both among cells and among individuals. This information could also lead to more sensitive measures of instability that could yield accurate measures of instability induction at low doses. We have developed an in-vitro cell model, in which radiation-induced chromosome instability develops in a two-stage process.

324

Solar Radiative Transfer for Wind-Sheared Cumulus Cloud Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monte Carlo method of photon transport was used to simulate solar radiative transfer for cumulus-like cloud forms (and cloud fields) possessing structural characteristics similar to those induced by wind shear. Using regular infinite arrays ...

Howard W. Barker

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Cytogenetic tests of Radiobiologi...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relevant low-dose range (less than 0.1 Gy). Relate chromosome damage to radiation-induced cancer. Research Approach By studying molecular mechanisms relevant to low doses and low...

326

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Are Animals Heterozygous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lymphocytes from animals of known genotypes. Radiation-induced foci occur in a time and dose dependent manner in the nuclei of normal cells, NBS cells on the other hand, do not...

327

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

328

Radiation Physics Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Events. Radiation Physics Events. (showing 1 - 3 of 3). CIRMS 2012 Start Date: 10/22/2012 ...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Measurements and General Instrumentation

Kenneth D. Jarman; Erin A. Miller; Richard S. Wittman; Christopher J. Gesh

330

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

331

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The In-Orbit Radiation Environment and Its Effects on Space-Borne Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An overview is given on the various components of the radiation environment of the ISO mission, including cosmic rays, geomagnetically trapped protons and electrons, and the solar proton events. Various aspects related to the radiation shielding and to the radiation-induced effects on instrumentation will also be discussed. For the benefit of future missions, relevant lessons learned concerning ISO radiation environment and its effects will finally be summarised. Key words: ISO, space radiation -- macros: L A T E X 1.

P. Nieminen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li, Zhanjun Guo, Zhonghui Yang, and Eric Chuang Institutions: Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland Background The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

334

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Identification of Mouse Genetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Allan Balmain University of California, San Francisco San Francisco, CA. (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Why this Project? To identify pathways that control genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage and tumor development using novel developments in genomics together with mouse genetics. Project Goals To identify genetic loci that trigger rapid tumor development of mice after radiation. To characterize new genes at these loci that act as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. Experimental Approach New candidate-radiation susceptibility genes will be identified using a unique haplotyping approach. Using DNA from radiation-induced lymphoma, changes in the gene copy number can be detected using BAC microarrays. The

335

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2003 Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li,1 Eric Chuang2 Institutions: 1Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore, internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

336

Right-Left Asymmetry of Radiation from Fission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of the right-left asymmetry is considered in the predicted earlier electric dipole radiation from fission fragments arising due to the Strutinski-Denisov induced polarisation mechanism. The magnitude of the asymmetry parameter is on the level of 10^-3. That is in agreement with the recent experimental data on the radiative ROT effect in ^{235}U fission induced by cold polarised neutrons.

F. F. Karpeshin

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

337

15TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON TOXICITY ASSESSMENT Alpha radiation exposure decreases apoptotic cells in zebrafish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON TOXICITY ASSESSMENT Alpha radiation exposure decreases apoptotic of an adaptive response by the ionizing radiation against sub- sequent exposures to Cd. Keywords Multiple embryos subjected to a priming exposure provided by one environmental stressor (low-dose alpha particles

Yu, K.N.

338

Microscreen radiation shield for thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a microscreen radiation shield which reduces radiative heat losses in thermoelectric generators such as sodium heat engines without reducing the efficiency of operation of such devices. The radiation shield is adapted to be interposed between a reaction zone and a means for condensing an alkali metal vapor in a thermoelectric generator for converting heat energy directly to electrical energy. The radiation shield acts to reflect infrared radiation emanating from the reaction zone back toward the reaction zone while permitting the passage of the alkali metal vapor to the condensing means. The radiation shield includes a woven wire mesh screen or a metal foil having a plurality of orifices formed therein. The orifices in the foil and the spacing between the wires in the mesh is such that radiant heat is reflected back toward the reaction zone in the interior of the generator, while the much smaller diameter alkali metal atoms such as sodium pass directly through the orifices or along the metal surfaces of the shield and through the orifices with little or no impedance.

Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

340

Development of laser radiation limiters based on stratified solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of limiting the intensity of laser radiation using a light-induced critical scattering of light at optothermodynamic conversion of stratified solutions of triethylamine/water and 2-butoxyethanol/water into the labile supercritical region ... Keywords: critical state, intensity limiting, laser, radiation, stratified solutions

A. Yu. Gerasimenko; V. M. Podgaetsky; V. N. Semin; M. M. Simunin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method for increased sensitivity of radiation detection and measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength. Reduced background is accomplished by more thorough annealing and enhanced radiation induced luminescence is obtained by treating the crystalline material to coalesce primary damage centers into secondary damage centers.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Adaptive Comfort Model: Simulations & Future Directions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Comfort Model: Simulations & Future Directions Adaptive Comfort Model: Simulations & Future Directions Speaker(s): Richard de Dear Date: February 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Philip Haves The last 20 years of thermal comfort have witnessed a shift away from the "static" approach (exemplified by the PMV/PPD model) towards the adaptive approach (exemplified by the adaptive models in ASHRAE's Standard 55 (2004, 2010) and the European Union's counterpart standard, EN15251 (2007). - the basis and derivation of the adaptive comfort model - adaptive comfort standards (ASHRAE 55 and EN15251) - new developments and directions (reporting back from the January 2011 ASHRAE Meeting of SSPC-55 in Las Vegas) - environmental variables other than dry bulb, in the adaptive model

343

NIST MIRF - Accelerator Radiation Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerator Radiation Physics. Medium-energy accelerators are under investigation for production of channeling radiation ...

