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1

Stable CSR in storage rings: A model  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user s shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring-based CSR sources with a stable broadband photon flux in the terahertz region of up to {approx} 9 orders of magnitude larger than in existing ''conventional'' storage rings. Such a scheme is of interest not only for the design of new sources but also for the evaluation and optimization of the CSR performance in existing electron storage rings. The presented results are mainly based on reference [19].

Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Venturini, Marco; Abo-Bakr, Michael; Feikes, Jorge; Holldack, Karsten; Kuske, Peter; Wustefeld, Godehart; Hubers, Heinz-Willerm; Warnock, Robert

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

2

Comparison of 1D and 2D CSR Models with Application to the FERMI@ELETTRA Bunch Compressors  

SciTech Connect

We compare our 2D mean field (Vlasov-Maxwell) treatment of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects with 1D approximations of the CSR force which are commonly implemented in CSR codes. In our model we track particles in 4D phase space and calculate 2D forces [1]. The major cost in our calculation is the computation of the 2D force. To speed up the computation and improve 1D models we also investigate approximations to our exact 2D force. As an application, we present numerical results for the Fermi{at}Elettra first bunch compressor with the configuration described in [1].

Bassi, G.; Ellison, J.A.; Heinemann, K.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

3

Solar radiation model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mathematical models have been developed within the past few years which estimate the solar radiation from other weather variables. Some of these models have been used to generate data bases which are extensively used in the design and analysis of solar system. Three of these solar radiation models have been used in developing the Augmented SOLMET Solar Data Tapes for the 26 SOLMET sites and the 222 ERSATZ Solar Data Tapes. One of the models, a theoretical one, predicts the solar noon radiation for clear sky conditions from the optical air mass, precipitable water vapor and turbidity variables. A second model, an empirical one, predicts the hourly total horizontal radiation from meteorological variables. And, a third model, also an empirical one, predicts the hourly direct normal radiation from the hourly total horizontal radiation. A study of the accuracy of these three solar radiation models is reported here. To assess the accuracy of these models, data were obtained from several US National Weather Service Stations and other sources, used the models to estimate the solar-radiation, and then compared the modeled radiation values with observed radiation values. The results of these comparisons and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the models are presented.

Hall, I.J.; Prairie, R.R.; Anderson, H.E.; Boes, E.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Solar radiation modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sun is the main energy source of the life on the Earth. Thus, solar radiation energy data and models are important for many areas of research and applications. Many parameters influence the amount of solar energy at a particular standing point of ... Keywords: Digital elevation model, Energy of quasiglobal radiation, Meteorology, Shadows, Virtual Sun motion

Klemen Zakšek; Toma Podobnikar; Krištof Oštir

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A MODEL FOR PRODUCING STABLE, BROADBAND TERAHERTZ COHERENT SYNCHROTRONRADIATION IN STORAGE RINGS  

SciTech Connect

We present a model for producing stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), enhancing higher frequency coherent emission and limits to stable emission due to a microbunching instability excited by the SR. We use this model to optimize the performance of a source for CSR emission.

Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Martin, MichaelC.; Venturini, Marco

2003-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

7

A Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Reflection of Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over ...

X. Xiang; E. A. Smith; C. G. Justus

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in...

9

CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Research Institute | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Research Institute CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Research Institute Place Zhuzhou, Hunan Province, China Zip 412001 Product String representation "Times Electric ... new industries." is too long. References CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Research Institute[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Research Institute is a company located in Zhuzhou, Hunan Province, China . References ↑ "CSR Zhuzhou Electric Locomotive Research Institute" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CSR_Zhuzhou_Electric_Locomotive_Research_Institute&oldid=343995

10

An Earth Outgoing Longwave Radiation Climate Model. Part II: Radiation with Clouds Included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Earth outgoing longwave radiation (OLWR) climate model was constructed for radiation budget studies. The model consists of the upward radiative transfer parameterization of Thompson and Warren, the cloud cover model of Sherr et al., and a ...

Shi-Keng Yang; G. Louis Smith; Fred L. Bartman

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Modeling early galaxies using radiation hydrodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This simulation uses a flux-limited diffusion solver to explore the radiation hydrodynamics of early galaxies, in particular, the ionizing radiation created by Population III stars. At the time of this rendering, the simulation has evolved to a redshift ... Keywords: astrophysics, modeling, visualization

Joseph A. Insley; Rick Wagner; Robert Harkness; Daniel R. Reynolds; Michael L. Norman; Mark Hereld; Eric C. Olson; Michael E. Papka; Venkatram Vishwanath

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Investigation of possible csr induced energy spread effects with the A0 photoinjector bunch compressor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bunch compressor of the A0 Photoinjector at Fermilab was removed this past spring to install a transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange experiment. Prior to its removal questions arose about the possibility of observing the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation on the compressed beam. The energy spread of the beam with and without compression was measured to observe any changes. Various beam charges were used to look for square law effects associated with CSR. No direct observation of CSR in the compressor was attempted because the design of the vacuum chamber did not allow it. In this paper we report the results of these experiments and comparison with simulations using ASTRA and CSRTrack. The results are also compared with analytical approximations.

Fliller, R.P., III; Edwards, H.; Kazakevich, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.M.; Ruan, J.; /Fermilab

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Decomposition of radiational effects of model feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

Three separate doubled CO/sub 2/ experiments with the statistical dynamic model are used to illustrate efforts to study the climate dynamics, feedbacks, and interrelationships of meteorological parameters by decomposing and isolating their individual effects on radiation transport.

Ellsaesser, H.W.; MacCracken, M.C.; Potter, G.L.; Mitchell, C.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Two-Dimensional Radiation-Turbulence Climate Model. I: Sensitivity to Cirrus Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the thermodynamic energy balance between radiation and vertical plus horizontal dynamic transports, a two-dimensional radiation-turbulence climate model is developed. This model consists of a broadband solar and IR radiation transfer ...

Szu-Cheng S. Ou; Kuo-Nan Liou

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Development of a 3D atmospheric radiative transfer model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3D atmospheric radiative transfer model is established based on MODTRAN4. Moreover, the methods of calculating the ratio of atmospheric transmission, path radiation and single scattering solar radiation are presented. This 3D model is running by ... Keywords: MODTRAN4, atmospheric radiative transfer model, infrared radiation

Zhifeng Lu; Ge Li; Gang Guo; Kedi Huang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Modeling Surface Solar Radiation: Model Formulation and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for computing global solar radiation at the surface was formulated for use with satellite observations. A compromise in the approach was necessary, whereby the model accuracy and the inherent limitations of satellite observations were ...

R. T. Pinker; J. A. Ewing

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Estimation and Model Validation of Surface Solar Radiation and Cloud Radiative Forcing Using TOGA COARE Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) radiation measurements in the western Pacific warm pool are used to estimate surface solar radiation budgets and to validate radiation model ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Wenzhong Zhao

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A New Narrowband Radiation Model for Water Vapor Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of radiation models is a critical issue in climate studies. However, calculations from different radiation models used in climate calculations disagree with one another, and with more detailed models, at levels significant to many ...

Juying X. Warner; Robert G. Ellingson

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A [Escuela de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela); Ospino, J. [Area de Fisica Teorica. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca Salamanca (Spain)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Surface Solar Radiation Flux and Cloud Radiative Forcing for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP): A Satellite, Surface Observations, and Radiative Transfer Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents surface solar radiation flux and cloud radiative forcing results obtained by using a combination of satellite and surface observations interpreted by means of a simple plane-parallel radiative transfer model called 2001. This ...

Catherine Gautier; Martin Landsfeld

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Empirical Evaluation of Four Microwave Radiative Forward Models...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 31-April 4, 2003 Figure 1. (contd) (20.6, 31.65 GHz), hereafter referred as ACF, JPL, and CSR, respectively. These radiometers have shown a calibration accuracy of the...

23

Direct SNG production by the CS/R hydrogasification process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CS/R Hydrogasification Process utilizes a short residence-time entrained-flow reactor, derived from aerospace rocket reactor technology, for quickly reacting pulverized coal with hot hydrogen to directly produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Development testing has indicated the feasibility of two primary process options: the production of SNG as the sole major product or the coproduction of SNG and chemical-grade benzene. Recent emphasis has focused on process design, optimization, and economics. Preliminary design studies of commercial-scale (250 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/day) grassroots SNG plants have been completed for two widely different types of feedstock: Kentucky No. 9 hvAb coal and Minnesota peat. This paper summarizes the pertinent experimental data and analytical modeling studies of flash hydropyrolysis used as a basic input to the process design effort. The commercial process flowsheets for each feedstock are described, and the resultant capital and operating costs are discussed. Sensitivity analyses are presented relating the cost of gas to the major process operating variables and economic parameters.

Kahn, D.R.; Combs, L.P.; Garey, M.P.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Optimizing ring-based CSR sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synchrotron radiation from the NSLS VUV ring", NIMA, 463 (of Coherent Emission from the NSLS VUV Ring”, Proc. 1999

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

LABORATORY MODELLING OF THE EARTH RADIATION BELT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method of the laboratory modelling of the Earth radiation belt is presented. Method can be used for the estimation of consequences of global energetic and communication projects realizations. The radiation belt of the Earth is the inner part of the magnetosphere, in which the geomagnetic field hold charged particles with kinetic energy from 10 KeV to 100 MeV. This belt play the essential role for the sun radiation regime for the Earth and for the electromagnetic waves propagation. As it is well known, even small alteration of solar activity influent essential upon the biological and ecological balance at the Earth for all levels- from viruses and micro-organisms to biological societies and ecological systems at all. The most bright indicator of the solar activity alteration are changes of the pathogenic organisms activity as a result of a displacement of biological equilibrium. But the other phenomena, which are not connected with pathogenic biological objects are very important for thelife on the Earth and ecological balance too, although they can not be so obviously observed.

Dr. Alexander Luchinskiy A; Prof Dr; Yakov S. Shifrin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A Beta Regression Model for Improved Solar Radiation Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting global solar radiation is an integral part of much environmental modeling. There are several approaches for predicting global solar radiation at a site where no instrumentation exists. One popular approach uses the difference between ...

Randall Mullen; Lucy Marshall; Brian McGlynn

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A beta regression model for improved solar radiation predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting global solar radiation is an integral part of much environmental modeling. There are several approaches for predicting global solar radiation at a site where no instrumentation exists. One popular approach uses the difference between ...

Randall Mullen; Lucy Marshall; Brian McGlynn

28

An Accurate and Efficient Radiation Algorithm for Middle Atmosphere Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate, efficient, and user-friendly radiation algorithm is developed for calculating net radiative heating rate in middle atmosphere models. The Curtis matrix interpolation scheme originally developed by Zhu is adopted with explicit ...

Xun Zhu

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during SWERA Project in Brazil (Abstract):  This work describes the cross validation between two different...

30

Improvements to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado W. J. Wiscombe National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

31

3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

Howard Barker; Jason Cole

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

32

Electromagnetic field radiation model for lightning strokes to tall structures  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes observation and analysis of electromagnetic field radiation from lightning strokes to tall structures. Electromagnetic field waveforms and current waveforms of lightning strokes to the CN Tower have been simultaneously measured since 1991. A new calculation model of electromagnetic field radiation is proposed. The proposed model consists of the lightning current propagation and distribution model and the electromagnetic field radiation model. Electromagnetic fields calculated by the proposed model, based on the observed lightning current at the CN Tower, agree well with the observed fields at 2km north of the tower.

Motoyama, H. [CRIEPI, Tokyo (Japan); Janischewskyj, W.; Hussein, A.M. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chisholm, W.A. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chang, J.S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Rusan, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Antarctic Clouds and Radiation within the NCAR Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate and improve the treatment of clouds and radiation by the climate models of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), simulations by the NCAR Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3), as well as the recently released ...

Keith M. Hines; David H. Bromwich; Philip J. Rasch; Michael J. Iacono

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are compared with calculations made with a state-of-the art radiative transfer model (Modtran). The model is driven by measurements that give an as accurate as possible...

35

A Parametric Radiative Forcing Model for Contrail Cirrus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new parameterized analytical model is presented to compute the instantaneous radiative forcing (RF) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) produced by an additional thin contrail cirrus layer (called “contrail” below). The model calculates the RF ...

U. Schumann; B. Mayer; K. Graf; H. Mannstein

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the researchers reported the first observation of seeding an instability of the electron beam by the laser, and they presented a physical model that shows how this occurs under the proper conditions. Such a mechanism makes it possible to control the instability onset and to exploit its gain for the generation of pulses of terahertz CSR of unprecedented power. Terahertz radiation with a wavelength from about 1 cm to about 100 microns between the microwave and the infrared would provide access to a large number of fundamental phenomena. To mention only some of them: excited electrons orbit, small molecules rotate, proteins vibrate, superconducting energy gaps resonate, and gaseous and solid-state plasmas oscillate at terahertz frequencies. But generating terahertz radiation is ordinarily a challenging task for any kind of source, including storage-ring-based synchrotron light sources. The new findings by the ALS group could represent a significant step toward satisfying the need for powerful terahertz sources.

37

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the researchers reported the first observation of seeding an instability of the electron beam by the laser, and they presented a physical model that shows how this occurs under the proper conditions. Such a mechanism makes it possible to control the instability onset and to exploit its gain for the generation of pulses of terahertz CSR of unprecedented power. Terahertz radiation with a wavelength from about 1 cm to about 100 microns between the microwave and the infrared would provide access to a large number of fundamental phenomena. To mention only some of them: excited electrons orbit, small molecules rotate, proteins vibrate, superconducting energy gaps resonate, and gaseous and solid-state plasmas oscillate at terahertz frequencies. But generating terahertz radiation is ordinarily a challenging task for any kind of source, including storage-ring-based synchrotron light sources. The new findings by the ALS group could represent a significant step toward satisfying the need for powerful terahertz sources.

38

Modeling Topographic Solar Radiation Using GOES Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors present an algorithm that combines solar radiation fields derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations with digital elevation data to produce topographically varying insolation ...

R. Dubayah; S. Loechel

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Modelling magnetically dominated and radiatively cooling jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using 3D-MHD Eulerian-grid numerical simulations, we study the formation and evolution of rising magnetic towers propagating into an ambient medium. The towers are generated from a localized injection of pure magnetic energy. No rotation is imposed on the plasma. We compare the evolution of a radiatively cooling tower with an adiabatic one, and find that both bend due to pinch instabilities. Collimation is stronger in the radiative cooling case; the adiabatic tower tends to expand radially. Structural similarities are found between these towers and the millimeter scale magnetic towers produced in laboratory experiments.

Huarte-Espinosa, Martin; Blackman, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Community Radiative Transfer Model for Stratospheric Sounding Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better use the Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU) data for reanalysis and climate studies, issues associated with the fast radiative transfer (RT) model for SSU have recently been revisited and the results have been implemented into the ...

Yong Chen; Yong Han; Quanhua Liu; Paul Van Delst; Fuzhong Weng

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Surface Solar Radiation Model for Cloudy Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical solar radiation model based on standard meteorological data was revised for clouds using data from the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE). Climatic-mean transmittance functions were revised for low and convective clouds ...

Marshall A. Atwater; John T. Ball

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

[Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

This is a renewal proposal for an on-going project of the Department of Energy (DOE)/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The objective of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of radiation-cloud in GCMs so that reliable predictions of the timing and magnitude of greenhouse gas-induced global warming and regional responses can be made. The ARM Program supports two research areas: (I) The modeling and analysis of data related to the parameterization of clouds and radiation in general circulation models (GCMs); and (II) the development of advanced instrumentation for both mapping the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere and high accuracy/precision radiometric observations. The present project conducts research in area (I) and focuses on GCM treatment of cloud life cycle, optical properties, and vertical overlapping. The project has two tasks: (1) Development and Refinement of GCM Radiation-Cloud Treatment Using ARM Data; and (2) Validation of GCM Radiation-Cloud Treatment.

Wang, W.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Solar radiation data modeling with a novel surface fitting approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this work one year hourly solar radiation data are analyzed and modeled. Using a 2-D surface fitting approach, a novel model is developed for the general behavior of the solar radiation. The mathematical formulation of the 2-D surface model is obtained. The accuracy of the analytical surface model is tested and compared with another surface model obtained from a feed-forward Neural Network(NN). Analytical surface model and NN surface model are compared in the sense of Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). It is obtained that the NN surface model gives more accurate results with smaller RMSE results. However, unlike the specifity of the NN surface model, the analytical surface model provides an intuitive and more generalized form that can be suitable for several other locations on earth. 1

F. Onur Hocao˜glu; Ömer Nezih Gerek; Mehmet Kurban

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) : responsibility or Innovation? : an analysis of the feedback between CSR activities and the expectations placed upon corporations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis uses case study and interview data to present a framework for analyzing corporate behavior in order to define corporate social responsibility (CSR). It answers the question: Can corporations tie corporate social ...

Rodriguez, Adrian Xavier

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radiation transport phenomena and modeling - part A: Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need to understand how particle radiation (high-energy photons and electrons) from a variety of sources affects materials and electronics has motivated the development of sophisticated computer codes that describe how radiation with energies from 1.0 keV to 100.0 GeV propagates through matter. Predicting radiation transport is the necessary first step in predicting radiation effects. The radiation transport codes that are described here are general-purpose codes capable of analyzing a variety of radiation environments including those produced by nuclear weapons (x-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons), by sources in space (electrons and ions) and by accelerators (x-rays, gamma rays, and electrons). Applications of these codes include the study of radiation effects on electronics, nuclear medicine (imaging and cancer treatment), and industrial processes (food disinfestation, waste sterilization, manufacturing.) The primary focus will be on coupled electron-photon transport codes, with some brief discussion of proton transport. These codes model a radiation cascade in which electrons produce photons and vice versa. This coupling between particles of different types is important for radiation effects. For instance, in an x-ray environment, electrons are produced that drive the response in electronics. In an electron environment, dose due to bremsstrahlung photons can be significant once the source electrons have been stopped.

Lorence, L.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

Robinson, Tyler D. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Catling, David C., E-mail: robinson@astro.washington.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195-1310 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during SWERA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during SWERA Cross Validation of Satellite Radiation Transfer Models during SWERA Project in Brazil Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): This work describes the cross validation between two different core radiation transfer models that will be applied during the SWERA (Solar and Wind Energy Assessment): the BRAZIL-SR, and the SUNY-Albany. The model cross validation was performed by using two reference sites in Brazil: at Caicó (06°28'01"S - 037°05'05"W,175.8 m), and Florianópolis (27°34'18"S - 048°31'42"W, 10 m), Satellite data were collected by INPE-CPTEC for GOES-8, that also provides for its quality assessment, sectoring, storing and distribution to the participating teams. In this work we show the first results of this cross-validation along with some discussions on model deviations

48

Radiative Transfer Modeling of a Coniferous Canopy Characterized by Airborne Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation beneath a forest canopy can have large spatial variations, but this is frequently neglected in radiative transfer models for large-scale applications. To explicitly model spatial variations in subcanopy radiation, maps of canopy ...

Richard Essery; Peter Bunting; Aled Rowlands; Nick Rutter; Janet Hardy; Rae Melloh; Tim Link; Danny Marks; John Pomeroy

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Hawking radiation via Landauer transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, Nation et al confirmed that fluxes of Hawking radiation energy and entropy from a black hole can be regarded as a one-dimensional (1D) Landauer transport process. Their work can be extended to background spacetimes with gauge potential. The result shows that the energy flux, which is indicated to be equal to the energy-momentum tensor flux, contains not only the contribution of thermal flux but also that of particle flux. We find that the charge can also be regarded as transporting via a 1D quantum channel and the charge flux is equal to the gauge flux.

Xiao-Xiong Zeng; Wen-Biao Liu

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effects of Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity Model Radiation on Adaptive Immunity: Contact Hypersensitivity Model Gregory Nelson Loma Linda University Abstract It has long been appreciated that cells of the immune system are radiosensitive and use apoptosis as the primary mechanism of cell death following injury. The hypervariability of the immunoglobulin superfamily of genes expressed in lymphoid cells also led to the appreciation of the nonhomologous end joining mechanism of DNA repair. Clinically, whole body irradiation is used in treatment of some lymphomas and as an immunosuppressive agent for bone marrow transplants. Inflammation at sites of radiotherapy is a common side effect. Many studies with radiation have addressed the changes in cell populations following radiation exposure and have shown a reproducible pattern of relative sensitivities amongst

51

Radiation Fog: A Comparison of Model Simulation with Detailed Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional model designed to study the formation, growth, and dissipation of radiation fog is described. The model is compared with detailed observations made at the 200-m tower at Cabauw in the Netherlands. This study we use observations ...

Peter G. Duynkerke

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A Radiation Fog Model with a Detailed Treatment of the Interaction between Radiative Transfer and Fog Microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional radiation fog model is presented which includes a detailed description of the interaction between atmospheric radiative transfer and the microphysical structure of the fog. Aerosol particles and activated cloud droplets are ...

A. Bott; U. Sievers; W. Zdunkowski

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom) [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Trainor, Colman [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O'Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom) [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom) [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Radiation Boundary Conditions in Numerical Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional anelastic model is used to study the propagation of errors arising from the use of open lateral boundaries. Reference experiments were performed using very large horizontal domains. Other experiments were carried out in smaller ...

Mark Hedley; M. K. Yau

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Declared a national user facility in 1993, NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility (CSR) allows industry, government, and university researchers to examine the effects and applications of as much as 50,000 suns of concentrated solar radiation using a High-Flux Solar Furnace and long-term exposure using an ultraviolet (UV) concentrator.

Lewandowski, A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Successive-Order-of-Interaction Radiative Transfer Model. Part II: Model Performance and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer models for scattering atmospheres that are accurate yet computationally efficient are required for many applications, such as data assimilation in numerical weather prediction. The successive-order-of-interaction (SOI) model is ...

Christopher W. O’Dell; Andrew K. Heidinger; Thomas Greenwald; Peter Bauer; Ralf Bennartz

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling Intercellular Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Authors: Rainer K Sachs,1 Michael Chan,2 Lynn Hlatky,3 Philip Hahnfeldt3 Institutions: 1Departments of Mathematics and Physics, University of California Berkeley California; 2School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla California; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Abstract By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or pre-malignant epithelial cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells, including those in stromal and vascular tissues, can play a key role in carcinogenesis; cancer is ultimately a disease of a whole-cell community, not just of a single cell, clone, or cell lineage. However, current commonly used

58

Interpretation of AIRS Data in Thin Cirrus Atmospheres Based on a Fast Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thin cirrus cloud thermal infrared radiative transfer model has been developed for application to cloudy satellite data assimilation. This radiation model was constructed by combining the Optical Path Transmittance (OPTRAN) model, developed for ...

Qing Yue; K. N. Liou; S. C. Ou; B. H. Kahn; P. Yang; G. G. Mace

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Validation of General Circulation Model Radiative Fluxes Using Surface Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface radiative fluxes of the ECHAM3 General Circulation Model (GCM) with T2 1, T42, and T 106 resolutions have been validated using observations from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA, World Climate Program-Water Project A7). GEBA ...

Martin Wild; Atsumu Ohmura; Hans Gilgen; Erich Roeckner

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Impact of Changes to the Radiation Transfer Parameterizations Plus Cloud Optical. Properties in the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new radiation package, shown to correct most of the systematic errors of the operational ECMWF radiation scheme, has been extensively tested in the ECMWF forecast model. Improvements in the clear-sky fluxes and radiative heating/cooling rate ...

Jean-Jacques Morcrette

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An adaptive radiation model for the origin of new gene functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foster, P.L. Adaptive radiation of a frameshift mutation inThe Ecology of Adaptive Radiation, (Oxford University Press,18 th , 2004) An adaptive radiation model for the origin of

Francino, M. Pilar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

An Assessment of Radiation Damage Models and Methods  

SciTech Connect

The current state of development of the primary models used for investigating and simulating irradiation effects in structural alloys of interest to the U.S. DOE's Generation-IV reactor program are discussed. The underlying theory that supports model development is also described where appropriate. First, the key processes that underlie radiation-induced changes in material properties are summarized, and the types of radiation effects that subsequently arise are described. Future development work needed in order for theory, modeling, and computational materials science to support and add value to the Gen IV reactor materials program are then outlined. The expected specific outcomes and overall benefits of the required effort are: the knowledge to extrapolate material behavior to conditions for which there are no experimental data; systematic understanding of mechanisms and processes to enable confident interpolation between point-by-point experimental observations; acceleration of the development, selection, and qualification of materials for reactor service; and prediction of material response to real-world operating load histories which often involve a complicated superposition of time, temperature, radiation dose rate, and mechanical loading conditions. Opportunities for international collaboration to accelerate progress in all of the required research areas are briefly discussed, particularly in the context of two well coordinated, broad-based research projects on modeling and simulation of radiation effects on materials that are currently funded in Europe. In addition to providing the opportunity for substantial leveraging of the DOE-funded activities in this area, these projects may serve as models for future development within the Gen-IV program. The larger of these two projects, which involves 12 European research laboratories and 16 universities, is called PERFECT and is funded by the European Union. A smaller effort focusing on developing predictive models for fusion reactor materials is funded within the United Kingdom. Increased formal collaboration with these projects by DOE-funded materials scientists would be of substantial benefit to the Gen-IV program.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Mansur, Louis K [ORNL

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Modeling radiation characteristics of semitransparent media containing bubbles or particles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and heat, mass, and radiation transfer,” Journal of Non-Sacadura, J. F. , “Thermal radiation properties of dispersedG. , and Viskanta, R. , “Radiation characteristics of glass

Randrianalisoa, Jaona; Baillis, Dominique; Pilon, Laurent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A 3-D Canopy Radiative Transfer Model for Global Climate Modeling: Description, Validation and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of solar radiative transfer at the land surface is important to energy, water and carbon balance, especially for vegetated areas. Currently the most commonly used two-stream model considers the Plant Functional Types (PFTs) within a ...

