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1

ADAPTIVE RADIATION ROSEMARY G. GILLESPIE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A ADAPTIVE RADIATION ROSEMARY G. GILLESPIE University of California, Berkeley Adaptive radiation- tions and convergence of species groups on different land masses. Since then, adaptive radiation has diversity within a rapidly multiplying lineage." There are radiations that are not adaptive

Gillespie, Rosemary

2

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

7, 72357275, 2007 Adaptive radiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Two adaptive radiative transfer schemes for numerical weather prediction models V. Venema 1 , A numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. The atmosphere and the land surface are complex-stream approximation. In most weather prediction models these parameterisation schemes are therefore called infre

Boyer, Edmond

4

Adaptable radiation monitoring system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable radioactive-material detection system capable of detecting radioactive sources moving at high speeds. The system has at least one radiation detector capable of detecting gamma-radiation and coupled to an MCA capable of collecting spectral data in very small time bins of less than about 150 msec. A computer processor is connected to the MCA for determining from the spectral data if a triggering event has occurred. Spectral data is stored on a data storage device, and a power source supplies power to the detection system. Various configurations of the detection system may be adaptably arranged for various radiation detection scenarios. In a preferred embodiment, the computer processor operates as a server which receives spectral data from other networked detection systems, and communicates the collected data to a central data reporting system.

Archer, Daniel E. (Livermore, CA); Beauchamp, Brock R. (San Ramon, CA); Mauger, G. Joseph (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Karl E. (Livermore, CA); Mercer, Michael B. (Manteca, CA); Pletcher, David C. (Sacramento, CA); Riot, Vincent J. (Berkeley, CA); Schek, James L. (Tracy, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

Multiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality and HypoxiaEffects of Radiation Quality and Hypoxia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality and HypoxiaEffects of Radiation Quality and Hypoxia Robert D. Stewart, Ph.D.Robert D. Stewart, Ph

Stewart, Robert D.

6

Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Adaptation, Speciation, and Convergence: A Hierarchical Analysis of Adaptive Radiation in Caribbean Anolis Lizards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Caribbean Anolis lizards are a classic case of adaptive radiation, repeated four times across islands of the Greater Antilles. On each island, very similar patterns of evolutionary divergence have occurred, resulting in the evolution of the same set...

Losos, Jonathan B.; Glor, Richard E.; Kolbe, Jason J.; Nicholson, Kirsten

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is the first investigation of using direct aperture optimization (DAO) for online adaptive radiation therapy (ART). A geometrical model representing the anatomy of a typical prostate case was created. To simulate interfractional deformations, four different anatomical deformations were created by systematically deforming the original anatomy by various amounts (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 cm). We describe a series of techniques where the original treatment plan was adapted in order to correct for the deterioration of dose distribution quality caused by the anatomical deformations. We found that the average time needed to adapt the original plan to arrive at a clinically acceptable plan is roughly half of the time needed for a complete plan regeneration, for all four anatomical deformations. Furthermore, through modification of the DAO algorithm the optimization search space was reduced and the plan adaptation was significantly accelerated. For the first anatomical deformation (0.25 cm), the plan adaptation was six times more efficient than the complete plan regeneration. For the 0.50 and 0.75 cm deformations, the optimization efficiency was increased by a factor of roughly 3 compared to the complete plan regeneration. However, for the anatomical deformation of 1.00 cm, the reduction of the optimization search space during plan adaptation did not result in any efficiency improvement over the original (nonmodified) plan adaptation. The anatomical deformation of 1.00 cm demonstrates the limit of this approach. We propose an innovative approach to online ART in which the plan adaptation and radiation delivery are merged together and performed concurrently--adaptive radiation delivery (ARD). A fundamental advantage of ARD is the fact that radiation delivery can start almost immediately after image acquisition and evaluation. Most of the original plan adaptation is done during the radiation delivery, so the time spent adapting the original plan does not increase the overall time the patient has to spend on the treatment couch. As a consequence, the effective time allotted for plan adaptation is drastically reduced. For the 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 cm anatomical deformations, the treatment time was increased by only 2, 4, and 6 s, respectively, as compared to no plan adaptation. For the anatomical deformation of 1.0 cm the time increase was substantially larger. The anatomical deformation of 1.0 cm represents an extreme case, which is rarely observed for the prostate, and again demonstrates the limit of this approach. ARD shows great potential for an online adaptive method with minimal extension of treatment time.

Mestrovic, Ante; Milette, Marie-Pierre; Nichol, Alan; Clark, Brenda G.; Otto, Karl [Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) and Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Medical Physics, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Contemporary evolution, allelic recycling, and adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contemporary evolution, allelic recycling, and adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback within ten generations. Rare freshwater-adapted alleles have been recycled from freshwater to oceanic evolve very slowly led him to study artificial selection, natural selection's component mechanisms (e

Aguirre, Windsor E.

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive radiation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adaptive radiation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Supporting Information 10.1002bies.200900102 Summary:...

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive response ar Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of adaptation could approximate the ARs of P-cells on a single-trial basis in response to a richer stimulus... and color-sensitive pathway) showed response adaptation with...

12

Atmospheric response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton K. M. Shell and R. Frouin Scripps the absorption of solar radiation, affecting upper ocean temperature and circulation. These changes, in turn: phytoplankton, atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), absorption of solar radiation, seasonal cycle, sea

Shell, Karen M.

13

Antibody responses in allogeneic radiation chimeras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras, free of graft-versus-host disease, has been achieved using serologic elimination of Thy 1/sup +/ cells from donor bone marrow. Humoral immune function was not restored in these animals as evidenced by lack of primary antibody responses to a T cell-dependent antigen, namely, sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) both in vivo and in vitro. No evidence for a suppressor cell-mediated mechanism was found. Using separated chimera spleen cell populations and specific helper cell soluble mediators, the functional capabilities of chimera B cells, T cells, and macrophages were assessed. These findings suggested that the failure of chimeras to produce antibody is not the result of impaired B cell, T cell, or macrophage function, but rather, that it is due to ineffective cellular interactions. Physiologic cellular interactions depend upon the sharing of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) determinants between interacting cells. However, the self-recognition repertoire of developing T cells may be influenced by the environment which these cells differentiate such that they learn to recognize host MHC determinants as self. These findings support the interpretation that the immunologic hyporeactivity of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras reflects the role of the host environment in restricting the interactive capabilities of donor-derived cells.

Coico, R.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Distributed Demand Response and User Adaptation in Smart Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper proposes a distributed framework for demand response and user adaptation in smart grid networks. In particular, we borrow the concept of congestion pricing in Internet traffic control and show that pricing information is very useful to regulate user demand and hence balance network load. User preference is modeled as a willingness to pay parameter which can be seen as an indicator of differential quality of service. Both analysis and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the dynamics and convergence behavior of the algorithm.

Fan, Zhong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Tissue Radiation Response with Maximum Tsallis Entropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is currently based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation, and conditions. Here, we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature.

Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar [UNED, Departamento de Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, 28040 Madrid (Spain); UNED, Departamento de Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, 28040 Madrid (Spain) and University of Havana, Catedra de Sistemas Complejos Henri Poincare, Havana 10400 (Cuba); University of Havana, Catedra de Sistemas Complejos Henri Poincare, Havana 10400 (Cuba)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

16

Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

Jian Li

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Convergent evolution of behavior in an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian web-building spiders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convergent evolution of behavior in an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian web-building spiders Todd A independently evolve webs with similar architectures. Tetragnatha spiders are the only nocturnal orb- weaving-occur within mesic and wet forest habitats on each of the main islands. Therefore, comparison of web

Blackledge, Todd

18

7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia Universitys Kellogg Center in New York City on March 1517, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (15). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and non-targeted responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hierarchical Adaptive Solution of Radiation Transport Problems on Unstructured Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational radiation transport has steadily gained acceptance in the last decade as a viable modeling tool due to the rapid advancements in computer software and hardware technologies. It can be applied for the analysis of a wide range of problems which arise in nuclear reactor physics, medical physics, atmospheric physics, astrophysics and other areas of engineering physics. However, radiation transport is an extremely chanllenging computational problem since the governing equation is seven-deimensional (3 in space, 2 in direction, 1 in energy, and 1 in time) with a high degree of coupleing betwen these variables. If not careful, this relatively large number of independent variables when discretized can potentially lead to sets of linear equations of intractable size. Though parallel computing has allowed the solution of very large problems, avaliable computational resources will always be finite due to the fact that every more sophisticated multiphysics models are being demanded by industry. There is thus the pressing requirement to optimize the discretizations so as to minimize the effort and maximize the accuracy.

Dr. Cassiano R. E de Oliveira

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Response of structural materials to radiation environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of proton and neutron damage to aluminum, stainless steel, nickel alloys, and various aluminum alloys has been performed. The proton studies were conducted at energies of 200 MeV, 800 MeV, and 23.5 GeV. The proton studies consisted of evaluation and characterization of proton-irradiated window/target materials from accelerators and comparison to nonirradiated archival materials. The materials evaluated for the proton irradiations included 99.9999 wt% aluminum, 1100 aluminum, 5052 aluminum, 304 stainless steel, and inconel 718. The neutron damage research centered on 6061 T-6 aluminum which was obtained from a control-rod follower from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). This material had received thermal neutron fluence up to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2}. The possible effects of thermal-to-fast neutron flux ratios are discussed. The increases in tensile strength in the proton-irradiated materials is shown to be the result of atomic displacements. These displacements cause interstitials and vacancies which aggregate into defect clusters which result in radiation hardening of the materials. Production of gas (helium) in the grain boundaries of proton irradiated 99.9999 wt% aluminum is also discussed. The major factor contributing to the mechanical-property changes in the neutron-irradiated 6061 T-6 aluminum is the production of transmutation products formed by interactions of the aluminum with thermal neutrons. The metallurgical and mechanical-property evaluations for the research consisted of electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission), tensile testing, and microhardness testing.

Czajkowski, C.J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solution of the equation of radiative transfer using a NewtonKrylov approach and adaptive mesh refinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution of the equation of radiative transfer using a Newton­Krylov approach and adaptive mesh Available online 25 November 2011 Keywords: Radiation transport Discrete ordinates method Finite ordinates method (DOM) and finite-volume method (FVM) are used exten- sively to solve the radiative transfer

Groth, Clinton P. T.

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive survival responses Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 8 Bystander effect and adaptive response in C3H 10TK cells S. A. MITCHELL, S. A. MARINO, D. J. BRENNER and E. J. HALL Summary:...

23

Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process known as adaptive response allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating ...

Drennan, Catherine L.

24

Enhanced tumor responses through therapies combining CCNU, MISO and radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were performed to determine whether the radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could enhance the tumor control probability in a treatment strategy combining radiation and the nitrosourea 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). In initial experiments KHT sarcoma-bearing mice were injected with 1.0 mg/g of MISO simultaneously with a 20 mg/kg dose of CCNU 30-40 min prior to irradiation (1500 rad). With this treatment protocol approximately 60% of the mice were found to be tumor-free 100 days post treatment. By comparison all 2 agent combinations led to 0% cures. To evaluate the relative importance of chemopotentiation versus radiosensitization in the 3 agent protocol, tumors were treated with MISO plus one anti-tumor agent (either radiation of CCNU) and then at times ranging from 0 to 24 hr later exposed to the other agent. When the time between treatments was 0 to 6 hr, a 60 to 80% tumor control rate was achieved for both MISO plus radiation followed by CCNU and MISO plus CCNU followed by radiation. However if the time interval was increased to 18 or 24 hr, the cure rate in the former treatment regimen dropped to 10% while that of the latter remained high at 40%. The data therefore indicate that (1) improved tumor responses may be achieved when MISO is added to a radiation-chemotherapy combination and (2) MISO may be more effective in such a protocol when utilized as a chemopotentiator.

Siemann, D.W.; Hill, S.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hybrid Characteristics: 3D radiative transfer for parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a three-dimensional radiative transfer method designed specifically for use with parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics codes. This new algorithm, which we call hybrid characteristics, introduces a novel form of ray tracing that can neither be classified as long, nor as short characteristics, but which applies the underlying principles, i.e. efficient execution through interpolation and parallelizability, of both. Primary applications of the hybrid characteristics method are radiation hydrodynamics problems that take into account the effects of photoionization and heating due to point sources of radiation. The method is implemented in the hydrodynamics package FLASH. The ionization, heating, and cooling processes are modelled using the DORIC ionization package. Upon comparison with the long characteristics method, we find that our method calculates the column density with a similarly high accuracy and produces sharp and well defined shadows. We show the quality of the new algorithm in an application to the photoevaporation of multiple over-dense clumps. We present several test problems demonstrating the feasibility of our method for performing high resolution three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics calculations that span a large range of scales. Initial performance tests show that the ray tracing part of our method takes less time to execute than other parts of the calculation (e.g. hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh refinement), and that a high degree of efficiency is obtained in parallel execution. Although the hybrid characteristics method is developed for problems involving photoionization due to point sources, the algorithm can be easily adapted to the case of more general radiation fields.

Erik-Jan Rijkhorst; Tomasz Plewa; Anshu Dubey; Garrelt Mellema

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

26

adaptive immune response: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 205 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

27

adaptive immune responses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 205 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

28

A 5-Year Investigation of Children's Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Radiation Therapy for Localized Ependymoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies have the potential to preserve cognitive outcomes in children with ependymoma; however, functional behavior remains uninvestigated. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intelligence quotient (IQ) and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years after irradiation in children diagnosed with ependymoma. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 123 children with intracranial ependymoma. Mean age at irradiation was 4.60 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.85-5.35). Serial neurocognitive evaluations, including an age-appropriate IQ measure and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), were completed before irradiation, 6 months after treatment, and annually for 5 years. A total of 579 neurocognitive evaluations were included in these analyses. Results: Baseline IQ and VABS were below normative means (P<.05), although within the average range. Linear mixed models revealed stable IQ and VABS across the follow-up period, except for the VABS Communication Index, which declined significantly (P=.015). Annual change in IQ (-.04 points) did not correlate with annual change in VABS (-.90 to +.44 points). Clinical factors associated with poorer baseline performance (P<.05) included preirradiation chemotherapy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement, number and extent of surgical resections, and younger age at treatment. No clinical factors significantly affected the rate of change in scores. Conclusions: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies provided relative sparing of functional outcomes including IQ and adaptive behaviors, even in very young children. Communication skills remained vulnerable and should be the target of preventive and rehabilitative interventions.

Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Between adaptation and resistance : labor responses to globalization in France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation aims at accounting for labor responses to globalization in France. It addresses this issue through a comparative study of two labor organizations-the French Democratic Labor Confederation (CFDT) and the ...

Ancelovici, Marcos, 1971-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Developing Quality Assurance Processes for Image-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quality assurance has long been implemented in radiation treatment as systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that the radiation oncology service will satisfy the given requirements for quality care. The existing reports from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 have provided highly detailed QA guidelines for conventional radiotherapy and treatment planning. However, advanced treatment processes recently developed with emerging high technology have introduced new QA requirements that have not been addressed previously in the conventional QA program. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the existing QA guidelines to also include new considerations. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) is a closed-loop treatment process that is designed to include the individual treatment information, such as patient-specific anatomic variation and delivered dose assessed during the therapy course in treatment evaluation and planning optimization. Clinical implementation of IGART requires high levels of automation in image acquisition, registration, segmentation, treatment dose construction, and adaptive planning optimization, which brings new challenges to the conventional QA program. In this article, clinical QA procedures for IGART are outlined. The discussion focuses on the dynamic or four-dimensional aspects of the IGART process, avoiding overlap with conventional QA guidelines.

Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)], E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Multigroup radiation hydrodynamics with flux-limited diffusion and adaptive mesh refinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative transfer plays a key role in the star formation process. Due to a high computational cost, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations performed up to now have mainly been carried out in the grey approximation. In recent years, multi-frequency radiation-hydrodynamics models have started to emerge, in an attempt to better account for the large variations of opacities as a function of frequency. We wish to develop an efficient multigroup algorithm for the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES which is suited to heavy proto-stellar collapse calculations. Due to prohibitive timestep constraints of an explicit radiative transfer method, we constructed a time-implicit solver based on a stabilised bi-conjugate gradient algorithm, and implemented it in RAMSES under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We present a series of tests which demonstrate the high performance of our scheme in dealing with frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamic flows. We also present a preliminary simulation of a three-dimensional p...

Gonzlez, Matthias; Commeron, Benot; Masson, Jacques

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Global transcriptional, physiological and metabolite analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough responses to salt adaptation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. The growth of D. vulgaris was inhibited by high levels of NaCl, and the growth inhibition could be relieved by the addition of exogenous amino acids (e.g., glutamate, alanine, tryptophan) or yeast extract. Salt adaptation induced the expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). Genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell motility, and phage structures were repressed. Comparison of transcriptomic profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation with those of salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure) showed some similarity as well as a significant difference. Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine were accumulated under salt adaptation, suggesting that they may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. A conceptual model is proposed to link the observed results to currently available knowledge for further understanding the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl.

He, Z.; Zhou, A.; Baidoo, E.; He, Q.; Joachimiak, M. P.; Benke, P.; Phan, R.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wall, J.; Stahl, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Zhou, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

the Adaptive Response, Genetic Haplo-Insufficiency and Genomic Instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis is the driving force in the establishment of radiation protection standards. However, the scientific basis for linearity has been brought into question, particularly due to the concerns about induced radiation resistance as it pertains to oxidative stress. Specifically, we investigated the observation that tumor hypoxia is associated with malignant progression, increased metastases, chemo- and radioresistance and poor prognosis. Experiments were conducted with non-malignant 3T3/NIH cells and normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) that were subjected to ?-irradiation under the levels of oxygen resembling those in growing tumors, and related our data to the concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), which is a better indicator of the amounts of residual oxygen inside the cells cultured in the hypoxic or anoxic atmosphere. We found that at DO levels about 0.5 mg/L cells subjected to both short-term (17 hours) and prolonged (48-72 hours) hypoxia continued to proliferate, and that apoptotic events were decreased at the early hours of hypoxic treatment. We showed that the short-term hypoxia up-regulated p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and resulted in facilitated 53BP1 nuclear foci formation and disappearance, thus indicating the higher efficiency of DNA double strand breaks repair processes. The latter was confirmed by the lower micronuclei incidence in irradiated hypoxic cells.

Geard, Charles R.

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken placetechniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportationthe so-called second line of defense.

Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

THE RESPONSE OF HONEY BEES TO VARIATIONS IN SOLAR RADIATION AND TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RESPONSE OF HONEY BEES TO VARIATIONS IN SOLAR RADIATION AND TEMPERATURE Robert M. BURRILL elements, solar radiation and temperature are considered. While these two elements are naturally numbers of departures. In the case of solar radiation intensity, the response is both positive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

Predictive Models for Regional Hepatic Function Based on 99mTc-IDA SPECT and Local Radiation Dose for Physiologic Adaptive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: High-dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed before and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled iminodiacetic acid (IDA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans before RT, during, and 1 month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests, a measure of overall liver function, were performed within 1 day of each scan. Three-dimensional volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After coregistration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF doseresponse functions during and after RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, dose, priori, and adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function after RT. Results: The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r=?0.80, P<.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs 1 month after RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed before RT (R=0.71, P<.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by regional HEF reassessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, P<.0001). Conclusions: 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment strategies to maximize tumor control and minimize the risk of liver damage.

Wang, Hesheng, E-mail: hesheng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Frey, Kirk A. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5\\times5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5\\times2.5\\times2.5 mm3 voxel size were used to evaluate our algorithm on GPU. It takes onl...

Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

Adaptive microbial population shifts in response to a continuous ethanol blend release increases biodegradation potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive microbial population shifts in response to a continuous ethanol blend release increases 2013 Accepted 28 March 2013 Keywords: Pyrosequencing Ethanol Microbial diversity Temperature a b s t r a pilot- scale continuous release (10 months) of a 10% v:v ethanol solution mixed with benzene and toluene

Alvarez, Pedro J.

40

Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

McCann, Michael P. (Oliver Springs, TN); Chen, Chung H. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Bystander effect and adaptive response in C3H 10TK cells S. A. MITCHELL, S. A. MARINO, D. J. BRENNER and E. J. HALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the bystander effect, adaptive response, genomic instabil- ity and low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity. These pheno

42

Scientists in a Changed Institutional Environment: Subjective Adaptation and Social Responsibility Norms in Russia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How do scientists react when the institutional setting in which they conduct their work changes radically? How do long-standing norms regarding the social responsibility of scientists fare? What factors influence whether scientists embrace or reject the new institutions and norms? We examine these questions using data from a unique survey of 602 scientists in Russia, whose science system experienced a sustained crisis and sweeping changes in science institutions following the collapse of the Soviet Union. We develop measures of how respondents view financing based on grants and other institutional changes in the Russian science system, as well as measures of two norms regarding scientists social responsibility. We find that the majority of scientists have adapted, in the sense that they hold positive views of the new institutions, but a diversity of orientations remains. Social responsibility norms are common among Russian scientists, but far from universal. The main correlates of adaptation are age and current success at negotiating the new institutions, though prospective success, work context, and ethnicity have some of the hypothesized associations. As for social responsibility norms, the main source of variation is age: younger scientists are more likely to embrace individualistic rather than socially-oriented norms.