344

NIST Synchrotron radiation in SSD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation in the Sensor Science Division. ... Synchrotron Radiation-Based Calibrations for Space Weather Prediction. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

345

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

346

Uganda-National Adaptation Programme of Action | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptation Programme of Action AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Environment Programme, Global Environment Facility, Environmental Alert Topics Adaptation,...

347

Tanzania-National Adaptation Programme of Action | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptation Programme of Action AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Environment Programme, Global Environment Facility Topics Adaptation, Background analysis...

348

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

349

METHOD OF INHIBITING IRRADIATION-INDUCED VISCOSITY INCREASE OF ORGANIC FLUIDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of reducing radiation-induced thickening of lubricating oils are presented. A system subjected to nuclear radiation is lubricated with an oil containing iodonaphthalene, preferably in the amount of 0.5 to 16 per cent by volume. (AEC)

Denison, G.H.; Bolt, R.O.; Kent, J.W.; Christiansen, F.A.; Carroll, J.G.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

350

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The influence of tropical adaptation and breedtype on adrenal and testicular function in beef bulls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulls of various breedtypes including Angus (Bos taurus), Bonsmara (Sanga X Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), Romosinuano (Criollo), Tuli (Sanga) and Wagyu (Japanese Bos taurus) were utilized to evaluate the influence of tropical adaptation on adrenal and testicular function. The objectives were to determine if tropical adaptation influenced: a) response to management stressors, b) organ and gland weights, adrenal and testis StAR and P450 content and total adrenal, medullary and cortical areas, c) basal and hCG-induced testosterone and d) testis and epididymal sperm concentrations. Blood samples were obtained within 5 min before and after transportation and during restraint every 15 min for 6 h to evaluate cortical response. Angus, Brahman and Romosinuano bulls were slaughtered following sexual maturity. Cortical responses to transportation and restraint were not influenced by tropical adaptation. Response to these stressors could be categorized into high responders (Angus, Brahman), intermediate responders (Romosinuano, Tuli) and low responders (Wagyu, Bonsmara). Tropically-adapted breedtypes were not categorized into a single group; therefore, cortical responses to management stressors were influenced by breedtype, but not by tropical adaptation. Most organ and gland weights (actual weight and weight corrected for BW) and the steroid precursors, StAR and P450, were not influenced by tropical adaptation, but were by breedtype. Paired adrenal gland weight, total adrenal area, medullary and cortical areas were influenced by tropical adaptation. Tropically-adapted breedtypes had lighter glands and smaller areas than the temperate Bos taurus breedtypes. All breedtypes except Wagyu had similar basal concentrations of plasma testosterone prior to hCG administration; therefore, basal testosterone was not influenced by tropical adaptation, but only by breedtype. Wagyu had greater basal concentrations of testosterone than other breedtypes. Testosterone concentrations following hCG administration was similar between adaptation groups and breedtypes. As expected, testis and epididymal sperm concentrations were influenced by tropical adaptation. Tropically-adapted breedtypes had greater testicular and epididymal sperm concentrations than the temperate Bos taurus breedtypes during the summer months. In summary, adrenal weight and area and testicular and epididymal sperm concentrations were influenced by tropical adaptation. Cortical response to management stressors, basal testosterone and StAR and P450 content were influenced by breedtype, not tropical adaptation.

Koch, Jeffrey William

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Does an accelerated electron radiate Unruh radiation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerated particle sees the Minkowski vacuum as thermally excited, and the particle moves stochastically due to an interaction with the thermal bath. This interaction fluctuates the particle's transverse momenta like the Brownian motion in a heat bath. Because of this fluctuating motion, it has been discussed that the accelerated charged particle emits extra radiation (the Unruh radiation) in addition to the classical Larmor radiation, and experiments are under planning to detect such radiation by using ultrahigh intensity lasers constructed in near future. There are, however, counterarguments that the radiation is canceled by an interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the fluctuating motion. In fact, in the case of an internal detector where the Heisenberg equation of motion can be solved exactly, there is no additional radiation after the thermalization is completed. In this paper, we revisit the issue in the case of an accelerated charged particle in the scalar QED. We first prove the e...

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

IMPRINTED GENES & TRANSPOSITIONS: EPIGENOMIC TARGETS FOR LOW DOSE RADIATION EFFECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A{sup vy}) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure (radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in animals and humans needs to be defined.

Randy Jirtle

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

The versatile E. coli adaptive response protein AlkB mitigates toxicity and mutagenicity of etheno-, ethano-, and methyl-modified bases in vivo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Escherichia coli AlkB protein is an exceptionally versatile DNA repair enzyme. Its expression is induced upon exposure to alkylating agents as part of the Ada-mediated adaptive response. This member of the ac-ketoglu ...