Hua Yuan; Robert E. Dickinson; Yongjiu Dai; Muhammad J. Shaikh; Liming Zhou; Wei Shangguan; Duoying Ji

65

CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ISES- 2003 ISES- 2003 CROSS VALIDATION OF SATELLITE RADIATION TRANSFER MODELS DURING SWERA PROJECT IN BRAZIL Enio B. Pereira, Fernando R. Martins 1 Brazilian Institute for Space Research - INPE, São José dos Campos, 12245-970, SP, Brazil Phone + 55 12 39456741, Fax + 55 12 39456810, enio@dge.inpe.br Samuel L. Abreu, Hans Georg Beyer, Sergio Colle, and Solar Energy Laboratory - LABSOLAR - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina -UFSC, Florianopolis, 88040-900, (SC), Brazil, Richard Perez The University at Albany (SUNY), ASRC-CESTM, Albany, 12203 (NY), USA Abstract - This work describes the cross validation between two different core radiation transfer models that will be applied during the SWERA (Solar and Wind Energy Assessment): the BRAZIL-SR, and the

66

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Computational Modeling of Biochemical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Radiation to Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and Tumor Incidence Authors: Yuchao Maggie Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: Center for Computational Systems Biology CIIT Centers for Health Research Long-Range Goal: To develop an integrated, computational framework for the prediction of low-dose-response to ionizing radiation (IR) in people. Methodology: To provide a flexible framework to evaluate mechanisms of cellular adaptive responses after exposure to IR, three progressively more complicated descriptions of biochemical pathways linking DNA damage with cell-cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis were developed. These descriptions focus on p53-dependent checkpoint arrest and apoptosis, p73-dependent apoptosis, and Chk2-dependent checkpoint arrest,

67

Advances in Radiative Transfer Modeling in Support of Satellite Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of fast and accurate radiative transfer models for clear atmospheric conditions has enabled direct assimilation of clear-sky radiances from satellites in numerical weather prediction models. In this article, fast radiative transfer ...

Fuzhong Weng

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Estimation of Hourly Global Solar Radiation Using a Cloud Cover Model Developed at Blytheville, Arkansas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lack of a comprehensive solar radiation monitoring network throughout the United States has led to extensive modeling. Some of the models use a measured component, usually the global solar radiation, to predict the other components, direct ...

W. D. Turner; Abdulaziz Mujahid

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Origins of the solar radiation biases over the Southern Ocean in CFMIP2 models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current climate models generally reflect too little solar radiation over the Southern Ocean, which may be the leading cause of the prevalent sea-surface temperature biases in climate models. We study the role of clouds the radiation biases in ...

A. Bodas-Salcedo; K. D. Williams; M. A. Ringer; I. Beau; J. N. S. Cole; J.-L. Dufresne; T. Koshiro; B. Stevens; Z. Wang; T. Yokohata

70

Modeling and Analysis of Solar Radiation Potentials on Building Rooftops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The active application of photovoltaic for electricity generation could effectively transform neighborhoods and commercial districts into small, localized power plants. This application, however, relies heavily on an accurate estimation of the amount of solar radiation that is available on individual building rooftops. While many solar energy maps exist at higher spatial resolution for concentrated solar energy applications, the data from these maps are not suitable for roof-mounted photovoltaic for several reasons, including lack of data at the appropriate spatial resolution and lack of integration of building-specific characteristics into the models used to generate the maps. To address this problem, we have developed a modeling framework for estimating solar radiation potentials on individual building rooftops that is suitable for utility-scale applications as well as building-specific applications. The framework uses light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data at approximately 1-meter horizontal resolution and 0.3-meter vertical resolution as input for modeling a large number of buildings quickly. One of the strengths of this framework is the ability to parallelize its implementation. Furthermore, the framework accounts for building specific characteristics, such as roof slope, roof aspect, and shadowing effects, that are critical to roof-mounted photovoltaic systems. The resulting data has helped us to identify the so-called solar panel sweet spots on individual building rooftops and obtain accurate statistics of the variation in solar radiation as a function of time of year and geographical location.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Kodysh, Jeffrey B [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Spreader-Bar Radiation Detection System Enhancements: A Modeling and Simulation Study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the modeling and simulation results of the investigation of enhanced spreader bar radiation detection systems.

Ely, James H.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Baciak, James E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Schweppe, John E.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Radiation field modeling and optimization of a compact and modular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation field modeling and optimization of a compact and modular Radiation field modeling and optimization of a compact and modular multi-plate photocatalytic reactor (MPPR) for air/water purification by Monte Carlo method Title Radiation field modeling and optimization of a compact and modular multi-plate photocatalytic reactor (MPPR) for air/water purification by Monte Carlo method Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Zazueta, Ana Luisa Loo, Hugo Destaillats, and Gianluca Li Puma Journal Chemical Engineering Journal Volume 217 Pagination 475-485 Date Published 02/01/2013 Abstract The radiation field in a multi-plate photocatalytic reactor (MPPR) for air or water purification was modeled and optimized using a Monte Carlo stochastic method. The MPPR consists of parallel photocatalytic plates irradiated by cylindrical UV lamps orthogonal to the plates. The photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO2) is supported on the plates as a thin film. The photoreactor design is compact and offers a large irradiated photocatalytic surface area, a high degree of photon utilization, low pressure drop and a modular design which can facilitate scale-up. These features are desirable for the decontamination of indoor air in ventilation ducts or for water detoxification. The Monte Carlo method was applied to determine three dimensionless reactor performance parameters: the photon absorption efficiency (Φ), the uniformity of the distribution of the dimensionless radiation intensity (η) and the overall photonic efficiency (Φ). The emission of photons from the light sources was simulated by the extensive source with superficial emission (ESSE) model. Simulations were performed by varying the catalyst reflectivity albedo, the number and the diameter of lamps, and the dimensions and spacing of the photocatalytic plates. Optimal design for a basic reactor module with one lamp was accomplished for lamp-diameter-to-plate-height ratio (β) of 0.7, while the plate-spacing-to-plate-height ratio (α) was correlated by [αoptimum = 0.191 β2 - 0.5597 β + 0.3854]. A multilamp arrangement leads to a feasible increase in the size and number of the plates and the irradiated photocatalytic surface area. The optimum design was validated by measuring the apparent quantum yield of the oxidation of toluene (7 ppmv) in a humidified air stream using immobilized TiO2 (Degussa P25). Experiments performed varying the geometrical parameter α correlated well with the model calculations, with maximum apparent quantum yield for α = 0.137. The results are directly transferable to the treatment of water by photocatalysis.

73

The Simplest Models of Radiative Neutrino Mass: Excluding Simplified Zee Models and Beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complexity of radiative neutrino-mass models can be judged by: (i) whether they require the imposition of ad hoc symmetries, (ii) the number of new multiplets they introduce, and (iii) the number of arbitrary parameters that appear. Adopting the view that the imposition of arbitrary new symmetries is the least appealing approach, the simplest models have two new multiplets and a minimal number of new parameters. With this in mind, we search for the simplest models of radiative neutrino mass. We are lead to two new models, containing a real scalar triplet and a charged scalar doublet (respectively), in addition to the charged singlet scalar considered by Zee [h^+\\sim(1,1,2)]. The new models are essentially simplified versions of the Zee model and appear to be \\emph{the simplest} models of radiative neutrino mass. However, these models are only of pedagogical interest; despite successfully generating nonzero masses, present-day data is sufficient to rule them out. The lessons learned from these models also enable one to exclude a more general class of radiative models. Moving beyond the minimal cases, we find a new model of two-loop masses that employs the charged doublet \\Phi\\sim(1,2,3) and the doubly-charged scalar k^{++}\\sim(1,1,4).

Sandy S. C. Law; Kristian L. McDonald

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

74

Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Background Starting from a very simple stochastic cloud model by Mullamaa et al. (1972), several different stochastic models have been developed to describe radiative transfer regime in single-layer broken clouds (Kargin 1984; Titov 1990; Malvagi and Pomraning 1992; Barker et al. 1992; Malvagi et al. 1993; Kargin and Prigarin 1994; Prigarin and Titov 1996; Marshak et al. 1998; Prigarin et al. 1998, 2001; Evans et al. 1999, 2001). Recently Kassianov (2003a) generalized the Titov's (1990) stochastic model

75

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Use of Computational Modeling to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects Authors: Yuchao “Maggie” Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: CIIT Centers for Health Research, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina A detailed understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced damage at the molecular and cellular levels is needed for accurate assessment of the shape of the dose-response curve for radiationinduced health effects in the intact organism. Computational models can contribute to the improved understanding of mechanisms through integration of data and quantitative evaluation of hypotheses. We propose to develop a novel computational model of bystander effects elicited by oxidative stress and a

76

High Resolution Aerosol Modeling: Decadal Changes in Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Science Division of LLNL has performed high-resolution calculations of direct sulfate forcing using a DOE-provided computer resource at NERSC. We integrated our global chemistry-aerosol model (IMPACT) with the LLNL high-resolution global climate model (horizontal resolution as high as 100 km) to examine the temporal evolution of sulfate forcing since 1950. We note that all previous assessments of sulfate forcing reported in IPCC (2001) were based on global models with coarse spatial resolutions ({approx} 300 km or even coarser). However, the short lifetime of aerosols ({approx} days) results in large spatial and temporal variations of radiative forcing by sulfate. As a result, global climate models with coarse resolutions do not accurately simulate sulfate forcing on regional scales. It requires much finer spatial resolutions in order to address the effects of regional anthropogenic SO{sub 2} emissions on the global atmosphere as well as the effects of long-range transport of sulfate aerosols on the regional climate forcing. By taking advantage of the tera-scale computer resources at NERSC, we simulated the historic direct sulfate forcing at much finer spatial resolutions than ever attempted before. Furthermore, we performed high-resolution chemistry simulations and saved monthly averaged oxidant fields, which will be used in subsequent simulations of sulfate aerosol formation and their radiative impact.

Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C C; Govindasamy, B; Cameron-Smith, P J; Rotman, D A

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model to Investigate the Solar Radiation within a Cloudy Atmosphere. Part I: Spatial Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Monte Carlo–based three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model of high spectral and spatial resolution is presented. It is used to investigate the difference in broadband solar radiation absorption, top-of-the-atmosphere upwelling, and ...

William O’Hirok; Catherine Gautier

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model to Investigate the Solar Radiation within a Cloudy Atmosphere. Part II: Spectral Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part of a two-part paper, the spectral response of the interaction between gases, cloud droplets, and solar radiation is investigated using a Monte Carlo-based three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model with a spectral ...

William O’Hirok; Catherine Gautier

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A critical review of the ASHRAE solar radiation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inconsistencies are shown to exist in the presentation and formulation of the ASHRAE solar radiation model. To remove them, it is proposed: 1. To include in the Fundamentals Handbook the clearness number in the expressions for the direct and, in particular, the sky diffuse irradiation under cloudless conditions, and 2. To rewrite the expressions for cloud sky conditions so that they reduce to the cloudless formulation when the cloud cover is zero and they do not give rise to negative values of the sky diffuse irradiation as is presently the case under certain conditions.

Galanis, N.; Chatigny, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Artificial Intelligence technique for modelling and forecasting of solar radiation data: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been used and applied in different sectors, such as engineering, economic, medicine, military, marine, etc. AI has also been applied for modelling, identification, optimisation, prediction, forecasting, and control ... Keywords: AI, FPGA, GAs, VHDL, artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, hybrid systems, neural networks, photovoltaic systems, solar radiation forecasting, solar radiation modelling, solar radiation prediction

Adel Mellit

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Atomistic and Rate Theory Modeling of Radiation Damage and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and low neutron cross section, and improvements in mechanical and radiation ... and amorphization trends with grain size, radiation dose, and temperature.

82

Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

Modeling topographic influences on solar radiation: A manual for the SOLARFLUX Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SOLARFLUX is a geographical information system (GIS) based computer program (running under ARC/INFO and GRID) that models incoming solar radiation based on surface orientation (slope and aspect), solar angle (azimuth and zenith) as it shifts over time, shadows caused by topographic features, and atmospheric conditions. A convenient user interface allows specification of program parameters including latitude, time interval for simulation, file name of a topographic surface, atmospheric conditions (transmittivity), and file names for output. The user specifies a topographic surface as an array of elevation values (GRID). SOLARFLUX generates five basic types of output: 1) total direct radiation, 2) duration of direct sunlight, 3) total diffuse radiation, 4) skyview factor, and 5) hemispherical viewsheds of sky obstruction for specified surface locations. This manual serves as the comprehensive guide to SOLARFLUX. Included are discussions on modeling insolation on complex surfaces, our theoretical approach, program setup and operation, and a set of applications illustrating characteristics of topographic insolation modeling.

Rich, P.M.; Hetrick, W.A.; Saving, S.C. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Feedbacks between Eddy Heat Fluxes and Radiative Heating in an Energy-Balance Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of midlatitude temperature structure to changes in radiative forcing is examined in an analytical energy-balance model that includes parameterized eddy heat fluxes and linear radiative heating. The characteristics of heat-...

Lee E. Branscome; Enda O'Brien

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation in Cloudy Atmospheres: A 20 cm?1 Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral of solar radiation in typical water clouds is determined using a radiative transfer model based on LOWTRAN transmission functions at a 20 cm?1 resolution and Monte Carlo simulations of photon pathlength distributions. Relative ...

Roger Davies; William L. Ridgway; Kyung-Eak Kim

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Comprehensive Radiation Scheme for Numerical Weather Prediction Models with Potential Applications in Climate Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive scheme for the parameterization of radiative transfer in numerical weather Prediction (NWP) models has been developed. The scheme is based on the solution of the ?-two-stream version of the radiative transfer equation ...

Bodo Ritter; Jean-Francois Geleyn

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Effect of Tropospheric Aerosols on the Earth's Radiation Budget: A Parameterization for Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guided by the results of doubling-adding solutions to the equation of radiative transfer, we develop a simple technique for incorporating in climate models the effect of the background tropospheric aerosol on solar radiation. Because the ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Robert D. Cess; Franz B. Yurevich

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A novel 2-D model approach for the prediction of hourly solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, a two-dimensional (2-D) representation of the hourly solar radiation data is proposed. The model enables accurate forecasting using image prediction methods. One year solar radiation data that is acquired and collected between August 1, ...

F. Onur Hocaoglu; Ö Nezih Gerek; Mehmet Kurban

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Observations and Modeling of Downward Radiative Fluxes (Solar and Infrared) in Urban/Rural Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutants (gaseous and aerosol) contained in urban atmospheres alter radiative fluxes at the surface.Numerous radiative models have been developed, and while few experimental data are available, results areoften contradictory. We have taken ...

Claude Estournel; Raoul Vehil; Daniel Guedalia; Jacques Fontan; Aimé Druilhet

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library file or mechanism for revising the data in a consistent and traceable manner. The authors of this revision have addressed that problem by first compiling all of the information (i.e., numbers and references) for all the materials into a single database, maintained at PNNL, that was then used as the basis for this document.

McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

91

Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diffusion approximation to the equation of transfer (Boltzmann transport equation) is usually applied to media where scattering dominates the interactions. Diffusion approximation helps in significant savings in terms of code complexity and computational time. However, this approximation often has significant error. Error due to the inherent nature of a physics model is called model error. Information about the model error associated with the diffusion approximation is clearly desirable. An indirect measure of model error is a quantity that is related in some way to the error but not equal to the error. In general, indirect measures of error are expected to be less costly than direct measures. Perhaps the most well-known indirect measure of the diffusion model error is the variable-Eddington tensor. This tensor provides a great deal of information about the angular dependence of the angular intensity solution, but it is not always simple to interpret. We define a new indirect measure of the diffusion model error called the diffusion model error source (DME source). When this DME source is added to the diffusion equation, the transport solution for the angular-integrated intensity is obtained. In contrast to the variable-Eddington tensor, our DME source is a scalar that is conceptually easy to interpret. In addition to defining the DME source analytically, we show how to generate this source numerically relative to the Sn radiative transfer equations with linear-discontinuous spatial discretization. This numerical source is computationally tested and shown to reproduce the Sn solution for a number of problems. Our radiative transfer model solves a coupled, time dependent, multi-frequency, 1-D slab equation and material heat transfer equation. We then use diffusion approximation to solve the same problem. The difference due to this approximation can be modelled by a “diffusion source”. The diffusion source is defined as an amount of inhomogeneous source that, when added to a diffusion calculation, gives a solution for the angle-integrated intensity that is equal to the transport solution.

Kumar, Akansha

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Simplest Models of Radiative Neutrino Mass: Excluding Simplified Zee Models and Beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complexity of radiative neutrino-mass models can be judged by: (i) whether they require the imposition of ad hoc symmetries, (ii) the number of new multiplets they introduce, and (iii) the number of arbitrary parameters that appear. Adopting the view that the imposition of arbitrary new symmetries is the least appealing approach, the simplest models have two new multiplets and a minimal number of new parameters. With this in mind, we search for the simplest models of radiative neutrino mass. We are lead to two new models, containing a real scalar triplet and a charged scalar doublet (respectively), in addition to the charged singlet scalar considered by Zee [h^+\\sim(1,1,2)]. The new models are essentially simplified versions of the Zee model and appear to be \\emph{the simplest} models of radiative neutrino mass. However, these models are only of pedagogical interest; despite successfully generating nonzero masses, present-day data is sufficient to rule them out. The lessons learned from these models also ...

Law, Sandy S C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A 3-D multiband closure for radiation and neutron transfer moment models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive a 3D multi-band moment model and its associated closure for radiation and neutron transfer. The new closure is analytical and nonlinear but very simple. Its derivation is based on the maximum entropy closure and assumes a Wien shape for the ... Keywords: Maximum entropy closure, Moment models, Multi-band models, Multi-bin models, Neutron transfer, ODF, Radiative transfer

J. -F. Ripoll; A. A. Wray

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or to other data-validated radiation models. This work extends the clear-sky shortwave (SW) GCM evaluation presented by Iacono et al. (2001) to computations including clouds. The rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) SW radiation model accurately reproduces clear-sky direct beam fluxes from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer

95

Nuisance Source Population Modeling for Radiation Detection System Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A major challenge facing the prospective deployment of radiation detection systems for homeland security applications is the discrimination of radiological or nuclear 'threat sources' from radioactive, but benign, 'nuisance sources'. Common examples of such nuisance sources include naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), medical patients who have received radioactive drugs for either diagnostics or treatment, and industrial sources. A sensitive detector that cannot distinguish between 'threat' and 'benign' classes will generate false positives which, if sufficiently frequent, will preclude it from being operationally deployed. In this report, we describe a first-principles physics-based modeling approach that is used to approximate the physical properties and corresponding gamma ray spectral signatures of real nuisance sources. Specific models are proposed for the three nuisance source classes - NORM, medical and industrial. The models can be validated against measured data - that is, energy spectra generated with the model can be compared to actual nuisance source data. We show by example how this is done for NORM and medical sources, using data sets obtained from spectroscopic detector deployments for cargo container screening and urban area traffic screening, respectively. In addition to capturing the range of radioactive signatures of individual nuisance sources, a nuisance source population model must generate sources with a frequency of occurrence consistent with that found in actual movement of goods and people. Measured radiation detection data can indicate these frequencies, but, at present, such data are available only for a very limited set of locations and time periods. In this report, we make more general estimates of frequencies for NORM and medical sources using a range of data sources such as shipping manifests and medical treatment statistics. We also identify potential data sources for industrial source frequencies, but leave the task of estimating these frequencies for future work. Modeling of nuisance source populations is only useful if it helps in understanding detector system performance in real operational environments. Examples of previous studies in which nuisance source models played a key role are briefly discussed. These include screening of in-bound urban traffic and monitoring of shipping containers in transit to U.S. ports.

Sokkappa, P; Lange, D; Nelson, K; Wheeler, R

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Comparison of Three Different Modeling Strategies for Evaluating Cloud and Radiation Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel simulations of clouds and radiation fields by a single-column model (SCM), a regional circulation model, and a global circulation model (GCM), each using the same treatment of all physical processes and approximately the same spatial ...

Steven J. Ghan; L. Ruby Leung; James McCaa

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

First-principles models for radiation damage in D-T fusion power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-Site Speaker (Planned), Duc Nguyen-Manh. Abstract Scope, We review current work on first-principles modelling of radiation defects in bcc iron-based ...

98

Numerical Modeling of Heat Pipe Radiator and Fin Size Optimization for Low and No Gravity Environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A heat-pipe radiator element has been designed and modeled to study the efficiency of heat transfer for low and no gravity environments, like in lunar… (more)

Bieger, Virginia Ruth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Modeling radiative transfer in photobioreactors for algal growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of radiative transfer within an air-lift photobioreactor (PBR) are demonstrated by coupling it to the fluid hydrodynamics and employing wavelength dependant properties for the participating media. The radiative properties of the algal media ... Keywords: CFD, Computer simulation, Photobioreactor, Radiation transfer

Zachary C. Wheaton; Gautham Krishnamoorthy

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Daily radiation model for use in the simulation of passive solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model is presented to characterize solar radiation with just three input parameters for each day. This compressed daily radiation data may be used in place of hourly data in simulations of passive solar buildings. This method is tested with the SUNCAT passive simulation. Global horizontal and direct normal radiation data are input using the compressed daily form instead of by hour. Simulation results are found to be comparable to results based on hourly radiation data.

Sillman, S.; Wortman, D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Environmental radiation dose criteria and assessment: pathway modeling and surveillance  

SciTech Connect

From nuclear science symposium; San Francisco, California, USA (14 Nov 1973). The controversy in recent years over the extent of the risk to the public from environmental radioactivity attributable to nuclear facilities (in particular nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing facilities) has resulted in a lowering of previously acceptable environmental radiation levels. The proposal by the AEC to limit effluents from light-water-cooled nuclear reactors so that the exposure of any individual in the public would not exceed 5 mR/yr, and the pronouncement by the BEIR Committee that the current environmental radiation protection guides are unnecessarily high, are illustrative. In turn the AEC has issued a Safety Guide calling for considerable refinement in the measuring and reporting of effluents from nuclear power plants, and has only recently issued a counterpart dealing with the measuring and reporting of radioactivity in the environs of nuclear power plants. The EPA has also recently issued a guide for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity. Currently, power reactor operators are being required by the AEC Regulatory Staff to conduct detailed, sensitive environmental surveillance. Much of this appears to be based on extremely conservative assumptions throughout, including doseeffect relationships, exposure situations, pathway models, reconcentration factors and intakes, which cannot be substantiated when examined in the light of current experience in the vicinity of existing power reactors. The expenditures occasioned by the required additional in-plant features necessary to meet the currently proposed effluent release criteria appear difficult to justify on a reasonable basis. Environmental monitoring at the proposed concentration limits appear even more excessive in terms of dollars per man-rem of potential dose commitment. (auth)

Hull, A.P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

General Circulation Model Calculations of the Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Sulfate and Fossil-Fuel Soot Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new radiation code within a general circulation model is used to assess the direct solar and thermal radiative forcing by sulfate aerosol of anthropogenic origin and soot aerosol from fossil-fuel burning. The radiative effects of different ...

J. M. Haywood; D. L. Roberts; A. Slingo; J. M. Edwards; K. P. Shine

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Systematic Study of Longwave Radiative Heating and Cooling within Valleys and Basins Using a Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monte Carlo code for the physically correct tracing of photons in cloudy atmospheres (MYSTIC) three-dimensional radiative transfer model was used in a parametric study to determine the strength of longwave radiative heating and cooling in ...

Sebastian W. Hoch; C. David Whiteman; Bernhard Mayer

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Change in regime and transfer function models of global solar radiation in Kuwait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the models for global solar radiation in Kuwait is based on removing the annual periodicity and seasonal variation. The first methodology used here is the change in regime technique that relies on dividing the observations into two ... Keywords: ARMA model, Harmonic analysis, Solar radiation, Transfer function

S. A. Al-Awadhi

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Simple Physical Model to Estimate Incident Solar Radiation at the Surface from GOES Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a model designed to estimate the incident solar radiation at the suface from GOES satellite brightness measurements in clear and cloudy conditions. In this simple physical model, the effect of Rayleigh scattering is taken into account. ...

Catherine Gautier; Georges Diak; Serge Masse

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Implementation of a Semiphysical Model for Examining Solar Radiation in the Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A semiphysical solar radiation (SR) model is implemented to generate a new historical daily SR database for 53 locations in nine Midwestern and six adjacent states (available from the Midwestern Climate Center). This model estimates daily SR ...

Mary Schoen Petersen; Peter J. Lamb; Kenneth E. Kunkel

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Reproducibility by Climate Models of Cloud Radiative Forcing Associated with Tropical Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, cloud radiative forcing (CRF) associated with convective activity over tropical oceans is analyzed for monthly mean data from twentieth-century simulations of 18 climate models participating in phase 3 of the Coupled Model ...

Hiroki Ichikawa; Hirohiko Masunaga; Yoko Tsushima; Hiroshi Kanzawa

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Radiative Forcing of Saharan Dust: GOCART Model Simulations Compared with ERBE Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses information on Saharan aerosol from a dust transport model to calculate radiative forcing values. The transport model is driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System. ...

Clark J. Weaver; Paul Ginoux; N. Christina Hsu; Ming-Dah Chou; Joanna Joiner

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Determination of Extratropical Tropopause Height in an Idealized Gray Radiation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the mechanisms that determine the extratropical tropopause height, extending previous results with a Newtonian cooling model. A primitive equation model forced by a meridional gradient of incoming solar radiation, with the ...

Pablo Zurita-Gotor; Geoffrey K. Vallis

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Adjustment to Radiative Forcing in a Simple Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study calculates the adjustment to radiative forcing in a simple model of a mixed layer ocean coupled to the overlying atmosphere. One application of the model is to calculate how dust aerosols perturb the temperature of the atmosphere and ...

R. L. Miller

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

An Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. J. S. Delamere, S. A. Clough, E. J. Mlawer, Sid-Ahmed Boukabara, K. Cady-Pereira, and M. Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Maine Introduction Over the last decade, a suite of radiative transfer models has been developed at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) with support from the Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. These models span the full spectral regime from the microwave to the ultraviolet, and range from monochromatic to band calculations. Each model combines the latest spectroscopic advancements with radiative transfer algorithms to efficiently compute radiances, fluxes, and cooling

112

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Testing a Model of IR Radiative Losses: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global and diffuse shortwave measurements made with first class thermopile based instruments. Pyrgeometers can be used to measure the sky temperature and are used to calculate the pyranometer?s IR radiative losses.