Gerber, T P; Ball, D Y

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

43

Dosimetric and Radiobiological Consequences of Computed TomographyGuided Adaptive Strategies for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy of the Prostate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine a range of scenarios for image-guided adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer, including different schedules for megavoltage CT imaging, patient repositioning, and dose replanning. Methods and Materials: We simulated multifraction dose distributions with deformable registration using 35 sets of megavoltage CT scans of 13 patients. We computed cumulative dosevolume histograms, from which tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for rectum were calculated. Five-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 18-MV x-rays was planned to achieve an isocentric dose of 76 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV). The differences between D{sub 95}, tumor control probability, V{sub 70Gy}, and NTCP for rectum, for accumulated versus planned dose distributions, were compared for different target volume sizes, margins, and adaptive strategies. Results: The CTV D{sub 95} for IMRT treatment plans, averaged over 13 patients, was 75.2 Gy. Using the largest CTV margins (10/7 mm), the D{sub 95} values accumulated over 35 fractions were within 2% of the planned value, regardless of the adaptive strategy used. For tighter margins (5 mm), the average D{sub 95} values dropped to approximately 73.0 Gy even with frequent repositioning, and daily replanning was necessary to correct this deficit. When personalized margins were applied to an adaptive CTV derived from the first 6 treatment fractions using the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) algorithm, target coverage could be maintained using a single replan 1 week into therapy. For all approaches, normal tissue parameters (rectum V{sub 70Gy} and NTCP) remained within acceptable limits. Conclusions: The frequency of adaptive interventions depends on the size of the CTV combined with target margins used during IMRT optimization. The application of adaptive target margins (<5 mm) to an adaptive CTV determined 1 week into therapy minimizes the need for subsequent dose replanning.

Battista, Jerry J., E-mail: j2b@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, ON (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, ON (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Johnson, Carol; Turnbull, David; Kempe, Jeff [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Bzdusek, Karl [Philips Healthcare (Radiation Oncology Systems), Fitchburg, Wisconsin (United States); Van Dyk, Jacob; Bauman, Glenn [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, ON (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London, ON (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors for the diagnosis of pulsed radiations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the conjugate gradient method, a simple algorithm is presented for deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors (XRDs) to reconstruct the resolved time-dependent x-ray fluxes. With this algorithm, we have studied the impact of temporal response of XRD on the radiation diagnosis of hohlraum heated by a short intense laser pulse. It is found that the limiting temporal response of XRD not only postpones the rising edge and peak position of x-ray pulses but also smoothes the possible fluctuations of radiation fluxes. Without a proper consideration of the temporal response of XRD, the measured radiation flux can be largely misinterpreted for radiation pulses of a hohlraum heated by short or shaped laser pulses.

Zou, Shiyang; Song, Peng; Pei, Wenbing [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Guo, Liang [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kosier, S.L. [VTC Inc., Bloomington, MN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

On the Tropospheric Response to Anomalous Stratospheric Wave Drag and Radiative Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Tropospheric Response to Anomalous Stratospheric Wave Drag and Radiative Heating DAVID W. J of anomalous diabatic heating in the polar stratosphere as stratospheric temperatures relax to climatology

47

LDRD final report on adaptive-responsive nanostructures for sensing applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Functional organic nanostructures such as well-formed tubes or fibers that can easily be fabricated into electronic and photonic devices are needed in many applications. Especially desirable from a national security standpoint are nanostructures that have enhanced sensitivity for the detection of chemicals and biological (CB) agents and other environmental stimuli. We recently discovered the first class of highly responsive and adaptive porphyrin-based nanostructures that may satisfy these requirements. These novel porphyrin nanostructures, which are formed by ionic self-assembly of two oppositely charged porphyrins, may function as conductors, semiconductors, or photoconductors, and they have additional properties that make them suitable for device fabrication (e.g., as ultrasensitive colorimetric CB microsensors). Preliminary studies with porphyrin nanotubes have shown that these nanostructures have novel optical and electronic properties, including strong resonant light scattering, quenched fluorescence, and electrical conductivity. In addition, they are photochemically active and capable of light-harvesting and photosynthesis; they may also have nonlinear optical properties. Remarkably, the nanotubes and potentially other porphyrin nanostructure are mechanically responsive and adaptive (e.g., the rigidity of the micrometers-long nanotubes is altered by light, ultrasound, or chemicals) and they self-heal upon removal the environmental stimulus. Given the tremendous degree of structural variation possible in the porphyrin subunits, additional types of nanostructures and greater control over their morphology can be anticipated. Molecular modification also provides a means of controlling their electronic, photonic, and other functional properties. In this work, we have greatly broadened the range of ionic porphyrin nanostructures that can be made, and determined the optical and responsivity properties of the nanotubes and other porphyrin nanostructures. We have also explored means for controlling their morphology, size, and placement on surfaces. The research proposed will lay the groundwork for the use of these remarkable porphyrin nanostructures in micro- and nanoscale devices, by providing a more detailed understanding of their molecular structure and the factors that control their structural, photophysical, and chemical properties.

Shelnutt, John Allen; van Swol, Frank B.; Wang, Zhongchun; Medforth, Craig J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ?60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy, E-mail: berringtona@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Neurodegeneration and adaptation in response to low-dose photon irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neural stem and precursor cells (i.e. multipotent neural cells) are concentrated in the neurogenic regions of the brain (hippocampal dentate gyrus, subventricular zones), and considerable evidence suggests that these cells are important in mediating the stress response of the CNS after damage from ionizing radiation. The capability of these cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate (i.e. to undergo neurogenesis) suggests they can participate in the repair and maintenance of CNS functions by replacing brain cells damaged or depleted due to irradiation. Importantly, we have shown that multipotent neural cells are markedly sensitive to irradiation and oxidative stress, insults that compromise neurogenesis and hasten the onset and progression of degenerative processes that are likely to have an adverse impact on cognition. Our past and current work has demonstrated that relatively low doses of radiation cause a persistent (weeks-months) oxidative stress in multipotent neural cells that can elicit a range of degenerative sequelae in the CNS. Therefore, our project is focused on determining the extent that endogenous and redox sensitive multipotent neural cells represent important radioresponsive targets for low dose radiation effects. We hypothesize that the activation of redox sensitive signaling can trigger radioadaptive changes in these cells that can be either harmful or beneficial to overall cognitive health.

Limoli, Charles L. [UCI

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

Leinders, Suzanne M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Mndez Romero, Alejandra [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schaart, Dennis [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, Yvette, E-mail: y.seppenwoolde@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive radiation therapy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1. What is radiation ... Source: Hamza-Lup, Felix G. - School of Computing, Armstrong Atlantic State University Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

52

Response of a SiC Photodiode to Extreme Ultraviolet through Visible Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The responsivity of a type 6H-SiC photodiode in the 1.5-400 nm wavelength range was measured using synchrotron radiation. The responsivity was 0.20 A/W at 270 nm and was less than 0.10 A/W in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region. The responsivity was calculated using a proven optical model that accounted for the reflection and absorption of the incident radiation and the variation of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) with depth into the device. The CCE was determined from the responsivity measured in the 200-400 nm wavelength range. By use of this CCE and the effective pair creation energy (7.2 eV) determined from x-ray absorption measurements, the EUV responsivity was accurately modeled with no free parameters. The measured visible-light sensitivity, although low compared with that of a silicon photodiode, was surprisingly high for this wide bandgap semiconductor.

Seely,J.; Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Holland, G.; Korde, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Characterization of AL2O3:C thermoluminescent dosimeter response to beta radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Health Physics CHARACTERIZATION OF A1203. C THERMOLUMINES CENT DOSIMETER RESPONSE TO BETA RADIATION A Thesis by CHAD KELVIN BROWN Approved as to the style and content by: Wesley E. Bolch Chair... Radiation. (December 1992) Chad Kelvin Brown, B. S. , Georgia Institute of Technology Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wesley E. Bolch Much effort has been spent searching for thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry systems which can more accurately measure...

Brown, Chad Kelvin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Response of intracerebral human glioblastoma xenografts to multifraction radiation exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We investigated the effects of fractionated radiation treatments on the life spans of athymic rats bearing intracerebral brain tumors. Methods and Materials: U-251 MG or U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were implanted into the brains of athymic rats, and the resulting tumors were irradiated once daily with various doses of ionizing radiation for 5 consecutive days or for 10 days with a 2-day break after Day 5. Results: Five daily doses of 1 and 1.5 Gy, and 10 doses of 0.75 and 1 Gy, cured some U-251 MG tumors. However, five daily doses of 0.5 Gy increased the survival time of animals bearing U-251 MG tumors 5 days without curing any animals of their tumors. Ten doses of 0.3 Gy given over 2 weeks extended the lifespan of the host animals 9 days without curing any animals. For U-87 MG tumors, 5 daily doses of 3 Gy produced an increased lifespan of 8 days without curing any animals, and 10 doses of 1 Gy prolonged lifespan 5.5 days without curing any animals. The differences in extension of life span between the 5- and 10-fraction protocols were minor for either tumor type. Conclusion: The finding that the U-251 MG tumors are more sensitive than U-87 MG tumors, despite the fact that U-251 MG tumors contain many more hypoxic cells than U-87 MG tumors, suggests the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivities of these cell lines are more important than hypoxia in determining their in vivo radiosensitivities.

Ozawa, Tomoko [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Faddegon, Bruce A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hu, Lily J. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Bollen, Andrew W. [Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lamborn, Kathleen R. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Deen, Dennis F. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: ddeen@itsa.ucsf.edu

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Purpose: The effect of low doses of low ^ linear energy transfer (photon) ionizing radiation (LDIR, and pathway. Conclusions: These results show for the first time that low doses of radiation have an identifi

Rocke, David M.

56

In Vivo Identification of Solar Radiation-Responsive Gene Network: Role of the p38 Stress-Dependent Kinase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Vivo Identification of Solar Radiation-Responsive Gene Network: Role of the p38 Stress Solar radiation is one of the most common threats to the skin, with exposure eliciting a specific 44K) to study epidermis gene expression in vivo in skin exposed to simulated solar radiation (SSR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive responses genomic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selected Topics in Molecular Biology Summary: genome variation - cancer genomes Genomics of the adaptive immune system Ancient genomes Synthetic... MOLECULAR BIOLOGY...

58

Nonlinear vs. bolometric radiation response and phonon thermal conductance in graphene-superconductor junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene is a promising candidate for building fast and ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors due to its weak electron-phonon coupling and low heat capacity. In order to realize a practical graphene-based bolometer, several important issues, including the nature of radiation response, coupling efficiency to the radiation and the thermal conductance need to be carefully studied. Addressing these issues, we present graphene-superconductor junctions as a viable option to achieve efficient and sensitive bolometers, with the superconductor contacts serving as hot electron barriers. For a graphene-superconductor device with highly transparent interfaces, the resistance readout in the presence of radio frequency radiation is dominated by non-linear response. On the other hand, a graphene-superconductor tunnel device shows dominantly bolometric response to radiation. For graphene devices fabricated on SiO{sub 2} substrates, we confirm recent theoretical predictions of T{sup 2} temperature dependence of phonon thermal conductance in the presence of disorder in the graphene channel at low temperatures.

Vora, Heli; Nielsen, Bent; Du, Xu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the P{sub n} method with {approx}500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiation diffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2-12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 {mu}m laser light for 5-10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. We show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heating radiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

Colvin, Jeffrey; Shestakov, Aleksei; Stoelken, James; Vignes, Ryan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The versatile E. coli adaptive response protein AlkB mitigates toxicity and mutagenicity of etheno-, ethano-, and methyl-modified bases in vivo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Escherichia coli AlkB protein is an exceptionally versatile DNA repair enzyme. Its expression is induced upon exposure to alkylating agents as part of the Ada-mediated adaptive response. This member of the ac-ketoglu ...

Frick, Lauren Elizabeth

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information that will be useful in estimating human health risks due to radiation that may occur during exposures in the work environment, nuclear/radiological catastrophes, as well as radiotherapy. Several papers have been published, accepted for publication or are in preparation. A number of poster and oral presentations have been made at scientific conferences and workshops. Archived tissues of various types will continue to be evaluated via funding from other sources (the DoE Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science and this specific grant will be appropriately included in the Acknowledgements of all subsequent publications/presentations). A post-doc and several students have participated in this study. More detailed description of the accomplishments is described in attached file.

Daila S. Gridley, PhD

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect radiation response Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Radiative Forcings: Shortwave Forcings... What about gases that affect the greenhouse effect? Radiative forcing for greenhouse gases: Instantly... ;Radiative Forcings In ......

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive melanin response Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine 3 Cutaneous melanin exhibiting fluorescence emission under near-infrared light excitation Summary: of the major fluorophores responsible for...

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive metabolic response Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bass (Micropterus salmoides) Summary: factor, there are a range of responses depending on test conditions and baseline metabolic rate... for greater differences in metabolic rate...

67

Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

69

Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are investigated. Pressure-driven hydraulic analysis is performed to simulate the complicated system hydraulics under pressure-deficit conditions. Performance of a novel preventive response action ? injection of food-grade dye directly into drinking water...

Rasekh, Amin

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

A comparison of the radiation response of the epidermis in two strains of pig  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The response of the epidermis was compared in two strains of pig, the English Large White and the Goettinger Miniature, after irradiation with 90Sr beta rays. The effects of two types of anesthesia were also tested in pigs of each strain, a volatile gas mixture of approximately 70% oxygen, approximately 30% nitrous oxide, and 2% halothane, and an intravenously administered narcotic azaperon/etimodat with the animals breathing air. Strain- and anesthetic-related changes were compared on the basis of dose-effect curves for the incidence of moist desquamation from which ED50 values (+/- SE) were determined, i.e., the dose required to produce this effect in 50% of the fields irradiated. For English Large White pigs anesthetized with the volatile gas mixture, an ED50 of 27.32 +/- 0.52 Gy was obtained for moist desquamation. Irradiation with the azaperon/etomidat anesthesia in this strain of pig produced a significantly higher ED50 of 33.36 +/- 0.76 Gy (P less than 0.001). This appeared to be related to the fact that the animals were breathing air, i.e., a lower oxygen concentration (approximately 21%), at the time of irradiation. For the Goettinger Miniature pig the ED50 values for moist desquamation were 38.93 +/- 3.12 Gy and 43.36 +/- 1.34 Gy while using the gaseous anesthetic mixture and the azaperon/etomidat anesthesia with the animals breathing air, respectively. These ED50 values are 10-11 Gy higher than those obtained for the English Large White pig under identical conditions of anesthesia, which resulted in a strain difference ratio of approximately 1.35. Radiation under the volatile gas mixture anesthesia resulted in a uniform irradiation response over the skin of the flank in both strains of pig. Radiation under azaperon/etomidat anesthesia resulted in a nonuniform skin response over the flank.

van den Aardweg, G.J.; Arnold, M.; Hopewell, J.W. (Univ. of Oxford (England))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Adaptive phenotypic differentiation of courtship in response to recent anthropogenic disturbance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

differentiated in response to spatial variation in human-induced eutrophication? Populations: Parallel pairs-induced eutrophication during the last decades. Methods: Males from mildly and severely eutrophied habitats were allowed variation in human-induced eutrophication. The differentiation should improve individual fitness. Keywords

Candolin, Ulrika

72

Spatial and doseresponse analysis of fibrotic lung changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is becoming the standard of care for early stage nonoperable lung cancers. Accurate doseresponse modeling is challenging for SBRT because of the decreased number of clinical toxicity events. As a surrogate for a clinical toxicity endpoint, studies have proposed to use radiographic changes in follow up computed tomography (CT) scans to evaluate lung SBRT normal tissue effects. The purpose of the current study was to use local fibrotic lung regions to spatially and dosimetrically evaluate lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT.Methods: Forty seven SBRT patients treated at our institution from 2003 to 2009 were used for the current study. Our patient cohort had a total of 148 follow up CT scans ranging from 3 to 48 months post-therapy. Post-treatment scans were binned into intervals of 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months after the completion of treatment. Deformable image registration was used to align the follow up CT scans with the pretreatment CT and dose distribution. Areas of visible fibrotic changes were contoured. The centroid of each gross tumor volume (GTV) and contoured fibrosis volume was calculated and the fibrosis volume location and movement (magnitude and direction) relative to the GTV and 30 Gy isodose centroid were analyzed. To perform a doseresponse analysis, each voxel in the fibrosis volume was sorted into 10 Gy dose bins and the average CT number value for each dose bin was calculated. Doseresponse curves were generated by plotting the CT number as a function of dose bin and time posttherapy.Results: Both fibrosis and GTV centroids were concentrated in the upper third of the lung. The average radial movement of fibrosis centroids relative to the GTV centroids was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm occurring in 11% of patients. Evaluating doseresponse curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. The authors observed a CT number plateau at doses ranging from 30 to 50 Gy for the 3, 6, and 12 months posttherapy time points. There was no evident plateau for the doseresponse curves generated using data from the 18, 24, 30, and 36 months posttherapy time points.Conclusions: Regions of local fibrotic lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT were evaluated spatially and dosimetrically. The authors found that the average fibrosis movement was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm possible. Evaluating doseresponse curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. Furthermore, our doseresponse data also suggest that one of the possible explanations of the CT number plateau effect may be the time posttherapy of the acquired data. Understanding normal tissue doseresponse is important for reducing toxicity after SBRT, especially in cases where larger tumors are treated. The methods presented in the current work build on prior quantitative studies and further enhance the understanding of normal lung doseresponse after SBRT.

Vinogradskiy, Yevegeniy; Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

A new parameterization of canopy spectral response to incident solar radiation: case study with hyperspectral data from pine dominant forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new parameterization of canopy spectral response to incident solar radiation: case study, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland c Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki Research Station, FIN-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland d VTT Automation, Remote Sensing Group, FIN-02044 VTT, Finland Received 27

Myneni, Ranga B.

74

Reproductive, morphological, and phytochemical responses of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to enhanced UV-B radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana, collected from Libya and Norway, were grown in the greenhouse under. UV-B doses of 0 and 10.5 kJ m[sup [minus]2] UV-B[sub BE]. The high UV-B dose simulated midsummer ambient conditions over Libya and a 40% reduction in stratospheric ozone over Norway. The Libyan ectotype, which originated from latitudes where solar UV-B is high, showed no UV-B induced damage to plant growth. However the Norwegian ecotype, which originated from latitudes where solar UV-B is low, showed a significant reduction in plant height, inflorescence weight, and rosette weight in response to enhanced UV-B. Although fruit and seed number for both ecotypes were unaffected by enhanced UV-B radiation the germination success of the seeds harvested from the irradiated Norwegian plants were significantly reduced. The two ecotypes also differed with respect to their accumulation of kaempferol, a putative UV-B protective filter. The Libyan ecotype increased kaempferol concentration by 38% over the 0 kJ treatment whereas the Norwegian ecotype increased by only 15%. These data suggest that, for these ecotypes, variation in UV-B sensitivity may be explained by the differential induction of UV-absorbing leaf pigments.

Trumbull, V.L.; McCloud, E.S.; Paige, K.N. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between {approximately} 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ``critical`` to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD{sub 50} and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients.

Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Adaptation and adaptability : expectant design for resilience in coastal urbanity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the nature of and possibility for urban resiliency through adaptation? Adaptation implies responsiveness to phenomena that are disruptive to a system's functioning; it is a willful evolution in response to changed ...

Ruskeep, Laura A. Delaney (Laura Ashley Delaney)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

78

Parotid Glands DoseEffect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were ?4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the doseeffect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dosesaliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were observed at first treatment, indicating potential benefit for more complex setup corrections or adaptive interventions in the minority of patients with large deviations detected early by CBCT.

Hunter, Klaudia U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Fernandes, Laura L. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cornwall, Craig [Department of Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Estimation of isodose curves in radiation therapy and related response analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The main problem in interstitial radiation therapy is the accurate calculation of dosages from volume needle implants. Some researchers in the U. S. expressed the belief several years ago that new methods of cobalt-60 teletherapy and other external beam... radiation therapy to be effective it is necessary to calculate the intensity distribution created by the several implanted needles. With the advent of high-speed electronic computers the various isodose curves in a given case can be determined and plotted...

Goodlett, James Campbell

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The response of certain stored products insects to various wavebands of electromagnetic radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?Numbers refer to referenoee listed in the bibliography. attracted to' blaok light, ultraviolet. Inseot traps using eleotromag-, netio radiation are reooszzsn4ed by Tenhet and Bare as a survey tool to 6 reflect the degree of infestation in tobacoo... INSECTS TO VARIOUS WAVESANDS OP ELECTRONAGNETIC RADIATION INTRODUCTION Interest in the attraotion of inseots to fire and light dates baok to the dsye of primitive man. From early literature such as "the Sanskrit EKooh~~atiks attributed to King Sudraka...