Frick, Lauren Elizabeth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Intensity clamping in the filament of femtosecond laser radiation  

SciTech Connect

We have studied numerically the evolution of the light field intensity and induced refractive index of a medium upon filamentation of femtosecond laser radiation in air. It is shown that the intensity clamping results from the dynamic balance of optical powers of nonlinear lenses, induced by radiation due to the Kerr nonlinearity of air, and laser plasma produced during photoionisation. We have found the relation between the peak values of the light field intensity and the electron density in laser-produced plasma, as well as the transverse sizes of the filament and the plasma channel. (effects of laser radiation on matter)

Kandidov, V P; Fedorov, V Yu; Tverskoi, O V; Kosareva, O G; Chin, S L

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

RIGHT-LEFT ASYMMETRY OF RADIATION FROM FISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of the right-left asymmetry is considered in the predicted earlier electric dipole radiation from fission fragments arising due to the Strutinski Denisov induced polarisation mechanism. The magnitude of the asymmetry parameter is on the level of 10 ?3. That is in agreement with the recent experimental data on the radiative ROT effect in 235 U fission induced by cold polarised neutrons. PACS: 24.80.+y, 24.75.+i, 24.70.+s Key words: Fission, asymmetry, radiation, ROT-effect

F. F. Karpeshin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Polarized photons in radiative muon capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the measurement of polarized photons arising from radiative muon capture. The spectrum of left circularly polarized photons or equivalently the circular polarization of the photons emitted in radiative muon capture on hydrogen is quite sensitive to the strength of the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant $g_P$. A measurement of either of these quantities, although very difficult, might be sufficient to resolve the present puzzle resulting from the disagreement between the theoretical prediction for $g_P$ and the results of a recent experiment. This sensitivity results from the absence of left-handed radiation from the muon line and from the fact that the leading parts of the radiation from the hadronic lines, as determined from the chiral power counting rules of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, all contain pion poles.

Shung-ichi Ando; Harold W. Fearing; Dong-Pil Min

2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

360

Neutron Radiation Embrittlement and Microstructural Characterization of Ferritic Steels: Joint EPRI-CRIEPI RPV Embrittlement Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification of mechanisms by which neutron radiation embrittlement occurs in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) ferritic material may permit the design of alloys in which the radiation-induced degradation in mechanical properties is minimized or eliminated. This report documents the microstructural characterization of several RPV steels that will be used to develop predictive models for radiation embrittlement.

1995-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Optomechanically induced transparency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coherent interaction of laser radiation with multilevel atoms and molecules can lead to quantum interference in the electronic excitation pathways. A prominent example observed in atomic three-level-systems is the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), in which a control laser induces a narrow spectral transparency window for a weak probe laser beam. The concomitant rapid variation of the refractive index in this spectral window can give rise to dramatic reduction of the group velocity of a propagating pulse of probe light. Dynamic control of EIT via the control laser enables even a complete stop, that is, storage, of probe light pulses in the atomic medium. Here, we demonstrate optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT)--formally equivalent to EIT--in a cavity optomechanical system operating in the resolved sideband regime. A control laser tuned to the lower motional sideband of the cavity resonance induces a dipole-like interaction of optical and mechanical degrees of freedom. Under these conditions, the destructive interference of excitation pathways for an intracavity probe field gives rise to a window of transparency when a two-photon resonance condition is met. As a salient feature of EIT, the power of the control laser determines the width and depth of the probe transparency window. OMIT could therefore provide a new approach for delaying, slowing and storing light pulses in long-lived mechanical excitations of optomechanical systems, whose optical and mechanical properties can be tailored in almost arbitrary ways in the micro- and nano-optomechanical platforms developed to date.

S. Weis; R. Riviere; S. Deleglise; E. Gavartin; O. Arcizet; A. Schliesser; T. J. Kippenberg

2010-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

362

Polarization radiation of vortex electrons with large orbital angular momentum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortex electrons, - freely propagating electrons whose wavefunction has helical wavefronts, - could become a novel tool in the physics of electromagnetic radiation. They carry a non-zero intrinsic orbital angular momentum (OAM) $\\ell$ with respect to the propagation axis and, for \\ell \\gg 1, a large OAM-induced magnetic moment, \\mu ~ \\ell \\mu_B (\\mu_B is the Bohr magneton), which influences the radiation of electromagnetic waves. Here, we consider in detail the OAM-induced effects by such electrons in two forms of polarization radiation, namely in Cherenkov radiation and transition radiation. Thanks to the large \\ell, we can neglect quantum or spin-induced effects, which are of the order of \\hbar \\omega/E_e \\ll 1, but retain the magnetic moment contribution \\ell \\hbar \\omega/E_e \\lesssim 1, which makes the quasiclassical approach to polarization radiation applicable. We discuss the magnetic moment contribution to polarization radiation, which has never been experimentally observed, and study how its visibility depends on the kinematical parameters and the medium permittivity. In particular, it is shown that this contribution can, in principle, be detected in azimuthally non-symmetrical problems, for example when vortex electrons obliquely cross a metallic screen (transition radiation) or move nearby it (diffraction radiation). We predict a left-right angular asymmetry of the transition radiation (in the plane where the charge radiation distributions would stay symmetric), which appears due to an effective interference between the charge radiation field and the magnetic moment one. Numerical values of this asymmetry for vortex electrons with E_e = 300keV and \\ell = O(100-1000) are O(0.1-1%), and we argue that this effect could be detected with existing technology. The finite conductivity of the target and frequency dispersion play the crucial roles in these predictions.

Igor P. Ivanov; Dmitry V. Karlovets

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

Optimization Online - An adaptive accelerated proximal gradient ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 5, 2013 ... In case the strong convexity parameter is unknown, we also develop an adaptive scheme that can automatically estimate it on the fly, at the cost...

364

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

365

Adaptive computations on conforming quadtree meshes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adaptive re?nement for B-spline ?nite element, Int. J.enrichment [6,7] as well as B-splines [8]. These methods

Tabarraei, A; Sukumar, N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - General Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Radiation Information Answers to Questions about Radiation Dose Ranges Charts - tables showing radiation dose ranges from radio diagnostics to cancer radiotherapy....

367

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Websites about Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Websites About Radiation The ABC's of Nuclear Science A Teacher's Guide To The Nuclear Science Wall Chart Answers to Questions about Radiation and You Background Radiation:...