Vignola, F.; Long, C. N.; Reda, I.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Original article: Comparison of numerical models in radiative heat transfer with application to circuit-breaker simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different modeling approaches for the numerical computation of the radiation energy exchange in the context of the simulation of high-voltage circuit breakers are investigated. These are the basic Radiative Transfer Equation method and the P1 model ... Keywords: CFD modeling, Circuit breakers, Finite volume discretization, P1 model, Radiative heat transfer

Matthieu Melot; Jean-Yves TréPanier; Ricardo Camarero; Eddy Petro

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Effect of Directional Radiation Models on the Interpretation of Earth Radiation Budget Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameter estimation technique is presented to estimate the radiative flux density distribution over the earn from a set of radiometer measurements at satellite altitude. The technique analyzes measurements from a wide field of view, horizon to ...

Richard N. Green

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Economic analysis: impact of CS/R process on benzene market  

SciTech Connect

Contract No. DE-AC01-78ET10159 (formerly ET-78-C-01-3117) between UOP/SDC and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) requires UOP/SDC to provide specific engineering and technical services to the DOE Office of Coal Processing in support of the Coal Gasification Program. This report covers an economic study on the projected price of benzene through the next decade based on the market factors and production costs. The impact of the CS/R process on the benzene market was evaluated. In addition, the cost of gas from the CS/R process was determined as a function of the byproduct credit for benzene.

Spielberger, L.; Klein, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics J. Simmons, O. Lie-Svendsen, and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska The Arctic is a key element in determining the radiation budget of the earth. Within the polar regions, the net radiation (incoming solar radiation minus outgoing infrared radiation) is negative. To understand the role this energy deficit plays in the overall radiation budget, one must examine the prevalent atmospheric features of the Arctic. One such feature is a persistent layer of low-altitude, stratiform clouds found over the central Arctic predominantly from April to September (Tsay et al. 1984). These Arctic stratus clouds (ASC) modulate the earth's radiation budget

118

A Study on the “Runaway Greenhouse Effect” with a One-Dimensional Radiative–Convective Equilibrium Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple one-dimensional radiative–convective equilibrium model is used to investigate the relationship between the surface temperature and the outgoing infrared radiation at the top of the atmosphere. The model atmosphere has a gray infrared ...

Shinichi Nakajima; Yoshi-Yuki Hayashi; Yutaka Abe

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ICRCCM Phase 2: Verification and calibration of radiation codes in climate models  

SciTech Connect

Following the finding by the InterComparison of Radiation Codes used in Climate Models (ICRCCM) of large differences among fluxes predicted by sophisticated radiation models that could not be sorted out because of the lack of a set of accurate atmospheric spectral radiation data measured simultaneously with the important radiative properties of the atmosphere, our team of scientists proposed to remedy the situation by carrying out a comprehensive program of measurement and analysis called SPECTRE (Spectral Radiance Experiment). SPECTRE will establish an absolute standard against which to compare models, and will aim to remove the hidden variables'' (unknown humidities, aerosols, etc.) which radiation modelers have invoked to excuse disagreements with observation. The data to be collected during SPECTRE will form the test bed for the second phase of ICRCCM, namely verification and calibration of radiation codes used in climate models. This should lead to more accurate radiation models for use in parameterizing climate models, which in turn play a key role in the prediction of trace-gas greenhouse effects.

Ellingson, R.G.; Wiscombe, W.J.; Murcray, D.; Smith, W.; Strauch, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An Improved Microwave Radiative Transfer Model for Tropical Oceanic Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparation for the launch of TRMM, new algorithms must be created that take advantage of the combined data from radar and microwave radiometers that will be on board the satellite. A microwave radiative transfer algorithm with a one-...

Jeffrey R. Tesmer; Thomas T. Wilheit

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Runaway Greenhouse Effect in a Semigray Radiative–Convective Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of the nongray absorption (i.e., atmospheric opacity varying with wavelength) on the possible upper bound of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) emitted by a planetary atmosphere have been examined. This analysis is based on the ...

T. Pujol; G. R. North

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Solar Radiation Model for Use in Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar radiation routine has been developed for use in climate studies. It includes the absorption and scattering due to ozone, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide, clouds, and aerosols. Rayleigh scattering is also included. The UV and visible ...

Ming-Dah Chou

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanistic Modeling of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Why This Project? Cells that are directly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation may experience DNA damage. Cells which happen to be in the vicinity of the exposed...

125

Experimental Studies on Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at an Emittance Exchange Beamline  

SciTech Connect

One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to experimentally investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX) principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line could limit the performance of the emittance exchanger at short bunch lengths. In this paper, we present experimental and simulation studies of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at the A0 photoinjector. We report on time-resolved CSR studies using a skew-quadrupole technique. We also demonstrate the advantages of running the EEX with an energy chirped beam.

Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Santucci, J.; /Fermilab

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model: Optimization and Evaluation of Simulated Radiative Fluxes and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work continues the presentation and evaluation of the Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM), focusing on the model’s ability to represent radiation and precipitation. OLAM is a new, state-of-the-art earth system model, capable of user-specified ...

David Medvigy; Robert L. Walko; Martin J. Otte; Roni Avissar

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Study on development of education model and its evaluation system for radiation safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As one of the detailed action strategy of multi object preparedness for strengthening of radiation safety management by MOST, this project was performed, in order to promote the safety culture for user and radiation worker through effective education program. For the prevention of radiological accident and effective implementation of radiation safety education and training, this project has been carried out the development of education model and its evaluation system on radiation safety. In the development of new education model, education course was classified; new and old radiation worker, temporary worker, lecturer and manager. The education model includes the contents of expanding the education opportunity and workplace training. In the development of evaluation system, the recognition criteria for commission-education institute and inside-education institute which should establish by law were suggested for evaluation program. The recognition criteria contains classification, student, method, facilities, ...

Seo, K W; Nam, Y M

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Intercomparison of Radiation Transfer Models Representing Direct Shortwave Forcing by Sulfate Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study has been conducted, involving 15 models by 12 groups, to compare modeled forcing (change in shortwave radiation budget) due to sulfate aerosol for a wide range of values of particle radius, optical depth, surface albedo, and solar zenith angle (SZA). The models included high- and low-spectral resolution models, incorporating a variety of radiative transfer approximations, as well as a line-by-line model. The normalized forcings (forcing per sulfate column burden) obtained with the radiative transfer models were examined and the differences characterized. All models simulate forcings of comparable amplitude and exhibit a similar dependence on input parameters. As expected for a non-light-absorbing aerosol, forcings were negative (cooling influence), except at high surface albedo combined with low SZA. The relative standard deviation of the zenith-angle-average normalized broadband forcing for 15 models was 8% for particle radius near the maximum in magnitude of this forcing (ca....

Sulfate Aerosols; Stephen E Schwartz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Dislocation-Based Model for Design of Radiation-Tolerant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unexpected interfaces for extreme radiation environment are discussed. ... Atomic-Scale Modeling of the Mobility of Boundaries of Deformation Twins in Alpha-Iron ... Characterization of Reaction Layers in Mn1.5Co1.5O4 Coated Fuel Cell ... Possible Radiation Damage Healing Mechanism under Fusion Reactor Conditions.

130

A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified physical model for assessing solar radiation over Brazil using GOES 8 visible imagery; published 30 January 2004. [1] Solar radiation assessment by satellite is constrained by physical.4 and 1.3 MJ mÃ?2 for daily irradiation). A comparison with monthly means from about 80 automatic weather

131

Cross-Validation of SWERA's Core Radiative Transfer Models - Partial Report  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cross-Validation of SWERA's Core Radiative Transfer Models - Partial Report Cross-Validation of SWERA's Core Radiative Transfer Models - Partial Report Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): This partial report describes the results obtained by two of the core radiative transfer models adopted in the SWERA Project for global horizontal solar irradiation during the cross-validation step. They are BRASIL-SR and SUNY-ALBANY models (Martins, 2001; Stuhlmann et al. 1990; Perez et al., 2002). The results from other two other core models, NREL and DLR, are not yet available. The HELIOSAT was included as a reference model at this stage. The HELIOSAT model is widely employed for solar energy assessment in Europe and is well know by the solar energy community worldwide (Beyer et al., 1996; Cano et al., 1986). (Purpose): SWERA solar cross-validation study

132

Parameterization of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Part I: Validity of Simple Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines a radiation parameterization method for deriving broadband fluxes that is currently being implemented in a number of global and regional atmospheric models. The rationale for the use of the 2-stream method as a way of solving ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Philip M. Gabriel; Philip T. Partain

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Climate Prediction and Radiative Heating Climate models are driven by forcing, and these forces are seen primarily by the thermal field in general circulation models (GCMs). The major forces that affect the thermal field are longwave radiative (LWR) heating, shortwave radiative (SWR) heating, and convection (cumulus, etc.). These forcing effects are cycled through the thermal field to the motion field by nonlinear transfer. The dependent variables-in particular, temperature (T), moisture (Q) and especially clouds-evolve in time in a model and determine the subsequent forcing. If the dependent variables are not accurately calculated in space and time, the forcing

134

Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, a Shortwave Radiative Transfer Model for GCM Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, a Shortwave Radiative Transfer Model for General Circulation Model Applications M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Y.-T. Hou National Centers for Environmental Prediction Camp Springs, Maryland Introduction The k-distribution shortwave radiation model developed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, RRTM_SW_V2.4 (Clough et al. 2004), utilizes the discrete ordinates radiative transfer model, DISORT, for scattering calculations and 16 g-points in each of its 16 spectral bands. DISORT provides agreement with line-by-line flux calculations to within 1 Wm

135

Micrometeorological Modeling of Radiative and Convective Effects with a Building-Resolving Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many micrometeorological studies with computational fluid dynamics, building-resolving models usually assume a neutral atmosphere. Nevertheless, urban radiative transfers play an important role because of their influence on the energy budget. ...

Yongfeng Qu; Maya Milliez; Luc Musson-Genon; Bertrand Carissimo

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Transport, Radiative, and Dynamical Effects of the Antarctic Ozone Hole: A GFDL “SKYHI” Model Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GFDL “SKYHI” general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic “ozone hole” phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. Both the polar ozone destruction and photochemical ...

J. D. Mahlman; L. J. Umscheid; J. P. Pinto

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Comparison of Radiation Variables Calculated in the UCLA General Circulation Model to Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between the spatial patterns of solar and thermal fluxes of radiation calculated by the UCLA general circulation model and observations. The latter include estimates at the Pacific Ocean surface of the climatological averages ...

Bryan C. Weare

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

An Upper Boundary Condition Permitting Internal Gravity Wave Radiation in Numerical Mesoscale Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiative upper boundary condition is proposed for numerical mesoscale models which allows vertically propagating internal gravity waves to pass out of the computational domain with minimal reflection. In this formulation, the pressure along ...

Joseph B. Klemp; Dale R. Durran

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Response of a Spectral General Circulation Model to Refinements in Radiative Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here results and analyses of a series of numerical experiments performed with a spectral general circulation model (GCM). The purpose of the GCM experiments is to examine the role of radiation/cloud processes in the general circulation ...

V. Ramanathan; Eric J. Pitcher; Robert C. Malone; Maurice L. Blackmon

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

In vitro models for investigating keratinocyte responses to ultraviolet B radiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes the use of 2- and 3-dimensional cell-based models for studying how skin cells respond to ultraviolet radiation. These methods were used to… (more)

Fernandez, Tara L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Radiative Characteristics of the Canadian Climate Centre Second-Generation General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several observational datasets were used to assess the quality of the radiative characteristics of the Canadian Climate Centre (CCC) second-generation GCM. The GCM data were obtained from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) ...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li; Jean-Pierre Blanchet

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Estimation of Shortwave Direct Radiative Forcing of Biomass-Burning Aerosols Using New Angular Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a new angular distribution model (ADM) for smoke aerosols, the instantaneous top-of-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) is calculated for selected days over biomass-burning regions in South America. The visible and ...

Xiang Li; Sundar A. Christopher; Joyce Chou; Ronald M. Welch

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Effects of Ocean Biology on the Penetrative Radiation in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of phytoplankton on the seasonal cycle and the mean global climate is investigated in a fully coupled climate model. The control experiment uses a fixed attenuation depth for shortwave radiation, while the attenuation depth in the ...

Patrick Wetzel; Ernst Maier-Reimer; Michael Botzet; Johann Jungclaus; Noel Keenlyside; Mojib Latif

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Evaluating Mesoscale Model Predictions of Clouds and Radiation with SGP ARM Data over a Seasonal Timescale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the predictions of radiative and cloud-related processes of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU–NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5). It is based on extensive comparison of ...

Françoise Guichard; David B. Parsons; Jimy Dudhia; James Bresch

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A Model of the Radiative Properties of the EL Chichon Stratospheric Aerosol Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate multiple-scattering model has been employed to examine the effect of an aerosol layer at 25 mb, corresponding to the EL Chichon observations, on the reflection, transmission and absorption of radiation by the stratosphere as a ...

Michael D. King; Harshvardhan; Albert Arking

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Assessing 1D Atmospheric Solar Radiative Transfer Models: Interpretation and Handling of Unresolved Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study is to assess the performance of 1D solar radiative transfer codes that are used currently both for research and in weather and climate models. Emphasis is on interpretation and handling of unresolved clouds. ...

H. W. Barker; G. L. Stephens; P. T. Partain; J. W. Bergman; B. Bonnel; K. Campana; E. E. Clothiaux; S. Clough; S. Cusack; J. Delamere; J. Edwards; K. F. Evans; Y. Fouquart; S. Freidenreich; V. Galin; Y. Hou; S. Kato; J. Li; E. Mlawer; J.-J. Morcrette; W. O'Hirok; P. Räisänen; V. Ramaswamy; B. Ritter; E. Rozanov; M. Schlesinger; K. Shibata; P. Sporyshev; Z. Sun; M. Wendisch; N. Wood; F. Yang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fast 2D non-LTE radiative modelling of prominences I. Numerical methods and benchmark results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of solar prominences require improved radiative modelling capabilities in order to take into account both multi-dimensional - at least 2D - geometry and complex atomic models. This makes necessary the use of very fast numerical schemes for the resolution of 2D non-LTE radiative transfer problems considering freestanding and illuminated slabs. The implementation of Gauss-Seidel and successive over-relaxation iterative schemes in 2D, together with a multi-grid algorithm, is thoroughly described in the frame of the short characteristics method for the computation of the formal solution of the radiative transfer equation in cartesian geometry. We propose a new test for multidimensional radiative transfer codes and we also provide original benchmark results for simple 2D multilevel atom cases which should be helpful for the further development of such radiative transfer codes, in general.

L. Leger; L. Chevallier; F. Paletou

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

148

Modifying EPA Radiation Risk Models Based on BEIR VII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for internal lung dose in Mayak Workers and external lung dose in the Life Span Study Cohort of Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors exposed between the ages of 15 and 60 Figure 12-1A Age-time patterns in radiation. Introduction In 1994, EPA published a report, referred to as the "Blue Book," which lays out EPA's current

149

Radiative effects of a CO/sub 2/ increase: results of a model comparison  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of infrared radiative transfer models is announced. The initial phase is underway, with other phases scheduled through 1984. The results of the ir model comparison will be included in the state-of-the-art report on climate modeling. Although the time scale for completion of the comparison is a few years, significant preliminary results have already been obtained. (PSB)

Luther, F.M.

1982-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Numerical Forecasting of Radiation Fog. Part I: Numerical Model and Sensitivity Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the forecast of dense radiative fogs, a method has been developed using a one-dimensional model of the nocturnal boundary layer forced by the mesoscale fields provided by a 3D limited-area operational model. The 1D model involves a ...

Thierry Bergot; Daniel Guedalia

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Modeling and Forecasting the Onset and Duration of Severe Radiation Fog under Frost Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case of a severe radiation fog during frost conditions is analyzed as a benchmark for the development of a very high-resolution NWP model. Results by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the High-Resolution Limited-Area Model (...

I. R. van der Velde; G. J. Steeneveld; B. G. J. Wichers Schreur; A. A. M. Holtslag

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Physically Based Satellite Retrieval of Precipitation Using a 3D Passive Microwave Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A precipitation retrieval algorithm based on the application of a 3D radiative transfer model to a hybrid physical-stochastic 3D cloud model is described. The cloud model uses a statistical rainfall clustering scheme to generate 3D cloud ...

J. L. Haferman; E. N. Anagnostou; D. Tsintikidis; W. F. Krajewski; T. F. Smith

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Coupling Aerosol-Cloud-Radiative Processes in the WRF-Chem Model: Investigating the Radiative Impact of Elevated Point Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local and regional influence of elevated point sources on summertime aerosol forcing and cloud-aerosol interactions in northeastern North America was investigated using the WRF-Chem community model. The direct effects of aerosols on incoming solar radiation were simulated using existing modules to relate aerosol sizes and chemical composition to aerosol optical properties. Indirect effects were simulated by adding a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, simulate aqueous phase chemistry, and tie a two-moment treatment of cloud water (cloud water mass and cloud droplet number) to an existing radiation scheme. Fully interactive feedbacks thus were created within the modified model, with aerosols affecting cloud droplet number and cloud radiative properties, and clouds altering aerosol size and composition via aqueous processes, wet scavenging, and gas-phase-related photolytic processes. Comparisons of a baseline simulation with observations show that the model captured the general temporal cycle of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and produced clouds of comparable thickness to observations at approximately the proper times and places. The model slightly overpredicted SO2 mixing ratios and PM2.5 mass, but reproduced the range of observed SO2 to sulfate aerosol ratios, suggesting that atmospheric oxidation processes leading to aerosol sulfate formation are captured in the model. The baseline simulation was compared to a sensitivity simulation in which all emissions at model levels above the surface layer were set to zero, thus removing stack emissions. Instantaneous, site-specific differences for aerosol and cloud related properties between the two simulations could be quite large, as removing above-surface emission sources influenced when and where clouds formed within the modeling domain. When summed spatially over the finest resolution model domain (the extent of which corresponds to the typical size of a single GCM grid cell) and temporally over a three day analysis period, total rainfall in the sensitivity simulation increased by 31% over that in the baseline simulation. Fewer optically thin clouds, arbitrarily defined as a cloud exhibiting an optical depth less than 1, formed in the sensitivity simulation. Domain-averaged AODs dropped from 0.46 in the baseline simulation to 0.38 in the sensitivity simulation. The overall net effect of additional aerosols attributable to primary particulates and aerosol precursors from point source emissions above the surface was a domain-averaged reduction of 5 W m-2 in mean daytime downwelling shortwave radiation.

Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Barnard, James C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Development of coke strength after reaction (CSR) at Dofasco  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to prevent coke degradation without detrimentally affecting blast furnace service life, Dofasco initiated a project to improve coke strength after reaction. The results of the program and Dofasco's prediction model are presented. 9 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

T.W. Todoschuk; J.P. Price; J.F. Gransden

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

156

Incorporating Radiation Effects into Edge Plasma Transport Models with Extended Atomic Data Tables  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasmas at the tokamak edge can be very optically thick to hydrogen resonance lines. The resulting strong line radiation can significantly affect the ionization and energy balance in these plasmas. One method of account for effects is to self-consistently couple a partially ionized plasma transport model with a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model incorporating line radiation transfer. This approach has been implemented in one dimension, but would be computationally challenging and expensive to implement in multiple dimensions. Approximate treatments of radiation transfer can decrease the computational time, but would still require coupling to a multidimensional plasma transport model to address realistic geometries, e.g. the tokamak divertor. Here, we consider the development of atomic hydrogen data tables that include radiation interactions and can be easily applied to multidimensional geometries.

Scott, H A; Adams, M L

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeling and experimental measurements of residual stress using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

This work was an extension of recent LLNL-related efforts to determine the most effective method for determining residual stress in metal components by non-destructive techniques. These activities have included neutron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and ultrasonics. In 1988, we recognized that the newly installed UC/LLNL beam line at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) could be applied to determining lattice strains in a fashion helpful to our overall research goals. Pioneering work using synchrotron radiation for stress measurements had been reported in Japan. Benefits of a synchrotron source to our studies include a highly intense and monochromatic beam, with variable energies (allowing significant sample penetration) and very low beam divergence. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Shackelford, J.F.

1989-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism: Development of an NTCP Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Results: Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroid gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm{sup 3}). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. Conclusions: This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume.

Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Oosting, Sjoukje F. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A., E-mail: j.a.langendijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Macroscopic Model of Geomagnetic-Radiation from Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a macroscopic description of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays in the presence of the geo-magnetic field. This description offers a simple and direct insight in the relation between the properties of the air shower and the time-structure of the radio pulse. As we show the structure of the pulse is a direct reflection of the important length scales in the shower.

Scholten, Olaf

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Macroscopic Model of Geomagnetic-Radiation from Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a macroscopic description of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays in the presence of the geo-magnetic field. This description offers a simple and direct insight in the relation between the properties of the air shower and the time-structure of the radio pulse. As we show the structure of the pulse is a direct reflection of the important length scales in the shower.

Olaf Scholten; Klaus Werner

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, Illinois Introduction Improving the representation of cloud-radiation interaction is a major challenge for the global climate simulation. The development of cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and the extensive Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARMs) provide a unique opportunity for shading some lights on this problem. Current general circulation models (GCMs) predict cloud cover fractions and hydrometeor concentra- tions only in individual model layers, where clouds are assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in a

162

Modeling the Global Solar Radiation on the Earth’s Surface Using Atmospheric Deterministic and Intelligent Data-Driven Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three methods for analyzing and modeling the global shortwave radiation reaching the earth’s surface are presented in this study. Solar radiation is a very important input for many aspects of climatology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, and ...

M. Santamouris; G. Mihalakakou; B. Psiloglou; G. Eftaxias; D. N. Asimakopoulos

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

paNTICA: A Fast 3D Radiative Transfer Scheme to Calculate Surface Solar Irradiance for NWP and LES Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resolution of numerical weather prediction models is constantly increasing, making it necessary to consider three-dimensional radiative transfer effects such as cloud shadows cast into neighboring grid cells and thus affecting radiative ...

Ulrike Wissmeier; Robert Buras; Bernhard Mayer

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Modeling of the radiation belt megnetosphere in decisional timeframes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for calculating L* in the magnetosphere with essentially the same accuracy as with a physics based model at many times the speed by developing a surrogate trained to be a surrogate for the physics-based model. The trained model can then beneficially process input data falling within the training range of the surrogate model. The surrogate model can be a feedforward neural network and the physics-based model can be the TSK03 model. Operatively, the surrogate model can use parameters on which the physics-based model was based, and/or spatial data for the location where L* is to be calculated. Surrogate models should be provided for each of a plurality of pitch angles. Accordingly, a surrogate model having a closed drift shell can be used from the plurality of models. The feedforward neural network can have a plurality of input-layer units, there being at least one input-layer unit for each physics-based model parameter, a plurality of hidden layer units and at least one output unit for the value of L*.

Koller, Josef; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Friedel, Reiner H.W.

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Radiative Reactions and Coherence Modeling in the High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) with a peak field intensity of 5 x 10^4 V/m carries momentum that results in a retarding force on the average Compton electron (radiating coherently to produce the waveform) with magnitude near that of the geomagnetic force responsible for the coherent radiation. The retarding force results from a self field effect. The Compton electron interaction with the self generated magnetic field due to the other electrons accounts for the momentum density in the propagating wave; interaction with the self generated electric field accounts for the energy flux density in the propagating wave. Coherent addition of radiation is also quantitatively modeled.

Charles N. Vittitoe; Mario Rabinowitz

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

Validation of the RRTM Shortwave Radiation Model and Comparison...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use at European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) in their weather forecast model (Morcrette et al. 2001). The absorption coefficients required for RRTM are...

167

Posters Single-Column Model for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Sites: Model Development and Sensitivity Test Q. Xu and M. Dong Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman,...

168

Brazil Latitude Tilted Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files.
The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed...

169

Brazil Global Horizontal Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files.
The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed...

170

Computer simulation and topological modeling of radiation effects in zircon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to understand on atomic level the structural response of zircon (ZrSiO4) to irradiation using molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, and to develop topological models that can describe ...

Zhang, Yi, 1979-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanistic Modeling of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas A&M University College Station TX 77843 The primary objective of this project is to provide data for building a mathematical model of the role of repair in the...

172

Ab Initio-Based Rate Theory Modeling of Radiation Induced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we construct a rate theory model to simulate RIS in Ni-Cr alloys ... Evolution and Hardening of High- and Low-Cu Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels.

173

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Model for Interphase Chromosome...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the 46 interphase chromosomes is modeled as a random polymer involving 30 nm zig-zag chromatin fiber confined within a sphere whose radius is dependent upon the chromosome length...

174

Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact that the research project did not continue beyond its first year.

David G. Hoel, PhD

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Handbook of Anatomical Models for Radiation Dosimetry (To be published in 2009 in "Series in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering")  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Exposures Nina Petoussi-Henss and Kimiaki Saito Chapter 18 External Radiation Exposures in Nuclear Power Plants W. Dan Reece, Chan Hyeong Kim, and X. George Xu Chapter 19 Bioassay for Internal RadiationHandbook of Anatomical Models for Radiation Dosimetry (To be published in 2009 in "Series

Linhardt, Robert J.

176

Radiation MHD modeling of a proposed dynamic hohlraum  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we report 2D radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a dynamic hohlraum target designed to be driven by the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque New Mexico. Z generates currents up 20 MA with a rise time of 100 ns and peak electrical power of 40 TW. In this design we attempt to reduce the effects of magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (RT) modes by using a distributed initial density profile. Earlier work showed that ``tailoring`` the initial density profile could reduce the sheath acceleration and the number of e-foldings that the RT instability grows during the implosion . As the sheath moves in radially, fresh material is swept up or ``snow plowed``, providing a back pressure that counters the J x B force. A special profile can be found in which the unstable outer surface of the sheath implodes at constant velocity, reducing the classical growth rate to zero, although residual Richtmeyer-Meshkov type instability (instability of the snow-plow shock front) may be present. In practice, it is hard to create tailored initial density profiles due to the difficulty of machining and otherwise manipulating very low density materials. It becomes easier to manufacture these complex targets as the current, energy and load mass increase with large drivers. Z is the first fast pulse power device with enough energy to consider loads of this type.

Hammer, J.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); De Groot, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)|California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Tabak, M.; Toor, A.; Zimmerman, G.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Broadband Model Performance for an Updated National Solar Radiation Database in the United States of America: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Updated review of broadband model performance in a project being done to update the existing United States National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB).

Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S.; Marion, W.; George, R.; Anderberg, M.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A. [Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing(ISARS), National Observatory of Athens (NOA), Metaxa and Vasillis Pavlou Street, Penteli, Athens 15236 (Greece); Vassiliadis, D. [Department of Physics, Hodges Hall, PO Box 6315, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 (United States)

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

179

Radiation fog forecasting using a 1-dimensional model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of fog forecasting to the aviation community, to road transportation and to the public at large is irrefutable. The deadliest aviation accident in history was in fact partly a result of fog back on 27 March 1977. This has, along with numerous less dramatic examples, helped focus many meteorological efforts into trying to forecast this phenomenon as accurately as possible. Until recently, methods of fog forecasting have relied primarily on the forecaster's ability to recognize surface weather patterns known to be favorable for producing fog and once it has formed, to state that it will persist unless the pattern changes. Unfortunately, while such methods have shown some success, many times they have led weather forecasters astray with regards to the onset and dissipation of the phenomenon. Fortunately, now with computers becoming ever-increasingly powerful, numerical models have been utilized to attempt to more accurately deal with the fog forecasting problem. This study uses a 1 dimensional model called COBEL to simulate several past fog cases in the hopes of mimicking its actual occurrence and determining what weather parameters the fog is most sensitive to. The goal is to create a technique where the weather forecaster will be able to run several fog forecasts with the model each time with different initial conditions representing the uncertain weather conditions. In this way, the forecaster will be able to use his expertise to choose the most likely scenario. Results indicate that COBEL is able to simulate the fog cases quite well. Issues remain with the model's handling of the gravitational settling rate, the fact that it currently does not include any vegetation, and its coupling process with the soil model. Nevertheless, simulations and sensitivity tests indicate that soil temperature, soil moisture, low-level winds, initial relative humidity, dew deposition and surface emissivity are the weather parameters that affect fog the most. These parameters will be prime candidates for the 1 dimensional ensemble (ODEP) technique described above.

Peyraud, Lionel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS Francis A. Cucinotta 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Artem Ponomarev 3 , Shaowen Hu 3 , Jennifer Anderson 4 , Jane Harper 4 , and Peter O'Neill 4 1 NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA; 3 U.S.R.A., Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX, USA; 4 MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Didcot, UK Abstract: On space missions astronauts are exposed to a steady flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) consisting of high-energy protons and heavy ions. In the next decades long- term missions of up to 200 days to the Earth's moon and 1100 days to Mars are planed by NASA where cumulative doses will not be low (>100 mSv) albeit dose-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Larry Toburen East Carolina University Why This Project Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on (MC) Monte Carlo simulations of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many MC codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction

182

INVENTORY OF SOLAR RADIATION/SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS ESTIMATORS, MODELS, SITE-SPECIFIC DATA, AND PUBLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVENTORY OF SOLAR RADIATION/SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS ESTIMATORS, MODELS, SITE-SPECIFIC DATA, and Buildings Systems Integration Center National Renewable Energy Laboratory 8 July 2009 SOLAR SYSTEM POTENTIAL/calculators/PVWATTS/version1/ http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/calculators/PVWATTS/version2/ Estimates the electrical energy

183

The Parameterization of Radiation for Numerical Weather Prediction and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a review of the various methods used to compute both the fluxes and the rate of heating and/or cooling due to atmospheric radiation for use in numerical models of atmospheric circulation. The paper does not follow, step by ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Computation of the Stratospheric Diabatic Circulation Using an Accurate Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global diabatic circulation is computed for the months of January, April, July and October over the altitude region 100 to 0.1 mb using an accurate troposphere-stratosphere radiative transfer model, SBUV and SME ozone data, and NMC ...

Joan E. Rosenfield; Mark R. Schoeberl; Marvin A. Geller

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Impact of Spatial Resolution on Model-Derived Radiative Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Spatial Resolution Impact of Spatial Resolution on Model-Derived Radiative Heating W. O'Hirok and C. Gautier Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California C. Gautier Department of Geography University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction At the typical spatial resolution of climate and weather forecasting models, clouds are portrayed as uniform plane-parallel entities with three-dimensional (3D) radiative effects generally considered not important. However, as the resolution of these models increase, and with the development of "super parameterizations" (embedded cloud resolving models), there is a need to assess the spatial resolution where 3D effects should not be neglected (Khairoutdinov and Randall 2001). In this study, we perform

186

Stochastic modeling of the cell killing effect for low- and high-LET radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical modeling of biological response to radiation describes qualitatively and quantitatively the results of radiobiological effects at the molecular, chromosomal, and cellular level. The repair-misrepair (RMR) model is the radiobiological model chosen for our study. It models deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage formation and lesion repair through linear and quadratic processes. Double strand breaks (DSB) are a critical lesion in DNA. With increasing LET, the number of DSB per track traversing the cell nucleus increases. Using a compound Poisson process (CPP), we describe DNA damage formation. Three models were considered: a simple CPP using constant LET, a CPP using a chord length distribution, and a CPP using specific energy distribution. In the two first cases, and for low LET radiation the initial distribution of DSB was well approximated by a Poisson distribution, while for high LET radiation the initial distribution of DSB deviated slightly from a Poisson distribution. In the last case, DSB distribution was much broader than a pure Poisson distribution. Datasets from the literature for seven human cell lines, exhibiting various sensitivities to radiation were analyzed. We compared stochastic, CPP, and CPP using chord length distribution, with deterministic RMR models. For low LET radiation and at high dose rates the stochastic survival results agree well with the deterministic survival results. Also the stochastic model allows for non-linearity at low doses due to the accumulation of sub-lethal damage. At low dose rates deterministic results overestimate the surviving fraction compared to stochastic results. For high LET radiation stochastic and deterministic survival results agree. Stochastic survival results using specific energy distribution diverged from deterministic results by underestimating the surviving fraction at low and high LET radiation. The dose rate sparing curve, representing surviving fraction at a dose of 10Gy vs. dose rate shows that deterministic survival results are consistent with stochastic survival results, using CPP, or CPP with chord length distribution, for low and high dose rate values. Compared to deterministic aspects of DNA damage formation we concluded that stochastic aspects of DNA damage formation and repair using CPP or CPP with chord length distribution are not as prominent as reported in the earlier studies.

Partouche, Julien

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A Statistical Model for Generating a Population of Unclassified Objects and Radiation Signatures Spanning Nuclear Threats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an approach for generating a simulated population of plausible nuclear threat radiation signatures spanning a range of variability that could be encountered by radiation detection systems. In this approach, we develop a statistical model for generating random instances of smuggled nuclear material. The model is based on physics principles and bounding cases rather than on intelligence information or actual threat device designs. For this initial stage of work, we focus on random models using fissile material and do not address scenarios using non-fissile materials. The model has several uses. It may be used as a component in a radiation detection system performance simulation to generate threat samples for injection studies. It may also be used to generate a threat population to be used for training classification algorithms. In addition, we intend to use this model to generate an unclassified 'benchmark' threat population that can be openly shared with other organizations, including vendors, for use in radiation detection systems performance studies and algorithm development and evaluation activities. We assume that a quantity of fissile material is being smuggled into the country for final assembly and that shielding may have been placed around the fissile material. In terms of radiation signature, a nuclear weapon is basically a quantity of fissile material surrounded by various layers of shielding. Thus, our model of smuggled material is expected to span the space of potential nuclear weapon signatures as well. For computational efficiency, we use a generic 1-dimensional spherical model consisting of a fissile material core surrounded by various layers of shielding. The shielding layers and their configuration are defined such that the model can represent the potential range of attenuation and scattering that might occur. The materials in each layer and the associated parameters are selected from probability distributions that span the range of possibilities. Once an object is generated, its radiation signature is calculated using a 1-dimensional deterministic transport code. Objects that do not make sense based on physics principles or other constraints are rejected. Thus, the model can be used to generate a population of spectral signatures that spans a large space, including smuggled nuclear material and nuclear weapons.

Nelson, K; Sokkappa, P

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Modeling Ultraviolet Radiation at the Earth's Surface. Part II: Model and Instrument Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution measurements in the spectral region of 280?400 nm using a double monochromator are compared with detailed radiative transfer calculations at Reading, United Kingdom (52°N, 0°), for clear and totally overcast days, using aerosol ...

Piers M. De F. Forster; Keith P. Shine; Ann R. Webb

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transports as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports on energy fluxes across the surface of the ocean as simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models in which ocean surface temperatures and sea-ice boundaries are prescribed. The oceanic meridional energy transport that would be required to balance these surface fluxes is computed, and is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean energy transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions.

Gleckler, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Randall, D.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Boer, G. [Canadian Climate Centre, Victoria (Canada)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

How Well Do Regional Climate Models Reproduce Radiation and Clouds in the Arctic? An Evaluation of ARCMIP Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downwelling radiation in six regional models from the Arctic Regional Climate Model Intercomparison (ARCMIP) project is systematically biased negative in comparison with observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ...

Michael Tjernström; Joseph Sedlar; Matthew D. Shupe

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Modeling Ultraviolet Radiation at the Earth's Surface. Part I: The Sensitivity of Ultraviolet Irradiances to Atmospheric Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model is employed for the prediction of surface UV irradiances. A wide-ranging sensitivity study is undertaken to show how changes to the model input parameters aged UV irradiances at the surface. The ...

Piers M. De F. Forster

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Global Calibration of the GEOS-5 L-Band Microwave Radiative Transfer Model over Nonfrozen Land Using SMOS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A zero-order (tau-omega) microwave radiative transfer model (RTM) is coupled to the Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) catchment land surface model in preparation for the future assimilation of global brightness temperatures (Tb) ...

Gabriëlle J. M. De Lannoy; Rolf H. Reichle; Valentijn R. N. Pauwels

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Relationships between Net Radiation at the Surface and the Top of the Atmosphere Derived from a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the net radiation at the surface and the top of the atmosphere in the UCLA general circulation model are investigated. These suggest that it may be possible to formulate statistical models from limited observations ...

Bryan C. Weare

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of work in section F.

Pannala, S.; D'Azevedo, E.; Zacharia, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

A two dimensional modeling study of the sensitivity of ozone to radiative flux uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative processes strongly effect equilibrium trace gas concentrations both directly, through photolysis reactions, and indirectly through temperature and transport processes. We have used the LLNL 2-D chemical-radiative-transport model to investigate the net sensitivity of equilibrium ozone concentrations to several changes in radiative forcing. Doubling CO/sub 2/ from 300 ppmv to 600 ppmv resulted in a temperature decrease of 5 K to 8 K in the middle stratosphere along with an 8% to 16% increase in ozone in the same region. Replacing our usual shortwave scattering algorithms with a simplified Rayleigh algorithm led to a 1% to 2% increase in ozone in the lower stratosphere. Finally, modifying our normal CO/sub 2/ cooling rates by corrections derived from line-by-line calculations resulted in several regions of heating and cooling. We observed temperature changes on the order of 1 K to 1.5 K with corresponding changes of 0.5% to 1.5% in O/sub 3/. Our results for doubled CO/sub 2/ compare favorably with those by other authors. Results for our two perturbation scenarios stress the need for accurately modeling radiative processes while confirming the general validity of current models. 15 refs., 5 figs.

Grant, K.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Brazil Global Horizontal Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from INPE 40km) from INPE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Global horizontal solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files. The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took art in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory.

197

Brazil PAR Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Photosynthetically active radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

198

Brazil Direct Normal Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Normal direct solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files. The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory.

199

Brazil Direct Normal Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Normal direct solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

200

Brazil Global Horizontal Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE 10km) from INPE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Global horizontal solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Brazil PAR Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Photosynthetically active radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE -National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

202

Brazil Latitude Tilted Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude tilted solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE -National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources incountries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates providedby the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

203

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM's). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM's under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM's to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Los Alamos dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM) for space weather specification and forecasting  

SciTech Connect

The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to assess, quantify, and predict the hazards from the natural space environment and the anthropogenic environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). DREAM was initially developed as a basic research activity to understand and predict the dynamics of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. It uses Kalman filter techniques to assimilate data from space environment instruments with a physics-based model of the radiation belts. DREAM can assimilate data from a variety of types of instruments and data with various levels of resolution and fidelity by assigning appropriate uncertainties to the observations. Data from any spacecraft orbit can be assimilated but DREAM was designed to function with as few as two spacecraft inputs: one from geosynchronous orbit and one from GPS orbit. With those inputs, DREAM can be used to predict the environment at any satellite in any orbit whether space environment data are available in those orbits or not. Even with very limited data input and relatively simple physics models, DREAM specifies the space environment in the radiation belts to a high level of accuracy. DREAM has been extensively tested and evaluated as we transition from research to operations. We report here on one set of test results in which we predict the environment in a highly-elliptical polar orbit. We also discuss long-duration reanalysis for spacecraft design, using DREAM for real-time operations, and prospects for 1-week forecasts of the radiation belt environment.

Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluation of Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Sa...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Type Occurrences Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Satellite and Cloud Radar Y. Luo and S. K. Krueger University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Because of both the various effects clouds exert on the earth-atmospheric system and the cloud feedback, correct representations of clouds in numerical models are critical for accurate climate modeling and weather forecast. Unfortunately, determination of clouds and their radiative feedback processes is still the weakest component of current general circulation models (e.g., Senior and Mitchell 1993, Cess et al. 1996). Using radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) available from satellite observations made by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE; Barkstrom 1984), one could assess cloud radiative effects

207

A generalized linear-quadratic model incorporating reciprocal time pattern of radiation damage repair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: It has been conventionally assumed that the repair rate for sublethal damage (SLD) remains constant during the entire radiation course. However, increasing evidence from animal studies suggest that this may not the case. Rather, it appears that the repair rate for radiation-induced SLD slows down with increasing time. Such a slowdown in repair would suggest that the exponential repair pattern would not necessarily accurately predict repair process. As a result, the purpose of this study was to investigate a new generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model incorporating a repair pattern with reciprocal time. The new formulas were tested with published experimental data. Methods: The LQ model has been widely used in radiation therapy, and the parameter G in the surviving fraction represents the repair process of sublethal damage with T{sub r} as the repair half-time. When a reciprocal pattern of repair process was adopted, a closed form of G was derived analytically for arbitrary radiation schemes. The published animal data adopted to test the reciprocal formulas. Results: A generalized LQ model to describe the repair process in a reciprocal pattern was obtained. Subsequently, formulas for special cases were derived from this general form. The reciprocal model showed a better fit to the animal data than the exponential model, particularly for the ED50 data (reduced {chi}{sup 2}{sub min} of 2.0 vs 4.3, p = 0.11 vs 0.006), with the following gLQ parameters: {alpha}/{beta} = 2.6-4.8 Gy, T{sub r} = 3.2-3.9 h for rat feet skin, and {alpha}/{beta} = 0.9 Gy, T{sub r} = 1.1 h for rat spinal cord. Conclusions: These results of repair process following a reciprocal time suggest that the generalized LQ model incorporating the reciprocal time of sublethal damage repair shows a better fit than the exponential repair model. These formulas can be used to analyze the experimental and clinical data, where a slowing-down repair process appears during the course of radiation therapy.

Huang, Zhibin; Mayr, Nina A.; Lo, Simon S.; Wang, Jian Z.; Jia Guang; Yuh, William T. C.; Johnke, Roberta [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, 27834 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Brazil Latitude Tilted Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Latitude tilted solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files.The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase

209

Accurate and Fast Neural Network Emulations of Model Radiation for the NCEP Coupled Climate Forecast System: Climate Simulations and Seasonal Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The approach to accurate and fast-calculating model physics using neural network emulations was previously developed by the authors for both longwave and shortwave radiation parameterizations or the full model radiation, which is the most time-...

V. M. Krasnopolsky; M. S. Fox-Rabinovitz; Y. T. Hou; S. J. Lord; A. A. Belochitski

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing Based Approach  

SciTech Connect

For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent- and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required {approx}100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only {approx}2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) - a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Fillippi, Anthony [Texas A& M University; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing-Based Approach  

SciTech Connect

Abstract For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent-and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required ~100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only ~2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Filippi, Anthony M [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology E. Andrews Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environment University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado E. Andrews, J. A. Ogren, P. J. Sheridan, and J. M. Harris Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado P. K. Quinn Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Seattle, Washington Abstract The uncertainties associated with assumptions of generic aerosol properties in radiative transfer codes are unknown, which means that these uncertainties are frequently invoked when models and

213

An Accurate Radiative Heating and Cooling Algorithm for Use in a Dynamical Model of the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared radiative heating and cooling algorithm designed to be used with dynamical models of the middle atmosphere is described. A Curtis matrix is used to compute cooling by the 15 and 10 ?m bands of carbon dioxide. Escape of radiation to ...

W. M. Wehrbein; C. B. Leovy

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Messenger Sector of SUSY Flavour Models and Radiative Breaking of Flavour Universality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flavour messenger sectors and their impact on the soft SUSY breaking terms are investigated in SUSY flavour models. In the case when the flavour scale M is below the SUSY breaking mediation scale M_S, the universality of soft terms, even if assumed at M_S, is radiatively broken. We estimate this effect in a broad class of models. In the CKM basis that effect gives flavour off-diagonal soft masses comparable to the tree-level estimate based on the flavour symmetry.

Calibbi, Lorenzo; Pokorski, Stefan; Ziegler, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Class of Inert N-tuplet Models with Radiative Neutrino Mass and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a class of models with radiative neutrino mass and stable dark-matter candidates. Neutrino mass is generated by a one-loop diagram with the same topography as Ma's 2006 proposal (which used an inert scalar-doublet and singlet fermion). We generalize this approach and determine all variants with new fields no larger than the adjoint representation. When the neutrino mass diagram contains a Majorana mass insertion there are two possibilities, both of which are known. If the mass insertion is of the Dirac type there are seven additional models, two of which are excluded by direct-detection experiments. The other five models are also constrained, such that only scalar dark-matter is viable. There are cases with an inert singlet, an inert doublet, and an inert triplet, providing a natural setting for inert N-tuplet models of dark matter, with the additional feature of achieving radiative neutrino mass. We show that some of the models admit a simple explanation for the (requisite) discrete symmetry, and ...

Law, Sandy S C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Class of Inert N-tuplet Models with Radiative Neutrino Mass and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a class of models with radiative neutrino mass and stable dark-matter candidates. Neutrino mass is generated by a one-loop diagram with the same topography as Ma's 2006 proposal (which used an inert scalar-doublet and singlet fermion). We generalize this approach and determine all variants with new fields no larger than the adjoint representation. When the neutrino mass diagram contains a Majorana mass insertion there are two possibilities, both of which are known. If the mass insertion is of the Dirac type there are seven additional models, two of which are excluded by direct-detection experiments. The other five models are also constrained, such that only scalar dark-matter is viable. There are cases with an inert singlet, an inert doublet, and an inert triplet, providing a natural setting for inert N-tuplet models of dark matter, with the additional feature of achieving radiative neutrino mass. We show that some of the models admit a simple explanation for the (requisite) discrete symmetry, and briefly discuss cases with representations larger than the adjoint, which can admit a connection to the astrophysical gamma-ray signal.

Sandy S. C. Law; Kristian L. McDonald

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Characterization of vegetation properties: Canopy modeling of pinyon-juniper and ponderosa pine woodlands; Final report. Modeling topographic influences on solar radiation: A manual for the SOLARFLUX model  

SciTech Connect

This report is comprised of two studies. The first study focuses on plant canopies in pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine woodland, and waste sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory which involved five basic areas of research: (1) application of hemispherical photography and other gap fraction techniques to study solar radiation regimes and canopy architecture, coupled with application of time-domain reflectometry to study soil moisture; (2) detailed characterization of canopy architecture using stand mapping and allometry; (3) development of an integrated geographical information system (GIS) database for relating canopy architecture with ecological, hydrological, and system modeling approaches; (4) development of geometric models that simulate complex sky obstruction, incoming solar radiation for complex topographic surfaces, and the coupling of incoming solar radiation with energy and water balance, with simulations of incoming solar radiation for selected native vegetation and experimental waste cover design sites; and (5) evaluation of the strengths and limitations of the various field sampling techniques. The second study describes an approach to develop software that takes advantage of new generation computers to model insolation on complex topographic surfaces. SOLARFLUX is a GIS-based (ARC/INFO, GRID) computer program that models incoming solar radiation based on surface orientation (slope and aspect), solar angle (azimuth and zenith) as it shifts over time, shadows caused by topographic features, and atmospheric conditions. This manual serves as the comprehensive guide to SOLARFLUX. Included are discussions on modelling insolation on complex surfaces, the theoretical approach, program setup and operation, and a set of applications illustrating characteristics of topographic insolation modelling.

Rich, P.M.; Hetrick, W.A.; Saving, S.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Final report, September 15, 1990--October 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

DOE has launched a major initiative -- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCMs under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. In 1990, the authors proposed to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems connected with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem -- longwave radiation. In particular, their long-term research goals are to: develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations, assess the impact of the longwave radiative forcing in a GCM, determine the sensitivity of a GCM to the radiative model used in it, and determine how the longwave radiative forcing contributes relatively when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and expansion.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Cloud shading direct solar radiation model for the Crosbyton Solar Power Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CSPP was initiated to study the feasibility of using hemispheric bowl solar collectors for power generation. A non-spectral direct solar radiation (DSR) model was developed to aid in determining whether there exists a preferred spacing of these solar collectors based solely on meteorological considerations. The DSR model is applicable to the Northern Hemisphere and, with a few adjustments, to the Southern Hemisphere. The DSR model considers the reduction of direct insolation through the atmosphere due to Rayleigh scattering, uniformly mixed gases, ozone, precipitable water, and aerosols. It incorporates geographical information along with temperature, dew point, barometric pressure, and visibility data, updated every 15 minutes. This clear sky DSR model was verified against actual direct insolation data.

Peterson, R.E.; Smalley, D.J.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Incorporating Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms Into the Lyman Model to Improve Prediction of Radiation Pneumonitis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with DNA repair, cell cycle, transforming growth factor-{beta}, tumor necrosis factor and receptor, folic acid metabolism, and angiogenesis can significantly improve the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Sixteen SNPs from 10 different genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, APEX1, MDM2, TGF{beta}, TNF{alpha}, TNFR, MTHFR, MTRR, and VEGF) were genotyped in 141 NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy. The LKB model was used to estimate the risk of severe (grade {>=}3) RP as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with SNPs and patient smoking status incorporated into the model as dose-modifying factors. Multivariate analyses were performed by adding significant factors to the MLD model in a forward stepwise procedure, with significance assessed using the likelihood-ratio test. Bootstrap analyses were used to assess the reproducibility of results under variations in the data. Results: Five SNPs were selected for inclusion in the multivariate NTCP model based on MLD alone. SNPs associated with an increased risk of severe RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, TNF{alpha}, XRCC1 and APEX1. With smoking status included in the multivariate model, the SNPs significantly associated with increased risk of RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, and XRCC3. Bootstrap analyses selected a median of 4 SNPs per model fit, with the 6 genes listed above selected most often. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that SNPs can significantly improve the predictive ability of the Lyman MLD model. With a small number of SNPs, it was possible to distinguish cohorts with >50% risk vs <10% risk of RP when they were exposed to high MLDs.

Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li Minghuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xu Ting; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yuan Xianglin [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)] [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yu Jinming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Zhensheng; Yin Ming; Guan Xiaoxiang; Wang Lie; Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Martel, Mary [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

The Sensitivity of Latent Heat Flux to Changes in the Radiative Forcing: A Framework for Comparing Models and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climate model must include an accurate surface physics scheme in order to examine the interactions between the land and atmosphere. Given an increase in the surface radiative forcing, the sensitivity of latent heat flux to available energy ...

Jonathan M. Winter; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations S. Kato Center for Atmospheric Sciences Hampton University Hampton, Virginia Introduction Recent development of remote sensing instruments by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM?) Program provides information of spatial and temporal variability of cloud structures. However it is not clear what cloud properties are required to express complicated cloud fields in a realistic way and how to use them in a relatively simple one-dimensional (1D) radiative transfer model to compute the domain averaged irradiance. To address this issue, a simple shortwave radiative transfer model that can treat the vertical cloud optical property correlation is developed. The model is based on the gamma-weighted

223

The Use of New Parameterizations for Gaseous Absorption in the CLIRAD-SW Solar Radiation Code for Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new gaseous absorption parameterizations are incorporated in the CLIRAD-SW solar radiation code for models, openly distributed for the scientific community. In the new parameterizations, the magnitude of absorption coefficients in each ...

T. A. Tarasova; B. A. Fomin

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Effect of Ice-Albedo Feedback on Global Sensitivity in a One-Dimensional Radiative-Convective Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feedback between ice albedo and temperature is included in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model. The effect of this feedback on global sensitivity to changes in solar constant is studied for the current climate conditions. ...

Wei-Chyung Wang; Peter H. Stone

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Implementing the Delta-Four-Stream Approximation for Solar Radiation Computations in an Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper quantification of the solar radiation budget and its transfer within the atmosphere is of utmost importance in climate modeling. The delta-four-stream (DFS) approximation has been demonstrated to offer a more accurate computational method ...

Tarek Ayash; Sunling Gong; Charles Q. Jia

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evaluation of Cirrus Parameterizations for Radiative Flux Computations in Climate Models Using TOVS–ScaRaB Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined simultaneous satellite observations are used to evaluate the performance of parameterizations of the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds used for radiative flux computations in climate models. Atmospheric and cirrus ...

C. J. Stubenrauch; F. Eddounia; J. M. Edwards; A. Macke

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation Carcinogenesis—A Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) remains one of the best animal model systems for cancer research due to its molecular and physiological similarities to man, small size, ease of breeding in captivity and a fully sequenced genome. This work reviews relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models and methodologies of induction of radiation-induced leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast, and lung cancer in these models. Where available, the associated molecular pathologies are also included.

Leena Rivina; Robert Schiestl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Gastropod Fast Radiative Transfer Model for Advanced Infrared Sounders and Characterization of Its Errors for Radiance Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal aspects of the development of Gastropod, a fixed-pressure-grid fast radiative transfer model for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), are described. Performance of the forward and gradient operators is characterized, and the impact ...

V. Sherlock; A. Collard; S. Hannon; R. Saunders

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Narrow- and Broad-Band Satellite Measurements of Shortwave Radiation: Conversion Simulations with a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oregon State University/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory general circulation model has been employed as a vehicle for suggesting and exploring various means of converting narrow-band measurements of reflected solar radiation from the ...

Robert D. Cess; Gerald L. Potter

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A Simplified Model of the Walker Circulation with an Interactive Ocean Mixed Layer and Cloud-Radiative Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud–climate feedbacks between precipitation, radiation, circulation strength, atmospheric temperature and moisture, and ocean temperature are studied with an idealized model of the Walker circulation in a nonrotating atmosphere coupled to an ...