Stermer, Raymond Andrew

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.B. Mikkelsen, Ionizing radiation-induced, mitochondria-W.K. Rorrer, P.B. Chen, Radiation-induced proliferation ofresponse genes to ionizing radiation in human lymphoblastoid

Wyrobek, A. J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Adaptive sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive data compression device for compressing data having variable frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

Watson, Bobby L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Aeby, Ian (Fremont, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Adaptive sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

1980-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

84

Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

Quantifying the response of phytoplankton photosynthesis to ultraviolet radiation: Biological weighting functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Zürich, Zollikerstr. 107, 8008 Zürich, Switzerland Key words: Lake Lucerne, Lake Cadagno radiation (UV) was assessed for phytoplankton assemblages in two Swiss lakes, pre-alpine Lake Lucerne compared to incubation of the same sample in L. Lucerne, consistent with increased UV sensitivity due

86

Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

Azzam, Edouard I

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Miften, Moyed, E-mail: Moyed.Miften@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effects of ionizing radiation on the response of certain photosensitive seeds to red light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and molecular oxygen. Studies of phosphate metabolism (Surrey and Gordon, 1962) and phosphorylation (Gordon and Surrey, 1961) indicate that energy transfer through phosphate esterification plays an important role and may be the key enzymatic reaction in red... spectrum promoting the germination of light-sensitive lettuce seed. Smithsonian Inst. Pubis. Misc. Collections 96: 1-8 ~ 11. Gordon, S. A. , and K. Surrey. 1961. Phosphorylation and red-spectrum photomorphogenesis. ~n Effects of ionizing radiations...

Richardson, Billy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Dynamical and radiative response to the massive injection of aerosol from Kuwait oil burning fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the injection of large amount of soot comparable to that produced in the burning of oil wells in Kuwait were studied using a 2-D mesoscale model. During the three day numerical simulation the ground-atmosphere system appears to be strongly perturbed. A surface cooling is produced in the first two days above and downwind of the sources. The cooling, between -10 C over the desert and -0.5 C over the sea is dependent on the surface characteristics. The temperature decrease at the ground results in a stratified troposphere which inhibits convection and perturbs the normal diurnal variability of the boundary layer while the upper levels are driven by the radiative warming of the aerosol layer. In this region after few hours the simulation produces a warming of 0.8 C reaching a maximum of 6 C is after 60 hours. During the last 2 days of simulation the long wave radiation emitted by the low altitude atmospheric layers contribute to mitigate the surface cooling. A detailed discussion of the radiative and the dynamical interactions is given and it is shown that beside the specific interest in the short term effects these results may be useful to parameterize the smoke source for a General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation.

Ferretti, R.; Visconti, G. [Univ. L`Aquila (Italy)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Association of Clinical Response and Long-term Outcome Among Patients With Biopsied Orbital Pseudotumor Receiving Modern Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate institutional outcomes for patients treated with modern radiation therapy (RT) for biopsied orbital pseudotumor (OP). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients (26 affected orbits) with OP were treated with RT between January 2002 and December 2011. All patients underwent biopsy with histopathologic exclusion of other disease processes. Sixteen patients (80%) were treated with intensity modulated RT, 3 (15%) with opposed lateral beams, and 1 (5%) with electrons. Median RT dose was 27 Gy (range 25.2-30.6 Gy). Response to RT was evaluated at 4 months post-RT. Partial response (PR) was defined as improvement in orbital symptoms without an increase in steroid dose. Complete response (CR) 1 and CR 2 were defined as complete resolution of orbital symptoms with reduction in steroid dose (CR 1) or complete tapering of steroids (CR 2). The median follow-up period was 18.6 months (range 4-81.6 months). Results: Seventeen patients (85%) demonstrated response to RT, with 7 (35%), 1 (5%), and 9 (45%) achieving a PR, CR 1, and CR 2, respectively. Of the 17 patients who had ?PR at 4 months post-RT, 6 (35%) experienced recurrence of symptoms. Age (>46 years vs ?46 years, P=.04) and clinical response to RT (CR 2 vs CR 1/PR, P=.05) were significantly associated with pseudotumor recurrence. Long-term complications were seen in 7 patients (35%), including 4 with cataract formation, 1 with chronic dry eye, 1 with enophthalmos, and 1 with keratopathy. Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment for improving symptoms and tapering steroids in patients with a biopsy supported diagnosis of OP. Older age and complete response to RT were associated with a significantly reduced probability of symptom recurrence. The observed late complications may be related to RT, chronic use of steroids/immunosuppressants, medical comorbidities, or combination of factors.

Prabhu, Roshan S., E-mail: rprabhu@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kandula, Shravan; Liebman, Lang [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wojno, Ted H.; Hayek, Brent [Division of Oculoplastics, Orbital and Cosmetic Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Division of Oculoplastics, Orbital and Cosmetic Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A.; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Crocker, Ian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A study of the response of a gas ionization chamber to different sources of ionizing radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; is the effective average energy to produce one pair (for values, see Table I). Charged particles produced by ionization lose their energy rather quickly in multiple collisions with the gas molecules and assume the thermal energy distribution of the gas. When... of aluminum extrusion ionization chambers to this kind of radiation was investigated. Also, since the TAMU counter is a prototype (1 in x 7in x 7in) of the chambers installed at CDF (1 in x 84in x 84in), the pad-to-wire signal ratio had to be measured...

Zamble?-Die?guez, Filiberto Edmundo

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Responses of the adult almond moth, (Ephestia cautella (Walker)) to intermittent near ultraviolet radiation stimuli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but the light out- put also fluctuates in a similar manner when the lamp is operated from an alternating power souroe. Figure 3 shows the typical pattern of fluotuations in radiation output from an argon glow lamp when energiaed by conventional 60-cyols a... 3j2mycle of the energiaing voltage. Thus, the pulses shown are reourrent at the rats of 120 per second. insect attractants indicate that no consideration has been given to the possible influence of supply voltage frequency cn the attractive effi...

Hollingsworth, Joe Pettus

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

94

Impulsive cylindrical gravitational wave: one possible radiative form emitted from cosmic strings and corresponding electromagnetic response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cosmic strings(CSs) may be one important source of gravitational waves(GWs), and it has been intensively studied due to its special properties such as the cylindrical symmetry. The CSs would generate not only usual continuous GW, but also impulsive GW that brings more concentrated energy and consists of different GW components broadly covering low-, intermediate- and high-frequency bands simultaneously. These features might underlie interesting electromagnetic(EM) response to these GWs generated by the CSs. In this paper, with novel results and effects, we firstly calculate the analytical solutions of perturbed EM fields caused by interaction between impulsive cylindrical GWs (would be one of possible forms emitted from CSs) and background celestial high magnetic fields or widespread cosmological background magnetic fields, by using rigorous Einstein - Rosen metric. Results show: perturbed EM fields are also in the impulsive form accordant to the GW pulse, and asymptotic behaviors of the perturbed EM fields are fully consistent with the asymptotic behaviors of the energy density, energy flux density and Riemann curvature tensor of corresponding impulsive cylindrical GWs. The analytical solutions naturally give rise to the accumulation effect which is proportional to the term of distance^1/2, and based on it, we for the first time predict potentially observable effects in region of the Earth caused by the EM response to GWs from the CSs.

H. Wen; F. Y. Li; Z. Y. Fang; A. Beckwith

2014-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

95

Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

96

Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSAs role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Climate response and radiative forcing from mineral aerosols during the last glacial maximum, pre-industrial, current and doubled-carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate response and radiative forcing from mineral aerosols during the last glacial maximum, pre-industrial, current and doubled-carbon dioxide climates Natalie M. Mahowald,1,2 Masaru Yoshioka,1,2 William D. Collins July 2006; accepted 9 August 2006; published 27 October 2006. [1] Mineral aerosol impacts on climate

Mahowald, Natalie

98

Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop a model of the radiation...

Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

ABSTRACT : The direct analysis of the dynamic response of materials is possible using Split Hopkinson pressure bar method. For soils, it has to be adapted since the specimen has generally poor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hopkinson pressure bar method. For soils, it has to be adapted since the specimen has generally poor mechanical properties. An original experimental arrangement called "Three-Dimensional Split Hopkinson response of soils. Different types of confinement systems are used. The results on different loading paths

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Vision 20/20: The role of Raman spectroscopy in early stage cancer detection and feasibility for application in radiation therapy response assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique capable of identifying chemical constituents of a sample by their unique set of molecular vibrations. Research on the applicability of Raman spectroscopy in the differentiation of cancerous versus normal tissues has been ongoing for many years, and has yielded successful results in the context of prostate, breast, brain, skin, and head and neck cancers as well as pediatric tumors. Recently, much effort has been invested on developing noninvasive Raman probes to provide real-time diagnosis of potentially cancerous tumors. In this regard, it is feasible that the Raman technique might one day be used to provide rapid, minimally invasive real-time diagnosis of tumors in patients. Raman spectroscopy is relatively new to the field of radiation therapy. Recent work involving cell lines has shown that the Raman technique is able to identify proteins and other markers affected by radiation therapy. Although this work is preliminary, one could ask whether or not the Raman technique might be used to identify molecular markers that predict radiation response. This paper provides a brief review of Raman spectroscopic investigations in cancer detection, benefits and limitations of this method, advances in instrument development, and also preliminary studies related to the application of this technology in radiation therapy response assessment.

Devpura, Suneetha, E-mail: sdevpur1@hfhs.org; Barton, Kenneth N.; Brown, Stephen L.; Siddiqui, Farzan; Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Palyvoda, Olena [College of Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] [College of Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Kalkanis, Steven [Department of Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Naik, Vaman M. [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States)] [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States); Naik, Ratna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

102

Simulation of Infrared Laser Heating of Silica Using Heat Conduction and Multifrequency Radiation Diffusion Equations Adapted for Homogeneous Refractive Lossy Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized, transient heating of materials using micro-scale, highly absorbing laser light has been used in many industries to anneal, melt and ablate material with high precision. Accurate modeling of the relative contributions of conductive, convective and radiative losses as a function of laser parameters is essential to optimizing micro-scale laser processing of materials. In bulk semi-transparent materials such as silicate glass melts, radiation transport is known to play a significantly larger role as the temperature increases. Conventionally, radiation is treated in the frequency-averaged diffusive limit (Rosseland approximation). However, the role and proper treatment of radiative processes under rapidly heated, high thermal gradient conditions, often created through laser-matter interactions, is at present not clear. Starting from the radiation transport equation for homogeneous, refractive lossy media, they derive the corresponding time-dependent multi-frequency diffusion equations. Zeroth and first moments of the transport equation couple the energy density, flux and pressure tensor. The system is closed by neglecting the temporal derivative of the flux and replacing the pressure tensor by its diagonal analogue. The radiation equations are coupled to a diffusion equation for the matter temperature. They are interested in modeling infrared laser heating of silica over sub-millimeter length scales, and at possibly rapid rates. Hence, in contrast to related work, they retain the temporal derivative of the radiation field. They derive boundary conditions at a planar air-silica interface taking account of reflectivities obtained from the Fresnel relations that include absorption. The effect of a temperature-dependent absorption index is explored through construction of a multi-phonon dielectric function that includes mode dispersion. The spectral dimension is discretized into a finite number of intervals yielding a system of multigroup diffusion equations. Simulations are presented. To demonstrate the bulk heat loss due to radiation and the effect of the radiation's temporal derivative, they model cooling of a silica slab, initially at 2500 K, for 10 s. Retaining the derivative enables correctly modeling the loss of photons initially present in the slab. Other simulations model irradiating silica discs (of approximately 5 mm radii and thickness) with a CO2 laser: {lambda} = 10.59 and 4.6 um, Gaussian profile, r{sub 0} = 0.5 mm for 1/e decay. By surrounding the disks in room-temperature air, they make use of the boundary conditions described above.

Shestakov, A I; Matthews, M J; Vignes, R M; Stolken, J S

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

A study to determine statistically and empirically the influence of solar radiation on physiological responses of dairy cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as to st@Is aad osutea4 bgs ( 1957 IHTRQDUCTIOH REVIEU Qy THE LITERATURE General Observations on Clinstic Causes of Cattle Atnospheric Tenperature and Hnnid1ty Solar Radiation Analysis of the Data Analysis of Variance of Body Teaperature Analysis... ~ vtdenee and no ?xtensive research, tho offsets of solar radiation have been assnned to bs of little inportanoe. This study, a pzo]oot of the Southern Regional Dairy Researsh pro- gras, was designed to dotoznine the relative inportnnoo of solar...

Williams, James Stanley

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

COMMENTARY:Limits to adaptation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society s responses to climate change.

Preston, Benjamin L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

adaptive antioxidant methionine: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Departments of *Ecology for review July 26, 2005) Adaptive radiation is defined as the evolution of ecological and phenotypic diversity within a rapidly multiplying lineage....

106

The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to the accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). To better understand and eventually better represent these processes in this major national climate model, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global climate models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, on intra-seasonal oscillations and on the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. In addition, the MIT and AER physics packages have been incorporated and tested in combination within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model for the purpose of evaluating and improving convective and radiative processes on time scales appropriate to weather simulations. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics are unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of dynamical intra-seasonal oscillations such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation. In addition, it has been shown that the new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor in CAM as established through the comparison of modeled and observed satellite radiances. This suggests that continuing regional discrepancies in water vapor amounts in the climate model may not be solely related to convective or radiative processes. The major results of this project have been described in more detail in a journal article titled ??The Impacts of AER Radiation and MIT Convection on the Water Cycle Simulated by CAM3.5? that will be submitted for publication during Fall 2010.

Emanuel, Kerry; Iacono, Michael J.

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

DCE-MRI defined subvolumes of a brain metastatic lesion by principle component analysis and fuzzy-c-means clustering for response assessment of radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a pharmacokinetic modelfree framework to analyze the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data for assessment of response of brain metastases to radiation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with 45 analyzable brain metastases had MRI scans prior to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and at the end of the 2-week therapy. The volumetric DCE images covering the whole brain were acquired on a 3T scanner with approximately 5 s temporal resolution and a total scan time of about 3 min. DCE curves from all voxels of the 45 brain metastases were normalized and then temporally aligned. A DCE matrix that is constructed from the aligned DCE curves of all voxels of the 45 lesions obtained prior to WBRT is processed by principal component analysis to generate the principal components (PCs). Then, the projection coefficient maps prior to and at the end of WBRT are created for each lesion. Next, a pattern recognition technique, based upon fuzzy-c-means clustering, is used to delineate the tumor subvolumes relating to the value of the significant projection coefficients. The relationship between changes in different tumor subvolumes and treatment response was evaluated to differentiate responsive from stable and progressive tumors. Performance of the PC-defined tumor subvolume was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in prediction of nonresponsive lesions and compared with physiological-defined tumor subvolumes. Results: The projection coefficient maps of the first three PCs contain almost all response-related information in DCE curves of brain metastases. The first projection coefficient, related to the area under DCE curves, is the major component to determine response while the third one has a complimentary role. In ROC analysis, the area under curve of 0.88 0.05 and 0.86 0.06 were achieved for the PC-defined and physiological-defined tumor subvolume in response assessment. Conclusions: The PC-defined subvolume of a brain metastasis could predict tumor response to therapy similar to the physiological-defined one, while the former is determined more rapidly for clinical decision-making support.

Farjam, Reza; Tsien, Christina I.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States); Cao, Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Med Inn Building C478, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development and adaptation of conduction and radiation heat-transfer computer codes for the CFTL. [Core Flow Test Loop; RODCON; HOTTEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RODCON and HOTTEL are two computational methods used to calculate thermal and radiation heat transfer for the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) analysis efforts. RODCON was developed at ORNL to calculate the internal temperature distribution of the fuel rod simulator (FRS) for the CFTL. RODCON solves the time-dependent heat transfer equation in two-dimensional (R angle) cylindrical coordinates at an axial plane with user-specified radial material zones and time- and position-variant surface conditions at the FRS periphery. Symmetry of the FRS periphery boundary conditions is not necessary. The governing elliptic, partial differential heat equation is cast into a fully implicit, finite-difference form by approximating the derivatives with a forward-differencing scheme with variable mesh spacing. The heat conduction path is circumferentially complete, and the potential mathematical problem at the rod center can be effectively ignored. HOTTEL is a revision of an algorithm developed by C.B. Baxi at the General Atomic Company (GAC) to be used in calculating radiation heat transfer in a rod bundle enclosed in a hexagonal duct. HOTTEL uses geometric view factors, surface emissivities, and surface areas to calculate the gray-body or composite view factors in an enclosure having multiple reflections in a nonparticipating medium.

Conklin, J.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Collaborative Research: The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to an accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR climate model. To better understand and eventually better represent these processes, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, intra-seasonal oscillations and the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. The effect of the MIT and AER physics also has been tested in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 (hereinafter STD) and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics (hereinafter MOD) are still unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of the intra-seasonal oscillations (ISOs). The new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor relative to satellite measurements.

Dr. Kerry Emanuel; Michael J. Iacono

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Adaptive method with intercessory feedback control for an intelligent agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for an intelligent agent provides for adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for multiple intelligent agents provides for coordinating and adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. Re-programming of the adaptive architecture is through a nexus which coordinates reflexive and deliberator components.

Goldsmith, Steven Y.

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Adaptation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment ? Natural Environment ? People FIVE STRATEGIES Copyright 2011, City of Chicago ADAPTATION ESL-KT-11-11-16 9 CCAP Adaptation Evolution 2007 2008 2009 2010 ? Understood the climate science: Assess climate impacts ? Assessed economic... E xi st in g Tr un k Existing on Rogers Rogers Ave CIP Stormwater management: Chicago?s comprehensive sewer model Climate impacts Example actions to prepare the built environment Copyright 2011, City of Chicago ESL-KT-11-11-16 13 CCAP...

Durnbaugh, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Adaptive constructive processes 1 Running head: Adaptive constructive processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a current environmental demand when automatic, learned responses are not elicited. Bartlett argued further of Psychology Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 phone: (617) 495-3856 fax: (617) 496-3122 e to be operating in any well-adapted organic response (1932, p. 201)". He further emphasized the importance of "the

Schacter, Daniel

113

Adaptive sequential controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Xing, Jian (Seattle, WA); Butler, Nicholas G. (Newberg, OR); Rodriguez, Alonso (Pasadena, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 26, NO. 4, 2009, 748762 Climate Responses to Direct Radiative Forcing of Anthropogenic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is internally mixed with other aerosols. Model results indicate that the simulated climate change over 1951 of Sciences, Beijing 100049 4 Climate Change Research Center (CCRC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing model is applied in this work to compare climate responses to chang- ing concentrations of long

115

Tissue responses to low protracted doses of high let radiations or photons: Early and late damage relevant to radio-protective countermeasures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early and late murine tissue responses to single or fractionated low doses of heavy charged particles, fission-spectrum neutrons or gamma rays are considered. Damage to the hematopoietic system is emphasized, but results on acute lethality, host response to challenge with transplanted leukemia cells and life-shortening are presented. Low dose rates per fraction were used in some neutron experiments. Split-dose lethality studies (LD 50/30) with fission neutrons indicated greater accumulation of injury during a 9 fraction course (over 17 days) than was the case for ..gamma..-radiation. When total doses of 96 or 247 cGy of neutrons or ..gamma.. rays were given as a single dose or in 9 fractions, a significant sparing effect on femur CFU-S depression was observed for both radiation qualities during the first 11 days, but there was not an earlier return to normal with dose fractionation. During the 9 fraction sequence, a significant sparing effect of low dose rate on CFU-S depression was observed in both neutron and ..gamma..-irradiated mice. CFU-S content at the end of the fractionation sequence did not correlate with measured LD 50/30. Sustained depression of femur and spleen CFU-S and a significant thrombocytopenia were observed when a total neutron dose of 240 cGy was given in 72 fractions over 24 weeks at low dose rates. The temporal aspects of CFU-S repopulation were different after a single versus fractionated neutron doses. The sustained reduction in the size of the CFU-S population was accompanied by an increase in the fraction in DNA synthesis. The proliferation characteristics and effects of age were different for radial CFU-S population closely associated with bone, compared with the axial population that can be readily aspirated from the femur. In aged irradiated animals, the CFU-S proliferation/redistribution response to typhoid vaccine showed both an age and radiation effect. 63 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Ainsworth, E.J.; Afzal, S.M.J.; Crouse, D.A.; Hanson, W.R.; Fry, R.J.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

McGuire, Sean E., E-mail: semcguir@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cerne, Jasmina Z. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

Morgan, William F.; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Dubrova, Yuri E.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Schr, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

118

Adaptive Lighting  

Energy Savers [EERE]

* ...based on environmental conditions... - Occupancy Vacancy - Daylight Availability - Demand Response Signals - ... * ...to optimize space & building performance - Maximize...

119

Urban climate resilience : a global assessment of city adaptation plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As policy makers accept climate change as an irrefutable threat, adaptation planning has emerged as a necessary action for countries, states, and municipalities. This thesis explores adaptive responses to climate change ...