368

Genome-Wide Changes in Epigenomics Induced by X-Irradiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wide Changes in Epigenomics Induced by X-Irradiation Terumi Kohwi-Shigematsu Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract After radiation insult, sites of damaged DNA are marked...

369

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

Tailor Made: Adapting Psychotherapeutic Interventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With increased diversity and globalization, there is increased emphasis on awareness of cultural influences on functioning and in fostering cultural competence. This is particularly important in the context of intervention planning and acceptability. The standard approach is through didactic coursework; however the extent to which the content of the courses is universal and includes relevance for intervention is unknown. The purpose of this content analysis was to determine whether or not cultural competence is addressed in psychotherapeutic intervention coursework. Direct intervention syllabi from APA accredited school psychology doctoral programs were analyzed. Findings suggest that cultural competence is minimally addressed in intervention courses. Similarly, the mechanisms for culturally adapting interventions are rarely addressed. Findings further suggest that when addressing cultural competence intervention courses focus on applying knowledge to the delivery of services. Understanding the content of current curricula may provide trainers with information to aid in designing their curriculum so that pre service school psychologists may matriculate with a broader basic therapy skill set.

Henry-Smith, Latanya Sherone

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A Power and Resolution Adaptive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new power and resolution adaptive flash ADC, named PRA-ADC, is proposed. The PRA-ADC enables exponential power reduction with linear resolution reduction. Unused parallel voltage comparators are switched to standby mode. The voltage comparators consume only the leakage power during the standby mode. The PRA-ADC, capable of operating at 5-bit, 6-bit, 7-bit, and 8-bit precision, dissipates 69 mW at 5-bit and 435 mW at 8-bit. The PRA-ADC was designed and simulated with 0.18 m CMOS technology. The PRA-ADC design is applicable to RF portable communication devices, allowing tighter management of power and e#ciency.

Flash Analog-To-Digital Converter; Jincheol Yoo; Daegyu Lee; Kyusun Choi; Jongsoo Kim

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Downhole tool adapted for telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cycleable downhole tool such as a Jar, a hydraulic hammer, and a shock absorber adapted for telemetry. This invention applies to other tools where the active components of the tool are displaced when the tool is rotationally or translationally cycled. The invention consists of inductive or contact transmission rings that are connected by an extensible conductor. The extensible conductor permits the transmission of the signal before, after, and during the cycling of the tool. The signal may be continuous or intermittent during cycling. The invention also applies to downhole tools that do not cycle, but in operation are under such stress that an extensible conductor is beneficial. The extensible conductor may also consist of an extensible portion and a fixed portion. The extensible conductor also features clamps that maintain the conductor under stresses greater than that seen by the tool, and seals that are capable of protecting against downhole pressure and contamination.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Provo, UT)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

Transcending the Adaptation/Mitigation Climate Change Science Policy Debate: Unmasking Assumptions about Adaptation and Resilience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two principal policy approaches to global climate change include mitigation and adaption. In recent years, the interest in adaptation and resilience has increased significantly in part because anthropogenic climate change appears unavoidable ...

Tori L. Jennings

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

375

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisor Paul Hoover Special Assistant and Issues Management Coordinator Elinor Gwynn Radiation Protection Radiation Protection The Radiation Protection Division supports the...

377

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. RADIATION EXPOSURE CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2.2. Internal ExposureRADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Rubloff, Gary W.

378

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

379

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

380

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV Name: Flora R Pitchford Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are the effects of nonionizing radiation on DNA , RNA or any other cell...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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381

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Radiation protection at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Radiation Dosimetry Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Dosimetry Data. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions. MJ Berger The databases ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Radiation Shields Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Radiation...

385

Adaptive mesh generation for curved domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the technologies needed to support the creation of adaptively constructed meshes for general curved three-dimensional domains and outlines one set of solutions for providing them. A brief review of an effective way to integrate mesh ... Keywords: adaptive meshes, anisotropic meshes, curved meshes

Mark S. Shephard; Joseph E. Flaherty; Kenneth E. Jansen; Xiangrong Li; Xiaojuan Luo; Nicolas Chevaugeon; Jean-Franois Remacle; Mark W. Beall; Robert M. O'Bara

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Adaptive learning for event modeling and characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptive learning of specific patterns or events of interest has been an area of significant research for various applications in the last two decades. In developing diagnostic evaluation and safety monitoring applications of a propulsion system, it ... Keywords: Adaptive learning, Event modeling, Fuzzy k-means clustering, Hierarchical clustering

Shuangshuang Dai; Atam P. Dhawan

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Adaptive workflow nets for grid computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing grid applications commonly use workflows for the orchestration of grid services. Existing workflow models however suffer from the lack of adaptivity. In this paper we define Adaptive Grid Workflow nets (AGWF nets) appropriate for modeling grid ... Keywords: coordination, grid computing, modeling, petri nets, verification, workflows

Carmen Bratosin; Kees van Hee; Natalia Sidorova

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Adapting Your Home for More Accessible Living  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important for people to live comfortably and independently in their homes. Homes can be adapted to aid people with various disabilities. This publication explains how to make such adaptations for people with vision loss, hearing loss, problems with touch and hand dexterity, loss of strength and range of motion, cognitive difficulties, mobility impairments, and problems with balance and coordination.