Matthew E. Peters; Christopher S. Bretherton

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Response of the NCAR Community Climate Model to the Radiative Forcing by the Naturally Occurring Tropospheric Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We insert the effect of naturally occurring tropospheric aerosols on solar radiation into the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The effect of the aerosol depends on concentration and type (continental, maritime), surface albedo, solar zenith ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Robert D. Cess

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Sensitivity of Latent Heat Flux to Changes in the Radiative Forcing: A Framework for Comparing Models and Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A climate model must include an accurate surface physics scheme in order to examine the interactions between the land and atmosphere. Given an increase in the surface radiative forcing, the sensitivity of latent heat flux ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

233

The Radiative Effects of Aerosols on Photochemical Smog: Measurements and Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. High concentrations of both ozone and aerosols are observed in the eastern United States during stagnant weather conditions associated with transport from the W or NW; they show similar spatial and temporal patterns. We discuss a causal mechanism that may contribute to this correlation - the radiative effects of aerosols on photolysis rates. We measured j(NO 2 ), the rate coefficient for nitrogen dioxide photolysis, and column aerosol optical depths at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD (39.01 ffi N and 76.87 ffi W) during the smog seasons of 1995 and 1997. Direct measurements and radiative transfer model calculations show that particles can reduce surface j(NO 2 ) by 5 - 60%, depending on solar zenith angle and aerosol loading. Although particle scattering by dense aerosol loading on smoggy days decreases near-surface photolysis rates, it increases the integrated boundary layer photolysis rates by up to 20% and leads to accelerated photochemical smog formation in ...

Kondragunta Dickerson Stenchikov; S. Kondragunta; R. R. Dickerson; G. Stenchikov; W. F. Ryan; B. Holben; R. W. Stewart

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Computational Models for Crystal Growth of Radiation Detector Materials: Growth of CZT by the EDG Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystals are the central materials element of most gamma radiation detection systems, yet there remains surprisingly little fundamental understanding about how these crystals grow, how growth conditions affect crystal properties, and, ultimately, how detector performance is affected. Without this understanding, the prospect for significant materials improvement, i.e., growing larger crystals with superior quality and at a lower cost, remains a difficult and expensive exercise involving exhaustive trial-and-error experimentation in the laboratory. Thus, the overall goal of this research is to develop and apply computational modeling to better understand the processes used to grow bulk crystals employed in radiation detectors. Specifically, the work discussed here aims at understanding the growth of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), a material of long interest to the detector community. We consider the growth of CZT via gradient freeze processes in electrodynamic multi-zone furnaces and show how crucible mounting and design are predicted to affect conditions for crystal growth. (authors)

Derby, Jeffrey J.; Gasperino, David [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0132 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Adaptive Breast Radiation Therapy Using Modeling of Tissue Mechanics: A Breast Tissue Segmentation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To validate and compare the accuracy of breast tissue segmentation methods applied to computed tomography (CT) scans used for radiation therapy planning and to study the effect of tissue distribution on the segmentation accuracy for the purpose of developing models for use in adaptive breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients receiving postlumpectomy radiation therapy for breast cancer underwent CT imaging in prone and supine positions. The whole-breast clinical target volume was outlined. Clinical target volumes were segmented into fibroglandular and fatty tissue using the following algorithms: physical density thresholding; interactive thresholding; fuzzy c-means with 3 classes (FCM3) and 4 classes (FCM4); and k-means. The segmentation algorithms were evaluated in 2 stages: first, an approach based on the assumption that the breast composition should be the same in both prone and supine position; and second, comparison of segmentation with tissue outlines from 3 experts using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Breast datasets were grouped into nonsparse and sparse fibroglandular tissue distributions according to expert assessment and used to assess the accuracy of the segmentation methods and the agreement between experts. Results: Prone and supine breast composition analysis showed differences between the methods. Validation against expert outlines found significant differences (P<.001) between FCM3 and FCM4. Fuzzy c-means with 3 classes generated segmentation results (mean DSC = 0.70) closest to the experts' outlines. There was good agreement (mean DSC = 0.85) among experts for breast tissue outlining. Segmentation accuracy and expert agreement was significantly higher (P<.005) in the nonsparse group than in the sparse group. Conclusions: The FCM3 gave the most accurate segmentation of breast tissues on CT data and could therefore be used in adaptive radiation therapy-based on tissue modeling. Breast tissue segmentation methods should be used with caution in patients with sparse fibroglandular tissue distribution.

Juneja, Prabhjot, E-mail: Prabhjot.Juneja@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Harris, Emma J. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kirby, Anna M. [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Evans, Philip M. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Comparison Between Modeled and Measured Clear-Sky Radiative Shortwave Fluxes in Arctic Environments, with Special Emphasis on Diffuse Radiation  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the SBDART radiative transfer model to predict clear-sky diffuse and direct normal broadband shortwave irradiances is investigated. Model calculations of these quantities are compared with data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. The model tends to consistently underestimate the direct normal irradiances at both sites by about 1%. In regards to clear-sky diffuse irradiance, the model overestimates this quantity at the SGP site in a manner similar to what has been observed in other studies (Halthore and Schwartz, 2000). The difference between the diffuse SBDART calculations and Halthore and Schwartz’s MODTRAN calculations is very small, thus demonstrating that SBDART performs similarly to MODTRAN. SBDART is then applied to the NSA site, and here it is found that the discrepancy between the model calculations and corrected diffuse measurements (corrected for daytime offsets, Dutton et al., 2001) is 0.4 W/m2 when averaged over the 12 cases considered here. Two cases of diffuse measurements from a shaded “black and white” pyranometer are also compared with the calculations and the discrepancy is again minimal. Thus, it appears as if the “diffuse discrepancy” that exists at the SGP site does not exist at the NSA sites. We cannot yet explain why the model predicts diffuse radiation well at one site but not at the other.

Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Donna M.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Multilayer Upper-Boundary Condition for Longwave Radiative Flux to Correct Temperature Biases in a Mesoscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An upper-level cold bias in potential temperature tendencies of 10 K day?1, strongest at the top of the model, is observed in Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model forecasts. The bias originates from the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model ...

Steven M. Cavallo; Jimy Dudhia; Chris Snyder

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Anatomical database generation for radiation transport modeling from computed tomography (CT) scan data  

SciTech Connect

Geometric models of the anatomy are used routinely in calculations of the radiation dose in organs and tissues of the body. Development of such models has been hampered by lack of detailed anatomical information on children, and models themselves have been limited to quadratic conic sections. This summary reviews the development of an image processing workstation used to extract anatomical information from routine diagnostic CT procedure. A standard IBM PC/AT microcomputer has been augmented with an automatically loading 9-track magnetic tape drive, an 8-bit 1024 {times} 1024 pixel graphics adapter/monitor/film recording package, a mouse/trackball assembly, dual 20 MB removable cartridge media, a 72 MB disk drive, and a printer. Software utilized by the workstation includes a Geographic Information System (modified for manipulation of CT images), CAD software, imaging software, and various modules to ease data transfer among the software packages. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Margle, S.M.; Tinnel, E.P.; Till, L.E.; Eckerman, K.F.; Durfee, R.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Modeling heat conduction and radiation transport with the diffusion equation in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat conduction and radiation transport with the diffusion equation in NIF ALE-AMR heat conduction and radiation transport with the diffusion equation in NIF ALE-AMR This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2010 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244 022075 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/244/2/022075) Download details: IP Address: 50.136.219.251 The article was downloaded on 18/04/2013 at 01:36 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience Modeling Heat Conduction and Radiation Transport with the Diffusion Equation in NIF ALE-AMR A.C. Fisher 1 , D.S. Bailey 1 , T.B. Kaiser 1 , B.T.N. Gunney 1 , N.D. Masters 1 , A.E. Koniges 2 , D.C. Eder 1 , R.W. Anderson 1 1: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory,

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241

Radiation Parameterization for Three-Dimensional Inhomogeneous Cirrus Clouds Applied to ARM Data and Climate Models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 (a) We developed a 3D radiative transfer model to simulate the transfer of solar and thermal infrared radiation in inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The model utilized a diffusion approximation approach (four-term expansion in the intensity) employing Cartesian coordinates. The required single-scattering parameters, including the extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor, for input to the model, were parameterized in terms of the ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size. The incorporation of gaseous absorption in multiple scattering atmospheres was accomplished by means of the correlated k-distribution approach. In addition, the strong forward diffraction nature in the phase function was accounted for in each predivided spatial grid based on a delta-function adjustment. The radiation parameterization developed herein is applied to potential cloud configurations generated from GCMs to investigate broken clouds and cloud-overlapping effects on the domain-averaged heating rate. Cloud inhomogeneity plays an important role in the determination of flux and heating rate distributions. Clouds with maximum overlap tend to produce less heating than those with random overlap. Broken clouds show more solar heating as well as more IR cooling as compared to a continuous cloud field (Gu and Liou, 2001). (b) We incorporated a contemporary radiation parameterization scheme in the UCLA atmospheric GCM in collaboration with the UCLA GCM group. In conjunction with the cloud/radiation process studies, we developed a physically-based cloud cover formation scheme in association with radiation calculations. The model clouds were first vertically grouped in terms of low, middle, and high types. Maximum overlap was then used for each cloud type, followed by random overlap among the three cloud types. Fu and Liou's 1D radiation code with modification was subsequently employed for pixel-by-pixel radiation calculations in the UCLA GCM. We showed that the simulated cloud cover and OLR fields without special tuning are comparable to those of ISCCP dataset and the results derived from radiation budget experiments. Use of the new radiation and cloud schemes enhances the radiative warming in the middle to upper tropical troposphere and alleviates the cold bias in the UCLA atmospheric GCM. We also illustrated that ice crystal size and cloud inhomogeneous are significant factors affecting the radiation budgets at the top of the atmosphere and the surface (Gu et al. 2003). (c) An innovative approach has been developed to construct a 3D field of inhomogeneous clouds in general and cirrus in particular in terms of liquid/ice water content and particle size on the basis of a unification of satellite and ground-based cloud radar data. Satellite remote sensing employing the current narrow-band spectro-radiometers has limitation and only the vertically integrated cloud parameters (optical depth and mean particle size) can be determined. However, by combining the horizontal cloud mapping inferred from satellites with the vertical structure derived from the profiling Doppler cloud radar, a 3D cloud field can be constructed. This represents a new conceptual approach to 3D remote sensing and imaging and offers a new perspective in observing the cloud structure. We applied this novel technique to AVHRR/NOAA satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data obtained from the ARM achieve and assessed the 3D cirrus cloud field with the ice crystal size distributions independently derived from optical probe measurements aboard the University of North Dakota Citation. The retrieved 3D ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size involving an impressive cirrus cloud occurring on April 18, 1997, are shown to be comparable to those derived from the analysis of collocated and coincident in situ aircraft measurements (Liou et al. 2002). (d) Detection of thin cirrus with optical depths less than 0.5, particularly those occurring i n the tropics remains a fundamental problem in remote sensing. We developed a new detection scheme for the

Kuo-Nan Liou

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

242

Modeling Tropical Pacific Sea Surface Temperature with Satellite-Derived Solar Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two independent datasets for the solar radiation at the surface derived from satellites are compared. The data derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is for the net solar radiation at the surface whereas the International ...

Richard Seager; M. Benno Blumenthal

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Characterisation of radiation damage in silicon photomultipliers with a Monte Carlo model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measured response functions and low photon yield spectra of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) were compared to multi-photoelectron pulse-height distributions generated by a Monte Carlo model. Characteristic parameters for SiPM were derived. The devices were irradiated with 14 MeV electrons at the Mainz microtron MAMI. It is shown that the first noticeable damage consists of an increase in the rate of dark pulses and the loss of uniformity in the pixel gains. Higher radiation doses reduced also the photon detection efficiency. The results are especially relevant for applications of SiPM in fibre detectors at high luminosity experiments.

S. Sanchez Majos; P. Achenbach; J. Pochodzalla

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Three-dimensional dust radiative-transfer models: The Pinwheel Nebula of WR104  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present radiative-transfer modelling of the dusty spiral Pinwheel Nebula observed around the Wolf-Rayet/OB-star binary WR104. The models are based on the three-dimensional radiative-transfer code TORUS, modified to include an adaptive mesh that allows us to adequately resolve both the inner spiral turns (sub-AU scales) and the outer regions of the nebula (distances of 10^4 AU from the central source). The spiral model provides a good fit to both the spectral energy distribution and Keck aperture masking interferometry, reproducing both the maximum entropy recovered images and the visibility curves. We deduce a dust creation rate of 8+-1 x 10^{-7} solar masses per year, corresponding to approximately 2% by mass of the carbon produced by the Wolf-Rayet star. Simultaneous modelling of the imaging and spectral data enables us to constrain both the opening-angle of the wind-wind collision interface and the dust grain size. We conclude that the dust grains in the inner part of the Pinwheel nebula are small (~100A), in agreement with theoretical predictions, although we cannot rule out the presence of larger grains (~1 micron) further from the central binary. The opening angle of the wind-wind collision interface appears to be about 40 degrees, in broad agreement with the wind parameters estimated for the central binary. We discuss the success and deficiencies of the model, and the likely benefits of applying similar techniques to the more the more complex nebulae observed around other WR/O star binaries.

Tim J Harries; John D Monnier; Neil H Symington; Ryuichi Kurosawa

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Angular Distribution of UV-B Sky Radiance under Cloudy Conditions: A Comparison of Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations Using a Fractal Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, global warming concerns have focused attention on cloud radiative forcing and its accurate encapsulation in radiative transfer measurement and modeling programs. At present, this process is constrained by the dynamic movement and ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Kurt Fienberg; Manuel Nunez

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. In addition, models are included for assessing the risks of several nonlethal early and continuing effects -- including prodromal vomiting and diarrhea, hypothyroidism and radiation thyroiditis, skin burns, reproductive effects, and pregnancy losses. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and other.'' The category, other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also developed. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. The models of cancer risk are derived largely from information summarized in BEIR III -- with some adjustment to reflect more recent studies. 64 refs., 18 figs., 46 tabs.

Evans, J.S. (Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (USA). School of Public Health)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

3-D Radiative Transfer Modeling of Structured Winds in Massive Hot Stars with Wind3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop 3-D models of the structured winds of massive hot stars with the Wind3D radiative transfer (RT) code. We investigate the physical properties of large-scale structures observed in the wind of the B-type supergiant HD 64760 with detailed line profile fits to Discrete Absorption Components (DACs) and rotational modulations observed with IUE in Si IV {\\lambda}1395. We develop parameterized input models Wind3D with large-scale equatorial wind density- and velocity-structures, or so-called `Co-rotating Interaction Regions' (CIRs) and `Rotational Modulation Regions' (RMRs). The parameterized models offer important advantages for high-performance RT calculations over ab-initio hydrodynamic input models. The acceleration of the input model calculations permits us to simulate and investigate a wide variety of physical conditions in the extended winds of massive hot stars. The new modeling method is very flexible for constraining the dynamic and geometric wind properties of RMRs in HD 64760. We compute that t...

Lobel, A; Blomme, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks I. Hydrostatic disk structure and inner rim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new disk code, called ProDiMo, to calculate the thermo-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and to interpret gas emission lines from UV to sub-mm. We combine frequency-dependent 2D dust continuum radiative transfer, kinetic gas-phase and UV photo-chemistry, ice formation, and detailed non-LTE heating & cooling balance with the consistent calculation of the hydrostatic disk structure. We include FeII and CO ro-vibrational line heating/cooling relevant for the high-density gas close to the star, and apply a modified escape probability treatment. The models are characterized by a high degree of consistency between the various physical, chemical and radiative processes, where the mutual feedbacks are solved iteratively. In application to a T Tauri disk extending from 0.5AU to 500AU, the models are featured by a puffed-up inner rim and show that the dense, shielded and cold midplane (z/r<0.1, Tg~Td) is surrounded by a layer of hot (5000K) and thin (10^7 to 10^8 cm^-3) atomic ga...

Woitke, Peter; Thi, Wing-Fai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Polarization of high-energy pulsar radiation in the striped wind model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Stokes parameters of the pulsed synchrotron radiation produced in the striped pulsar wind model are computed and compared with optical observations of the Crab pulsar. We assume the main contribution to the wind emissivity comes from a thin transition layer where the dominant toroidal magnetic field reverses its polarity. The radial component of the field is neglected, but a small meridional component is added. The resulting radiation is linearly polarized (Stokes V=0). In the off-pulse region, the electric vector lies in the direction of the projection on the sky of the rotation axis of the pulsar. This property is unique to the wind model and in good agreement with the data. Other properties such as a reduced degree of polarization and a characteristic sweep of the polarization angle within the pulses are also reproduced. These properties are qualitatively unaffected by variations of the wind Lorentz factor, the electron injection power law index and the inclination of the line of sight.

J. Petri; J. Kirk

2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Thermal-radiation heat-transfer model for degraded cores. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

One consequence of the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant is a realization by the nuclear power technical community that there is a need for calculational tools that can be used to analyze the TMI-2 accident and to investigate hypothetical situations involving degraded light-water reactor (LWR) cores. As a result, there are now several ongoing modeling and code development efforts in the United States among which is the development of the MIMAS (Multifield Integrated Meltdown Analysis System code) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper describes a thermal-radiation heat-transfer model for LWR degraded cores that has been developed for the MIMAS code.

Tomkins, J.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Linking Work Design and Corporate Social Responsibility Through an Exploratory Model for the Interdependency of Work Characteristics and Corporate Social Responsibility Orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driven by the demands of drastic changes in today’s nature of work due to globalization and technological advances, researchers have continually revisited, redesigned, and restructured work design processes in a quest to identify the key characteristics that can result in desired organizational outcomes. Specifically, in current times, organizations are looking to develop socially responsible outcomes, otherwise referred as corporate social responsibility (CSR). A possible link between work design and CSR has been postulated by researchers, but few studies have emerged where the associations between work design and CSR factors are examined. The purpose of this study was to explore the link between work design and CSR using a work design-CSR conceptual model that was developed based on previous literature. The model depicted relationships between work design factors and CSR factors. Work design factors included work characteristics and worker characteristics. Work characteristics were measured using task, knowledge, social, and contextual characteristics; while worker characteristics were measured using personality traits. CSR Orientation (CSRO) was used as a reflective indicator of CSR at the individual level. The study sample consisted of 941 job incumbents of a public education institution in Texas. The data were collected using an online survey that included the work design questionnaire, the short Big Five Inventory, and the CSRO questionnaire. The model was tested using Structural Equation Modeling. Based on the results, a significant association between work characteristics and CSRO factors were obtained. As hypothesized, associations were found between task characteristics and profit CSRO, and between social characteristics and legal CSRO and philanthropic CSRO. The knowledge characteristics were found to have negative association to philanthropic CSRO. The findings also suggest that jobs that are high on problem solving and job autonomy had a negative association to philanthropic CSRO. Similarly, as the job complexity increased, individuals’ orientation towards profit making decreased, and information processing was found to be linked to legal compliance. Research and practice implications of these results are discussed.

Kurup, Priya Darshini

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS OF THE EVOLVING CIRCUMSTELLAR MEDIUM AROUND MASSIVE STARS  

SciTech Connect

We study the evolution of the interstellar and circumstellar media around massive stars (M {>=} 40 M{sub sun}) from the main sequence (MS) through to the Wolf-Rayet (WR) stage by means of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. We use publicly available stellar evolution models to investigate the different possible structures that can form in the stellar wind bubbles around WR stars. We find significant differences between models with and without stellar rotation, and between models from different authors. More specifically, we find that the main ingredients in the formation of structures in the WR wind bubbles are the duration of the red supergiant (or luminous blue variable) phase, the amount of mass lost, and the wind velocity during this phase, in agreement with previous authors. Thermal conduction is also included in our models. We find that MS bubbles with thermal conduction are slightly smaller, due to extra cooling which reduces the pressure in the hot, shocked bubble, but that thermal conduction does not appear to significantly influence the formation of structures in post-MS bubbles. Finally, we study the predicted X-ray emission from the models and compare our results with observations of the WR bubbles S 308, NGC 6888, and RCW 58. We find that bubbles composed primarily of clumps have reduced X-ray luminosity and very soft spectra, while bubbles with shells correspond more closely to observations.

Toala, J. A.; Arthur, S. J. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

A stochastic model of radiation carcinogenesis: Latent time distributions and their properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic model of radiation carcinogenesis is proposed that has much in common with the ideas suggested by M. Pike as early as 1966. The model allows one to obtain a parametric family of substochastic-type distributions for the time of tumor latency that provides a description of the rate of tumor development and the number of affected individuals. With this model it is possible to interpret data on tumor incidence in terms of promotion and progression processes. The basic model is developed for a prolonged irradiation at a constant dose rate and includes short-term irradiation as a special case. A limiting form of the latent time distribution for short-term irradiation at high doses is obtained. This distribution arises in the extreme value theory within the random minima framework. An estimate for the rate of convergence to a limiting distributions is given. Based on the proposed latent time distributions, long-term predictions of carcinogenic risk do not call for information about irradiation dose. As shown by computer simulation studies and real data analysis, the parametric estimation of carcinogenic risk appears to be robust to the loss of statistical information caused by the right-hand censoring of time-to-tumor observations. It seems likely that this property, although revealed by means of a purely empirical procedure, may be useful in selecting a model for the practical purpose of risk prediction. 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Klebanov, L.V.; Yakovlev, A.Yu. (St. Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)); Rachev, S.T. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Light and Superlight Sterile Neutrinos in the Minimal Radiative Inverse Seesaw Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the possibility of light and superlight sterile neutrinos in the recently proposed Minimal Radiative Inverse Seesaw extension of the Standard Model for neutrino masses, in which all existing neutrino data can be explained. In particular, we discuss two benchmark scenarios with one of the three sterile neutrino states in the keV-range, having very small mixing with the active neutrinos to account for the Dark Matter in the Universe, while (i) the other two light sterile neutrino states could be in the eV-range, possessing a nonzero mixing with the active states as required to explain the LSND+MiniBooNE+reactor neutrino data, or (ii) one of the light sterile states is in the eV-range, whereas the second one could be superlight and almost mass-degenerate with the solar neutrinos. Such superlight sterile neutrinos could give rise to potentially observable effects in future neutrino oscillation experiments and may also offer a possible explanation for the extra radiation observed in the Universe.

P. S. Bhupal Dev; Apostolos Pilaftsis

2012-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects  

SciTech Connect

Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

1997-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Model for the Estimation of Global Solar Radiation Using Fuzzy Random Variables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the concept of fuzzy random variables is applied for the estimation of global solar radiation on a surface at ground level. The cloudiness index is defined as the fraction of extraterrestrial radiation that reaches the earth's ...

Nalin K. Gautam; N. D. Kaushika

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Assessment of the ECMWF Model Cloudiness and Surface Radiation Fields at the ARM SGP Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud and radiation fields produced by the operational ECMWF forecasts are assessed using observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site over the April–May 1999 period. Over the first 36 ...

Jean-Jacques Morcrette

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Computational phenotype prediction of ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria with a multiple-instance learning model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB) are important in biotechnology. The use of these bacteria for the treatment of radioactive wastes is determined by their surprising capacity of adaptation to radionuclides and a variety of toxic molecules. ... Keywords: ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria, ionizing-radiation-sensitive bacteria, multiple-instance learning, phenotypic prediction, protein sequences

Sabeur Aridhi; Mondher Maddouri; Haitham Sghaier; Engelbert Mephu Nguifo

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Advances in radiation modeling in ALEGRA :a final report for LDRD-67120, efficient implicit mulitgroup radiation calculations.  

SciTech Connect

The original LDRD proposal was to use a nonlinear diffusion solver to compute estimates for the material temperature that could then be used in a Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculation. At the end of the first year of the project, it was determined that this was not going to be effective, partially due to the concept, and partially due to the fact that the radiation diffusion package was not as efficient as it could be. The second, and final year, of the project focused on improving the robustness and computational efficiency of the radiation diffusion package in ALEGRA. To this end, several new multigroup diffusion methods have been developed and implemented in ALEGRA. While these methods have been implemented, their effectiveness of reducing overall simulation run time has not been fully tested. Additionally a comprehensive suite of verification problems has been developed for the diffusion package to ensure that it has been implemented correctly. This process took considerable time, but exposed significant bugs in both the previous and new diffusion packages, the linear solve packages, and even the NEVADA Framework's parser. In order to manage this large suite of problem, a new tool called Tampa has been developed. It is a general tool for automating the process of running and analyzing many simulations. Ryan McClarren, at the University of Michigan has been developing a Spherical Harmonics capability for unstructured meshes. While still in the early phases of development, this promises to bridge the gap in accuracy between a full transport solution using IMC and the diffusion approximation.

Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Kurecka, Christopher J. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); McClarren, Ryan (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Problem-orientable numerical algorithm for modelling multi-dimensional radiative MHD flows in astrophysics -- the hierarchical solution scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a hierarchical approach for enhancing the robustness of numerical solvers for modelling radiative MHD flows in multi-dimensions. This approach is based on clustering the entries of the global Jacobian in a hierarchical manner that enables employing a variety of solution procedures ranging from a purely explicit time-stepping up to fully implicit schemes. A gradual coupling of the radiative MHD equation with the radiative transfer equation in higher dimensions is possible. Using this approach, it is possible to follow the evolution of strongly time-dependent flows with low/high accuracies and with efficiency comparable to explicit methods, as well as searching quasi-stationary solutions for highly viscous flows. In particular, it is shown that the hierarchical approach is capable of modelling the formation of jets in active galactic nuclei and reproduce the corresponding spectral energy distribution with a reasonable accuracy.

A. A. Hujeirat

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

On the spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation in the CSL model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spontaneous photon emission in the Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) model is studied one more time. In the CSL model each particle interacts with a noise field that induces the collapse of its wave function. As a consequence of this interaction, when the particle is electrically charged, it radiates. As discussed in [1], the formula for the emission rate, to first perturbative order, contains two terms: One is proportional to the Fourier component of the noise field at the same frequency as that of the emitted photon and one is proportional to the zero Fourier component of the noise field. As discussed in previous works, this second term seems unphysical. In [1], it was shown that the unphysical term disappears when the noises is confined to a bounded region and the final particle's state is a wave packet. Here we investigate the origin of the unphysical term and why it vanishes according to the previous prescription. For this purpose, the electrodynamic part of the equation of motion is solved exactly while the part due to the noise is treated perturbatively. We show that the unphysical term is connected to exponentially decaying function of time which dies out in the large time limit, however, approximates to 1 in the first perturbative order in the electromagnetic field.