Katich, Kristina Noel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

REGULATORY MECHANISMS OF SLC39A4 (ZIP4) AND SLC39A5 (ZIP5) IN THE ADAPTIVE RESPONSE TO ZINC AVAILABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aims of this research were to determine how Zip4 and Zip5 are regulated in response to zinc availability and how Zip4 impacts development. Loss of Zip4 resulted in embryonic lethality. Heterozygosity negatively affected eye, heart, and brain...

Weaver, Benjamin Patrick

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Self-Adaptive Management of The Sleep Depths of Idle Nodes in Large Scale Systems to Balance Between Energy Consumption and Response Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Between Energy Consumption and Response Times Yongpeng Liu(1) , Hong Zhu(2) , Kai Lu(1) , Xiaoping Wang(1.659 MW, which equals the power usage of a middle scale city. In 2006, US servers and data centers U.S. electricity consumption or the output of about 15 typical power plants [2]. In 2007

Zhu, Hong

122

Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe...

Yu, Kaiyuan

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

124

Skeletal adaptation to reduced mechanical loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone adapts its mass and architecture in response to its mechanical environment. Yet control of this process by mechanical cues is poorly understood, particularly for unloading. Defining the fundamental mechanoregulation ...

Eliman, Rachel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Synthesis and Application of an Environmentally Insensitive Cy3-Based Arsenical Fluorescent Probe to Identify Adaptive Microbial Responses Involving Proximal Dithiol Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reversible disulfide oxidation between proximal cysteines in proteins represents a common regulatory control mechanism to modulate flux through metabolic pathways in response to changing environmental conditions. To enable in vivo measurements of cellular redox changes linked to disulfide bond formation, we have synthesized a cell-permeable monosubstituted cyanine dye derivatized with arsenic (i.e., TRAP_Cy3) to trap and visualize dithiols in cytosolic proteins. Alkylation of reactive thiols prior to displacement of the bound TRAP-Cy3 by ethanedithiol permits facile protein capture and mass spectrometric identification of proximal reduced dithiols to the exclusion of individual cysteines. Applying TRAP_Cy3 to evaluate cellular responses to increases in oxygen and light levels in the photosynthetic microbe Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, we observe large decreases in the abundance of reduced dithiols in cellular proteins, which suggest redox-dependent mechanisms involving the oxidation of proximal disulfides. Under these same growth conditions that result in the oxidation of proximal thiols, there is a reduction in the abundance of post-translational oxidative modifications involving nitrotyrosine and methionine sulfoxide formation. These results suggest that the redox status of proximal cysteines respond to environmental conditions, acting to regulate metabolic flux and minimize the formation of reactive oxygen species to decrease oxidative protein damage.

Fu, Na; Su, Dian; Cort, John R.; Chen, Baowei; Xiong, Yijia; Qian, Weijun; Konopka, Allan; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

126

RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68508; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis [PLS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551; Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Inst. Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, 5500 Argentina; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

adaptive tree code: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in Adaptive Mesh Refinement codes Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds CERN Preprints...

129

Radiation Protection Guidance Hospital Staff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Radiation Protection Guidance For Hospital Staff Prepared for Stanford The privilege to use ionizing radiation at Stanford University, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard with radioactive materials or radiation devices are responsible for knowing and adhering to applicable requirements

Kay, Mark A.

130

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2012 Page 1 of 8 Radiation Safety Retraining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2012 Page 1 of 8 Radiation Safety Retraining Spring 2012 Contents: Thank You Responsibilities for Radiation Safety Biological Effects and Exposure Limits Training for Non-Radiation Workers Training for Radiation Workers What Everyone in Your Lab Should Know Security

Kaye, Jason P.

131

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2013 Page 1 of 7 Radiation Safety Retraining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2013 Page 1 of 7 Radiation Safety Retraining Spring 2013 Contents: Thank You Responsibilities for Radiation Safety Biological Effects and Exposure Limits Training for Non-Radiation Workers Training for Radiation Workers What Everyone in Your Lab Should Know Security

Kaye, Jason P.

132

NEWS AND COMMENTARY Adaptive genomic changes in Antarctic fish...............................................................  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-zero temperatures of the Southern Ocean requires special adaptation to extreme cold, and the notothenioid fish radiation--which dominates the biomass and species diversity of Antarctic fish--has provided textbook., 2004). This result suggests that, not surprisingly, evolu- tionary adaptation to the Southern Ocean has

Renn, Susan C.P.

133

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

134

Radiation tolerance of ceramicsInsights from atomistic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

different radiation response as the damage accumulates. Citation: Devanathan R, WJ Weber, and JD Gale.2010."Radiation tolerance of ceramicsInsights from atomistic simulation...

135

Position sensitive detection of neutrons in high radiation background field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the development of a high-resolution position sensitive device for detection of slow neutrons in the environment of extremely high ? and e{sup ?} radiation background. We make use of a planar silicon pixelated (pixel size: 55 55 ?m{sup 2}) spectroscopic Timepix detector adapted for neutron detection utilizing very thin {sup 10}B converter placed onto detector surface. We demonstrate that electromagnetic radiation background can be discriminated from the neutron signal utilizing the fact that each particle type produces characteristic ionization tracks in the pixelated detector. Particular tracks can be distinguished by their 2D shape (in the detector plane) and spectroscopic response using single event analysis. A Cd sheet served as thermal neutron stopper as well as intensive source of gamma rays and energetic electrons. Highly efficient discrimination was successful even at very low neutron to electromagnetic background ratio about 10{sup ?4}.

Vavrik, D., E-mail: vavrik@itam.cas.cz [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prosecka 76, 190 00 Prague 9 (Czech Republic); Jakubek, J.; Pospisil, S. [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prosecka 76, 190 00 Prague 9 (Czech Republic)] [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prosecka 76, 190 00 Prague 9 (Czech Republic); Vacik, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rez, 250 68 Prague, Czech Republic (Czech Republic)] [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rez, 250 68 Prague, Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Adaptive mean filtering for noise reduction in CT polymer gel dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray computed tomography (CT) as a method of extracting 3D dose information from irradiated polymer gel dosimeters is showing potential as a practical means to implement gel dosimetry in a radiation therapy clinic. However, the response of CT contrast to dose is weak and noise reduction is critical in order to achieve adequate dose resolutions with this method. Phantom design and CT imaging technique have both been shown to decrease image noise. In addition, image postprocessing using noise reduction filtering techniques have been proposed. This work evaluates in detail the use of the adaptive mean filter for reducing noise in CT gel dosimetry. Filter performance is systematically tested using both synthetic patterns mimicking a range of clinical dose distribution features as well as actual clinical dose distributions. Both low and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) situations are examined. For all cases, the effects of filter kernel size and the number of iterations are investigated. Results indicate that adaptive mean filtering is a highly effective tool for noise reduction CT gel dosimetry. The optimum filtering strategy depends on characteristics of the dose distributions and image noise level. For low noise images (SNR {approx}20), the filtered results are excellent and use of adaptive mean filtering is recommended as a standard processing tool. For high noise images (SNR {approx}5) adaptive mean filtering can also produce excellent results, but filtering must be approached with more caution as spatial and dose distortions of the original dose distribution can occur.

Hilts, Michelle; Jirasek, Andrew [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia, V8R6V5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W2Y2 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Generalized Adaptive A* Xiaoxun Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized Adaptive A* Xiaoxun Sun USC Computer Science Los Angeles, California xiaoxuns spaces changes. Adaptive A* [7] is a Cite as: Generalized Adaptive A*, Xiaoxun Sun, Sven Koenig

Yeoh, William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sensor response rate accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Information Center Emergency Manager Offsite Interface Coordinator DOE Technical Advisor Emergency Press Center Radiation Safety Figure 1. Pantex Plant Emergency Response...

143

Wide-cross whole-genome radiation hybrid (WWRH) mapping and identification of cold-responsive genes using oligo-gene microarray analysis in cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the WWRH mapping method can be used to map the cotton genome, and that this method complements traditional linkage mapping approaches. The second part of this research focused on the identification of cold-responsive genes using spotted oligo...

Gao, Wenxiang

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

144

High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, CALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, CALL: Radiation Safety Officer (479) 263 iii FOREWORD RADIATION SAFETY is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students who are directly or indirectly involved in the use of radionuclides or radiation-producing machines. The Radiation

Li, Jiali

146

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le confrencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrle des zones et les prcautions prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Reanalysis of Curvature in the Dose Response for Cancer and Modifications by Age at Exposure Following Radiation Therapy for Benign Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose response for various cancer endpoints and modifiers by age and time. Methods and Materials: Reanalysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by cancer endpoint (stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia, all other). Results: There are statistically significant (P<.05) excess risks for all cancer and for lung cancer and borderline statistically significant risks for stomach cancer (P=.07), and leukemia (P=.06), with excess relative risks Gy{sup -1} of 0.024 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.011, 0.039), 0.559 (95% CI 0.221, 1.021), 0.042 (95% CI -0.002, 0.119), and 1.087 (95% CI -0.018, 4.925), respectively. There is statistically significant (P=.007) excess risk of pancreatic cancer when adjusted for dose-response curvature. General downward curvature is apparent in the dose response, statistically significant (P<.05) for all cancers, pancreatic cancer, and all other cancers (ie, other than stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia). There are indications of reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure (for all cancers, pancreatic cancer), but no evidence for quadratic variations in relative risk with age at exposure. If a linear-exponential dose response is used, there is no significant heterogeneity in the dose response among the 5 endpoints considered or in the speed of variation of relative risk with age at exposure. The risks are generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers. Conclusions: There are excess risks for various malignancies in this data set. Generally there is a marked downward curvature in the dose response and significant reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure. The consistency of risks with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

SR-2508 plus buthionine sulfoximine or SR-2508 alone: effects on the radiation response and the glutathione content of a human tumor xenograft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study determined the radiosensitivity of the human tumor xenograft HT29 and its glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (CYS) contents after treatment with both buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and SR-2508 or SR-2508 alone. Tumor radiosensitivity was assessed by the in vitro colony assay and thiol content was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The radiosensitizing effect of SR-2508 is dose dependent and increases when higher doses of radiation are given. SR-2508 given alone does not modify GSH and CYS content; however, when given with BSO, the GSH level is significantly reduced, yet radiosensitivity of the HT29 tumor is only slightly increased. These results have been compared to our previously observed results of HT29 treatment with misonidazole (MISO), BSO, or MISO + BSO.

Lespinasse, F.; Biscay, P.; Malaise, E.P.; Guichard, M.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity trial adapt Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine 6 Running Head: CONFLICT ADAPTATION FOLLOWING ERRONEOUS RESPONSE PREPARATION Summary: (Botvinick et al., 2001). Reduced ACC activation (sometimes...

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive supply survival Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 6 RICKARD, I.J. & LUMMAA V. 2007: The Predictive Adaptive Response and metabolic syndrome: Challenges for the hypothesis. Summary: 1: survival...

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive phased array Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the desired array response; in this case... of adaptive beamformers on seismic data ... Source: van der Veen, Alle-Jan - Department of Electrical Engineering, Technische...

152

Wireless passive radiation sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, B.T.

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

155

BIODIVERSITY Incorporating sociocultural adaptive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY VIEWPOINT Incorporating sociocultural adaptive capacity in conservation hotspot of biodiversity threats. Conservation biogeography (Whittaker et al., 2005) has emerged as a critical area biodiversity (Mawdsley et al., 2009). Adjusting conservation strategies to maintain diversity in recognition

156

Dynamic Adaptation using Xen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The topic of virtualization has received renewed attention. Xen is a popular open source type-I hypervisor. The Xen hypervisor currently has limited capabilities for runtime modification to the core hypervisor, which impairs research into dynamic adaptation for system-level virtualization. This paper discusses recent investigations into the feasibility of extending Xen to support runtime adaptation for core hypervisor service, e.g., scheduler.

Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; Vallee, Geoffroy R [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Discriminative Adaptive Training and Bayesian Inference for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adaptation is a standard part of many speech recognition systems. This process requires some adaptation data

de Gispert, Adrià

158

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office 130 DeSoto Street G-7 Parran with sources of ionizing radiation are required to be instructed in the basic principles of radiation protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide

Sibille, Etienne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

162

Atomistic simulations of radiation damage in amorphous metal alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While numerous fundamental studies have characterized the atomic-level radiation response mechanisms in irradiated crystalline alloys, comparatively little is known regarding the mechanisms of radiation damage in amorphous ...

Baumer, Richard E. (Richard Edward)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

GADRAS Detector Response Function.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Irradiators for measuring the biological effects of low dose-rate ionizing radiation fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological response to ionizing radiation differs with radiation field. Particle type, energy spectrum, and dose-rate all affect biological response per unit dose. This thesis describes methods of spectral analysis, ...

Davidson, Matthew Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Lymphatic Functional Adaptations to Prolonged Changes in Mechanical Stimuli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The adaptive responses first reported in the present work, are thus consistent with an accepted understanding of interstitial volume regulation (4). 3.1.3b. Strengths of the experimental model The difficulty in studying adaptation of blood vessels..., one end of a fluid-filled tube (Tygon R3603, Saint- Gobain Performance Plastic, Garden Grove, CA) was inserted through the wall of the vein while the other end was brought outside of the animal. Exteriorized intestine and mesentery were...

Nguyen, Tam L

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

166

Adaptive Medical Information Delivery Combining User, Task and Situation Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., in their model for adaptive hypermedia AHAM [2], distinguish contentadaptation from link adaptation

167

Adaptive filters for detection of gravitational waves from coalescing binaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we propose use of infinite impulse response adaptive line enhancer (IIR ALE) filters for detection of gravitational waves from coalescing binaries. We extend our previous work and define an adaptive matched filter structure. Filter performance is analyzed in terms of the tracking capability and determination of filter parameters. Furthermore, following the Neyman-Pearson strategy, receiver operating characteristics are derived, with closedform expressions for detection threshold, false alarm, and detection probability. Extensive tests demonstrate the effectiveness of adaptive filters both in terms of small computational cost and robustness.

Eleuteri, Antonio; Milano, Leopoldo; De Rosa, Rosario; Garufi, Fabio; Acernese, Fausto; Barone, Fabrizio; Giordano, Lara; Pardi, Silvio [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy) and INFN sez. Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Dip. di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita di Salerno, via Ponte Don Melillo, 84084 Fisciano (Saudi Arabia) (IT) and INFN sez. Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Dip. di Matematica ed Applicazioni, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II', via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy) and INFN sez. Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Naples (Italy)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

169

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Project: (version of January 28, 2009) Sparse tensor product methods for radiative transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulating a dense gas at very high temperatures, energy transport by means of radiation has to be taken into account. However, as even the non-scattering stationary monochromatic radiative transfer equation s · x. Applying an adaptive sparse discretiza- tion to the radiative transfer equation [1] allows to significantly

Hiptmair, Ralf

171

ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS APPLICATIONS MOODY T. CHU \\Lambda Abstract. The wavefront aberrations induced by atmospheric turbulence can severely degrade the performance of an optical imaging system. Adaptive optics refers to the process of removing unwanted wave front distortions

172

ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS APPLICATIONS MOODY T. CHU Abstract. The wavefront aberrations induced by atmospheric turbulence can severely degrade the performance of an optical imaging system. Adaptive optics refers to the process of removing unwanted wave front distortions

173

Louisiana Nuclear Energy and Radiation Control Law (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation of nuclear energy safety, permitting and radiation safety and control in Louisiana. The Department operates...

174

Spectral-element adaptive refinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectral-element adaptive refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the island coalescence;Abstract A recently developed spectral-element adaptive refinement incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD statically refined and dynamically refined grids. The island coalescence instability is a fundamental MHD

Ng, Chung-Sang

175

Adaptation of Microvasculature to Pulsatility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adaptation has not yet been fully characterized. In fact, standard mathematical models using the common assumption that vessels solely adapt to steady flow do not reproduce normal vascular structure. Therefore, we developed a simple, mathematical model of a...

Bimal, Tia

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simple electrical circuits are analyzed, and the results show that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decays of atoms. As an illustration of the analogy a ...

Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Geant4 applications in the heliospheric radiation environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high energy ionizing radiation environment in the solar system consists of three main sources: the radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles. Geant4 is a Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation toolkit, with applications in areas as high energy physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics or medical physics research. In this poster, Geant4 applications to model and study the effects of the heliospheric radiation environment are presented. Specific applications are being developed to study the effect of the radiation environment on detector components, to describe the response and to optimise the design of radiation monitors for future space missions and to predict the radiation environment in Mars surface, orbits and moons.

Pedro Brogueira; Patrcia Gonalves; Ana Keating; Dalmiro Maia; Mrio Pimenta; Bernardo Tom

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

182

Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary is provided of presentations and discussions from the NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop held September 27-28, 2007, at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Invited speakers were distinguished scientists representing key sectors of the radiation research community. Speakers addressed recent developments in the biomarker and biotechnology fields that may provide new opportunities for health-related assessment of radiation-exposed individuals, including for long-duration space travel. Topics discussed include the space radiation environment, biomarkers of radiation sensitivity and individual susceptibility, molecular signatures of low-dose responses, multivariate analysis of gene expression, biomarkers in biodefense, biomarkers in radiation oncology, biomarkers and triage following large-scale radiological incidents, integrated and multiple biomarker approaches, advances in whole-genome tiling arrays, advances in mass-spectrometry proteomics, radiation biodosimetry for estimation of cancer risk in a rat skin model, and confounding factors. Summary conclusions are provided at the end of the report.

Straume, Tore; Amundson, Sally A,; Blakely, William F.; Burns, Frederic J.; Chen, Allen; Dainiak, Nicholas; Franklin, Stephen; Leary, Julie A.; Loftus, David J.; Morgan, William F.; Pellmar, Terry C.; Stolc, Viktor; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Adaptive control for accelerators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

Eaton, Lawrie E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jachim, Stephen P. (Los Alamos, NM); Natter, Eckard F. (Santa Fe, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Radiation-induced lung injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. (Yale Univ. Medical Center, New Haven, CT (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Radiation Pressure in Massive Star Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stars with masses of >~ 20 solar masses have short Kelvin times that enable them to reach the main sequence while still accreting from their natal clouds. The resulting nuclear burning produces a huge luminosity and a correspondingly large radiation pressure force on dust grains in the accreting gas. This effect may limit the upper mass of stars that can form by accretion. Indeed, simulations and analytic calculations to date have been unable to resolve the mystery of how stars of 50 solar masses and up form. We present two new ideas to solve the radiation pressure problem. First, we use three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations to study the collapse of massive cores. We find that in three dimensions a configuration in which radiation holds up an infalling envelope is Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, leading radiation driven bubbles to collapse and accretion to continue. We also present Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations showing that the cavities created by protostellar winds provides a valve that allow radiation to escape the accreting envelope, further reducing the ability of radiation pressure to inhibit accretion.

Mark R. Krumholz; Richard I. Klein; Christopher F. McKee

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

Adapting to Survive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T op Document: NAActivitiesAdapting to

189

Alpha Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OF RESEARCHThermal SolarAllocatioBasics of Radiation Gamma

190

Budget-based Control for Interactive Services with Adaptive Execution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the problem of managing a class of interactive services to meet a response time target while achieving high service quality. We focus here on interactive services that support adaptive execution, such as web search engines and finance servers. With adaptive execution, when a request receives more processing time, its result improves, posing new challenges and opportunities for resource management. We propose a new budget-based control model for interactive services with adaptive execution. The budget represents the amount of resources assigned to all pending requests. The budgetbased control model consists of two components: (1) a hybrid control mechanism, which combines adaptive and integral controllers and controls the budget in order to meet the response time target with small steady-state error, fast settling time and little runtime overhead, and (2) an optimization procedure, which takes advantage of adaptive execution to maximize the total response quality of all pending requests under a given budget. We implement and evaluate the budget-based control model experimentally in Microsoft Bing, a commercial web search engine. The experimental results show that it achieves more accurate control of mean response time and higher response quality than traditional static and dynamic admission control techniques that control the queue length. We also apply the model to a finance server that estimates option prices, and conduct a simulation study. The simulation results show large benefits for budget-based control. For example, under the same response time and quality requirements, the budget-based model accommodates double the system throughput compared to a traditional queuebased control model. 1.

Yuxiong He; Zihao Ye; Qiang Fu; Sameh Elnikety

191

Rendering Adaptation to Address Communication and Computation Constraints in Cloud Mobile Gaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rendering Adaptation to Address Communication and Computation Constraints in Cloud Mobile Gaming the responsibility of executing the gaming engines, including the most compute intensive tasks of graphic rendering imposed by the cost and availability of cloud servers. In this paper, we propose a rendering adaptation

California at San Diego, University of

192

Adaptive Restoration of Airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To incorporate the georegistration and restoration processes into airborne data processing in support of U.S. Department of Energy's nuclear emergency response task, we developed an adaptive restoration filter for airborne Daedalus AADS1268 ATM thermal data based on the Wiener filtering theory. Preliminary assessment shows that this filter enhances the detectability of small weak thermal anomalies in AADS1268 thermal images.