Harris, Janie

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

DRM protected dynamic adaptive HTTP streaming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic adaptive HTTP streaming (DASH) is a new concept for video streaming using consecutive downloads of short video segments. 3GPP has developed the basic DASH standard which is further extended by the Open IPTV Forum (OIPF) and MPEG. In all versions ... Keywords: adaptive http streaming, content protection, digital rights management, encryption

Frank Hartung; Sinan Kesici; Daniel Catrein

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Optimal Adaptive Waveform Selection for Target Tracking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Adaptive Waveform Selection for Target Tracking Barbara La Scala Mohammad Rezaeian Bill algorithms. This paper describes an optimal adaptive waveform selection algorithm for target tracking. An adap- tive scheduling algorithm that selects the waveforms to be used in future epochs based on current

Rezaeian, Mohammad-Jafar

391

Adaptive sampling for Bayesian variable selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive sampling for Bayesian variable selection DAVID J. NOTT Department of Statistics for variable selection and for dealing with model un- certainty have become increasingly popular in recent consider adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo schemes for Bayesian variable selection in Gaussian linear

Blennerhassett, Peter

392

Adaptive Fuzzy PID Control for Boiler Deaerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boiler deaerator temperature control system is a non-linear, time-varying, delay control process. It can not achieve satisfying effect using traditional control algorithm to control deaerator water temperature, the paper proposes an adaptive fuzzy ... Keywords: Deaerator, Adaptive, Fuzzy control, PID control

Lei Jinli

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Assessing systems adaptability to a product family  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many cases, product families are established on top of a successful pilot product. While this approach provides an option to measure many concrete attributes like performance and memory footprint, adequateness and adaptability of the architecture ... Keywords: adaptability, assessment, product line architecture, software product lines

Mika Korhonen; Tommi Mikkonen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Applying Adaptive Evolutionary Algorithms to Hard Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying Adaptive Evolutionary Algorithms to Hard Problems J.I. van Hemert1 jvhemert into two distinct parts. The main theme is adaptive evolutionary algorithms. The rst part covers. The second part mainly consists of the development of a library. Its use is aimed at evolutionary algorithms

Emmerich, Michael

395

Petascale Adaptive Computational Fluid Dynamics | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Petascale Adaptive Computational Fluid Dynamics Petascale Adaptive Computational Fluid Dynamics PI Name: Kenneth Jansen PI Email: jansen@rpi.edu Institution: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute The specific aim of this request for resources is to examine scalability and robustness of our code on BG/P. We have confirmed that, during the flow solve phase, our CFD flow solver does exhibit perfect strong scaling to the full 32k cores on our local machine (CCNI-BG/L at RPI) but this will be our first access to BG/P. We are also eager to study the performance of the adaptive phase of our code. Some aspects have scaled well on BG/L (e.g., refinement has produced adaptive meshes that take a 17 million element mesh and perform local adaptivity on 16k cores to match a requested size field to produce a mesh exceeding 1 billion elements) but other aspects (e.g.,

396

Feedback based adaptive compensation of control system sensor uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the problem of adaptively compensating sensor uncertainties is addressed in a feedback based framework. In this study, sensor characteristics are modeled as parametrizable uncertain functions and a compensator is constructed to adaptively ... Keywords: Adaptive control, Adaptive systems, Sensor and data fusion, Tracking and adaptation

Shanshan Li; Gang Tao

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

398

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Radiation detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Davies, Terence J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Morton, III, John R. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.; Schuch, R.L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NIST Optical Radiation Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Staff Directory. Staff. Name, Position, Office Phone. ... Contact. Optical Radiation Group Eric Shirley, Group Leader. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

NVLAP Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP. ... This site has been established for applicants to the accreditation program for ionizing radiation dosimetry. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Welcome. The Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division is a division ... disseminate the national standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

405

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course. ... 2012 NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course October 15-19, 2012 NIST Gaithersburg, Maryland. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ionizing Radiation Division of the Physics Laboratory supports the ... meaningful, and compatible measurements of ionizing radiations (x rays ...

407

Global methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure Pamela J Sykes, Michelle R Newman, Benjamin J Blyth and Rebecca J Ormsby Haematology and Genetic Pathology, Flinders University and Medical Centre, Flinders Centre for Cancer Prevention and Control, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 Australia. (pam.sykes@flinders.edu.au). Our goal is to study the mechanisms involved in biological responses to low doses of radiation in vivo in the dose range that is relevant to population and occupational exposures. At high radiation doses, DNA double-strand breaks are considered the critical lesion underlying the initiation of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. However, at the very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of DNA double-strand breaks

408

Radiation effects concerns at a spallation source  

SciTech Connect

Materials used at spallation neutron sources are exposed to energetic particle and photon radiation. Mechanical and physical properties of these materials are altered; radiation damage on the atomic scale leads to radiation effects on the macroscopic scale. Most notable among mechanical-property radiation effects in metals and metal alloys are changes in tensile strength and ductility, changes in rupture strength, dimensional stability and volumetric swelling, and dimensional changes due to stress-induced creep. Physical properties such as electrical resistivity also are altered. The fission-reactor community has accumulated a good deal of data on material radiation effects. However, when the incident particle energy exceeds 50 MeV or so, a new form of radiation damage ensues; spallation reactions lead to more energetic atom recoils and the subsequent temporal and spatial distribution of point defects is much different from that due to a fission-reactor environment. In addition, spallation reactions cause atomic transmutations with these new atoms representing an impurity in the metal. The higher-energy case is of interest at spallation sources; limited detailed data exist for material performance in this environment. 35 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Sommer, W.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Model of Adaptation in Collaborative Multi-Agent Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptation is an essential requirement for autonomous agent systems functioning in uncertain dynamic environments. Adaptation allows agents to change their behavior in order to improve the overall sys tem performance. We describe a general mechanism ... Keywords: adaptation, mathematical models, robotics

Kristina Lerman

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Adaptive simulation of gas turbine performance  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented allowing the simulation of gas turbine performance with the possibility of adapting to engine particularities. Measurements along the gas path are used, in order to adapt a given performance model by appropriate modification of the component maps. The proposed method can provide accurate simulation for engines of the same type, differing due to manufacturing or assembly tolerances. It doesn't require accurate component maps, as they are derived during the adaptation process. It also can be used for health monitoring purposes, introducing thus a novel approach for component condition assessment. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by application to an industrial gas turbine.