S. Donadi; A. Bassi; D. -A. Deckert

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

Numerical modelling of dynamical interaction between seismic radiation and near-surface geological structures: a parallel approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a faster and easier way to parallelise seismological codes able to simulate the dynamical interaction between seismic radiation and near-surface geological structures. This is important in assessing strong ground motion, in the mitigation ... Keywords: HPF, numerical modelling, openMP, parallel computing, seismic site effects

A. Caserta; V. Ruggiero; P. Lanucara

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A Discrete Ordinate, Multiple Scattering, Radiative Transfer Model of the Venus Atmosphere from 0.1 to 260 ?m  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe a new radiative transfer model of the Venus atmosphere (RTM) that includes optical properties from nine gases and four cloud modes between 0.1 and 260 ?m. A multiple-stream discrete ordinate flux solver is used to calculate ...

Christopher Lee; Mark Ian Richardson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A new time-dependent analytic model for radiation-induced photocurrent in finite 1D epitaxial diodes.  

SciTech Connect

Photocurrent generated by ionizing radiation represents a threat to microelectronics in radiation environments. Circuit simulation tools such as SPICE [1] can be used to analyze these threats, and typically rely on compact models for individual electrical components such as transistors and diodes. Compact models consist of a handful of differential and/or algebraic equations, and are derived by making simplifying assumptions to any of the many semiconductor transport equations. Historically, many photocurrent compact models have suffered from accuracy issues due to the use of qualitative approximation, rather than mathematically correct solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation. A practical consequence of this inaccuracy is that a given model calibration is trustworthy over only a narrow range of operating conditions. This report describes work to produce improved compact models for photocurrent. Specifically, an analytic model is developed for epitaxial diode structures that have a highly doped subcollector. The analytic model is compared with both numerical TCAD calculations, as well as the compact model described in reference [2]. The new analytic model compares well against TCAD over a wide range of operating conditions, and is shown to be superior to the compact model from reference [2].

Verley, Jason C.; Axness, Carl L.; Hembree, Charles Edward; Keiter, Eric Richard; Kerr, Bert (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.45º×0.4º in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 2001–2004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is ?1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60?138°E & Eq. ?45°N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving ?2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.’s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present study’s estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3’s anthropogenic aerosol forcing is much smaller than the present study’s estimate at the surface, and is outside of what the INDOEX findings can support.

Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

266

Multi-horizon solar radiation forecasting for Mediterranean locations using time series models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considering the grid manager's point of view, needs in terms of prediction of intermittent energy like the photovoltaic resource can be distinguished according to the considered horizon: following days (d+1, d+2 and d+3), next day by hourly step (h+24), next hour (h+1) and next few minutes (m+5 e.g.). Through this work, we have identified methodologies using time series models for the prediction horizon of global radiation and photovoltaic power. What we present here is a comparison of different predictors developed and tested to propose a hierarchy. For horizons d+1 and h+1, without advanced ad hoc time series pre-processing (stationarity) we find it is not easy to differentiate between autoregressive moving average (ARMA) and multilayer perceptron (MLP). However we observed that using exogenous variables improves significantly the results for MLP . We have shown that the MLP were more adapted for horizons h+24 and m+5. In summary, our results are complementary and improve the existing prediction techniques ...

Voyant, Cyril; Muselli, Marc; Nivet, Marie Laure

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 16 March 1991--15 March 1992  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM`s). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM`s under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM`s to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Modeling the Downwelling Longwave Radiation over a Groomed Ski Run under Clear Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface radiation budget of a groomed ski run is important to ski racing. Variables such as snow-surface temperature and liquid water content depend upon the surface radiation budget and are crucial to preparing fast skis. This case study ...

Rosie Howard; Roland Stull

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ground Characterization of the Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB) Flight Model 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB) is a satellite-based radiometer for measurements of the planetary radiation budget. It was launched in January 1994 on a Russian METEOR-3 platform and provided excellent data from February 1994 to March ...

Johannes Mueller; Rolf Stuhlmann; Renate Becker; Ehrhard Raschke; Heiko Rinck; Peter Burkert; Jean-Louis Monge; Francis Sirou; Robert Kandel; Thierry Tremas; Leonid A. Pakhomov

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Investigation of Thin Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties on the Basis of Satellite Observations and Fast Radiative Transfer Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the global investigation of optically thin cirrus cloud optical thickness (tau) and microphysical properties, such as, effective particle size (D_(eff)) and ice crystal habits (shapes), based on the global satellite observations and fast radiative transfer models (RTMs). In the first part, we develop two computationally efficient RTMs simulating satellite observations under cloudy-sky conditions in the visible/shortwave infrared (VIS/SWIR) and thermal inferred (IR) spectral regions, respectively. To mitigate the computational burden associated with absorption, thermal emission and multiple scattering, we generate pre-computed lookup tables (LUTs) using two rigorous models, i.e., the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) and the discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT). The second part introduces two methods (i.e., VIS/SWIR- and IR-based methods) to retrieve tau and D_(eff) from satellite observations in corresponding spectral regions of the two RTMs. We discuss the advantages and weakness of the two methods by estimating the impacts from different error sources on the retrievals through sensitivity studies. Finally, we develop a new method to infer the scattering phase functions of optically thin cirrus clouds in a water vapor absorption channel (1.38-µm). We estimate the ice crystal habits and surface structures by comparing the inferred scattering phase functions and numerically simulated phase functions calculated using idealized habits.

Wang, Chenxi

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Identifies Filaggrin and other Targets of Ionizing Radiation in a Human Skin Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low and high dose ionizing radiation dependent signaling in a complex 3-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labeling strategy using sham and 3 radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1113 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 151 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1 and 2,) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. A phosphorylation site present in multiple copies in the linker regions of human profilaggrin underwent the largest fold change. Increased phosphorylation of these sites coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain skin barrier functions and minimize the damaging consequences of radiation exposure.

Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Gristenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

272

INDOS: conversational computer codes to implement ICRP-10-10A models for estimation of internal radiation dose to man  

SciTech Connect

INDOS1, INDOS2, and INDOS3 (the INDOS codes) are conversational FORTRAN IV programs, implemented for use in time-sharing mode on the ORNL PDP-10 System. These codes use ICRP10-10A models to estimate the radiation dose to an organ of the body of Reference Man resulting from the ingestion or inhalation of any one of various radionuclides. Two patterns of intake are simulated: intakes at discrete times and continuous intake at a constant rate. The IND0S codes provide tabular output of dose rate and dose vs time, graphical output of dose vs time, and punched-card output of organ burden and dose vs time. The models of internal dose calculation are discussed and instructions for the use of the INDOS codes are provided. The INDOS codes are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830. (auth)

Killough, G.G.; Rohwer, P.S.

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

THE PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION MODEL FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: INTERPRETING FOUR OBSERVED CORRELATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the empirical E{sub p}-L, {Gamma}-L, E{sub p}-{Gamma}, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}}-E{sub p} correlations (where L is the time-averaged luminosity of the prompt emission, E{sub p} is the spectral peak energy, {Gamma} is the bulk Lorentz factor, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}} is the emission efficiency of gamma-ray bursts, GRBs) are well consistent with the relations between the analogous parameters predicted in the photospheric radiation model of the prompt emission of GRBs. The time-resolved thermal radiation of GRB 090902B does follow the E{sub p}-L and {Gamma}-L correlations. A reliable interpretation of the four correlations in alternative models is still lacking. These may point toward a photospheric origin of prompt emission of some GRBs.

Fan Yizhong; Wei Daming; Zhang Fuwen [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Binbin, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: bbzhang@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosol on solar and infrared radiation through droplet and crystal nucleation on aerosol, and semidirect effects through the influence of solar absorption on the distribution of clouds. A three-mode representation of the aerosol in version 5.1 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.1) yields global annual mean radiative forcing estimates for each of these forcing mechanisms that are within 0.1 W m–2 of estimates using a more complex seven-mode representation that distinguishes between fresh and aged black carbon and primary organic matter. Simulating fresh black carbon particles separately from internally mixed accumulation mode particles is found to be important only near fossil fuel sources. In addition to the usual large indirect effect on solar radiation, this study finds an unexpectedly large positive longwave indirect effect (because of enhanced cirrus produced by homogenous nucleation of ice crystals on anthropogenic sulfate), small shortwave and longwave semidirect effects, and a small direct effect (because of cancelation and interactions of direct effects of black carbon and sulfate). Differences between the threemode and seven-mode versions are significantly larger (up to 0.2 W m–2) when the hygroscopicity of primary organic matter is decreased from 0.1 to 0 and transfer of the primary carbonaceous aerosol to the accumulation mode in the seven-mode version requires more hygroscopic material coating the primary particles. Radiative forcing by cloudborne anthropogenic black carbon is only 20.07 W m–2.

Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Eaton, Brian

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Spectral Distribution of Solar Radiation on Clear Days: A Comparison Between Measurements and Model Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral distribution of the direct solar and scattered sky radiation are computed and presented as functions of solar height and as integrated daily values for selected days of the year. The monochromatic fluxes are integrated over the ...

V. Hansen

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Some Perspectives on Recent In Situ Air Temperature Observations: Modeling the Microclimate inside the Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air temperature measurement has inherent biases associated with the particular radiation shield and sensor deployed. The replacement of the Cotton Region Shelter (CRS) with the Maximum–Minimum Temperature System (MMTS) and the introduction of ...

X. Lin; K. G. Hubbard; E. A. Walter-Shea; J. R. Brandle; G. E. Meyer

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Space radiation-induced bystander signaling in 2D and 3D skin tissue models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space radiation poses a significant hazard to astronauts on long-duration missions, and the low fluences of charged particles characteristic of this field suggest that bystander effects, the phenomenon in which a greater ...

Lumpkins, Sarah B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Plenary lecture I: electromagnetic low frequency radiation from natural phenomena - data analysis and modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Can severe weather conditions, volcanic eruptions or even earthquakes be predicted from monitoring and analyzing electromagnetic radiation especially in very and ultra low frequency ranges? What signatures in this frequency range leave solar wind, solar ...

Ernst D. Schmitter

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

An Accurate Parameterization of the Solar Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds for Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate parameterization of the solar radiative properties of cirrus clouds is developed based on improved light scattering calculations. Here 28 ice crystal size distributions from in situ aircraft observations in both tropical and ...

Qiang Fu

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Interactions among Radiation, Convection, and Large-Scale Dynamics in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed the effects of radiatively active clouds on the climate simulated by the UCLA/GLA GCM, with particular attention to the effects of the upper tropospheric stratiform clouds associated with deep cumulus convection, and the ...

David A. Randall; Harshvardhan; Donald A. Dazlich; Thomas G. Corsetti

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Observations and Modeling of the Surface Aerosol Radiative Forcing during UAE2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol radiative forcing in the Persian Gulf region is derived from data collected during the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2). This campaign took place in August and September of 2004. The land–sea-breeze circulation ...

K. M. Markowicz; P. J. Flatau; J. Remiszewska; M. Witek; E. A. Reid; J. S. Reid; A. Bucholtz; B. Holben

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Accounting for Unresolved Clouds in a 1D Infrared Radiative Transfer Model. Part I: Solution for Radiative Transfer, Including Cloud Scattering and Overlap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various aspects of infrared radiative transfer through clouds are investigated. First, three solutions to the IR radiative transfer equation are presented and assessed, each corresponding to a different approximation for the Planck function. It ...

J. Li

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The effect of horizontal resolution on cloud radiative forcing in the ECMWF model. PCMDI report No. 22  

SciTech Connect

With expanding computer capability and capacity there has been considerable interest in increasing the resolution in GCMs. The primary driving force behind this are two fold: (1) increased resolution may reduce the systematic errors inherent in parameterization of sub-grid scale processes, and (2) higher resolution may improve confidence in regional scale studies of climatic features that are orographically influenced -- such as the effect of the Tibetan Plateau on the East Asian Monsoon. This study focuses on the effect of horizontal resolution on the spatial and temporal systematic errors of cloud radiative forcing and its components. In this paper, the top-of-the-atmosphere radiation fields are taken from a series of simulations using the European Centre for Medium Range Forecasts (ECMWF) general circulation model (cycle 33), run at four different horizontal resolutions. Section 2 discusses the concept of cloud radiative forcing and describes the simulations from the ECMWF model. The observed global field of cloud forcing from ERBE is presented in section 3 along with the model-produced fields of the net solar and longwave cloud forcing. The seasonal effect of forcing is described in section 4, and the results are summarized in section 5.

Potter, G.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Evaluating WRF-Chem multi-scale model in simulating aerosol radiative properties over the tropics – A case study over India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We utilized WRF-Chem multi-scale model to simulate the regional distribution of aerosols, optical properties and its effect on radiation over India for a winter month. The model is evaluated using measurements obtained from upper-air soundings, AERONET sun photometers, various satellite instruments, and pyranometers operated by the Indian Meteorological Department. The simulated downward shortwave flux was overestimated when the effect of aerosols on radiation and clouds was neglected. Downward shortwave radiation from a simulation that included aerosol-radiation interaction processes was 5 to 25 Wm{sup -2} closer to the observations, while a simulation that included aerosol-cloud interaction processes were another 1 to 20 Wm{sup -2} closer to the observations. For the few observations available, the model usually underestimated particulate concentration. This is likely due to turbulent mixing, transport errors and the lack of secondary organic aerosol treatment in the model. The model efficiently captured the broad regional hotspots such as high aerosol optical depth over Indo-Gangetic basin as well as the northwestern and southern part of India. The regional distribution of aerosol optical depth compares well with AVHRR aerosol optical depth and the TOMS aerosol index. The magnitude and wavelength-dependence of simulated aerosol optical depth was also similar to the AERONET observations across India. Differences in surface shortwave radiation between simulations that included and neglected aerosol-radiation interactions were as high as -25 Wm{sup -2}, while differences in surface shortwave radiation between simulations that included and neglect aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions were as high as -30 Wm{sup -2}. The spatial variations of these differences were also compared with AVHRR observation. This study suggests that the model is able to qualitatively simulate the impact of aerosols on radiation over India; however, additional measurements of particulate mass and composition are needed to fully evaluate whether the aerosol precursor emissions are adequate when simulating radiative forcing in the region.

Seethala, C.; Pandithurai, G.; Fast, Jerome D.; Polade, Suraj D.; Reddy, M. S.; Peckham, Steven E.

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

Comparison between Model Simulations and Measurements of Hyperspectral Far- infrared Radiation from FIRST during the RHUBC-II Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface downward far-infrared (far-IR) spectra were collected from NASA’s Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument from August to October 2009 at an altitude of 5.4 km near the summit of Cerro Toco, Chile. This region is known for its dry, cold, and dominantly clear atmosphere, which is optimal for studying the effects, that water vapor and cirrus clouds have on the far-IR. Comparisons with Line-By-Line Discrete Ordinants Radiative Transfer model, LBLDIS, show that FIRST observes the very fine spectral structure in the far-IR with differences as small as +/- 0.7% for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky simulations. Clear sky model analysis demonstrated the greatest sensitivity to atmospheric conditions is between 300 and 500 cm-1. The cloudy-sky simulations demonstrated that the far-IR radiation has minimal sensitivity to cloud particle effective radius, yet is very sensitive to cloud optical thickness at wavenumbers between 400 - 600 cm-1. In fact, cirrus optical thickness found to be inferred from the brightness temperature differences at 250 and 559.5 cm-1. Aerosols proved to reduce downwelling radiance by half that a clear-sky would emit, but had little effect on the total far-IR radiative forcing. Furthermore, these far-IR measurements open a new window to understanding the radiative impacts of various atmospheric constituents such as water vapor and clouds, and to understanding and modeling the Earth’s climate and energy budget.

Baugher, Elizabeth

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evaluation of the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recently developed approach to climate modeling, called the multiscale modeling framework (MMF), a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) is embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), replacing traditional ...

Mikhail Ovtchinnikov; Thomas Ackerman; Roger Marchand; Marat Khairoutdinov

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A revised model for radiation dosimetry in the human gastrointestinal tract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents. Each wall was divided into many small regions so that the histologic and radiosensitive variations of the tissues across the wall could be distinguished. The characteristic parameters were determined based on the newest information available in the literature. Each of these sections except the stomach was subdivided into multiple subsections to include the spatiotemporal variations in the shape and characteristic parameters. This new GIT was integrated into an anthropomorphic phantom representing both an adult male and a larger-than-average adult female. The current phantom contains 14 different types of tissue. This phantom was coupled with the MCNP 4C Monte Carlo simulation package. The initial design and coding of the phantom and the Monte Carlo treatment employed in this study were validated using the results obtained by Cristy and Eckerman (1987). The code was used for calculating specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) in various organs and radiosensitive tissues from uniformly distributed sources of fifteen monoenergetic photons and electrons, 10 keV - 4 MeV, in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. The present studies showed that the average photon SAFs to the walls were significantly different from that to the radiosensitive cells (stem cells) for the energies below 50 keV. Above 50 keV, the photon SAFs were found to be almost constant across the walls. The electron SAF at the depth of the stem cells was a small fraction of the SAF routinely estimated at the contents-mucus interface. Electron studies showed that the “self-dose” for the energies below 300 keV and the “cross-dose” below 2 MeV were only from bremsstrahlung and fluorescent radiations at the depth of the stem cells and were not important.

Bhuiyan, Md. Nasir Uddin

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Landauer transport model for Hawking radiation from a Reissner-Nordstrom black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent work of Nation et al in which Hawking radiation energy and entropy flow from a black hole can be regarded as a one-dimensional (1D) Landauer transport process is extended to the case of a Reissner-Nordstrom (RN) black hole. It is found that the flow of charge current can also be transported via a 1D quantum channel except the current of Hawking radiation. The maximum entropy current, which is shown to be particle statistics independence, is also obtained.

Xiao-Xiong Zeng; Shi-Wei Zhou; Wen-Biao Liu

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Using a Parameterization of a Radiative Transfer Model to Build High-Resolution Maps of Typical Clear-Sky UV Index in Catalonia, Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To perform a climatic analysis of the annual UV index (UVI) variations in Catalonia, Spain (northeast of the Iberian Peninsula), a new simple parameterization scheme is presented based on a multilayer radiative transfer model. The ...

Jordi Badosa; Josep-Abel González; Josep Calbó; Michiel van Weele; Richard L. McKenzie

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Foundations for Statistical-Physical Precipitation Retrieval from Passive Microwave Satellite Measurements. Part I: Brightness-Temperature Properties of a Time-dependent Cloud-Radiation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud-radiation model is used to investigate the relationship between emerging microwave brightness temperatures (TB's) and vertically distributed mixtures of liquid and frozen hydrometeors as a means to establish the framework for a hybrid ...

Eric A. Smith; Harry J. Cooper; Xuwu Xiang; Alberto Mugnai; Gregory J. Tripoli

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and hybrid ARMA/ANN model to predict global radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1999; Hoinka and Castro 2003), Saudi Arabia (Ackermann and Cox 1982; Blake et al. 1983; Smith 1986a peak. Because of the dryness of the land, a large fraction of the incoming solar radiation is available on local weather. A good example is the `west- coast trough' over Australia. The coastal areas of Western

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

292

Radiative Transfer to Space through a Precipitating Cloud at Multiple Microwave Frequencies. Part I: Model Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a two-part study we investigate the impact of time-dependent cloud microphysical structure on the transfer to space of passive microwave radiation at several frequencies across the EHF and lower SHF portions of the microwave spectrum in order ...

Alberto Mugnai; Eric A. Smith

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Changing the Climate Sensitivity of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model through Cloud Radiative Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conducting probabilistic climate projections with a particular climate model requires the ability to vary the model’s characteristics, such as its climate sensitivity. In this study, the authors implement and validate a method to change the ...

Andrei P. Sokolov; Erwan Monier

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Drainage Flow Prediction with a One-Dimensional Model Including Canopy, Soil and Radiation Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model for simulation of winds over mountain slopes was developed and tested withobservations from Australia and the western United States. The model computes profiles of wind andtemperature normal to the slope. The model also ...

Alfred J. Garrett

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

296

Workshop on electronic and ionic collision cross sections needed in the modeling of radiation interactions with matter: proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The term modeling in the Workship title refers to the mathematical analysis of the consequences of many collision processes for characterizing the physical stage of radiation actions. It requires as input some knowledge of collision cross sections. Traditionally, work on cross sections and work on the modeling are conducted by separate groups of scientists. It was the purpose of the Workshop to bring these two groups together in a forum that would promote effective communication. Cross-section workers described the status of their work and told what data were available or trustworthy. Modeling workers told what kind of data were needed or were most important. Twenty-two items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Visualization of a Deterministic Radiation Transport Model Using Standard Visualization Tools  

SciTech Connect

Output from a deterministic radiation transport code running on a CRAY SV1 is imported into a standard distributed, parallel, visualization tool for analysis. Standard output files, consisting of tetrahedral meshes, are imported to the visualization tool through the creation of a application specific plug-in module. Visualization samples are included, providing visualization of steady state results. Different plot types and operators are utilized to enhance the analysis and assist in reporting the results of the analysis.

James A. Galbraith; L. Eric Greenwade

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The spatial distribution of mineral dust and its shortwave radiative forcing over North Africa: Modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model (WRF-Chem) with the implementation of two dust emission schemes (GOCART and DUSTRAN) into two aerosol models (MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC) is applied over North Africa to investigate the modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments in simulating mineral dust and its shortwave (SW) radiative forcing. Model results of the spatial distribution of mineral dust and its radiative forcing are evaluated using measurements from the AMMA SOP0 campaign in January and February of 2006 over North Africa. Our study suggests that the size distribution of emitted dust can result in significant differences (up to 100%) in simulating mineral dust and its SW radiative forcing. With the same dust emission and dry deposition processes, two aerosol models, MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC, can yield large difference in size distributions of dust particles due to their different aerosol size treatments using modal and sectional approaches respectively. However, the difference between the two aerosol models in simulating the mass concentrations and the SW radiative forcing of mineral dust is small (< 10%). The model simulations show that mineral dust increases AOD by a factor of 2, heats the lower atmosphere (1-3 km) with a maximum rate of 0.7?0.5 K day-1 below 1 km, and reduces the downwelling SW radiation by up to 25 W m-2 on 24-hour average at surface, highlighting the importance of including dust radiative impact in understanding the regional climate of North Africa. When compared to the available measurements, WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of mineral dust and its radiative properties over North Africa, suggesting that the model can be used to perform more extensive simulations of regional climate over North Africa.

Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Johnson, Ben; McFarlane, Sally A.; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

299

Effect of Cloud-Radiation Feedback on the Climate of a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The General Circulation Model (GCM) of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS) was integrated for 107 days starting from the initial conditions of 15 May. In this experiment the clouds dynamically generated by the model affect the ...

J. Shukla; Y. Sud

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Modeling Surface Sensible Heat Flux Using Surface Radiative Temperatures in a Simple Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensible heat fluxes over a light industrial area in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, are analyzed from observed tower fluxes and modeled using a bulk heat transfer approach. The bulk transfer models are initialized using remotely sensed ...

J. A. Voogt; C. S. B. Grimmond

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Using the Radiative Kernel Technique to Calculate Climate Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate models differ in their responses to imposed forcings, such as increased greenhouse gas concentrations, due to different climate feedback strengths. Feedbacks in NCAR’s Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) are separated into two components: ...

Karen M. Shell; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Christine A. Shields

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Developments in the CSU-RAMS Aerosol Model: Emissions, Nucleation, Regeneration, Deposition, and Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado State University – Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) has undergone development focused upon improving the treatment of aerosols in the microphysics model, with the goal of examining the impacts of aerosol characteristics, ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; Susan C. Van Den Heever

303

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Low LET radiation: Part 2, Scientific bases for health effects models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides dose-response models intended to be used in estimating the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents. Models of early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects are provided. Two-parameter Weibull hazard functions are recommended for estimating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary and gastrointestinal syndromes -- are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating cancer risks. Parameters are given for analyzing the risks of seven types of cancer in adults -- leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid and ''other''. The category, ''other'' cancers, is intended to reflect the combined risks of multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and cancers of the bladder, kidney, brain, ovary, uterus and cervix. Models of childhood cancers due to in utero exposure are also provided. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Linear and linear-quadratic models are also recommended for assessing genetic risks. Five classes of genetic disease -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocation and multifactorial diseases --are considered. In addition, the impact of radiation-induced genetic damage on the incidence of peri-implantation embryo losses is discussed. The uncertainty in modeling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of all model parameters. Data are provided which should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk. 22 refs., 14 figs., 51 tabs.

Abrahamson, S.; Bender, M.; Book, S.; Buncher, C.; Denniston, C.; Gilbert, E.; Hahn, F.; Hertzberg, V.; Maxon, H.; Scott, B.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

Radiation-induced lung injury using a pig model: Evaluation by high-resolution computed tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the early phase of radiation-induced lung injury using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) under experimental conditions and to perform precise CT-pathologic correlation. Five Yorkshire pigs received a single dose of 12.5 Gy to the right lower lung. Computed tomographic images were obtained at 2-week intervals. The animals were killed after follow-up periods of 4-16 weeks. The lungs were removed, inflated, fixed, dried, and sliced corresponding to the CT sections. Computed tomography, specimen radiography, and histologic findings were correlated. Various CT findings were observed during the first 16 weeks, including ground-glass opacity, discrete consolidation, patchy consolidation, thickened interlobular septum, and bronchovascular bundle. Ground-glass opacity was associated with thickened alveolar wall and scattered tiny fibrotic foci. Thickened interlobular septum and bronchovascular bundle were the results of fibrosis adjacent to these structures. Discrete consolidation correlated with intraalveolar edema with hemorrhage and infiltration of inflammatory cells. High-resolution CT correlated well with pathology of the lung due to radiation injury as verified by precise radiologic-pathologic correlation. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Takahashi, Masashi; Balazs, G.; Moskowitz, G.W.; Palestro, C.J.; Eacobacci, T.; Khan, A.; Herman, P.G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A General Strategy for Physics-Based Model Validation Illustrated with Earthquake Phenomenology, Atmospheric Radiative Transfer, and Computational Fluid Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Validation is often defined as the process of determining the degree to which a model is an accurate representation of the real world from the perspective of its intended uses. Validation is crucial as industries and governments depend increasingly on predictions by computer models to justify their decisions. In this article, we survey the model validation literature and propose to formulate validation as an iterative construction process that mimics the process occurring implicitly in the minds of scientists. We thus offer a formal representation of the progressive build-up of trust in the model, and thereby replace incapacitating claims on the impossibility of validating a given model by an adaptive process of constructive approximation. This approach is better adapted to the fuzzy, coarse-grained nature of validation. Our procedure factors in the degree of redundancy versus novelty of the experiments used for validation as well as the degree to which the model predicts the observations. We illustrate the new methodology first with the maturation of Quantum Mechanics as the arguably best established physics theory and then with several concrete examples drawn from some of our primary scientific interests: a cellular automaton model for earthquakes, an anomalous diffusion model for solar radiation transport in the cloudy atmosphere, and a computational fluid dynamics code for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. This article is an augmented version of Sornette et al. [2007] that appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2007 (doi: 10.1073/pnas.0611677104), with an electronic supplement at URL http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/0611677104/DC1. Sornette et al. [2007] is also available in preprint form at physics/0511219.