D. Yuan; E. Doak; P. Guss; A. Will

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Adaptive coherent interferometric imaging for sensor networks Gregoire Derveauxa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with distributed sensor networks is presented. The sensors record the impulse response of the unknown background imaging when the background is known is considered in Ref.8. The sensors record an approximate impulseAdaptive coherent interferometric imaging for sensor networks Gr´egoire Derveauxa) INRIA Domaine de

Papanicolaou, George C.

194

ORIGINAL PAPER Is selective thinning an adequate practice for adapting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Is selective thinning an adequate practice for adapting Quercus ilex coppices. & Objectives We investigated how selective thinning affected the response of an old Quercus ilex coppice to 6 in abandoned Q. ilex coppice stands helps remaining trees to cope with current and future (probably longer

Boyer, Edmond

195

Normal shock solutions to the viscous shock layer equations including thermal, chemical, thermodynamic, and radiative nonequilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An existing axisymmetric body viscous shock layer code including chemical, thermal, and thermodynamic nonequilibrium and nonequilibrium radiative gasdynamic coupling is adapted to simulate the one-dimensional flow within a shock tube. A suitable...

Mott, David Ray

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Making climate adaptation work : strategies for resource constrained South Asian mega-cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation compares the responses of Dhaka, Bangladesh and Kolkata, India to the serious challenges posed by climate change, particularly in the water sector. Drawing on the theories of "adaptation as development" ...

Dutta-Koehler, Madhu Chhanda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Emerging patterns of adaptive re-use : the new American House Hotel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to develop a design solution for the adaptive reuse of the American House Hotel that answers an architectural design challenge with technical responses. The process of actualization has been pushed a bit ...

Moody, Linda A

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Lanthanum Halide Nanoparticle Scintillators for Nuclear Radiation Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated and characterized for their nanocomposite radiation detector properties. This work investigated the properties of several nanostructured radiation scintillators, in order to determine the viability of using scintillators employing nanostructured lanthanum tribromide, lanthanum trifluoride, or cerium tribromide. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with the idea that these materials have an intrinsic response to nuclear radiation that may be correlated to the energy of the incident radiation.

Guss, P. P., Guise, R., Yuan, D., Mukhopadhyay, S., O'Brien, R., Lowe, D.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Maintainable and Reusable Scientific Software Adaptation Democratizing Scientific Software Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptation Pilsung Kang, Eli Tilevich, Srinidhi Varadarajan, and Naren Ramakrishnan Center for High, and available resources to en- sure its efficiency and reliability. Although adaptation pat- terns can be found, Maintenance, and Enhancement; D.2.13 [Reusable Soft- ware]: [Reusable libraries]; D.3.3 [Language Constructs

Ryder, Barbara G.

200

BRIDGING NAVIGATION, SEARCH AND ADAPTATION. Adaptive Hypermedia Models Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corpus, Dexter Model, AHAM, GAF. Abstract: Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHS) have long been concentrating The most referenced (but certainly not only) Adaptive Hypermedia (AH) model dates back to 1999. Since AHAM/Hypermedia modelling from Dexter Model through AHAM to the proposed GAF model, out- line advantages of each framework

De Bra, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Climate change effects on agriculture: Economic responses to biophysical shocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural production is sensitive to weather and will thus be directly affected by climate change. Plausible estimates of these climate change impacts require combined use of climate, crop, and economic models. Results from previous studies vary substantially due to differences in models, scenarios, and data. This paper is part of a collective effort to systematically integrate these three types of models. We focus on the economic component of the assessment, investigating how nine global economic models of agriculture represent endogenous responses to seven standardized climate change scenarios produced by two climate and five crop models. These responses include adjustments in yields, area, consumption, and international trade. We apply biophysical shocks derived from the IPCCs Representative Concentration Pathway that result in end-of-century radiative forcing of 8.5 watts per square meter. The mean biophysical impact on crop yield with no incremental CO2 fertilization is a 17 percent reduction globally by 2050 relative to a scenario with unchanging climate. Endogenous economic responses reduce yield loss to 11 percent, increase area of major crops by 12 percent, and reduce consumption by 2 percent. Agricultural production, cropland area, trade, and prices show the greatest degree of variability in response to climate change, and consumption the lowest. The sources of these differences includes model structure and specification; in particular, model assumptions about ease of land use conversion, intensification, and trade. This study identifies where models disagree on the relative responses to climate shocks and highlights research activities needed to improve the representation of agricultural adaptation responses to climate change.

Nelson, Gerald; Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; Havlik, Petr; Ahammad, Helal; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; von Lampe, Martin; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Mueller, C.; Popp, Alexander; Robertson, Richard; Robinson, Sherman; Schmid, E.; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Willenbockel, Dirk

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

Radiotherapy Adapted to Spatial and Temporal Variability in Tumor Hypoxia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To explore the feasibility and clinical potential of adapting radiotherapy to temporal and spatial variations in tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: Repeated dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (DCEMR) images were taken of a canine sarcoma during the course of fractionated radiation therapy. The tumor contrast enhancement was assumed to represent the oxygen distribution. The IMRT plans were retrospectively adapted to the DCEMR images by employing tumor dose redistribution. Optimized nonuniform tumor dose distributions were calculated and compared with a uniform dose distribution delivering the same integral dose to the tumor. Clinical outcome was estimated from tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling. Results: The biologically adapted treatment was found to give a substantial increase in TCP compared with conventional radiotherapy, even when only pretreatment images were used as basis for the treatment planning. The TCP was further increased by repeated replanning during the course of treatment, and replanning twice a week was found to give near optimal TCP. Random errors in patient positioning were found to give a small decrease in TCP, whereas systematic errors were found to reduce TCP substantially. NTCP for the adapted treatment was similar to or lower than for the conventional treatment, both for parallel and serial normal tissue structures. Conclusion: Biologically adapted radiotherapy is estimated to improve treatment outcome of tumors having spatial and temporal variations in radiosensitivity.

Sovik, Aste [Department of Medical Physics, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Malinen, Eirik [Department of Medical Physics, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway) and Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)]. E-mail: emalinen@fys.uio.no; Skogmo, Hege K. [Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bruland, Oyvind S. [Department of Oncology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Clincal Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Olsen, Dag Rune [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Department of Radiation Biology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Organizational Adaptation Kathleen M. Carley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-humans. For example, they suggest that organizational learning resides not just in the minds of the personnel withinOrganizational Adaptation Kathleen M. Carley Dept. of Social and Decision Sciences Carnegie Mellon: Kathleen M. Carley, 1998, "Organizational Adaptation." Annals of Operations Research. 75: 25-47. #12

Sadeh, Norman M.

204

Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H. Sayed University of California at Los 2014 A. H. Sayed DOI: 10.1561/2200000051 Adaptation, Learning, and Optimization over Networks Ali H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.6 Notation and Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 Optimization by Single Agents

California at Los Angeles, University of

205

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2. Radiation Safety Committee (RSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.4. Radiation Safety Office (RSO

Rubloff, Gary W.

206

Method and devices for performing stereotactic microbeam radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiation delivery system generally includes either a synchrotron source or a support frame and a plurality of microbeam delivery devices supported on the support frame, both to deliver a beam in a hemispherical arrangement. Each of the microbeam delivery devices or synchrotron irradiation ports is adapted to deliver at least one microbeam of radiation along a microbeam delivery axis, wherein the microbeam delivery axes of the plurality of microbeam delivery devices cross within a common target volume.

Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

207

Adaptive Optics in Star Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

Wolfgang Brandner

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Direct detector for terahertz radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM); Shaner, Eric A. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

210

Adaptive excitation control in power systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents an adaptive excitation controller of power systems. The control law is derived by using model reference adaptive control (MRAC) or adaptive pole placement control (APPC) and an equilibrium tracking mechanism is implemented...

Chiu, Pei-Chen

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - antioxidant response element-mediated Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

brake fern (Pteris vittata L.) upon... adaptive biochemical responses such as production of antioxidant ... Source: Ma, Lena - Soil and Water Science Department, University...

212

Microscreen radiation shield for thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a microscreen radiation shield which reduces radiative heat losses in thermoelectric generators such as sodium heat engines without reducing the efficiency of operation of such devices. The radiation shield is adapted to be interposed between a reaction zone and a means for condensing an alkali metal vapor in a thermoelectric generator for converting heat energy directly to electrical energy. The radiation shield acts to reflect infrared radiation emanating from the reaction zone back toward the reaction zone while permitting the passage of the alkali metal vapor to the condensing means. The radiation shield includes a woven wire mesh screen or a metal foil having a plurality of orifices formed therein. The orifices in the foil and the spacing between the wires in the mesh is such that radiant heat is reflected back toward the reaction zone in the interior of the generator, while the much smaller diameter alkali metal atoms such as sodium pass directly through the orifices or along the metal surfaces of the shield and through the orifices with little or no impedance.

Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

adaptive gene responses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Sustainability. In February 2013, Athens of students to be future generators of sustainable value for business and society at large and to work Chatziantoniou, Damianos...

214

Adaptive Response Surface Method Using Inherited Latin Hypercube Design Points  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARSM is tested using a group of standard test problems and then applied to an engineering design problem. In both testing and design application, significant improvement in the efficiency of ARSM and positive results have been achieved. Besides CCD, alphabetical optimal designs, especially D

Wang, Gaofeng Gary

215

adaptive response induced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NANOLAMINATES . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??To characterize the self-propagating, high-temperature exothermic alloying reactions of NiAl nanoscaled...

216

adaptive responses induced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NANOLAMINATES . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??To characterize the self-propagating, high-temperature exothermic alloying reactions of NiAl nanoscaled...

217

Automated Grid Disruption Response System: Robust Adaptive Topology Control (RATC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GENI Project: The RATC research team is using topology control as a mechanism to improve system operations and manage disruptions within the electric grid. The grid is subject to interruption from cascading faults caused by extreme operating conditions, malicious external attacks, and intermittent electricity generation from renewable energy sources. The RATC system is capable of detecting, classifying, and responding to grid disturbances by reconfiguring the grid in order to maintain economically efficient operations while guaranteeing reliability. The RATC system would help prevent future power outages, which account for roughly $80 billion in losses for businesses and consumers each year. Minimizing the time it takes for the grid to respond to expensive interruptions will also make it easier to integrate intermittent renewable energy sources into the grid.

None

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The AROUND project: Adapting robotic disaster response to developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduction (WCDR) [20] stresses this necessity in points no 89 ("Advanced technologies for disaster reduction hazards. As a consequence, in cities like Hanoi, not only are disasters (floods, storms, cyclones, fires

Boyer, Edmond

219

Adaptable architecture : a computational exploration into responsive design systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the fact that architecture is, among other things, the crystallization of a mediation among design intentions (function), meaning and contextual constraints (performance), we as designers are obligated to produce ...

Zulas, Alejandro, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Radiative Heat Transfer between Neighboring Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The near-field interaction between two neighboring particles is known to produce enhanced radiative heat transfer. We advance in the understanding of this phenomenon by including the full electromagnetic particle response, heat exchange with the environment, and important radiative corrections both in the distance dependence of the fields and in the particle absorption coefficients. We find that crossed terms of electric and magnetic interactions dominate the transfer rate between gold and SiC particles, whereas radiative corrections reduce it by several orders of magnitude even at small separations. Radiation away from the dimer can be strongly suppressed or enhanced at low and high temperatures, respectively. These effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of radiative heat transfer in nanostructured environments.

Alejandro Manjavacas; F. Javier Garcia de Abajo

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Autonomous adaptive acoustic relay positioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of maximizing underwater acoustic data transmission by adaptively positioning an autonomous mobile relay so as to learn and exploit spatial variations in channel performance. The acoustic channel ...

Cheung, Mei Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

An Adaptive Voltage Control Algorithm with Multiple Distributed Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DE) with power electronics (PE) interfaces with the right control are capable of providing reactive power related ancillary services. Voltage regulation in particular has drawn much attention. In this paper the challenges to control multiple DEs to regulate the local voltage in distribution systems is addressed and a decentralized adaptive voltage control method is proposed. The simulation results in different system conditions show that this adaptive voltage control method is capable of satisfying the fast response speed requirement without causing oscillation or instability of the system. Since this method has high tolerance to the shortage of the system parameters and can be widely adaptive to the variable operation situations of the power systems, it is very suited for the utility application.

Li, Huijuan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Radiation sensitive devices and systems for detection of radioactive materials and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation sensitive devices include a substrate comprising a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements coupled to the substrate. Each resonance element is configured to resonate responsive to non-ionizing incident radiation. Systems for detecting radiation from a special nuclear material include a radiation sensitive device and a sensor located remotely from the radiation sensitive device and configured to measure an output signal from the radiation sensitive device. In such systems, the radiation sensitive device includes a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements positioned on the radiation sensitive material. Methods for detecting a presence of a special nuclear material include positioning a radiation sensitive device in a location where special nuclear materials are to be detected and remotely interrogating the radiation sensitive device with a sensor.

Kotter, Dale K

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

225

Asymptotic Accuracy of the Equilibrium Diffusion Approximation and Semi-analytic Solutions of Radiating Shocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 I.4 State-of-the-art computational methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 CHAPTER II RADIATION TRANSPORT AND RADIATION HYDRODY- NAMICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 II.1 Radiation transport without material... recombination at the front of the expanding shock. Adapted from the March 24, 2005, Astronomy Picture of the Day [16]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Figure I.2 SN1987A was viewed from earth on February 23, 1987. Only 168,000 light...

Ferguson, Jim Michael

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

Unilateral radiation pneumonitis in sheep: Physiological changes and bronchoalveolar lavage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation pneumonitis is a life-threatening result of therapeutic thoracic irradiation, yet its mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied the effects of unilateral lung irradiation (3,000 rad) in sheep from the immediate response to the later development of radiation pneumonitis. We defined radiation pneumonitis by its diagnostic clinical feature, radiographic infiltration of the irradiated zone with a straight margin corresponding to the radiation port. The immediate response in the few hours after irradiation was characterized by cough, labored respiration, hypoxemia (arterial PO{sub 2} decreased 19 Torr), mild pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary arterial pressure increased 20%), and lymphopenia. Hemodynamics and gas exchange returned to normal by day 2 but became abnormal again before or during radiation pneumonitis at 32 +/- 2 days. Respiratory distress, hypoxemia, and pulmonary hypertension recurred during radiation pneumonitis. Bronchoalveolar lavage during radiation pneumonitis contained increased neutrophils (19 +/- 4%, control = 7%), increased protein (0.27 +/- 0.1 g/dl, control = 0.12 +/- 0.03), and severely impaired ability to lower surface tension. Alveolar macrophages from both lungs during unilateral radiation pneumonitis exhibited impaired generation of superoxide after phorbol myristate (only a 30% increase). Normal control alveolar macrophages increased superoxide production after stimulation greater than 400%. We conclude that unilateral lung irradiation in sheep causes a mild immediate response followed by radiation pneumonitis at 1 mo. Unilateral radiation pneumonitis in this model is associated with ipsilateral neutrophilic alveolitis, increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein, and impaired surfactant function, as well as bilateral functional abnormalities of alveolar macrophages.

Tillman, B.F.; Loyd, J.E.; Malcolm, A.W.; Holm, B.A.; Brigham, K.L. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mutations in Global Regulators Lead to Metabolic Selection during Adaptation to Complex Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adaptation to ecologically complex environments can provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics and functional constraints encountered by organisms during natural selection. Unlike adaptation to a single limiting resource, adaptation to a new environment with abundant and varied resources can be difficult to achieve by small incremental changes since many mutations are required to achieve even modest gains in fitness. Since changing complex environments are quite common in nature, we investigated how such an epistatic bottleneck can be avoided to allow rapid adaptation. We show that adaptive mutations arise repeatedly in independently evolved populations in the context of greatly increased genetic and phenotypic diversity. We go on to show that weak selection requiring substantial metabolic reprogramming can be readily achieved by mutations in the global response regulator arcA and the stress response regulator rpoS. We identified 46 unique single-nucleotide variants of arcA and 18 mutations in rpoS, nine of which resulted in stop codons or large deletions, suggesting that a subtle modulation of ArcA function and knockouts of rpoS are largely responsible for the metabolic shifts leading to adaptation. These mutations allow a higher order metabolic selection that eliminates epistatic bottlenecks, which could occur when many changes would be required. Proteomic and carbohydrate analysis of adapting E. coli populations revealed an up-regulation of enzymes associated with the TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism and an increase in the secretion of putrescine. The overall effect of adaptation across populations is to redirect and efficiently utilize uptake and catabolism of abundant amino acids. Concomitantly, there is a pronounced spread of more ecologically limited strains that results from specialization through metabolic erosion. Remarkably, the global regulators arcA and rpoS can provide a one-step mechanism of adaptation to a novel environment, which highlights the importance of global resource management as a powerful strategy to adaptation.

Saxer, Gerda; Krepps, Michael D.; Merkley, Eric D.; Ansong, Charles; Kaiser, Brooke LD; Valovska, Marie-Thrse; Ristic, Nikola; Yeh, Ping T.; Prakash, Vittal; Leiser, Owen P.; Nakhleh, Luay; Gibbons, Henry S.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Shamoo, Yousif

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

228

Matrix adaptation in discriminative vector quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gabriel Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Matrix adaptation in discriminative vector quantization Petra

Zachmann, Gabriel

229

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water Supply and Demand Jim Schneider, Ph · How Nebraska manages water · Dealing with uncertain water supplies: adaptive management #12;Regional-wide, systematic approach · Flexible--Adaptive Management Adaptive Manageme nt #12;Integrated Water Management

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

230

Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft 1ft prototype panels for the worlds first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicrons patented e-Tint technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of power consumption by ALCWs allows for on-board power electronics for automatic matching of transmission through windows to varying climate conditions without drawing the power from the power grid. ALCWs are capable of transmitting more sunlight in winters to assist in heating and less sunlight in summers to minimize overheating. As such, they can change the window from being a source of energy loss to a source of energy gain. In addition, the scalable AMIs roll-to-roll process, proved by making 1ft 1ftALCW prototype panels, allows for cost-effective production of large-scale window panels along with capability to change easily their color and shape. In addition to architectural glazing in houses and commercial buildings, ALCWs can be used in other applications where control of sunlight is needed, such as green houses, used by commercial produce growers and botanical gardens, cars, aircrafts, etc.

Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923 Introduction to Climate Change Adaptation in New  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

change and the high costs and long-term planning needed to adapt effectively, investment can responsive climate change adaptation measures, both in the near- and long-term, that protect its citizens day more people recognize it as a major concern. An international panel of leading climate scientists

232

Exploring scaling up community-based adaptation: A case study with the PRODUCE Project in Rangpur, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an approach to respond to these immediate impacts by adjusting the natural or human systems in response to actual impacts of climate change. Community-based adaptation (CBA) is a bottom-up and development-oriented view of adaptation that accommodates...

Harsoyo, Dwi, L. R.

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling Cortical Plasticity Based on Adapting Lateral Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A neural network model called LISSOM for the cooperative self-organization of afferent and lateral connections in cortical maps is applied to modeling cortical plasticity. After self-organization, the LISSOM maps are in a dynamic equilibrium with the input, and reorganize like the cortex in response to simulated cortical lesions and intracortical microstimulation. The model predicts that adapting lateral interactions are fundamental to cortical reorganization, and suggests techniques to hasten recovery following sensory cortical surgery.

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing radiation feedbacks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

content from the whole quarter Summary: . Overview 2. Solar radiation and the Greenhouse effect 3. Forcings and feedbacks 4. Who's responsible 5... . Overview 2. Solar...

235

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Straddle Carrier Radiation Portal Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the primary enforcement agency protecting the nations ports of entry. CBP is enhancing its capability to interdict the illicit import of nuclear and radiological materials and devices that may be used by terrorists. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing scientific and technical support to CBP in their goal to enable rapid deployment of nuclear and radiation detection systems at U. S. ports of entry to monitor 100% of the incoming international traffic and cargo while not adversely impacting the operations or throughput of the ports. The U.S. ports of entry include the following vectors: land border crossings, seaports, airports, rail crossings, and mail and express consignment courier facilities. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) determined that a screening solution was needed for Seaport cargo containers being transported by Straddle Carriers (straddle carriers). A stationary Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) for Straddle Carriers (SCRPM) is needed so that cargo containers can be scanned while in transit under a Straddle Carrier. The Straddle Carrier Portal operational impacts were minimized by conducting a time-motion study at the Port, and adaptation of a Remotely Operated RPM (RO-RPM) booth concept that uses logical lighting schemes for traffic control, cameras, Optical Character Recognition, and wireless technology.

Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.; Mullen, O Dennis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Radiation hardness of si strip detectors with integrated coupling capacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Si strip detectors with integrated coupling capacitors between diode and metallization and with separate bias resistors for each strip have been exposed to ionising radiation. Results from measurements of detector response before and after irradiation are presented.