Stamatis, A.; Mathioudakis, K.; Papailiou, K.D. (Ethnikon Metsovion Polytechneion, Athens (Greece))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Solar radiation model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mathematical models have been developed within the past few years which estimate the solar radiation from other weather variables. Some of these models have been used to generate data bases which are extensively used in the design and analysis of solar system. Three of these solar radiation models have been used in developing the Augmented SOLMET Solar Data Tapes for the 26 SOLMET sites and the 222 ERSATZ Solar Data Tapes. One of the models, a theoretical one, predicts the solar noon radiation for clear sky conditions from the optical air mass, precipitable water vapor and turbidity variables. A second model, an empirical one, predicts the hourly total horizontal radiation from meteorological variables. And, a third model, also an empirical one, predicts the hourly direct normal radiation from the hourly total horizontal radiation. A study of the accuracy of these three solar radiation models is reported here. To assess the accuracy of these models, data were obtained from several US National Weather Service Stations and other sources, used the models to estimate the solar-radiation, and then compared the modeled radiation values with observed radiation values. The results of these comparisons and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the models are presented.

Hall, I.J.; Prairie, R.R.; Anderson, H.E.; Boes, E.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RADIATION SAFETY is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students who are directly or indirectly involved in the use of radioisotopes or radiation-producing machines. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means a minimum of controls by the state, it requires that The University establish and pursue an effective Radiation Safety Program. The Radiation Safety Committee is responsible for The University's radiation control program outlined in this manual. The use of radiation in a university, where a large number of people may be unaware of their exposure to radiation hazards, makes strict adherence to procedures established by federal and state authorities of paramount importance for the protection of The University and the safety of its faculty, staff and students. It is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students involved in radiation work to familiarize themselves thoroughly with The University's radiation control program and to comply with its requirements and all applicable federal and state regulations. I hope you will always keep in mind that radiation safety depends on a continuous awareness of potential hazards and on the acceptance

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the microstructure can remove point defects produced by irradiation. Engineered nanocrystalline SiC with a high-density of stacking faults (SFs) has significantly enhanced recombination of interstitials and vacancies, leading to selfhealing of irradiation-induced defects. While single crystal SiC readily undergoes an irradiationinduced crystalline to amorphous transformation at room temperature, the nano-engineered SiC with a high-density of SFs exhibits more than an order of magnitude increase in radiation resistance. Molecular dynamics simulations of collision cascades show that the nano-layered SFs lead to enhanced mobility of interstitial Si atoms. The remarkable radiation resistance in the nano-engineered SiC is attributed to the high-density of SFs within nano-sized grain structures that significantly enhance point defect annihilation.

Zhang, Yanwen; Ishimaru, Manabu; Varga, Tamas; Oda, Takuji; Hardiman, Christopher M.; Xue, Haizhou; Katoh, Yutai; Shannon, Steven; Weber, William J.

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Radiation Damage in Polarized Ammonia Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid NH3 and ND3 provide a highly polarizable, radiation resistant source of polarized protons and deuterons and have been used extensively in high luminosity experiments investigating the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past twenty years, the UVA polarized target group has been instrumental in producing and polarizing much of the material used in these studies, and many practical considerations have been learned in this time. In this discussion, we analyze the polarization performance of the solid ammonia targets used during the recent JLab Eg4 run. Topics include the rate of polarization decay with accumulated charge, the annealing procedure for radiation damaged targets to recover polarization, and the radiation induced change in optimum microwave frequency used to polarize the sample. We also discuss the success we have had in implementing frequency modulation of the polarizing microwave frequency.

K. Slifer

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Health physics applications of nuclear safeguards radiation monitors  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear safeguards needs fostered the development of radiation monitors whose sensitivity and microprocessor-controlled logic permit detection of small, transient increases in environmental levels of gamma radiation. While this capability was originally developed to detect the diversion of the special nuclear materials /sup 235/U and plutonium, adaptation to health physics monitoring is straigthforward. Applications of the safeguards instruments range from small, handheld instruments used to monitor laundry of salvage-bound materials to more complex systems devoted to monitoring moving vehicles at entry/exit points. In addition to these health physics applications, other new applications for safeguards instruments are being considered.

Fehlau, P.E.; Dvorak, R.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptation to Climate Variability and Change: A Guidance Manual for Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Adaptation to Climate Variability and...

418

India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities to...

419

Climate Change Adaptation: Weighing Strategies for Heat-Related...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Adaptation: Weighing Strategies for Heat-Related Health Challenges Print E-mail Climate Change Adaptation: Weighing Strategies for Heat-Related Health Challenges...

420

Ethiopia-Climate Change National Adaptation Programme of Action...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptation Programme of Action Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethiopia-Climate Change National Adaptation Programme of Action AgencyCompany Organization United Nations...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Rwanda-National Adaptation Programs of Action to Climate Change AgencyCompany...

422

Burundi-National Adaptation Plan of Action to Climate Change...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burundi-National Adaptation Plan of Action to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name Burundi-National Adaptation Plan of Action to Climate Change AgencyCompany...