Didier Sornette; Anthony B. Davis; James R. Kamm; Kayo Ide

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Response of a Deep Cumulus Convection Model to Changes in Radiative Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bulk diagnostic model is presented for the evaluation of the mass and heat fluxes due to convective ensembles. The cloud model is consistent with the hot-tower hypothesis and includes a moist downdraft, the depth and intensity of which are ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Kenneth J. Wilson

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Radiative Upper Boundary Condition Adapted for f-Plane Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the assumption of weak background rotational and wind shear effects, an attractive computational upper boundary condition capable of transmitting gravity waves is generalized for use in a variety of f-plane models. Issues relating to ...

Stephen T. Garner

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Brazil Diffuse Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files.
The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed...

311

Brazil Diffuse Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files. The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed...

312

Brazil Direct Normal Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files. The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed...

313

Evolution of Ozone, Particulates, and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in the Vicinity of Houston Using a Fully Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry-Aerosol Model  

SciTech Connect

A new fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban to regional scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a five day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still under-estimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg; Peckham, S. E.

2006-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

GLOBAL MODELING OF RADIATIVELY DRIVEN ACCRETION OF METALS FROM COMPACT DEBRIS DISKS ONTO WHITE DWARFS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent infrared observations have revealed the presence of compact (radii {approx}rate M-dot{sub PR}{approx}10{sup 8} g s{sup -1}. Here we extend this local analysis by exploring the global evolution of the debris disk under the action of the PR drag for a variety of assumptions about the disk properties. We find that massive disks (mass {approx}> 10{sup 20} g), which are optically thick to incident stellar radiation, inevitably give rise to metal accretion at rates M-dot {approx}>0.2 M-dot{sub PR}. The magnitude of M-dot and its time evolution are determined predominantly by the initial pattern of the radial distribution of the debris (i.e., ring-like versus disk-like) but not by the total mass of the disk. The latter determines only the disk lifetime, which can be several Myr or longer. The evolution of an optically thick disk generically results in the development of a sharp outer edge of the disk. We also find that the low-mass ({approx}< 10{sup 20} g), optically thin disks exhibit M-dot << M-dot{sub PR} and evolve on a characteristic timescale {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} yr, independent of their total mass.

Bochkarev, Konstantin V. [Department of General and Applied Physics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 141700 (Russian Federation); Rafikov, Roman R., E-mail: bochkarevkv@gmail.com, E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

An Improvement of the IGMK Model to Derive Total and Diffuse Solar Radiation at the Surface from Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a better understanding, of climate, as well as all kinds of solar power applications it is necessary to know about incoming solar radiation at the surface (global radiation) and its partition into disuse and direct components Over the last ...

Rolf Stuhlmann; Martin Rieland; Ehrhard Paschke

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic ...

S. J. Ghan; X. Liu; R. C. Easter; R. Zaveri; P. J. Rasch; J.-H. Yoon; B. Eaton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Satellite-based reconstruction of the tropical oceanic clear sky outgoing longwave radiation and comparison with climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) in clear-sky conditions have been calculated using High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) observations from 1979 to 2004. After applying corrections for satellite orbital drift and ...

Guillaume Gastineau; Brian J. Soden; Darren L. Jackson; Chris W. O’Dell

318

The Radiation Budget of the West African Sahel and Its Controls: A Perspective from Observations and Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous measurements of the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net cross-atmosphere radiation flux divergence over the West African Sahel were made during the year 2006 using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) and ...

Mark A. Miller; Virendra P. Ghate; Robert K. Zahn

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Models for Solar Abundance Stars with Gravitational Settling and Radiative Accelerations: Application to M67 and NGC188  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolutionary models taking into account radiative accelerations, thermal diffusion, and gravitational settling for 28 elements, including all those contributing to OPAL stellar opacities, have been calculated for solar metallicity stars of 0.5 to 1.4 solar masses. The Sun has been used to calibrate the models. Isochrones are fitted to the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of M67 and NGC188, and ages of 3.7 and 6.4 Gyr are respectively determined. Convective core overshooting is not required to match the turnoff morphology of either cluster, including the luminosity of the gap in M67, because central convective cores are larger when diffusive processes are treated. This is due mainly to the enhanced helium and metal abundances in the central regions of such models. The observation of solar metallicity open clusters with ages in the range 4.8--5.7Gyr would further test the calculations of atomic diffusion in central stellar regions: according to non-diffusive isochrones, clusters should not have gaps nea...

Michaud, G; Richer, J; Van den Berg, D A; Berg, Don A. Vanden

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas  

SciTech Connect

We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

GFDL ARM Project Technical Report: Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Cloud and Convection Parameterizations & Cloud-Convection-Radiation Interactions in the GFDL Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly summarizes the progress made by ARM postdoctoral fellow, Yanluan Lin, at GFDL during the period from October 2008 to present. Several ARM datasets have been used for GFDL model evaluation, understanding, and improvement. This includes a new ice fall speed parameterization with riming impact and its test in GFDL AM3, evaluation of model cloud and radiation diurnal and seasonal variation using ARM CMBE data, model ice water content evaluation using ARM cirrus data, and coordination of the TWPICE global model intercomparison. The work illustrates the potential and importance of ARM data for GCM evaluation, understanding, and ultimately, improvement of GCM cloud and radiation parameterizations. Future work includes evaluation and improvement of the new dynamicsPDF cloud scheme and aerosol activation in the GFDL model.

V. Ramaswamy; L. J. Donner; J-C. Golaz; S. A. Klein

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

Using radiative transfer equation to model absorption by thin Cu(In,Ga)Se2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Photovoltaic Energy Conversion, K. Kurokawa ed. (Arisumi, Osaka, Japan, 2003), pp. 344­347. 10. F. Leblanc, J European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, James & James ed. (Alden, Glasgow, UK, 2000), pp. 522 thin film silicon solar cells: optical model," in 16th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference

323

A Wave Amplitude Transition in a Quasi-Linear Model with Radiative Forcing and Surface Drag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasi-linear two-layer quasigeostrophic ?-plane model of the interaction between a baroclinic jet and a single zonal wavenumber perturbation is used to study the mechanics leading to a wave amplitude bifurcation—in particular, the role of the ...

Orli Lachmy; Nili Harnik

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Radiative pion-proton scattering in the static Chew--Low model  

SciTech Connect

The results of a nonrelativistic calculation of $pi$/sup +-/-proton bremsstrahlung cross sections at the pion laboratory kinetic energy of 298 MeV for backward photon angles is presented. The $pi$p interaction is described by the static Chew-Low model. (auth)

Ho-Kim, Q.; Lavine, J.P.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Scalar dark matter and fermion coannihilations in the radiative seesaw model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By extending the Standard Model with three right-handed neutrinos (N_i) and a second Higgs doublet (H_2), odd under a Z_2 symmetry, it is possible to explain non-zero neutrino masses and to account for the dark matter. We consider the case where the dark matter is a scalar and study its coannihilations with the right-handed neutrinos. These coannihilations tend to increase, rather than reduce, the dark matter density and they modify in a significant way the viable parameter space of the model. In particular, they allow to satisfy the relic density constraint for dark matter masses well below 500 GeV. The dependence of the relic density on the relevant parameters of the model, such as the dark matter mass, the mass splitting, and the number of coannihilating fermions, is analyzed in detail. We also investigate, via a scan over the parameter space, the new viable regions that are obtained when coannihilations are taken into account. Notably, they feature large indirect detection rates, with sigmav reaching values of order 10^{-24} cm^3/s. Finally, we emphasize that coannihilation effects analogous to those discussed here can be used to reconcile a thermal freeze-out with a large sigmav also in other models of dark matter.

Michael Klasen; Carlos E. Yaguna; Jose D. Ruiz-Alvarez; Diego Restrepo; Oscar Zapata

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

Radiative Cooling Calculated by Random Band Models with S-1-? Tailed Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Random band models with S-l-u tailed distribution for line intensity are proposed for both the Lorentz lineprofile and an approximate Voigt line profile suggested by Zhu. Such a distribution for the weak line intensityis more realistic than a ...

Xun Zhu

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

328

The potential of different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques in daily global solar radiation modeling based on meteorological data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of present study is to predict daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface, based on meteorological variables, using different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation, and wind speed values between 2002 and 2006 for Dezful city in Iran (32 16'N, 48 25'E), are used in this study. In order to consider the effect of each meteorological variable on daily GSR prediction, six following combinations of input variables are considered: (I)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and relative humidity as inputs and daily GSR as output. (II)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (III)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (IV)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and evaporation as inputs and daily GSR as output. (V)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. (VI)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks are applied for daily GSR modeling based on six proposed combinations. The measured data between 2002 and 2005 are used to train the neural networks while the data for 214 days from 2006 are used as testing data. The comparison of obtained results from ANNs and different conventional GSR prediction (CGSRP) models shows very good improvements (i.e. the predicted values of best ANN model (MLP-V) has a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) about 5.21% versus 10.02% for best CGSRP model (CGSRP 5)). (author)

Behrang, M.A.; Assareh, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, Dezful Branch (Iran); Ghanbarzadeh, A.; Noghrehabadi, A.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis: Modifications of models resulting from recent reports on health effects of ionizing radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The most recent health effects models resulting from these efforts were published in two reports, NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990) and Part 2 (1989). Several major health effects reports have been published recently that may impact the health effects models presented in these reports. This addendum to the Part 2 (1989) report, provides a review of the 1986 and 1988 reports by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council BEAR 5 Committee report and Publication 60 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection as they relate to this report. The three main sections of this addendum discuss early occurring and continuing effects, late somatic effects, and genetic effects. The major changes to the NUREG/CR-4214 health effects models recommended in this addendum are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies like that on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. The results presented in this addendum should be used with the basic NUREG/CR-4214 reports listed above to obtain the most recent views on the potential health effects of radionuclides released accidentally from nuclear power plants. 48 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs.

Abrahamson, S. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)); Bender, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Gilbert, E.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Comparison of collisional radiative models for edge electron density reconstruction from Li I (2s-2p) emission profiles  

SciTech Connect

Four collisional radiative models (CRMs) for reconstruction of the edge electron density profile from the measured Li I (2s-2p) emission profile of an accelerated lithium beam are compared using experimental data from DIII-D. It is shown for both L- and H-mode plasmas that edge density profiles reconstructed with the CRMs DDD2, ABSOLUT, [Sasaki et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1699 (1993)] and a new model developed at DIII-D agree in a density scan from n{sub e}{sup ped}= (2.0-6.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} within 20%, 20%, <5%, and 40%, respectively, of the pedestal density measured with Thomson scattering. Profile shape and absolute density vary in a scan of the effective ion charge Z{sub eff}= 1-6 up to a factor of two but agree with Thomson data for Z{sub eff}= 1-2 within the error bars.

Stoschus, H.; Hudson, B.; Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States); Thomas, D. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Schweinzer, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Utilization of solar radiation by polar animals: an optical model for pelts  

SciTech Connect

A summary of existing passive solar-heat conversion panels provides the basis for a definition of an ideal passive solar-heat converter. Evidence for the existence of a biological greenhouse effect in certain homopolar homeothermic species is reviewed. The thermal and optical properties of homeothermic pelts, in particular those of the polar bear, are described, and a qualitative optical model of the polar bear pelt is proposed. The effectiveness of polar bear and seal pelts as solar-heat converters is discussed, and comparison is made with the ideal converter.

Grojean, R.E.; Sousa, J.A.; Henry, M.C.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Shock model description of the interaction radiation pulse in nested wire array z-pinches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bow shock structures are observed in a nested wire array z-pinch as ablation streams from the outer array pass the inner array. The jump in plasma conditions across these shocks results in an enhancement of snowplow emission from the imploding plasma piston. Results from a snowplow model modified to account for the shock jumps are discussed and compared to experimental data from MAGPIE. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicate that this is the primary heating mechanism responsible for the interaction pulse recorded on the Z generator, which is required for pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion.

Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Sinars, D. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1106 (United States); Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Palmer, J. B. A.; Chittenden, J. P. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Bott, S. C. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Retrieval of Ice Cloud Properties from AIRS and MODIS Observations Based on a Fast High-Spectral-Resolution Radiative Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computationally efficient high-spectral-resolution cloudy-sky radiative transfer model (HRTM) in the thermal infrared region (700–1300 cm?1, 0.1 cm?1 spectral resolution) is advanced for simulating the upwelling radiance at the top of atmosphere ...

Chenxi Wang; Ping Yang; Steven Platnick; Andrew K. Heidinger; Bryan A. Baum; Thomas Greenwald; Zhibo Zhang; Robert E. Holz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Surface Downwelling Solar Radiation Surplus over the Southern Ocean in the Met Office Model: The Role of Midlatitude Cyclone Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors study the role of clouds in the persistent bias of surface downwelling shortwave radiation (SDSR) in the Southern Ocean in the atmosphere-only version of the Met Office model. The reduction of this bias in the atmosphere-only version ...

A. Bodas-Salcedo; K. D. Williams; P. R. Field; A. P. Lock

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty: Pyrgeometers Compared to an Absolute Sky-Scanning Radiometer, Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, and Radiative Transfer Model Calculations  

SciTech Connect

Because atmospheric longwave radiation is one of the most fundamental elements of an expected climate change, there has been a strong interest in improving measurements and model calculations in recent years. Important questions are how reliable and consistent are atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations and what are the uncertainties? The First International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer Comparison, which was held at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Souther Great Plains site in Oklahoma, answers these questions at least for midlatitude summer conditions and reflects the state of the art for atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations. The 15 participating pyrgeometers were all calibration-traced standard instruments chosen from a broad international community. Two new chopped pyrgeometers also took part in the comparison. And absolute sky-scanning radiometer (ASR), which includes a pyroelectric detector and a reference blackbody source, was used for the first time as a reference standard instrument to field calibrate pyrgeometers during clear-sky nighttime measurements. Owner-provided and uniformly determined blackbody calibration factors were compared. Remarkable improvements and higher pyrgeometer precision were achieved with field calibration factors. Results of nighttime and daytime pyrgeometer precision and absolute uncertainty are presented for eight consecutive days of measurements, during which period downward longwave irradiance varied between 260 and 420 W m-2. Comparisons between pyrgeometers and the absolute ASR, the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer, and radiative transfer models LBLRTM and MODTRAN show a surprisingly good agreement of <2 W m-2 for nighttime atmospheric longwave irradiance measurements and calculations.

Philipona, J. R.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Stoffel, T.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Reda, I.; Stifter, Armin; Wendling, Peter; Wood, Norm; Clough, Shepard A.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Anderson, Gail; Revercomb, Henry E.; Shippert, Timothy R.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

336

The solar radiation model for Open source GIS: implementation and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cet article doit présent les possibilités, la structure et l'exécution du modèle solaire de rayonnement de r.sun et montrer des exemples de son application. Chacun des trois composants de rayonnement solaire potentiel est calculé (faisceau, diffus et reflété) pour des états de clair-ciel. Les conditions obscurcies peuvent être aussi bien simulées en utilisant un facteur d'atténuation de nuages. Le modèle est applicable pour les grandes régions, variation spatiale de rayonnement solaire due au terrain et terrain-ombrageant des effets sont également inclus. Les exemples présentent l'application du modèle solaire de rayonnement pour projeter les systèmes photovoltaïques en Europe de l'Est centrale et et pour le rayonnement solaire modelant dans le terrain montagneux de la Slovaquie

Jaroslav Hofierka; Marcel Suri; Marcel Šúri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Models for Solar Abundance Stars with Gravitational Settling and Radiative Accelerations: Application to M67 and NGC188  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolutionary models taking into account radiative accelerations, thermal diffusion, and gravitational settling for 28 elements, including all those contributing to OPAL stellar opacities, have been calculated for solar metallicity stars of 0.5 to 1.4 solar masses. The Sun has been used to calibrate the models. Isochrones are fitted to the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of M67 and NGC188, and ages of 3.7 and 6.4 Gyr are respectively determined. Convective core overshooting is not required to match the turnoff morphology of either cluster, including the luminosity of the gap in M67, because central convective cores are larger when diffusive processes are treated. This is due mainly to the enhanced helium and metal abundances in the central regions of such models. The observation of solar metallicity open clusters with ages in the range 4.8--5.7Gyr would further test the calculations of atomic diffusion in central stellar regions: according to non-diffusive isochrones, clusters should not have gaps near their main-sequence turnoffs if they are older than ~4.8Gyr, whereas diffusive isochrones predict that gaps should persist up to ages of ~5.7Gyr. Surface abundance isochrones are also calculated. In the case of M67 and NGC188, surface abundance variations are expected to be small. Abundance differences between stars of very similar Teff are expected close to the turnoff, especially for elements between P and Ca. Moreover, in comparison with the results obtained for giants, small generalized underabundances are expected in main-sequence stars. The lithium to beryllium ratio is discussed briefly and compared to observations.

G. Michaud; O. Richard; J. Richer; Don A. VandenBerg

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 15 September 1990--25 April 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of our group to meet our stated objectives. The report is divided into sections entitled: Radiation Model Testing Activities, General Circulation Model Testing Activities, Science Team Activities, and Publications, Presentations and Meetings. The section on Science Team Activities summarizes our participation with the science team to further advance the observation and modeling programs. Appendix A lists graduate students supported, and post-doctoral appointments during the project. Reports on the activities during each of the first two years are included as Appendix B. Significant progress has been made in: determining the ability of line-by-line radiation models to calculate the downward longwave flux at the surface; determining the uncertainties in calculated the downwelling radiance and flux at the surface associated with the use of different proposed profiling techniques; intercomparing clear-sky radiance and flux observations with calculations from radiation codes from different climate models; determining the uncertainties associated with estimating N* from surface longwave flux observations; and determining the sensitivity of model calculations to different formulations of the effects of finite sized clouds.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

340

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model. Part II: Impacts on In-Canopy Latent Heat Flux over a Winter Wheat Field Determined by Detailed Calculation of Canopy Radiation Transmission and Stomatal Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the validation and sensitivity analysis of an atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and a radiation scheme for the transmission ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

NREL: Solar Radiation Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's solar radiation research supports industry, government, and academia by providing solar radiation measurements, models, maps, and support services. These resources are used...

343

ORBITAL MIGRATION OF INTERACTING LOW-MASS PLANETS IN EVOLUTIONARY RADIATIVE TURBULENT MODELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The torques exerted by a locally isothermal disk on an embedded planet lead to rapid inward migration. Recent work has shown that modeling the thermodynamics without the assumption of local isothermality reveals regions where the net torque on an embedded planet is positive, leading to outward migration of the planet. When a region with negative torque lies directly exterior to this, planets in the inner region migrate outward and planets in the outer region migrate inward, converging where the torque is zero. We incorporate the torques from an evolving non-isothermal disk into an N-body simulation to examine the behavior of planets or planetary embryos interacting in the convergence zone. We find that mutual interactions do not eject objects from the convergence zone. Small numbers of objects in a laminar disk settle into near resonant orbits that remain stable over the 10 Myr periods that we examine. However, either or both increasing the number of planets or including a correlated, stochastic force to represent turbulence drives orbit crossings and mergers in the convergence zone. These processes can build gas giant cores with masses of order 10 Earth masses from sub-Earth mass embryos in 2-3 Myr.

Horn, Brandon; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th St, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Lyra, Wladimir [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Sandor, Zsolt, E-mail: bhorn@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: wlyra@amnh.org, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: zsolt.sandor@uibk.ac.at [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Higgs Boson Decays in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with Radiative Higgs Sector CP Violation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re–evaluate the decays of the Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) where the tree-level CP invariance of the Higgs potential is explicitly broken by the loop effects of the third–generation squarks with CP–violating soft–breaking Yukawa interactions. This study is based on the mass matrix of the neutral Higgs bosons that is valid for arbitrary values of all the relevant MSSM parameters. It extends the previous work considerably by including neutral Higgs–boson decays into virtual gauge bosons and those into top–squark pairs, by implementing squark–loop contributions to the two–gluon decay channel, and by incorporating the decays of the charged Higgs boson. The constraints from the electron electric dipole moment on the CP phases are also discussed. We find that the branching fractions of both the neutral and charged Higgs–boson decays and their total decay widths depend strongly on the CP phases of the top (and bottom) squark sectors through the loop–induced neutral Higgs boson mixing as well as the direct couplings of the neutral Higgs bosons to top squark pairs. PACS number(s): 14.80.Cp, 11.30.Er, 12.60.Jv Typeset using REVTEX 1 I.

S. Y. Choi; Kaoru Hagiwara; Jae Sik Lee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Numerical modeling of radiation-dominated and quantum-electrodynamically strong regimes of laser-plasma interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultra-strong laser pulses can be so intense that an electron in the focused beam loses significant energy due to {gamma}-photon emission while its motion deviates via the radiation back-reaction. Numerical methods and tools designed to simulate radiation-dominated and quantum-electrodynamically strong laser-plasma interactions are summarized here.

Sokolov, Igor V. [Space Physics Research Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Naumova, Natalia M. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR 7639 ENSTA, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Nees, John A. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately accounting for radiative energy balance between the incoming solar and the outgoing infrared radiative fluxes is very important in modeling the Earth's climate. Water vapor absorption plays a critical role in the radiative heating rate ...

D. D. Turner; E. J. Mlawer

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Radiation Budgets in the Western Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usefulness of the radiances measured by operational satellites in deriving radiation budgets is demonstrated by comparing the model calculations with the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) fluxes. The radiation budgets in the atmosphere ...

Mino-Dah Chou

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

350

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Downscaling Aerosols and the Impact of Neglected Subgrid Processes on Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing for a Representative Global Climate Model Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to many global climate models include detailed, prognostic aerosol calculations intended to better reproduce the observed climate. However, the trace gas and aerosol fields are treated at the grid-cell scale with no attempt to account for sub-grid impacts on the aerosol fields. This paper begins to quantify the error introduced by the neglected sub-grid variability for the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a representative climate model grid spacing of 75 km. An analysis of the value added in downscaling aerosol fields is also presented to give context to the WRF-Chem simulations used for the sub-grid analysis. We found that 1) the impact of neglected sub-grid variability on the aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in regions of complex topography and complicated flow patterns, and 2) scale-induced differences in emissions contribute strongly to the impact of neglected sub-grid processes on the aerosol radiative forcing. The two of these effects together, when simulated at 75 km vs. 3 km in WRF-Chem, result in an average daytime mean bias of over 30% error in top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a large percentage of central Mexico during the MILAGRO field campaign.

Gustafson, William I.; Qian, Yun; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

Microphysical and Radiative Effects of Ice Clouds on Tropical Equilibrium States: A Two-Dimensional Cloud-Resolving Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysical and radiative effects of ice clouds on tropical equilibrium states are investigated based on three two-dimensional cloud-resolving simulations imposed by zero vertical velocity and time-invariant zonal wind and sea surface ...

Fan Ping; Zhexian Luo; Xiaofan Li

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling near-field radiative heat transfer from sharp objects using a general three-dimensional numerical scattering technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a general numerical method to calculate the nonequilibrium radiative heat transfer between a plate and compact objects of arbitrary shapes, making the first accurate theoretical predictions for the total heat ...

McCauley, Alexander Patrick

354

The Impact of Clouds on the Shortwave Radiation Budget of the Surface-Atmosphere System: Interfacing Measurements and Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two datasets have been combined to demonstrate how the availability of more comprehensive datasets could serve to elucidate the shortwave radiative impact of clouds on both the atmospheric column and the surface. These datasets consist of two ...

Robert D. Cess; Seth Nemesure; Ellsworth G. Dutton; John J. Deluisi; Gerald L. Potter; Jean-Jacques Morcrette

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Retrieval of Sea Surface Temperature from Space, Based on Modeling of Infrared Radiative Transfer: Capabilities and Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retrieval (estimation) of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from space-based infrared observations is increasingly performed using retrieval coefficients derived from radiative transfer simulations of top-of-atmosphere brightness temperatures (...

Christopher J. Merchant; Pierre Le Borgne

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Incoming Solar and Infrared Radiation Derived from METEOSAT: Impact on the Modeled Land Water and Energy Budget over France  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA SAF) project radiation fluxes, derived from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) geostationary satellite, were used in the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere (ISBA) ...

D. Carrer; S. Lafont; J.-L. Roujean; J.-C. Calvet; C. Meurey; P. Le Moigne; I. F. Trigo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

An energy-conserving two-temperature model of radiation damage in single-component and binary Lennard-Jones crystals  

SciTech Connect

Two-temperature models are used to represent the interaction between atoms and free electrons during thermal transients such as radiation damage, laser heating, and cascade simulations. In this paper, we introduce an energy-conserving version of an inhomogeneous finite reservoir two-temperature model using a Langevin thermostat to communicate energy between the electronic and atomic subsystems. This energy-conserving modification allows the inhomogeneous two-temperature model to be used for longer and larger simulations and simulations of small energy phenomena, without introducing nonphysical energy fluctuations that may affect simulation results. We test this model on the annealing of Frenkel defects. We find that Frenkel defect annealing is largely indifferent to the electronic subsystem, unless the electronic subsystem is very tightly coupled to the atomic subsystem. We also consider radiation damage due to local deposition of heat in two idealized systems. We first consider radiation damage in a large face-centered-cubic Lennard-Jones (LJ) single-component crystal that readily recrystallizes. Second, we consider radiation damage in a large binary glass-forming LJ crystal that retains permanent damage. We find that the electronic subsystem parameters can influence the way heat is transported through the system and have a significant impact on the number of defects after the heat deposition event. We also find that the two idealized systems have different responses to the electronic subsystem. The single-component LJ system anneals most rapidly with an intermediate electron-ion coupling and a high electronic thermal conductivity. If sufficiently damaged, the binary glass-forming LJ system retains the least permanent damage with both a high electron-ion coupling and a high electronic thermal conductivity. In general, we find that the presence of an electronic gas can affect short and long term material annealing.