Dijkstra, H.; Horisberger, R.; Hubbeling, L.; Maehlum, G.; Peisert, A.; Weilhammer, P.; Tuuva, T.; Evensen, L.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

Olivier, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

240

Training Adaptive Decision-Making.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adaptive Thinking has been defined here as the capacity to recognize when a course of action that may have previously been effective is no longer effective and there is need to adjust strategy. Research was undertaken with human test subjects to identify the factors that contribute to adaptive thinking. It was discovered that those most effective in settings that call for adaptive thinking tend to possess a superior capacity to quickly and effectively generate possible courses of action, as measured using the Category Generation test. Software developed for this research has been applied to develop capabilities enabling analysts to identify crucial factors that are predictive of outcomes in fore-on-force simulation exercises.

Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James C.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

242

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................10 AREA RADIATION SURVEYS AND CONTAMINATION CONTROL...........................................11.....................................................................................................13 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT meetings of the Radiation Safety Committee where new users and uses of radioactive materials, radiation

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

245

Structural building response review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

Not Available

1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Maintainable and Reusable Scientific Software Adaptation Democratizing Scientific Software Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.kang@samsung.com Eli Tilevich, Srinidhi Varadarajan, and Naren Ramakrishnan Center for High-End Computing Systems Dept resources to ensure its efficiency and reliability. Although adaptation patterns can be found in a sizable-oriented Pro- gramming; D.2.7 [Software Engineering]: Distribution, Maintenance, and Enhancement; D.2

Ramakrishnan, Naren

247

WI Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

248

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

249

Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

251

Radiation Damping with Inhomogeneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Damping with Inhomogeneous Broadening: Limitations of the Single Bloch Vector Model of inhomoge- neous broadening on radiation damping of free precession signals have been described using 13: 1 7, 2001 KEY WORDS: radiation damping; FID shape; inhomogeneous broadening The phenomenon

Augustine, Mathew P.

252

astroph/9507030 Gravitational Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

astro­ph/9507030 10 Jul 95 Gravitational Radiation and Very Long Baseline Interferometry Ted Pyne of gravitational radiation on astrometric observations. We derive an equation for the time delay measured by two antennae observing the same source in an Einstein­de Sitter spacetime containing gravitational radiation

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

253

Radiation Processing -an overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of radiation · Facilities ­ Gamma ­ electrons ­ X-ray ­ Safety · Sterilisation of medical devices · Food irradiation · Material modification #12;3 Content ­ Part 2 · Environmental applications · Other applications Radiation · Energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles Irradiation · Exposure to radiation

254

Development of a plasma panel radiation detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports on the development and experimental results of commercial plasma display panels adapted for their potential use as micropattern gas radiation detectors. The plasma panel sensor (PPS) design and materials include glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures which provide a physically robust, hermetically sealed device. Plasma display panels used as detectors were tested with cosmic ray muons, beta rays and gamma rays, protons, and thermal neutrons. The results demonstrated rise times and time resolution of a few nanoseconds, as well as sub-millimeter spatial resolution compatible with the pixel pitch.

Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Bensimon, B [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Wetzel, R. [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan; Anderson, T [GE Measurement and Control Solutions; McKinny, K [GE Measurement and Control Solutions; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Development of a plasma panel radiation detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article reports on the development and experimental results of commercial plasma display panels adapted for their potential use as micropattern gas radiation detectors. The plasma panel sensors (PPS) design an materials include glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures which provide a physically robust, hermetically-sealed device. Plasma display panels used as detectors were tested with cosmic ray muons, beta rays and gamma rays, protons and thermal neutrons. The results demonstrated rise times and time resolution of a few nanoseconds, as well as sub-millimeter spatial resolution compatible with the pixel pitch.

R. Ball; J. R. Beene; M. Ben-Moshe; Y. Benhammou; R. Bensimon; J. W. Chapman; E. Etzion; C. Ferretti; P. S. Friedman; D. S. Levin; Y. Silver; R. L. Varner; C. Weaverdyck; R. Wetzel; B. Zhou; T. Anderson; K. McKinny; E. H. Bentefour

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

258

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

Pedersen, Tom

259

Adaptive protection algorithm and system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive protection algorithm and system for protecting electrical distribution systems traces the flow of power through a distribution system, assigns a value (or rank) to each circuit breaker in the system and then determines the appropriate trip set points based on the assigned rank.

Hedrick, Paul (Pittsburgh, PA) [Pittsburgh, PA; Toms, Helen L. (Irwin, PA) [Irwin, PA; Miller, Roger M. (Mars, PA) [Mars, PA

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection J. Kenneth Shultis Richard E. Faw Department@triad.rr.com Radiation Fields and Sources ................................................ . Radiation Field Variables........................................................... .. Direction and Solid Angle Conventions ......................................... .. Radiation Fluence

Shultis, J. Kenneth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

adaptive control algorithm: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS APPLICATIONS Mathematics Websites Summary: ON AN ADAPTIVE CONTROL ALGORITHM FOR...

262

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

CLIMATE VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION STUDY FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION STUDY FOR CALIFORNIA Legal Analysis of Barriers's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012019 Prepared for: California Energy Commission to that framework that would facilitate adaptation to climate change. Since such changes may be difficult

264

Climate Change Adaptation Planning | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Change Adaptation Planning Climate Change Adaptation Planning October 7, 2014 6:00AM CDT to October 9, 2014 3:00PM CDT Norman, Oklahoma This course provides an introduction to...

265

IIR algorithms for adaptive line enhancement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a simple IIR structure for the adaptive line enhancer. Two algorithms based on gradient-search techniques are presented for adapting the structure. Results from experiments which utilized real data as well as computer simulations are provided.

David, R.A.; Stearns, S.D.; Elliott, G.R.; Etter, D.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Mechanics and Applications of Pressure Adaptive Honeycomb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A pressure-adaptive wing structure is presented that relies on the pressure-altitude relation to adapt the wing shape to the various flight conditions (e.g. landing and cruise). This structure employs conventional, certified ...

Vos, Roelof

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Radiation Related Terms Basic Terms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Related Terms Basic Terms Radiation Radiation is energy in transit in the form of high not carry enough energy to separate molecules or remove electrons from atoms. Ionizing radiation Ionizing radiation is radiation with enough energy so that during an interaction with an atom, it can remove tightly

Vallino, Joseph J.

268

Radiation: Facts, Risks and Realities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Radiation 3 Understanding Radiation Risks 6 Naturally Occurring (Background) Radiation 7 Man-Made Radiation, beta particles and gamma rays. Other types, such as x-rays, can occur naturally or be machine-produced. Scientists have also learned that radiation sources are naturally all around us. Radiation can come from

269

Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Adaptive security systems -- Combining expert systems with adaptive technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Adaptive Multisensor Integrated Security System (AMISS) uses a variety of computational intelligence techniques to reason from raw sensor data through an array of processing layers to arrive at an assessment for alarm/alert conditions based on human behavior within a secure facility. In this paper, the authors give an overview of the system and briefly describe some of the major components of the system. This system is currently under development and testing in a realistic facility setting.

Argo, P.; Loveland, R.; Anderson, K. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 97, No. 3, pp. 279-285 (2001)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 97, No. 3, pp. 279-285 (2001) Nuclear Technology Publishing of radioactive airborne particles, internal radiation dosimetry, and the dose-response relationships for internally deposited radionuclides. He is editor of the textbook, Internal Radiation Dosimetry, published

Brenner, David Jonathan

272

Adaptation in constant utility nonstationary environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptation in constant utility nonstationary environments Michael L. Littman & David H. Ackley Abstract Environments that vary over time present a fundamental problem to adaptive systems. Although adaptive opportunities. We consider a broad class of nonstationary environments, those which combine

Littman, Michael L.

273

Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs David A. Venditti and David L Anisotropic gridadaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate estimation and Hessian-based anisotropic grid adaptation. Airfoil test cases are presented to demonstrate

Peraire, Jaime

274

Article original Adaptation digestive du lapin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article original Adaptation digestive du lapin la teneur en constituants paritaux du rgime ne diffre pas d'un rgime l'autre, du fait d'une rgulation de l'nergie digestible ingre. L le rgime B. lapin / digestion / fibre / adaptation / transit Summary Digestive adaptation

Boyer, Edmond

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive systems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adaptive systems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Summary: 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Peter...

276

REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

NELSON RL

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

277

adapter protein tsad: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecosystem Adaptive Management Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: ;2 Baltic Ecosystem Adaptive Management, BEAM, r ett tvrvetenskapligt...

278

adaptive antitumor immunity: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecosystem Adaptive Management Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: ;2 Baltic Ecosystem Adaptive Management, BEAM, r ett tvrvetenskapligt...

279

adaptation azole drug: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecosystem Adaptive Management Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: ;2 Baltic Ecosystem Adaptive Management, BEAM, r ett tvrvetenskapligt...

280

Solar radiation intensity calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

Levine, Randolph Steven

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

282

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

283

Rotating bubble membrane radiator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

Webb, Brent J. (West Richland, WA); Coomes, Edmund P. (West Richland, WA)

1988-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

284

Does the Entire Uterus Need to be Treated in Cancer of the Cervix? Role of Adaptive Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate local control and toxicity by use of a method of adaptive cervical brachytherapy (ACB). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2008, we identified 65 cervical cancer patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) Stage IB1-IVA disease who received definitive external beam radiation therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. As tumors regressed, 45 of 65 patients had the tandem source retracted from the uterine fundus at successive brachytherapy insertions, thus decreasing the number of {sup 192}Ir dwell positions. Tests of trend and Fisher's exact test were used to identify the effect of ACB on disease control and toxicity. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to evaluate disease control and late complications. Results: The median follow-up was 24.5 months. Of the patients, 92% received chemotherapy. The 3-year overall survival, 3-year disease-free survival, 3-year distant metastasis-free survival, and local control rates were 67%, 76%, 79%, and 97%, respectively. There was only 1 isolated local failure, and there were no local failures beyond 1 year. Distant failure was involved in 93% of recurrences. No significant trend was identified regarding the extent of retraction of the tandem source start position with either failure or toxicity. Acute and actuarial 3-year late Grade 3 toxicity or greater occurred in 24.6% and 17% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: ACB determined by clinical response yielded excellent local control rates. These data indicate that ACB may be useful in decreasing late toxicities from high-dose rate brachytherapy. With the advent of three-dimensional image-guided brachytherapy, additional methods to adapt treatment technique to changes in tumor volume warrant investigation.

Anker, Christopher J.; Cachoeira, Charles V.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Rankin, Jim M.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gaffney, David K., E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Original article Response of Pinus pinaster Ait. provenances at early  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. pinaster in response to water shortage. These physiological adaptations complement known morphologicalOriginal article Response of Pinus pinaster Ait. provenances at early age to water supply. I. Water evolution of tissue water relations was assessed in 1-year-old seedlings of four Pinus pinaster Ait. prove

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

286

Genetic shift in photoperiodic response correlated with global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic shift in photoperiodic response correlated with global warming William E. Bradshaw observed in insects, birds, amphibians, and plants associated with global warm- ing during the latter half- tent with an adaptive evolutionary response to recent global warming. The latter half of the 20th

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

287

Center for Adaptive Optics* Santa Cruz,CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Adaptive Optics* Santa Cruz,CA The Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) will concentrate on astronomical and vision science applications of adaptive optics and will reach out to other adaptive optics communities to share technologies. It will develop new instruments optimized for adaptive optics. Adaptive

Grether, Gregory

288

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for understanding

Pennycook, Steve

289

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM

Pennycook, Steve

290

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposedAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 Fig. F.1. The hydrogen atom and its

Pennycook, Steve

291

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation G-3 Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

292

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

293

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

Weber, P.G.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Characterizing the hohlraum radiation via one-end driven experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new experiment is designed and performed on the Shenguang III laser facility with the first eight available beams to characterizing the hohlraum radiation, in which the hohlraum with laser entrance holes on both ends is driven through one-end only. The experiment enables us to identify the x-ray radiations originated from the hohlraum reemission wall and high-Z bubble plasmas utilizing their position and spectral characters, which provides a better test on the associated hohlraum models. The total and M-band x-ray radiation fluxes are measured with the flat response x-ray detectors and the filtered M-band x-ray detectors, respectively. Numerical simulations are conducted with the two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED-INTEGRATION using the multi-group radiation transfer and/or diffusion models. It is found that the experimentally measured temporal profiles and angular distributions of hohlraum radiation are in good agreement with the predictions of simulation using radiation transfer models, but differ significantly from the results obtained with the multi-group radiation diffusion calculations. We thus note that to accurately represent the hohlraum radiation, a true radiation transfer model is essential.

Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang, E-mail: zou-shiyang@iapacm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational, Beijing 100094 (China); Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses and cancert-A T. w- - SIR- In February 1990, the Soviet. Nikipelov et al. published in g Priroda (Nature)' the radiation doses for each year, averaged over environmental impact on the Gulf waters is rapidly ex- ported to the Arabian Sea and then to the Indian Ocean

Shlyakhter, Ilya

297

Radiative Flux Analysis  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

Long, Chuck [NOAA

298

Radiation-resistant microorganism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

Fliermans, Carl B.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Issues in adaptive mesh refinement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an approach for a patch-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for multi-physics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, and management of patches. Among the special features of this patch-based AMR are symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement, special implementation offlux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. Here, higher efficiency of refinement means less unnecessarily refined cells for a given set of cells to be refined. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement are shown in both two- and three-dimensions.

Dai, William Wenlong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeV. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeapproximation for solar radiation in the NCAR Community

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Adaptive management: a paradigm for remediation of public facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public facility restoration planning traditionally focused on response to natural disasters and hazardous materials accidental releases. These plans now need to integrate response to terrorist actions. Therefore, plans must address a wide range of potential vulnerabilities. Similar types of broad remediation planning are needed for restoration of waste and hazardous material handling areas and facilities. There are strong similarities in damage results and remediation activities between unintentional and terrorist actions; however, the uncertainties associated with terrorist actions result in a re-evaluation of approaches to planning. Restoration of public facilities following a release of a hazardous material is inherently far more complex than in confined industrial settings and has many unique technical, economic, social, and political challenges. Therefore, they arguably involve a superset of drivers, concerns and public agencies compared to other restoration efforts. This superset of conditions increases complexity of interactions, reduces our knowledge of the initial conditions, and even condenses the timeline for restoration response. Therefore, evaluations of alternative restoration management approaches developed for responding to terrorist actions provide useful knowledge for large, complex waste management projects. Whereas present planning documents have substantial linearity in their organization, the 'adaptive management' paradigm provides a constructive parallel operations paradigm for restoration of facilities that anticipates and plans for uncertainty, multiple/simUltaneous public agency actions, and stakeholder participation. Adaptive management grew out of the need to manage and restore natural resources in highly complex and changing environments with limited knowledge about causal relationships and responses to restoration actions. Similarities between natural resource management and restoration of a facility and surrounding area(s) after a disruptive event suggest numerous advantages over preset linearly-structured plans by incorporating the flexibility and overlap of processes inherent in effective facility restoration. We discuss three restoration case studies (e.g., the Hart Senate Office Building anthrax restoration, Rocky Flats actinide remediation, and hurricane destruction restoration), that implement aspects of adaptive management but not a formal approach. We propose that more formal adoption of adaptive management principles could be a basis for more flexible standards to improve site-specific remediation plans under conditions of high uncertainty.

Janecky, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doerr, Ted B [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent-living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials: Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21-17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20-19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at preirradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. Five hundred eighty-eight evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results: Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and preirradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r=0.34; P=.01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (P<.05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions: There was relative sparing of postirradiation functional outcomes over time in this sample. Baseline differences in functional abilities before the initiation of irradiation suggested that other factors influence functional outcomes above and beyond the effects of irradiation.

Netson, Kelli L. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Kansas University School of MedicineWichita, Kansas (United States)] [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Kansas University School of MedicineWichita, Kansas (United States); Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Psychology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Coherent Radiation in an Undulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solving the particle-radiation system in a self-consistentto clarify the coherent radiation mechanism. References 1.the Proceedings Coherent Radiation in an Undulator Y,H. Chin

Chin, Y.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Properties of Undulator Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Dedicated Synchrotron Radiation Facility," IEEE Trans.1983), "Characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation and of itsHandbook on Synchrotron Radiation, E. -E. Koch.1A. 65-172,

Howells, M.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated December 2012 Stanford University, Stanford California #12; #12; Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University, Stanford California #12; CREDITS This Radiation Safety

Kay, Mark A.

307

Adapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; this is the adaptation component. Communication of climate change information to various publicsAdapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin 52 Great Lakes in response to potential climate change and variability. When we were preparing for this talk on what we have

308

Performance of Adaptive Query Processing in the Mariposa Distributed Database Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

present performance results which show that in multi-user situations, when response time is used assigns a price to perform a service and may adjust its prices as it sees fit. In designing Mariposa such as the effect of supply and demand on prices. We investigate the benefits of adaptive distributed query

California at Irvine, University of

309

Climate Change Adaptation New Perspectives for Natural Resource Management and Conservation1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Adaptation New Perspectives for Natural Resource Management and Conservation1 Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences February 2012 A Changing Climate for Conservation Climate change species of plants and animals are already shifting their distributions in response to climate change

Mazzotti, Frank

310

Adaptive Robust Control of Programmable Valves with Manufacturer Supplied Flow Mapping Only  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and final tracking accuracy. In addition, real-time adaptation is used to reduce the degree of modelling-in and meter-out orifices [2], [3], [4] through valves number 1,2 and 4,5; and ii) enabling the precise control is the significant modelling error. The cartridge valves are of fast response and low cost but low accuracy

Yao, Bin

311

Responses of an articulated loading platform in waves and currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The responses of an articulated loading platform (ALP) in regular and irregular unidirectional waves (with or without currents) are investigated both in frequency and time domain. The first- and second-order wave diffraction radiation are solved...

Ran, Zhihuang

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Machine Learning for Adaptive Computer Game Opponents .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates the use of machine learning techniques in computer games to create a computer player that adapts to its opponent's game-play. This includes (more)

Miles, Jonathan David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

AN ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR THE ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adaptive strategy is established for the diffraction grating problem, such that ...... applications in optical filters and guided mode resonance devices. the...

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Adaptive Barrier Strategies for Nonlinear Interior Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 25, 2005 ... that adaptive choices, such as Mehrotra's probing procedure, outperform ... focus on the effects of merit functions or filters, and on regularization...

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Training for Climate Adaptation in Conservation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wildlife Conservation Society and the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science are hosting this two-day training for climate adaptation.

316

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

317

Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning: A Guide for Practitioners Agency...

318

Adapting California's water management to climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage, water transfers, conservation, recycling, and desalination to meet changing demands. These same settlers had fewer intellectual, organizational, and economic resources to adapt than present

Pasternack, Gregory B.

319

Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in the ability to access, characterize, predict, and adaptively manipulate fracture and flow processes over scales from nanometers to kilometers. This town hall...

320

SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radiation Protection | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The Federal Regulation governing the use of radioactive materials at Ames Laboratory is 10 CFR 835. To implement this...

322

High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Alpha-beta radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws.

Fleming, Dale M. (Richland, WA); Simmons, Kevin L. (Kennewick, WA); Froelich, Thomas J. (West Richland, WA); Carter, Gregory L. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Alpha-beta radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws. 16 figs.

Fleming, D.M.; Simmons, K.L.; Froelich, T.J.; Carter, G.L.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Method and apparatus for measuring spatial uniformity of radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for measuring the spatial uniformity of the intensity of a radiation beam from a radiation source based on a single sampling time and/or a single pulse of radiation. The measuring apparatus includes a plurality of radiation detectors positioned on planar mounting plate to form a radiation receiving area that has a shape and size approximating the size and shape of the cross section of the radiation beam. The detectors concurrently receive portions of the radiation beam and transmit electrical signals representative of the intensity of impinging radiation to a signal processor circuit connected to each of the detectors and adapted to concurrently receive the electrical signals from the detectors and process with a central processing unit (CPU) the signals to determine intensities of the radiation impinging at each detector location. The CPU displays the determined intensities and relative intensity values corresponding to each detector location to an operator of the measuring apparatus on an included data display device. Concurrent sampling of each detector is achieved by connecting to each detector a sample and hold circuit that is configured to track the signal and store it upon receipt of a "capture" signal. A switching device then selectively retrieves the signals and transmits the signals to the CPU through a single analog to digital (A/D) converter. The "capture" signal. is then removed from the sample-and-hold circuits. Alternatively, concurrent sampling is achieved by providing an A/D converter for each detector, each of which transmits a corresponding digital signal to the CPU. The sampling or reading of the detector signals can be controlled by the CPU or level-detection and timing circuit.