423

Using Technology to Bring Climate Change Adaptation Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Technology to Bring Climate Change Adaptation Research to the Great Lakes Print E-mail Using Technology to Bring Climate Change Adaptation Research to the Great Lakes...

424

The Cost to Developing Countries of Adapting to Climate Change...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Cost to Developing Countries of Adapting to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Cost to Developing Countries of Adapting to Climate Change Agency...

425

Information Resources: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Street Lighting Controls Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components. In Part I, presenters Amy Olay of the City of San Jose, CA, and Kelly Cunningham of the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis discussed their experiences as early adopters of these smart street lighting systems. In Part II, presenters Laura Stuchinsky of the City of San Jose, CA, and Michael Poplawski of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory explored the MSSLC's recently released Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway Luminaires. Part I: Experiences and Benefits June 11, 2013 View the presentation slides Part II: Reviewing the MSSLC's Model Specification

426

Cross-layer wireless bit rate adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents SoftRate, a wireless bit rate adaptation protocol that is responsive to rapidly varying channel conditions. Unlike previous work that uses either frame receptions or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimates ...

Vutukuru, Mythili

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Cross-Layer Wireless Bit Rate Adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents SoftRate, a wireless bit rate adaptation protocol that is responsive to rapidly varying channel conditions. Unlike previous work that uses either frame receptions or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimates ...

Vutukuru, Mythili

428

EVALUATING CONSERVATION EFFECTIVENESS AND ADAPTATION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATING CONSERVATION EFFECTIVENESS AND ADAPTATION IN DYNAMIC LANDSCAPES ADENA R. RISSMAN* I INTRODUCTION Despite the widespread use of conservation easements, their conservation outcomes are relatively unknown.1 Evaluating conservation easement effectiveness requires interdisciplinary research that reaches

Rissman, Adena

429

Robust adaptive subspace extraction for DOA tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of extracting a time-varying signal subspace from noisy signal measurements for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation and tracking. A robust adaptive method for extracting the signal subspace is developed based on robust ...

Dekun Yang; S. J. Flockton

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Adaptive file transfers for diverse environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents dsync, a file transfer system that can dynamically adapt to a wide variety of environments. While many transfer systems work well in their specialized ontext, their performance comes at the cost of generality, and they perform poorly ...

Himabindu Pucha; Michael Kaminsky; David G. Andersen; Michael A. Kozuch

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Providing Dynamic Instructional Adaptation in Programming Learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an approach to create an Intelligent Tutoring System that provides dynamic personalization and learning activities sequencing adaptation by combining eLearning standards and Artificial Intelligent techniques. The work takes advantage ...

Francisco Jurado; Olga C. Santos; Miguel A. Redondo; Jess G. Boticario; Manuel Ortega

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Convert! : the adaptive reuse of churches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the phenomenon of vacated churches and analyzes the major issues underlying their adaptive reuse in order to help promulgate an awareness of the range of successful strategies and solutions that are ...

Kiley, Christopher John, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Adaptive control of a generic hypersonic vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a an adaptive augmented, gain-scheduled baseline LQR-PI controller applied to the Road Runner six-degree-of-freedom generic hypersonic vehicle model. Uncertainty in control effectiveness, longitudinal ...

Wiese, Daniel Philip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

High Performance Adaptive Distributed Scheduling Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exascale computing requires complex runtime systems that need to consider affinity, load balancing and low time and message complexity for scheduling massive scale parallel computations. Simultaneous consideration of these objectives makes online distributed ... Keywords: Distributed Scheduling, Adaptive Scheduling, Performance Analysis

Ankur Narang, Abhinav Srivastava, R. K. Shyamasundar

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Adaptive power management in energy harvesting systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, there has been a substantial interest in the design of systems that receive their energy from regenerative sources such as solar cells. In contrast to approaches that attempt to minimize the power consumption we are concerned with adapting ...

Clemens Moser; Lothar Thiele; Davide Brunelli; Luca Benini

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Exponential convergence with adaptive Monte Carlo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For over a decade, it has been known that exponential convergence on discrete transport problems was possible using adaptive Monte Carlo techniques. Now, exponential convergence has been empirically demonstrated on a spatially continuous problem.

Booth, T.E.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Usability engineering for the adaptive web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter discusses a usability engineering approach for the design and the evaluation of adaptive web-based systems, focusing on practical issues. A list of methods will be presented, considering a user-centered approach. After having introduced ...

Cristina Gena; Stephan Weibelzahl

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Dynamic Grid Adaptation Using the MPDATA Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic grid adaptation (DGA) scheme is developed using various combinations of the multidimensional positive definite advection transport algorithm (MPDATA) to show the applicability of DGA with the MPDATA scheme to solve advection problems. A ...

John P. Iselin; Joseph M. Prusa; William J. Gutowski

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Statistical Design for Adaptive Weather Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suppose that one has the freedom to adapt the observational network by choosing the times and locations of observations. Which choices would yield the best analysis of the atmospheric state or the best subsequent forecast? Here, this problem of ...

L. Mark Berliner; Zhan-Qian Lu; Chris Snyder

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Model 467-1 Adapter Hardware Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1 Adapter vi Important Notes: Make sure you follow proper ESD handling procedures (refer to EIA-625, ESD ............................................................................. 15 1.10 Interrupt And Error Handling....................................................... 16 1 Jumpers.........................................................32 3.4.6 Remote RAM Jumpers

Berns, Hans-Gerd

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441

Adaptive learning of semantic locations and routes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptation of devices and applications based on contextual information has a great potential to enhance usability and mitigate the increasing complexity of mobile devices. An important topic in context-aware computing is to learn semantic locations and ...