Phillips, Carolyn L. [Applied Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Crozier, Paul S. [Department of Multiscale Dynamic Materials Modeling, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1322, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1322 (United States)

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

358

RESRAD-RECYCLE : a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing ratioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data.

Cheng, J. J.; Kassas, B.; Yu, C.; Arnish, J. J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Univ. of Texas

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Development of a second-generation regional climate model (RegCM2). Part I: Boundary-layer and radiative transfer processes  

SciTech Connect

During the last few years the development of a second-generation regional climate modeling system (RegCM2) has been completed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Based upon the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Pennsylvania State University Mesoscale Model (MM4), RegCM2 includes improved formulations of boundary layer, radiative transfer, surface physics, cumulus convection, and time integration technique, which make it more physically comprehensive and more computationally efficient than the previous regional climate model version. This paper discusses a number of month-long simulations over the European region that were conducted to test the new RegCM2 boundary-layer parameterization (the scheme developed by Holtsag et al.) and radiative transfer formulation [the package developed for the NCAR Community Climate Model 2 (CCM2)]. Both schemes significantly affect the model precipitation, temperature, moisture, and cloudiness climatology, leading to overall more realistic results, while they do not substantially modify the model performance in simulating the aggregated characteristics of synoptic patterns. Description of the convective processes and procedures of boundary condition assimilation included in RegCM2 is presented in companion paper by Giorgi et al. 26 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

Giorgi, F.; Marinucci, M.R.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

362

Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Modeling Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP B. Schmid and J. Redemann Bay Area Environmental Research Institute National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California W. P. Arnott Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada A. Bucholtz and J. Reid Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, California P. Colarco Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. Covert and R. Elleman University of Washington Seattle, Washington J. Eilers, P. Pilewskie, and A. Strawa National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames, Research Center Moffett Field, California R. A. Ferrare

363

Hyperon radiative decay  

SciTech Connect

The radiative decay widths of the low-lying strange baryons are calculated both within the relativistic quark bag model and the nonrelativistic potential model. These widths are found to depend sensitively upon the quark-model dynamics through multiplet mixing and q/sup 4/q-bar admixtures. The comparison between our calculated results and the very limited experimental data is discussed.

Kaxiras, E.; Moniz, E.J.; Soyeur, M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

365

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) are estimated from empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) that convert instantaneous radiance measurements to TOA fluxes. This paper ...

Norman G. Loeb; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Bruce A. Wielicki; David F. Young

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Terra Satellite. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors in top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument due to uncertainties in radiance-to-flux conversion from CERES Terra angular distribution models (ADMs) are evaluated ...

Norman G. Loeb; Seiji Kato; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith; David R. Doelling

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

368

Ground-Based Observations and Modeling of the Visibility and Radar Reflectivity in a Radiation Fog Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a radiation fog layer at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (51.97°N, 4.93°E) on 23 March 2011 was observed with ground-based in situ and remote sensing observations to investigate the relationship between ...

R. Boers; H. Klein Baltink; H. J. Hemink; F. C. Bosveld; M. Moerman

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resolved Radiative Transfer Model: MODTRAN……….131 APMEXModerate Imaging Spectroradiometer MODTRAN MODerate spectralprovide by MODTRAN…………………………………………………………………………133 Table 4.2

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

371

Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures  

SciTech Connect

The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

372

Parameterization of Outgoing Infrared Radiation Derived from Detailed Radiative Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art radiative transfer models can calculate outgoing infrared (IR) irradiance at the top of the atmosphere (F) to an accuracy suitable for climate modeling given the proper atmospheric profiles of temperature and absorbing gases and ...

Starley L. Thompson; Stephen G. Warren

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Single-Scattering Albedo and Radiative Forcing of Various Aerosol Species with a Global Three-Dimensional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global distributions of the aerosol optical thickness, Ångström exponent, and single-scattering albedo are simulated using an aerosol transport model coupled with an atmospheric general circulation model. All the main tropospheric aerosols are ...

Toshihiko Takemura; Teruyuki Nakajima; Oleg Dubovik; Brent N. Holben; Stefan Kinne

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Numerical Forecasting of Radiation Fog. Part II: A Comparison of Model Simulation with Several Observed Fog Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1D model adapted for forecasting the formation and development of fog, and forced with mesoscale parameters derived from a 3D limited-area model, was used to simulate three fog event observations made during the Lille 88 campaign. The model ...

Daniel Guedalia; Thierry Bergot

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Relationship Between Grain Boundary Structure and Radiation Induced Segregation in a Neutron Irradiated 9 wt. % Cr Model Ferritic/Martensitic Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs but has only been demonstrated in ion irradiated specimens. A 9 wt. % Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of neutron radiation environment on the RIS-GB structure dependence. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

Field, Kevin G [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, Brandon [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Chichester, Heather J.M. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Sridharan, K. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivi...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our research utilizes radiation cataract as a model system to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly differentiated tissue. We believe...

378

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

379

Effect of laser e LED radiations associated or not on dorsal cutaneous wound repair in a rodent model: histologic study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate histologically tissue repair on dorsal cutaneous wounds in a rodent model treated with Laser and/or LED,… (more)

Ana Paula Cavalcanti de Sousa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The radiative influence of aerosol effects on liquid-phase cumulus clouds based on sensitivity studies with two climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global black carbon aerosol model. J Geophys Res 101:of interactions between aerosols and cloud microphysics overby anthropogenic sulfate aerosol. J Geophys Res 106: 5279-

Menon, Surabi; Rotstayn, Leon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

New Approach to Calculation of Atmospheric Model Physics: Accurate and Fast Neural Network Emulation of Longwave Radiation in a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach based on a synergetic combination of statistical/machine learning and deterministic modeling within atmospheric models is presented. The approach uses neural networks as a statistical or machine learning technique for an accurate ...

Vladimir M. Krasnopolsky; Michael S. Fox-Rabinovitz; Dmitry V. Chalikov

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Radiative Effects of Cloud-Type Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative flux changes induced by the occurrence of different cloud types are investigated using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud data and a refined radiative transfer model from National Aeronautics and Space ...

Ting Chen; William B. Rossow; Yuanchong Zhang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Solar Radiation Atlas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas provides a record of monthly mean solar radiation generated by a Climatological Solar Radiation model, using quasi-climatological inputs of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, and atmospheric pressure.

NREL

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

384

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

385

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

386

An Iterative Radiative Transfer Code For Ocean-Atmosphere Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the details of an iterative radiative transfer code for computing the intensity and degree of polarization of diffuse radiation in models of the ocean-atmosphere system. The present code neglects the upwelling radiation from below the ...

Ziauddin Ahmad; Robert S. Fraser

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Cross Correlations between the Radiation and Atmospheric Variables in a General Circulation Model and in Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical picture of the influence of midlatitude troughs on cloud patterns is investigated in a general circulation model (GCM) and in satellite and National Meteorological Centre (NMC) data by comparing the cross correlation of the poleward ...

Thomas P. Charlock; Fred G. Rose; Karen M. Cattany-Cranes

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Radiative Transfer Simulations Using Mesoscale Cloud Model Outputs: Comparisons with Passive Microwave and Infrared Satellite Observations for Midlatitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real midlatitude meteorological cases are simulated over western Europe with the cloud mesoscale model Méso-NH, and the outputs are used to calculate brightness temperatures at microwave frequencies with the Atmospheric Transmission at Microwave (...

Ingo Meirold-Mautner; Catherine Prigent; Eric Defer; Juan R. Pardo; Jean-Pierre Chaboureau; Jean-Pierre Pinty; Mario Mech; Susanne Crewell

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Albedo Field and Cloud Radiative Forcing Produced by a General Circulation Model with Internally Generated Cloud Optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectral general circulation model (GCM) is run for perpetual January with fixed sea surface temperature conditions. It has internally generated, variable cloud optical properties as well as variable cloud arm and heights. The cloud optics are ...

Thomas P. Charlock; V. Ramanathan

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

Flores, Alejandro N.

391

Equilibrium Response of an Atmosphere–Mixed Layer Ocean Model to Different Radiative Forcing Agents: Global and Zonal Mean Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equilibrium response to various forcing agents, including CO2, solar irradiance, tropospheric ozone, black carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, and volcanic aerosols, is investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a ...

Masakazu Yoshimori; Anthony J. Broccoli

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radiation in Particle Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of fusion ignition plasmas including the important effects of radiation emission and absorption.

More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Radiation and viral DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

396

A Model Predicting the Evolution of Ice Particle Size Spectra and Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds. Part I: Microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lagrangian time-dependent three-dimensional model was developed that predicts the evolution of ice particle size spectra in cirrus clouds in terms of the growth processes of vapor diffusion and aggregation, as well as the cloud updraft profile. ...

David L. Mitchell

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

399

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Short communication: A software component for estimating solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GSRad (global solar radiation) is a software component containing models to estimate extra-terrestrial and ground-level solar radiation (global and photosynthetically active; direct, diffuse, and reflected components) from alternative methods. Radiation ... Keywords: Atmospheric transmissivity, Component architecture, GSRad, Model extensibility, Solar radiation fractions

M. Donatelli; L. Carlini; G. Bellocchi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

CSR Press Release Submitted by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in energy usage. The legacy servers were replaced with smaller, more efficient, and virtualized servers, it introduced its purpose- built platform family saving customers 60 percent on energy, instituted internal energy reduction initiatives sufficient to power more than 200 U.S. homes and supported employee

403

CSR Press Release Submitted by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and the Environmental Markets Association (EMA). Bloomberg New Energy Finance will provide content resources and has://bit.ly/CTA201SpeakerList. A sampling of speakers includes David Sandalow - U.S. Department of Energy, Abyd ­ Barclays, Kyle Danish ­ Van Ness Feldman, Miles Austin ­ Carbon Markets & Investors Association, Milo

404

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

405

Radiation receiver  

SciTech Connect

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Stratospheric Influence on Tropopause Height: The Radiative Constraint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earlier theoretical and modeling work introduced the concept of a radiative constraint relating tropopause height to tropospheric lapse rate and other factors such as surface temperature. Here a minimal quantitative model for the radiative ...

John Thuburn; George C. Craig

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Structure of the Atmosphere in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate water vapor transport in an atmosphere in radiative–convective equilibrium, a simplified dynamical convection model (DCM) was constructed that explicitly models moist convection and longwave radiation in a gray atmosphere. In the ...

Yoshiharu Iwasa; Yutaka Abe; Hiroshi Tanaka

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Radiative heating rate The heating rate due to the divergence of long and shortwave radiative flux. Categories Radiometric, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 : Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS

410

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

411

Radiation Tolerant Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategies that can alleviate radiation damage may assist the design of radiation tolerant materials. We will summarize our recent studies on radiation damage in ...

412

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Radiation properties of cavity Cerenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect

Cerenkov radiation from cavities has been analyzed by quantum electrodynamic theory. Analytical expressions of basic radiation properties such as the Einstein's A and B coefficients are derived and shown to be directly modified by the cavities. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the coherent radiation from the Cerenkov radiation devices is due to super radiance of spontaneous emission instead of stimulated emission. Coherent and incoherent radiations are analyzed in the THz radiation range.

Gao Ju; Shen Fang [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

416

Radiation Effects In Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RADIATION MATERIALS SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II: Radiation Effects in Ceramics. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials ...

417

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. ... OH. US Air Force Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Wright-Patterson - Base, OH [100548- 0] PA. ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

418

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

419

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Partially Cloudy Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiation treatment of the broken-cloud problem is presented, based upon various stochastic models of the equation of radiative transfer that consider the clouds and clear sky as a two-component mixture. These models, recently introduced in the ...

F. Malvagi; R. N. Byrne; G. C. Pomraning; R. C. J. Somerville

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Using ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional differences of mammary glands derived from mouse strains that differ in cancer susceptibility to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation sensitivity or resistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional ex vivo organ culture models as surrogates to investigate morphological and functional differences of mammary glands derived from mouse strains that differ in cancer susceptibility to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation sensitivity or resistance Alvin Lo, Joni D. Mott, Jian-Hua Mao, and Mina J. Bissell Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 Goal: Within the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Low Dose SFA, as part of Project 2, we are using a systems genetics approach to determine the contribution of non-targeted and targeted radiation effects for risk of mammary carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to characterize the mammary gland of the parental mouse strains, and the F1 and F2 generations used in these studies with respect to tissue

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluation of the Surface Radiation Budget in the Atmospheric Component of the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model (HadGEM1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partitioning of the earth radiation budget (ERB) between its atmosphere and surface components is of crucial interest in climate studies as it has a significant role in the oceanic and atmospheric general circulation. An analysis of the ...

A. Bodas-Salcedo; M. A. Ringer; A. Jones

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Radiative Flux Estimation from a Broadband Radiometer Using Synthetic Angular Models in the EarthCARE Mission Framework. Part II: Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instantaneous top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance-to-flux conversion for the broadband radiometer (BBR) on board the Earth Clouds, Aerosols, and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) was assessed in Part I of this paper, by developing theoretical ...

Carlos Domenech; Ernesto Lopez-Baeza; David P. Donovan; Tobias Wehr

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

In-Flight Calibration of the Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) Sensors. Part I: A Thermal Model for the Shortwave Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the early record of spectrally broadband earth radiation budget (ERB) measurements was taken by the ERB instrument launched on the Nimbus-7 spacecraft in October 1978. The wide-field-of-view (WFOV) sensors measured the emitted and ...

H. Lee Kyle; Richard Hucek; Philip Ardanuy; Lanning Penn; John Hickey; Brian Groveman

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part II: Impact on Cloudiness, the Earth's Radiation Budget, and the General Circulation of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prognostic equation for the mass of condensate associated with large-scale cloudiness introduces a direct coupling between the atmospheric moisture budget and the radiation budget through interactive cloud amounts and cloud optical properties. ...

Laura D. Fowler; David A. Randall

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Background. Extensive research on the health effects of radiation using standard epidemiological and toxicological approaches has been done for decades to characterize responses of populations and individuals to high radiation doses, and to set exposure standards to protect both the public and the workforce. These standards were set using models that extrapolated from the cancers observed following exposure to high doses of radiation to predicted, but not measurable, changes in cancer frequency at low radiation doses. The use of models was necessary because of our inability to detect changes in cancer incidence following low doses of radiation. Historically, the predominant approach has been the Linear-no-Threshold model (see Wikipedia entry) and collective dose concept that assumes each unit of radiation, no

426

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Synchrotron Radiation. What is Synchrotron Radiation? Synchrotron radiation ... known. Properties of Synchrotron Radiation. Schwinger ...

427

Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

428

Theory of Microwave Instability and Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in Electron Storage Rings  

SciTech Connect

Bursting of coherent synchrotron radiation has been observed and in fact used to generate THz radiation in many electron storage rings. In order to understand and control the bursting, we return to the study of the microwave instability. In this paper, we will report on the theoretical understanding, including recent developments, of the microwave instability in electron storage rings. The historical progress of the theories will be surveyed, starting from the dispersion relation of coasting beams, to the work of Sacherer on a bunched beam, and ending with the Oide and Yokoya method of discretization. This theoretical survey will be supplemented with key experimental results over the years. Finally, we will describe the recent theoretical development of utilizing the Laguerre polynomials in the presence of potential-well distortion. This self-consistent method will be applied to study the microwave instability driven the impedances due to the coherent synchrotron radiation. Over the past quarter century, there has been steady progress toward smaller transverse emittances in electron storage rings used for synchrotron light sources, from tens of nm decades ago to the nm range recently. In contrast, there is not much progress made in the longitudinal plane. For an electron bunch in a typical ring, its relative energy spread {sigma}{sub {delta}} remains about 10{sup -3} and its length {sigma}{sub z} is still in between 5 mm to 10 mm. Now the longitudinal emittance ({sigma}{sub {delta}}{sigma}{sub z}) becomes a factor of thousand larger than those in the transverse dimensions. In this paper, we will address questions of: How short a bunch can be? What is the fundamental limit? If there is a limit, is there any mitigation method? Since the synchrotron radiation is so fundamental in electron storage rings, let us start with the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR).

Cai, Y.; /SLAC

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

429

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

430

RADIATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

Goldsworthy, W.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

RADIATION DOSIMETER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

432

Radiation Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Simon Bouffler Health Protection Agency Abstract Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation. The CBA mouse model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has been used extensively for both quantitative and mechanistic studies. Loss of genetic material from chromosome 2 (chr2) is known to be associated with most radiation-induced AMLs. AML develops in CBA mice exposed to X- or γ-radiation, after a mean latency period of 18 months, with a maximal incidence of approximately 25% at 3Gy. A strong candidate AML-suppressor gene located within the commonly deleted region of chr2 has been identified, Sƒpil/PU.1. This gene suffers hemizygous loss and specific

433

High-let radiation carcinogenesis  

SciTech Connect

Recent results for neutron radiation-induced tumors are presented to illustrate the complexities of the dose-response curves for high-LET radiation. It is suggested that in order to derive an appropriate model for dose-response curves for the induction of tumors by high-LET radiation it is necessary to take into account dose distribution, cell killing and the susceptibility of the tissue under study. Preliminary results for the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice exposed to various heavy ion beams are presented. The results suggest that the effectiveness of the heavy ion beams increases with increasing LET. The slopes of the dose-response curves for the different high-LET radiations decrease between 20 and 40 rads and therefore comparisons of the relative effectiveness should be made from data obtained at doses below about 20 to 30 rads.

Fry, R.J.M.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E.L.; Ainsworth, E.J.; Ullrich, R.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

11th International Conference of Radiation Research  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.

NONE

1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

A Reduced Radiation Grid for the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A specific interface between the radiation transfer calculations and the rest of the ECMWF model was introduced in 2003, potentially providing substantial economy in computer time by reducing the spatial resolution at which radiation transfer is ...

Jean-Jacques Morcrette; George Mozdzynski; Martin Leutbecher

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Global Character of the Flux of Downward Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four different types of estimates of the surface downwelling longwave radiative flux (DLR) are reviewed. One group of estimates synthesizes global cloud, aerosol, and other information in a radiation model that is used to calculate fluxes. Because ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Martin Wild; Paul W. Stackhouse Jr.; Tristan L’Ecuyer; Seiji Kato; David S. Henderson

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

Accardi, Anthony J.

438

The Sensitivity of the Tropical-Mean Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key disagreement exists between global climate model (GCM) simulations and satellite observations of the decadal variability in the tropical-mean radiation budget. Measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) over the period ...

Amy C. Clement; Brian Soden

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Radiative Energy Budget in the Cloudy and Hazy Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiation model is constructed that includes radiative interactions with atmospheric gases as well as parameterized treatments of scattering and absorption/emission by cloud droplets and haze particles. A unified treatment of solar and ...

Si-Chee Tsay; Knut Stamnes; Kolf Jayaweera

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Radiative Energy Budget Estimates for the 1979 Southwest Summer Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obsemations of temperature moisture, cloud amount, cloud height and soil-derived aerosols are incorporated into radiative transfer models to yield estimates of the tropospheric and surface radiative energy budgets for the summer Monsoon of 1979. ...

Steven A. Ackerman; Stephen K. Cox

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Entrainment into a Stratocumulus Layer with Distributed Radiative Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the radiative cooling of a cloud layer strongly influences the turbulent flux profiles and the entrainment rate, and that the radiative cooling should be modeled as acting inside the turbulent layer. Numerical experiments ...

David A. Randall

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Radiative Processes in Upper Tropospheric Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusional mass evolution of hydrometeors in upper tropospheric clouds for various radiative conditions in the cloud and for varying ambient moisture Supply is simulated using a time dependent microphysical model. Radiation can play an ...

Douglas A. Wesley; Stephen K. Cox

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Uncertainties in the Radiative Forcing Due to Sulfate Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer calculations based on a new sulfate distribution from a chemistry-transport model simulation have been performed. A wide range of sensitivity experiments have been performed to illustrate the large uncertainty in the radiative ...

Gunnar Myhre; Frode Stordal; Tore F. Berglen; Jostein K. Sundet; Ivar S. A. Isaksen

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Geant4 applications in the heliospheric radiation environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high energy ionizing radiation environment in the solar system consists of three main sources: the radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles. Geant4 is a Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation toolkit, with applications in areas as high energy physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics or medical physics research. In this poster, Geant4 applications to model and study the effects of the heliospheric radiation environment are presented. Specific applications are being developed to study the effect of the radiation environment on detector components, to describe the response and to optimise the design of radiation monitors for future space missions and to predict the radiation environment in Mars surface, orbits and moons.

Pedro Brogueira; Patrícia Gonçalves; Ana Keating; Dalmiro Maia; Mário Pimenta; Bernardo Tomé

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

445

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

446

Contemporaneous Relationships between Global Radiation and Heating Degree Days during Severe Winters in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global radiation climate associated with anomalously cold winter months and cold winters is analyzed for the contiguous United States. The radiation data consist of rehabilitated measured and modeled monthly values of global radiation on both ...

Thomas R. Karl; Frank T. Quinlan

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) W. J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , Newand R. J. Berry, "Manual on Radiation Dosimetry" (New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (New

Perez-Mendez, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

450

Radiation Physics Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Events. Radiation Physics Events. (showing 1 - 3 of 3). CIRMS 2012 Start Date: 10/22/2012 ...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Measurements and General Instrumentation

Kenneth D. Jarman; Erin A. Miller; Richard S. Wittman; Christopher J. Gesh

452

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

453

Radiative Heating Rates for Saharan Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined longwave and shortwave radiative transfer model was used to determine effects of Saharan dust on the radiative fluxes and heating/cooling rates in the atmosphere. Cases are treated for cloud-free and overcast conditions over the ocean ...

Toby N. Carlson; Stanley G. Benjamin

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

455

NIST MIRF - Accelerator Radiation Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerator Radiation Physics. Medium-energy accelerators are under investigation for production of channeling radiation ...

456

NIST Synchrotron radiation in SSD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation in the Sensor Science Division. ... Synchrotron Radiation-Based Calibrations for Space Weather Prediction. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

457

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

458

Satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds: hyperspectral radiative transfer modeling, analysis of uncertainties in in-situ cloud extinction measurements and intercomparison of cirrus retrievals from a-train instruments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three parts, each devoted to a particular issue of significant importance for satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In the first part, we develop and present a fast infrared radiative transfer model on the basis of the adding-doubling principle. The model aims to facilitate the radiative transfer computations involved in hyperspectral remote sensing applications. The model is applicable to a variety of cloud conditions, including vertically inhomogeneous or multilayered clouds. It is shown that for hyperspectral applications the model is two order-of-magnitude faster than the well-known discrete ordinate transfer (DISORT) model, while maintains a similar accuracy. The second part is devoted to the investigation of uncertainties in the FSSP (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe) measurement of cloud extinction by small ice particles. First, the single-scattering properties of small ice particles in cirrus clouds are derived and compared to those of equivalent spheres according to various definitions. It is found that, although small ice particles in cirrus clouds are often “quasi-spherical”, their scattering phase functions and asymmetry factors are significant different from those of ice spheres. Such differences may lead to substantial underestimation of cloud extinction in FSSP measurement, if small ice particles are assumed to be spheres. In the third part, we present a comparison of cirrus cloud optical thickness retrievals from two important instruments, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) and POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth’s Reflection), on board NASA’s A-train satellite constellation. The comparison reveals a large difference. Several possible reasons are discussed. It is found that much of the difference is attributable to the difference between the MODIS and POLDER retrieval algorithm in the assumption of cirrus cloud bulk scattering properties. Potential implications of the difference for climate studies are investigated. An important finding is that the use of an unrealistic cirrus bulk scattering model might introduce artificial seasonal variation of cirrus optical thickness and shortwave radiative forcing into the retrieval.

Zhang, Zhibo

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Rings of Saturn, Sandia's workhorse pulsed-power machine. The Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Foundation seeks to advance science and engineering in the areas of radiation effects sciences, high energy density science, and pulsed-power science and technology to address critical national security issues. Why our work matters We address several issues key to nuclear security and maintaining a safe, secure, and effective nuclear stockpile. For example, radiation effects science ensures that engineered systems are able to operate as intended in the radiation environments they encounter. In addition, high energy density science validates models that are used to certify the performance of the

460

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation csr model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Small satellite radiation budget instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major diagnostic in understanding the response of the Earth`s climate to natural or anthropogenic changes is the radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere. Two classes of measurements may be undertaken: (1) a monitoring of the radiation balance over decade-long long time-scales, and (2) measurements designed to provide a sufficiently complete data set to validate or improve models. This paper discusses some of the important ingredients in obtaining such data, and presents a description of some candidate instrumentation for use on a small satellite. 23 refs.

Weber, P.G.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Small satellite radiation budget instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major diagnostic in understanding the response of the Earth's climate to natural or anthropogenic changes is the radiative balance at the top of the atmosphere. Two classes of measurements may be undertaken: (1) a monitoring of the radiation balance over decade-long long time-scales, and (2) measurements designed to provide a sufficiently complete data set to validate or improve models. This paper discusses some of the important ingredients in obtaining such data, and presents a description of some candidate instrumentation for use on a small satellite. 23 refs.

Weber, P.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

A Model Predicting the Evolution of Ice Particle Size Spectra and Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds. Part II: Dependence of Absorption and Extinction on Ice Crystal Morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study builds upon the microphysical modeling described in Part I by deriving formulations for the extinction and absorption coefficients in terms of the size distribution parameters predicted from the microphysical model. The optical depth ...

David L. Mitchell; W. Patrick Arnott

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A Model for Particle Microphysics, Turbulent Mixing, and Radiative Transfer in the Stratocumulus-Topped Marine Boundary Layer and Comparisons with Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed 1D model of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer is described. The model has three coupled components: a microphysics module that resolves the size distributions of aeroso