Field, Halden (Boulder, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Reversal of Hugoniot locus for strong shocks due to radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock Hugoniot can be used to express the response of a material to shocks, and the compression ratio of the shock can be determined by the Hugoiot locus. When the shock is strong, it will become radiating, and the radiation will affect the Hugoniot. The role of radiation on the Hugoniot condition is studied in the paper. For the radiative flux-dominated shocks, the radiative flux if large enough may render the structure of the shock Hugoniot locus totally different with the case for the pure hydrodynamic shock: the two branches with one in quadrant I and the other in quadrant III are reversed into two in quadrants IV and II, respectively, correspondingly the compression ratio may be larger than the limiting value ({gamma}+1)/({gamma}-1) for ideal gases with index {gamma}. For the radiative shock in which the radiative heat wave propagates supersonically, a threshold value for the net radiative flux to the preshock is also defined which determines whether the Hugoniot locus is reversed and the compression ratio exceeds the limiting value. Numerical results also verify the reversal of the Hugoniot locus of the shocks if the net radiative flux to the preshock exceeds the threshold value.

Li Jiwei; Li Jinghong; Meng Guangwei [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Response Elements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT LABORATORY SAFETY AUDITS & COMPLIANCE BIOSAFETY and ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT and MISSION CONTINUITY FIRE PREVENTION and LIFE SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY TRAINING

333

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL For Columbia University NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital New York State Psychiatric Institute Barnard College December 2012 #12;Radiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 Table of Contents Introduction Chapter I: Radiation Safety Program A. Program

Grishok, Alla

336

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

Dai, Pengcheng

337

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

Dai, Pengcheng

338

Downhole tool adapted for telemetry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cycleable downhole tool such as a Jar, a hydraulic hammer, and a shock absorber adapted for telemetry. This invention applies to other tools where the active components of the tool are displaced when the tool is rotationally or translationally cycled. The invention consists of inductive or contact transmission rings that are connected by an extensible conductor. The extensible conductor permits the transmission of the signal before, after, and during the cycling of the tool. The signal may be continuous or intermittent during cycling. The invention also applies to downhole tools that do not cycle, but in operation are under such stress that an extensible conductor is beneficial. The extensible conductor may also consist of an extensible portion and a fixed portion. The extensible conductor also features clamps that maintain the conductor under stresses greater than that seen by the tool, and seals that are capable of protecting against downhole pressure and contamination.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Provo, UT)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

339

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

Roybal, Lyle Gene

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A fuzzy-tuned adaptive Kalman filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, fuzzy processing is applied to the adaptive Kalman filter. The filter gain coefficients are adapted over a 50 dB range of unknown signal/noise dynamics, using fuzzy membership functions. Specific simulation results are shown for a...

Painter, John H.; Young Hwan Lho

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change: The Role of NOAA Sea Grant Extension years and generations about how to adapt to a changing climate. Effective preparation for possible effects of climate change includes engagement of resource managers, planners, public works officials

343

Adaptive Composite Map Projections Bernhard Jenny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Composite Map Projections Bernhard Jenny Abstract--All major web mapping services use.The proposed composite map projection combines several projections that are recommended in cartographic.The composite projection adapts the maps geometry to scale, to the maps height-to-width ratio

Jenny, Bernhard

344

Enabling Informed Adaptation of Reformed Instructional Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enabling Informed Adaptation of Reformed Instructional Materials Rachel E. Scherr and Andrew Elby 20742 USA Abstract. Instructors inevitably need to adapt even the best reform materials to suit instructors, and video clips of students working on the materials. Our materials thus facilitate their own

Elby, Andy

345

Adaptive Filtering of Multilingual Document Streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the volume of new documents that must be examined by the user to manageable levels. This paper presents three techniques for extending adaptive monolingual text ltering techniques to manage multilingual document streamsAdaptive Filtering of Multilingual Document Streams Douglas W. Oard College of Library

Oard, Doug

346

WORKLOAD ADAPTATION IN AUTONOMIC DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Autonomic DBMSs", Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Self-Managing Database Systems (SMDB 2007 to meet its Service Level Objectives (SLOs). It is a challenge to adapt multiple workloads with complex scheduler that performs workload adaptation in a DBMS, as the test bed to prove the effectiveness

347

Proceedings of the International Workshop on Adaptation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Adaptation, Personalization and REcommendation. Carrero3 1 Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain {ivan.cantador, david.vallet}@uam.es 2 Yahoo! Research.carrero}@uem.es #12;#12;Preface The 1st International Workshop on Adaptation, Personalization and REcommendation

Cantador, Iván

348

Adaptive Web Sites: Automatically Synthesizing Web Pages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Web Sites: Automatically Synthesizing Web Pages Mike Perkowitz Oren Etzioni Department interfaces Abstract The creation of a complex web site is a thorny problem in user interface design. In IJCAI '97, we challenged the AI community to address this problem by creating adaptive web sites: sites

Etzioni, Oren

349

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry and climate change Manuel R adapt to this change. This paper discusses how tropical forestry practices can contribute to maintaining Forestry Research, P.O. Box 6596 JKPWB, Jakarta 10065, Indonesia e-mail: m.guariguata@cgiar.org J. P

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

General Adaptive Replacement Policies Yannis Smaragdakis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Adaptive Replacement Policies Yannis Smaragdakis College of Computing Georgia Institute of Technology yannis@cc.gatech.edu ABSTRACT We propose a general scheme for creating adaptive replace- ment any two existing replacement policies so that the resulting policy provably can never perform worse

Smaragdakis, Yannis

351

Adaptive Port Reduction in Static Condensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Port Reduction in Static Condensation JL Eftang DBP Huynh DJ Knezevic EM Rønquist a framework for adaptive reduction of the degrees of freedom associated with ports in static condensation (SC reduction for the interior of a component with model order reduction on the ports in order to rapidly

Rønquist, Einar M.

352

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive information processing Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

user (adaptable... .1 Adaptation and Adaptivity Even if ... Source: Oppermann, Reinhard - Fraunhofer-Institute for Applied Information Technology & Fachbereich Informatik,...

353

Creating Adaptive Feedback designed for Improving Data Entry Accuracy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract- Data quality is a critical problem in modern databases. Data-entry forms present the first and arguably best opportunity for detecting and mitigating errors, but there has been little research into automatic methods for improving data quality at entry time. In this paper, we propose USHER, an end-to-end system for form design, entry, and data quality assurance. Using previous form submissions, USHER learns a probabilistic model over the questions of the form. USHER then applies this model at every step of the data-entry process to improve data quality. Before entry, it induces a form layout that captures the most important data values of a form instance as quickly as possible and reduces the complexity of error-prone questions. During entry, it dynamically adapts the form to the values being entered by providing real-time interface feedback, reasking questions with dubious responses, and simplifying questions by reformulating them. After entry, it revisits question responses that it deems likely to have been entered incorrectly by reasking the question or a reformulation thereof. We evaluate these components of USHER using two real-world data sets. Our results demonstrate that USHER can improve data quality considerably at a reduced cost when compared to current practice. Index Terms- Data quality, data entry, form design, adaptive form. O I.

P. Jaya Prakash; B. Venkateswarlu; S. Abdul Jeelan; Assistant Professors; Andhra Pradesh-india

354

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

355

Appendix G: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix G: Radiation #12;#12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

356

Appendix A: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix A: Radiation #12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

357

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive systems theory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems theory Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Summary: 1 From Adaptive Hypermedia to the Adaptive Web Systems Peter...

358

Using the Heat-Shock Response To Discover Anticancer Compounds that Target Protein Homeostasis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unlike normal tissues, cancers experience profound alterations in protein homeostasis. Powerful innate adaptive mechanisms, especially the transcriptional response regulated by Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1), are activated in ...

Santagata, Sandro

359

Rights-based evaluation of government responses to a given 'natural' disaster : Katrina as case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disaster impacts human mobility and a rights-based approach to disaster response is needed to protect the human rights of those who seek migration as an adaptation strategy. This paper deals with returning to a place after ...

Haeffner, Melissa (Melissa Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Dscam gene expression in invertebrate immunity : alternative splicing in response to diverse pathogens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invertebrates show enhanced immunity and even specific primed immunity in response to repeat infections, analogous to vertebrate adaptive immunity. Little is known of the mechanism for this phenomenon, or which molecules ...

Smith, Paul Hugh

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Probing young massive clusters with laser guide star adaptive optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

laser guide star adaptive optics Nate McCrady Received: 10laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS/AO) on the 10 m Keckof 4 Mpc. Our adaptive optics work is motivated by three

McCrady, Nate

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program Dynamical Seasonal Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program Dynamical Seasonal Forecasting Seasonal Prediction · POAMA · Issues for future Outline #12;Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program Major source Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program El Nino Mean State · Easterlies westward surface current upwelling

Lim, Eun-pa

364

Radiation Response of Strained Silicon-Germanium Superlattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17 [22]. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 30 19 Reduction in measured kink angle due to equilibration of analyz- ing beam caused by beam focusing in the channeling axis [22]. : : : : 30 20 Two dimensional backscattering yield map of h110i axis in (100... orders of magnitude because of the steering e ect of the rows of atoms. Alignment of the ion beam with a crystal plane will also cause a reduction of backscattering yield, though this reduction will be less than in the case of axial channeling. When...

Martin, Michael Scott

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

NNSA Transfers Responsibility for Radiation Detection System to China  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogosAdministrationNetworkNuclearNationalTimeline

366

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

367

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

Phelps, J.E.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global and diffuse solar radiation sensors, wind directionfrom a crude radiation sensor. Solar Radiation Conductiosensor data (Temperature, motion, relative humidity, solar

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention for the healthcare sector as a whole.

Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@iuhealth.org [Indiana University Health East, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Azawi, Samar [VA Veteran Hospital/University of California Irvine, Newport Beach, California (United States); Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

National Adaptation Forum Webinar Series: Out of Town, Not Out...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Adaptation Forum Webinar Series: Out of Town, Not Out of Trouble: Small Agriculture and Indigenous Communities National Adaptation Forum Webinar Series: Out of Town, Not Out of...

372

Farming in a Changing Climate: Agricultural Adaptation in Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Adaptation in Canada Ellen Wall, Barry Smit,Agricultural Adaptation in Canada. Vancouver, BC: Universitythe agri-food sector in Canada, the insights provided are so

Jain, Varinder

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

adaptive signal processing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADAPTIVE CONTROL AND SIGNAL PROCESSING Int. J. Adapt. Control Signal Process. (in press) Engineering Websites Summary: predictive control 1....

374

adaptive predictive control: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

applied to analyze the transient Antsaklis, Panos 44 ADAPTIVE ROBUST TRACKING CONTROL OF PRESSURE Engineering Websites Summary: 1---- 1 ADAPTIVE ROBUST TRACKING CONTROL OF...

375

India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adaptive Capacities to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities to Climate Change AgencyCompany...

376

Software Adaptation Patterns for Service-Oriented Architectures .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis describes the concept of software adaptation patterns and how they can be used in software adaptation of service-oriented architectures. The patterns are described (more)

Hashimoto, Koji

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

adaptive interactive technologies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shock-induced combustion Fluid-structure interaction Implementation Parallel Adaptive Cartesian Upwind Mathematics Websites Summary: Finite volume methods Adaptive mesh refinement...

378

Development of an adaptive fuzzy logic controller for HVAC system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An adaptive approach to control a cooling coil chilled water valve operation, called adaptive fuzzy logic control (AFLC), is developed and validated in this study. (more)

Navale, Rahul Laxman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

adaptive particle swarm: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Page Topic Index 1 An Adaptive Learning Particle Swarm Optimizer for Function Optimization Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: An Adaptive...

380

adaptive intrusion detection: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Last Page Topic Index 1 Adaptive Model Generation for Intrusion Detection Systems Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Adaptive Model Generation for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments. Operations of the HPRR were terminated in 1987 and the reactor was moved to storage at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; however, RADCAL will continue to be operated in accordance with the guidelines of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secondary Calibration Laboratory program and will meet all requirements for testing dosimeters under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). This manual is to serve as the primary instruction and operation manual for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's RADCAL facility. Its purpose is to (1) provide operating protocols for the RADCAL facility, (2) outline the organizational structure, (3) define the Quality Assurance Action Plan, and (4) describe all the procedures, operations, and responsibilities for the safe and proper operation of all routine aspects of the calibration facility.

Bogard, J.S.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

account of in workforce planning. The importance of integrating academic training with clinical trainingCONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce of the Healthcare Science Workforce Modernising Scientific Careers: The Next Steps Response by the Wellcome Trust

Rambaut, Andrew

385

Tunable terahertz radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

386

Unruh radiation and Interference effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

Satoshi Iso; Yasuhiro Yamamoto; Sen Zhang

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space.

Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Synchrotron Radiation Wake in Free Space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we derive the transverse radiation force of a bunch of ultrarelativistic charged particles coherently radiating in free space assuming that the bending radius is much larger than the beam dimensions. In contrast to a similar recent study, where the authors decompose the total transverse force and find only a part that is responsible for the distortion of the beam orbit, we derive a full expression for the force and leave the issues of the beam dynamics for a separate consideration. Another approach to the calculation of the transverse force has been previously developed. In many cases considered in this paper, the calculations are extremely cumbersome; they were systematically performed with the use of symbolic engine of the computer program MATHEMATICA.

Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Relativistic MHD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We solve the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics equations using distributed parallel adaptive mesh refinement. We discuss strong scaling tests of the code, and present evolutions of Michel accretion and a TOV star.

David Neilsen; Eric W. Hirschmann; Matthew Anderson; Steven L. Liebling

2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

390

Adaptive control of a generic hypersonic vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a an adaptive augmented, gain-scheduled baseline LQR-PI controller applied to the Road Runner six-degree-of-freedom generic hypersonic vehicle model. Uncertainty in control effectiveness, longitudinal ...

Wiese, Daniel Philip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Adaptive Reliability Analysis of Excavation Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This analysis couples the adaptive design capabilities of the observational method with updated reliability indices, to be used in risk-based design decisions. A probabilistic framework is developed to predict three-dimensional deformation profiles due...

Park, Jun Kyung

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

392

Scalable Adaptive Multilevel Solvers for Multiphysics Problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, we investigated adaptive, parallel, and multilevel methods for numerical modeling of various real-world applications, including Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), complex fluids, Electromagnetism, Navier-Stokes equations, and reservoir simulation. First, we have designed improved mathematical models and numerical discretizaitons for viscoelastic fluids and MHD. Second, we have derived new a posteriori error estimators and extended the applicability of adaptivity to various problems. Third, we have developed multilevel solvers for solving scalar partial differential equations (PDEs) as well as coupled systems of PDEs, especially on unstructured grids. Moreover, we have integrated the study between adaptive method and multilevel methods, and made significant efforts and advances in adaptive multilevel methods of the multi-physics problems.

Xu, Jinchao

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Optimization Online - Multistage Adaptive Robust Optimization for ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 5, 2014 ... ... with the increasing penetration of wind and solar power generation has ... Keywords: Electric energy systems, multistage robust optimization, ... Multistage Adaptive Robust Optimization for the Unit Commitment Problem.

Alvaro Lorca

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

394

Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropic gridadaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate prediction of multiple aerodynamic outputs (such as the lift, drag, and moment coefficients) is required from a single ...

Venditti, David A.

395

Marginalized Monitoring: Adaptively Managing Urban Stormwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental assessment, 28 Superfund decisionmaking, 29 Endangered Species Act decisionmaking, 30 and water management.Environmental Impacts Under Florida Water Law: From Water Wars Towards Adaptive Management ,water infrastructure problems. And yet, the environmental management

Scanlan, Melissa K; Tai, Stephanie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fast Adaptive Silhouette Area based Template Matching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Adaptive Silhouette Area based Template Matching Daniel Mohr and Gabriel Zachmann If (Technical Informatics and Computer Systems) Prof. Dr. Gabriel Zachmann (Computer Graphics) Prof. Dr Template Matching Daniel Mohr and Gabriel Zachmann Clausthal University of Technology, Department

Zachmann, Gabriel

397

A Logical Characterization of Adaptive Educational Hypermedia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reference models for adaptive hypermedia, e.g. the AHAM Reference Model [4], or the Munich Reference Model [20]. Both, the AHAM and Munich Reference Model, extend the Dexter Hypertext Model [16], and pro- vide

Henze, Nicola

398

Adaptive Importance Sampling via Stochastic Convex Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Importance Sampling via Stochastic Convex Programming Ernest K. Ryu1 and Stephen P. Boyd1 Abstract We show that the variance of the Monte Carlo estimator that is importance sam- pled from

399

Developmental Plasticity Links Local Adaptation and Evolutionary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developmental Plasticity Links Local Adaptation and Evolutionary Diversification in Foraging, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona Developmental plasticity is thought to reconcile the constraining role morphology into adulthood, providing an opportunity to directly examine the links between plasticity of bone

Badyaev, Alex

400

Adaptive control for optimizing microalgae production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive control for optimizing microalgae production Francis Mairet Rafael Mu for light-limited microalgae culture. This controller regulates the light absorption factor, defined productivity under day-night cycles. Keywords: Nonlinear controller, Microalgae, Optimization, Biomass

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Exponential convergence with adaptive Monte Carlo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over a decade, it has been known that exponential convergence on discrete transport problems was possible using adaptive Monte Carlo techniques. Now, exponential convergence has been empirically demonstrated on a spatially continuous problem.

Booth, T.E.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Challenges of Adapting to a Changing Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Global Climate Change on Agriculture: An Interpretiveon U.S. Agriculture, in THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THEclimate change and the potential roles for adaptation are more severe for ecosystems than they are for managed systems like agriculture.

Hurd, Brian H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Robust adaptive control of switched systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, robust adaptive controllers are developed for classes of switched nonlinear systems. Switched systems are those governed by differential equations, which undergo vector field switching due to sudden changes ...

El-Rifai, Khalid, 1979-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Convert! : the adaptive reuse of churches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the phenomenon of vacated churches and analyzes the major issues underlying their adaptive reuse in order to help promulgate an awareness of the range of successful strategies and solutions that are ...

Kiley, Christopher John, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation David S. Liebl and Kenneth W. Potter Co of global climate change­ WICCI Stormwater Working Group #12;Projected Climate Change 200-2100 What Global

Sheridan, Jennifer

406

Adaptive sampling in autonomous marine sensor networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, an innovative architecture for real-time adaptive and cooperative control of autonomous sensor platforms in a marine sensor network is described in the context of the autonomous oceanographic network scenario. ...

Eickstedt, Donald Patrick

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Adaptive gain improves reactor control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An interesting application of the modern control theory technique called adaptive control is presently in use on a process located at a plant in the Standard Oil Co. (Ind.) system. The results of this application are: first, the transformation of an uncontrollable process to a controllable one; and, second, a significant economic savings to the corporation. It also shows that a detailed analysis of the mechanical, chemical and control systems can provide both the basis for revising an existing control system and some of the reasons why that system is inadequate. The contrast between classical and modern control theories is seen in four major areas. In classical systems, the controller manipulates the error to calculate its output. The error is subjected to a limited number of analog computing functions such as multiplication by a constant and integration. Each controller has one specific strategy--to hold the measured variable at the setpoint. And each controller controls only one variable, independent of all others. In a modern system, the controller can manipulate many different variables in addition to the error to compute its output. Its computing power is unlimited in a practical sense. It can do all classical computations plus many others, including a table look-up. The controller can independently change its strategy as a function of time or the condition of the process. It can also control many variables at one time to accomplish a complex objective. The implementation of a modern control theory project requires a good understanding of the dynamic, as well as the steady-state character of the process. As you can see we are limited only by our understanding of the process, our imagination, and the economics of the situation.

Whatley, M.J.; Pott, D.C.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 11002400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 7001700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

Fu, Tairan, E-mail: trfu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Time dependent annealing of radiation - induced leakage currents in MOS devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented showing the radiation response of several unhardened commercial 1.25-{mu}m bulk CMOS processes using LOCOS isolation technology. In all cases studied radiation-induced failure is caused by effects in the field oxide, and the radiation-induced {delta}V{sub T} in the channel region is usually small at the failure dose. Time dependent leakage current data for the field oxides are presented and discussed.