Keshu Zhang; Haifeng Li; Kari Torkkola; Mike Gardner

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Adaptive learning of semantic locations and routes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adaptation of devices and applications based on contextual information has a great potential to enhance usability and mitigate the increasing complexity of mobile devices. An important topic in context-aware computing is to learn semantic locations and ...

Keshu Zhang; Haifeng Li; Kari Torkkola; Mike Gardner

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

444

RADIATION WAVE DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

Wouters, L.F.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Howard L. Liber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Howard L. Liber Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: Delayed genomic instability in human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs y-rays radiation Schwartz, J.L., Jordan, R., Lenarczyk, M. and Liber, H.L. 2002 Workshop: Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Liber, H.L. and Schwartz, J.L. Publications Zhang, Y., Zhou, J., Held, K.D., Redmond, R.W., Prise, K.M., and Liber, H.L. (2008). Deficiencies of double-strand break repair factors and effects on mutagenesis in directly [gamma]-irradiated and medium-mediated bystander human lymphoblastoid cells. Radiation Research 169(2):197-206.

446

Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk will discuss details of the approach and present results for some example calculations performed in Manhattan in support of the DHS Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) using some of the tools developed as part of this new capability.

Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

447

Apoptosis as a Mechanism for Low Dose Radiation-and Amifostine-Mediated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apoptosis as a Mechanism for Low Dose Radiation- and Amifostine-Mediated Apoptosis as a Mechanism for Low Dose Radiation- and Amifostine-Mediated Chromosomal Inversion Responses Pam Sykes Flinders University and Medical Centre Abstract Low dose radiation and the chemical radioprotector amifostine have both been shown to protect cells from the immediate and delayed effects of radiation exposure. They display a number of distinct similarities including their ability to protect cells against radiation-induced DNA damage, radiation-induced cell death and metastases formation. Amifostine, which protects cells from the toxic effects of ionizing radiation, has a broad range of activities including free radical scavenging, polyamine-like DNA binding, and induction of hypoxia and redox-regulated genes. Amifostine’s ability to protect cells is often

448

Adaptive nonparametric regression on spin fiber bundles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of adaptive nonparametric procedures by means of wavelet thresholding techniques is now a classical topic in modern mathematical statistics. In this paper, we extend this framework to the analysis of nonparametric regression on sections ... Keywords: 42B35, 42C10, 42C40, 46E35, 62G08, 62G20, Adaptive nonparametric regression, Mixed spin needlets, Spin Besov spaces, Spin fiber bundles, Thresholding

Claudio Durastanti; Daryl Geller; Domenico Marinucci

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Radiation Shielding Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shielding Radiation Shielding Applications Heavy concrete is standard concrete in which conventional aggregate (typically gravel) is replaced with aggregate composed of a dense...

452

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

453

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

454

Quick Reference Information - Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma and x-rays are photons. Protons: Positively charged elementary particles found in atomic nuclei. Radiation: The propagation of energy through space, or some other medium,...

455

Synchrotron Radiation Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation Effects in the IR Solenoid Flux Excluder Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0007 Draft 23-September-1998 Abstract We examine the emittance dilution due to synchrotron...

456

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

457

Living with radiation  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an account of the hopes and fears associated with ionizing radiation, extending from nuclear energy and medical radiation to nuclear weapons. They argue that a justified fear of nuclear weapons has led to a widespread, unjustified, and unreasoning fear of the beneficial applications of radiation. Although these two aspects of atomic energy are tied together-they both involve the nucleus of the atom and its radioactive rays-a deep misunderstanding of this relationship by the general public has evolved since the time of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The authors' aim is to place the beneficial applications of nuclear radiation in perspective.

Wagner, H.N. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA). Div. of Nuclear Medicine); Ketchum, L.E. (Proclinica, Inc., New York, NY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study Science Objective This field campaign is designed to increase scientific knowledge about the evolution of black carbon, primary organic...

459

Documentation for the intergalactic radiative transfer code IGMtransfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes the publically available numerical code "IGMtransfer", capable of performing intergalactic radiative transfer (RT) of light in the vicinity of the Lyman alpha (Lya) line. Calculating the RT in a (possibly adaptively refined) grid of cells resulting from a cosmological simulation, the code returns 1) a "transmission function", showing how the intergalactic medium (IGM) affects the Lya line at a given redshift, and 2) the "average transmission" of the IGM, making it useful for studying the results of reionization simulations.

Laursen, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

CASTRO: A NEW COMPRESSIBLE ASTROPHYSICAL SOLVER. III. MULTIGROUP RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS  

SciTech Connect

We present a formulation for multigroup radiation hydrodynamics that is correct to order O(v/c) using the comoving-frame approach and the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We describe a numerical algorithm for solving the system, implemented in the compressible astrophysics code, CASTRO. CASTRO uses a Eulerian grid with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement based on a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular variable-sized grids with simultaneous refinement in both space and time. In our multigroup radiation solver, the system is split into three parts: one part that couples the radiation and fluid in a hyperbolic subsystem, another part that advects the radiation in frequency space, and a parabolic part that evolves radiation diffusion and source-sink terms. The hyperbolic subsystem and the frequency space advection are solved explicitly with high-order Godunov schemes, whereas the parabolic part is solved implicitly with a first-order backward Euler method. Our multigroup radiation solver works for both neutrino and photon radiation.

Zhang, W.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J. [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Howell, L. [Center for Applied Scientific Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Burrows, A.; Dolence, J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation induced adaptive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While t