Terrell, J.M. (Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc. Bethesda, MD (US)); Olkham, T.R.; Lelis, A.J.; Benedetto, J.M. (Harry Diamond Labs., Adelphi, MD (US))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

FY2008 Report on GADRAS Radiation Transport Methods.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary function of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) is the solution of inverse radiation transport problems, by which the con-figuration of an unknown radiation source is inferred from one or more measured radia-tion signatures. GADRAS was originally developed for the analysis of gamma spec-trometry measurements. During fiscal years 2007 and 2008, GADRAS was augmented to implement the simultaneous analysis of neutron multiplicity measurements. This report describes the radiation transport methods developed to implement this new capability. This work was performed at the direction of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development. It was executed as an element of the Proliferation Detection Program's Simulation, Algorithm, and Modeling element. Acronyms BNL Brookhaven National Laboratory CSD Continuous Slowing-Down DU depleted uranium ENSDF Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files GADRAS Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software HEU highly enriched uranium LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory NA-22 Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NNDC National Nuclear Data Center NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration ODE ordinary differential equation ONEDANT One-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory PARTISN Parallel time-dependent SN PDP Proliferation Detection Program RADSAT Radiation Scenario Analysis Toolkit RSICC Radiation Safety Information Computational Center SAM Simulation, Algorithms, and Modeling SNL Sandia National Laboratories SNM special nuclear material ToRI Table of Radioactive Isotopes URI uniform resource identifier XML Extensible Markup Language

Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee; Varley, Eric S.; Hilton, Nathan R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. (Psoriasis Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, D.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos Soares

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air and the Columbia River April 21,1994 TheTechnid Steering Panel of the Hanford - Environmental Dose Reconstruction than 40years, the U.S. Government made plutonium for nuclear weapons at the Hanford

418

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

419

Assessing exposure to radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the founding of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been world leaders in evaluating the risks associated with radiation. Ultrasensitive tools allow us not only to measure radionuclides present in the body but also to reconstruct the radiation dose from past nuclear events and to project the levels of radiation that will still be present in the body for 50 years after the initial intake. A variety of laboratory procedures, including some developed here, give us detailed information on the effects of radiation at the cellular level. Even today, we are re-evaluating the neutron dose resulting from the bombing at Hiroshima. Our dose reconstruction and projection capabilities have also been applied to studies of Nagasaki, Chernobyl, the Mayak industrial complex in the former Soviet Union, the Nevada Test Site, Bikini Atoll, and other sites. We are evaluating the information being collected on individuals currently working with radioactive material at Livermore and elsewhere as well as previously collected data on workers that extends back to the Manhattan Project.

Walter, K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

RADIATION ALERT User Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Area Monitoring 16 Checking for Surface Contamination 16 5 Maintenance 17 Calibration 17 Monitoring possible radiation exposure while working with radionuclides Screening for environmental. Water can damage the circuitry and the mica surface of the Geiger tube. Do not put the Inspector

Haller, Gary L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fully Adaptive AMG Scott MacLachlan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" Ah "-1 ik ff Energy measure: Let G (i) j = (Ah )-1 ij , Sij = G(i) - G (i) j e(j) Ah G(i) Ah Fully, Sij? Apply (localized) relaxation to Ah G(i) = e(i) Fully Adaptive AMG ­ p.11 #12;Approximating Sij to Ah G(i) = e(i) Weighted Jacobi, 1 step: Fully Adaptive AMG ­ p.11 #12;Approximating Sij Can

MacLachlan, Scott

422

Irradiation of the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes with an adaptive algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The simultaneous treatment of pelvic lymph nodes and the prostate in radiotherapy for prostate cancer is complicated by the independent motion of these two target volumes. In this work, the authors study a method to adapt intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans so as to compensate for this motion by adaptively morphing the multileaf collimator apertures and adjusting the segment weights. Methods: The study used CT images, tumor volumes, and normal tissue contours from patients treated in our institution. An IMRT treatment plan was then created using direct aperture optimization to deliver 45 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes and 50 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. The prostate target volume was then shifted in either the anterior-posterior direction or in the superior-inferior direction. The treatment plan was adapted by adjusting the aperture shapes with or without re-optimizing the segment weighting. The dose to the target volumes was then determined for the adapted plan. Results: Without compensation for prostate motion, 1 cm shifts of the prostate resulted in an average decrease of 14% in D-95%. If the isocenter is simply shifted to match the prostate motion, the prostate receives the correct dose but the pelvic lymph nodes are underdosed by 14% {+-} 6%. The use of adaptive morphing (with or without segment weight optimization) reduces the average change in D-95% to less than 5% for both the pelvic lymph nodes and the prostate. Conclusions: Adaptive morphing with and without segment weight optimization can be used to compensate for the independent motion of the prostate and lymph nodes when combined with daily imaging or other methods to track the prostate motion. This method allows the delivery of the correct dose to both the prostate and lymph nodes with only small changes to the dose delivered to the target volumes.

Hwang, A. B.; Chen, J.; Nguyen, T. B.; Gottschalk, A. G.; Roach, M. R. III; Pouliot, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Prowess Inc., Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal radiation initiates Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LOW-DOSE Summary: BIOLOGY CONTRIBUTION TRANSIENT GENOME-WIDE TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE TO LOW-DOSE IONIZING RADIATION... . HARTMANN SIANTAR, PH.D.,z AND ZELANNA GOLDBERG, M.D.*...

425

The Durham ELT adaptive optics simulation platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive optics systems are essential on all large telescopes where image quality is important. These are complex systems with many design parameters requiring optimisation before good performance can be achieved. The simulation of adaptive optics systems is therefore necessary to categorise the expected performance. This paper describes an adaptive optics simulation platform, developed at Durham University, which can be used to simulate adaptive optics systems on the largest proposed future extremely large telescopes (ELTs) as well as current systems. This platform is modular, object oriented and has the benefit of hardware application acceleration which can be used to improve the simulation performance, essential for ensuring that the run time of a given simulation is acceptable. The simulation platform described here can be highly parallelised using parallelisation techniques suited for adaptive optics simulation, whilst still offering the user complete control while the simulation is running. Results from the simulation of a ground layer adaptive optics system are provided as an example to demonstrate the flexibility of this simulation platform.

Alastair Basden; Timothy Butterley; Richard Myers; Richard Wilson

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

426

ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of external surfaces by naturally occurring atomic oxygen. CCD detectors are particularly vulnerable to damage damage. A comprehensive discussion of the types of radiation damage known to occur in CCDs is beyond1 ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment Michael R. Jones Space Telescope Science

Sirianni, Marco

427

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas K. Tathe resulting betatron radiation spectrum can therefore bepro?le, the betatron radiation emitted by theses electrons

Ta Phuoc, Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

429

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

430

FY08 Annual Report: Amorphous Semiconductors for Gamma Radiation Detection (ASGRAD)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the annual report for an old project funded by NA22. The purpose of the project was to develop amorphous semiconductors for use as radiation detectors. The annual report contains information about the progress made in synthesizing, characterizing, and radiation response testing of these new materials.

Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Sundaram, S. K.; McCloy, John S.; Rockett, Angus

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Effects of exogenous carbon monoxide on radiation-induced bystander effect in zebrafish embryos in vivo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the dose-response of radiation in the low-dose regime deviated from the LNT model. A notable example radiation are linearly proportional to the absorbed dose, evidence accumulated in the past decades showed as a pharmaceutical agent to release a low dose of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) to attenuate the effect on bystander

Yu, K.N.

432

Bubble Radiation Detection: Current and Future Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite a number of noteworthy achievements in other fields, superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) and bubble chambers (BCs) have not been used for nuclear nonproliferation and arms control. This report examines these two radiation-detection technologies in detail and answers the question of how they can be or should be ''adapted'' for use in national security applications. These technologies involve closely related approaches to radiation detection in which an energetic charged particle deposits sufficient energy to initiate the process of bubble nucleation in a superheated fluid. These detectors offer complete gamma-ray insensitivity when used to detect neutrons. They also provide controllable neutron-energy thresholds and excellent position resolution. SDDs are extraordinarily simple and inexpensive. BCs offer the promise of very high efficiency ({approximately}75%). A notable drawback for both technologies is temperature sensitivity. As a result of this problem, the temperature must be controlled whenever high accuracy is required, or harsh environmental conditions are encountered. The primary findings of this work are listed and briefly summarized below: (1) SDDs are ready to function as electronics-free neutron detectors on demand for arms-control applications. The elimination of electronics at the weapon's location greatly eases the negotiability of radiation-detection technologies in general. (2) As a result of their high efficiency and sharp energy threshold, current BCs are almost ready for use in the development of a next-generation active assay system. Development of an instrument based on appropriately safe materials is warranted. (3) Both kinds of bubble detectors are ready for use whenever very high gamma-ray fields must be confronted. Spent fuel MPC and A is a good example where this need presents itself. (4) Both kinds of bubble detectors have the potential to function as low-cost replacements for conventional neutron detectors such as {sup 3}He tubes. For SDDs, this requires finding some way to get boron into the detector. For BCs, this requires finding operating conditions permitting a high duty cycle.

AJ Peurrung; RA Craig

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

High speed infrared radiation thermometer, system, and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The high-speed radiation thermometer has an infrared measurement wavelength band that is matched to the infrared wavelength band of near-blackbody emittance of ceramic components and ceramic thermal barrier coatings used in turbine engines. It is comprised of a long wavelength infrared detector, a signal amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, an optical system to collect radiation from the target, an optical filter, and an integral reference signal to maintain a calibrated response. A megahertz range electronic data acquisition system is connected to the radiation detector to operate on raw data obtained. Because the thermometer operates optimally at 8 to 12 .mu.m, where emittance is near-blackbody for ceramics, interferences to measurements performed in turbine engines are minimized. The method and apparatus are optimized to enable mapping of surface temperatures on fast moving ceramic elements, and the thermometer can provide microsecond response, with inherent self-diagnostic and calibration-correction features.

Markham, James R. (Middlefield, CT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist) senior subject matter expert for health physics/radiation safety at the sites. You will...

435

Acceleration and Classical Electromagnetic Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classical radiation from an accelerated charge is reviewed along with the reciprocal topic of accelerated observers detecting radiation from a static charge. This review commemerates Bahram Mashhoon's 60th birthday.

E. N. Glass

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data

Oregon, University of

437

Center for Environmental Radiation Studies 1 Texas Tech University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and international nuclear safety. Critical Success Factors Critical measures of success shall include regarding nuclear research, nuclear safety, biological effects, and homeland security · Training of graduate students and post-doctorates in the areas of molecular genetic responses, radiation dosimetry

Chesser, Ronald Keith

438

SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF JOSEPHSON JUNCTIONS AS RADIATION DETECTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

125 SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF JOSEPHSON JUNCTIONS AS RADIATION DETECTORS Yu. Ya. DIVIN, F. Ya. NAD les microponts. Abstract. 2014 The V-I characteristic of Josephson junction with an external parallel admittance, the high frequency impedance and high frequency response of a Josephson junction to small

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

439

Proceedings: 2002 Radiation Protection Technology Conference: Baltimore, MD, October 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to program pressures resulting from shorter outages, combined with a diminishing group of contract health physics (HP) technicians, HP professionals must continuously upgrade their programs. Demanding emergent work also requires HP technicians in the nuclear industry to use new methods and technologies. The EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference was directed at highlighting a number of key health physics issues and developments.

None

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

DOE Radiation Records Contacts List  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

442

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

DCS1800/WCDMA ADAPTIVE VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED OSCILLATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DCS1800/WCDMA ADAPTIVE VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED OSCILLATOR Aleksandar Tasi, Wouter A. Serdijn and John R, an adaptive 2G/3G voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) is described in this paper. For the DCS1800 operation with this reasoning, an adaptive 2G/3G voltage- controlled oscillator, meant for a dual-standard adaptive front

Serdijn, Wouter A.

446

IEEE INFOCOM 2001 1 Pricing Network Resources for Adaptive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and provides a natural and equitable incentive for applications to adapt their service contract according

Wang, Xin

447

Adaptation to water scarcity in glacier-dependent towns of the Indian Himalayas : impacts, adaptive responses, barriers, and solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among the existing and projected impacts of climate change, impacts on water resources are expected to exacerbate the current and future threat of global water scarcity. Glacier-dependent societies are especially vulnerable ...

Sudhalkar, Amruta Anand

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia by more than 50 percent. #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212 ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia

Jia, Songtao

449

Radiation Chemistry of Advanced TALSPEAK Flowsheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of initial experiments designed to understand the radiation chemistry of an Advanced TALSPEAK process for separating trivalent lanthanides form the actinides. Biphasic aerated samples were irradiated and then analyzed for post-irradiation constituent concentrations and solvent extraction distribution ratios. The effects of irradiation on the TALSPEAK and Advanced TALSPEAK solvents were similar, with very little degradation of the organic phase extractant. Decomposition products were detected, with a major product in common for both solvents. This product may be responsible for the slight increase in distribution ratios for Eu and Am with absorbed dose, however; separation factors were not greatly affected.

Mincher, Bruce; Peterman, Dean; Mcdowell, Rocklan; Olson, Lonnie; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

Emergency Response Health Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Control apparatus and method responsive to a changing stimulus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a control apparatus responsive to a changing stimulus. It comprises: means for producing a first response to a changing stimulus; means for producing a second response to the stimulus wherein the second response is of the same type of response as the first response but wherein the first and second responses are of different relative varying degree so that the second response is initially masked by the first response, but so that the second response ultimately surpasses the first response; and means for producing a control signal in response to the second response surpassing the first response. This patent also describes an apparatus for controlling the opening of a valve, disposed in a tubing string in a well, during a drill stem test wherein the valve is opened during a flow period of the test and closed during a shut-in period of the test. It comprises: in hosing adapted to be disposed in the tubing string; a first slidable member disposed in the housing; a second slidable member disposed in the housing; first biasing means, disposed in the housing, for biasing the first slidable member within the housing during a flow period of a drill stem test.

Surjaatmadja, J.B.; White, B.W.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Adaptive Plasticity and Plasticity as an Adaptation: A Selective Review of Plasticity in Animal Morphology and Life History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Plasticity and Plasticity as an Adaptation: A Selective Review of Plasticity in Animal wide-ranging. All key REVIEW references should be cited. A summary is required. Adaptive plasticity and plasticity as an adaptation: a selective review of plasticity in animal morphology and life history Karl

Gotthard, Karl

453

Terahertz radiation mixer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

454

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

457

Time encoded radiation imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

458

National Ambient Radiation Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

459

Handheld CZT radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

460

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Purely radiative perfect fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study `purely radiative' (div E = div H = 0) and geodesic perfect fluids with non-constant pressure and show that the Bianchi class A perfect fluids can be uniquely characterized --modulo the class of purely electric and (pseudo-)spherically symmetric universes-- as those models for which the magnetic and electric part of the Weyl tensor and the shear are simultaneously diagonalizable. For the case of constant pressure the same conclusion holds provided one also assumes that the fluid is irrotational.

B. Bastiaensen; H. R. Karimian; N. Van den Bergh; L. Wylleman

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

462

EcoAdapt Working Paper Series N1 Adaptation to climate change for local development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 EcoAdapt Working Paper Series N°1 Adaptation to climate change for local development Análisis in terms of employment, water situation and land use, at a quantitative and qualitative level, in three and summer pastures, due to the geographic and climatic conditions. hal-01059368,version1-30Aug2014 #12

Boyer, Edmond

463

Photon Clusters in Thermal Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the framework of Bose-Einstein statistics, it is shown that the blackbody radiation, in addition to single photons, contains photon clusters, or coalescent photons. The probability to find a k-photon cluster versus radiation frequency and temperature is found, as well as the statistics of clusters. Spectra of photon-cluster radiation are calculated as functions of blackbody temperature. The Planck's radiation law is derived based on the existence of photon clusters. The possibility of experimental observation of photon clusters in thermal radiation is discussed.

Aleksey Ilyin

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Radiation damage tolerant nanomaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designing a material from the atomic level to achieve a tailored response in extreme conditions is a grand challenge in materials research. Nanostructured metals and composites provide a path to this goal because they ...

Beyerlein, I.J.

465

Integrating Demand into the U.S. Electric Power System: Technical, Economic, and Regulatory Frameworks for Responsive Load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Responsive/Adaptive Load by Jason W. Black Massachusetts Institute of Technology Submitted to the Engineering integration of demand response. Integrating demand into the US electricity system will allow the development, and market issues to determine a system structure that provides incentives for demand response. An integrated

de Weck, Olivier L.

466

Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide COURSE...

467

POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a 45 angle. Radiation whose electric field (polarization)radiation field, it can be uniquely characterized by its electric

Lubin, Philip Lubin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

Valentine, Kenneth H. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Gain scheduling adaptive control strategies for HVDC systems to accommodate large disturbances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Techniques have been developed to permit the response of the controls for dc transmission systems to adapt to large system changes. A gain scheduling approach tunes the control as an on-line function of the effective short-circuit ratio and contingency indicators. The method has been tested by digital simulation, based on EMTP, of a back-to-back dc system. It has been found to be robust and control performance has been enhanced.

Reeve, J.; Sultan, M. (Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapulas material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone elements remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than actual specimen. Low predicted bone density was lower than actual specimen. Differences were probably due to applied muscle and joint reaction loads, boundary conditions, and values of constants used. Work is underway to study this. Nonetheless, the results demonstrate three dimensional bone remodeling simulation validity and potential. Such adaptive predictions take physiological bone remodeling simulations one step closer to reality. Computational analyses are needed that integrate biological remodeling rules and predict how bone will respond over time. We expect the combination of computational static stress analyses together with adaptive bone remodeling simulations to become effective tools for regenerative medicine research.

Sharma, Gulshan B., E-mail: gbsharma@ucalgary.ca [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Spine and Orthopaedic Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); University of Pittsburgh, Swanson School of Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); University of Calgary, Schulich School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Robertson, Douglas D., E-mail: douglas.d.robertson@emory.edu [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Spine and Orthopaedic Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); University of Pittsburgh, Swanson School of Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Global aspects of radiation memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational radiation has a memory effect represented by a net change in the relative positions of test particles. Both the linear and nonlinear sources proposed for this radiation memory are of the "electric" type, or E mode, as characterized by the even parity of the polarization pattern. Although "magnetic" type, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory in which the velocity of charged particles obtain a net "kick". Again, the physically realistic sources of electromagnetic radiation memory that have been identified are of the electric type. In this paper, a global null cone description of the electromagnetic field is applied to establish the non-existence of B mode radiation memory and the non-existence of E mode radiation memory due to a bound charge distribution.

J. Winicour

2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

472

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

473

Anisotropic radiation elds: causality and quantum statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation transport 5 2.1 Radiation transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Closures The transport of radiation through a medium is described by the radiation transport equation for the radiative is used to describe anisotropic radiation. Because the two moment equations do not form a closed set

Honingh, Aline

474

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earths surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

Veers, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lobitz, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

477

Use of diamond-turned mirrors for synchrotron radiation (SR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diamond turning technique has great interest for users of synchrotron radiation because of its ability to produce surfaces of arbitrary shape. It also has the advantage of being well adapted to producing metal optics. These are of interest because they lend themselves to water cooling and hence represent one approach to the problem of high synchrotron radiation power loadings on optical surfaces. The optical figure produced by diamond turning is generally adequate for synchrotron radiation applications. The main difficulty centers around the question of smoothness. Diamond turned surfaces must receive a final polish after machining before they are sufficiently smooth for use with ultra-violet or x-ray radiation. The manufacturing stages can be carried out by various groups in the optics industry and the National Synchrotron Light Source has procured a considerable number of mirrors and is having them polished for use on the vuv storage ring. At the time of writing one mirror has been completed and evaluated and we give the results for this and discuss the indications for the future. The important measurement of the r.m.s. height of the surface roughness has given a value of 3 +- 0.9A using total integrated scatter of visible light at normal incidence.

Howells, M.R.; Takacs, P.Z.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

SALTS AND RADIATION PRODUCTS ON THE SURFACE OF EUROPA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface of Europa could contain the compositional imprint of an underlying interior ocean, but competing hypotheses differ over whether spectral observations from the Galileo spacecraft show the signature of ocean evaporates or simply surface radiation products unrelated to the interior. Using adaptive optics at the W. M. Keck Observatory, we have obtained spatially resolved spectra of most of the disk of Europa at a spectral resolution {approx}40 times higher than seen by the Galileo spacecraft. These spectra show a previously undetected distinct signature of magnesium sulfate salts on Europa, but the magnesium sulfate is confined to the trailing hemisphere and spatially correlated with the presence of radiation products like sulfuric acid and SO{sub 2}. On the leading, less irradiated, hemisphere, our observations rule out the presence of many of the proposed sulfate salts, but do show the presence of distorted water ice bands. Based on the association of the potential MgSO{sub 4} detection on the trailing side with other radiation products, we conclude that MgSO{sub 4} is also a radiation product, rather than a constituent of a Europa ocean brine. Based on ocean chemistry models, we hypothesize that, prior to irradiation, magnesium is primarily in the form of MgCl{sub 2}, and we predict that NaCl and KCl are even more abundant, and, in fact, dominate the non-ice component of the leading hemisphere. We propose observational tests of this new hypothesis.

Brown, M. E. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hand, K. P., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon ranksum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ? P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ? P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic curricula for the radiation oncology clerkship.

Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Spatial impulse responses from a flexible baffled circular piston Ronald M. Aartsa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial impulse responses from a flexible baffled circular piston Ronald M. Aartsa) Philips response, Zernike expansion, piston sound radiation, non-uniform profile, loudspeaker, ultrasound 2 #12;I, baffled, planar piston is often done by using the spatial impulse response approach as can be found

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "radiation adaptive responses" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Radiative ?(1S) decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wW~ ii~ ~ + v~ 1''&WV'' V 0.20 0.45 0.70 ~y ~ EBFA~ 0.95 l.20 FIG. 4. Energy spectrum (normalized to beam energy) for Y~y2(h+h ) event candidates, with continuum data and ex- pected background from Y~m 2(h +h ) overplotted. 40 30 ~ 20 LLI IO hl...PHYSICAL REVIEW 0 VOLUME 41, NUMBER 5 Radiative T(lS) decays 1 MARCH 1990 R. Fulton, M. Hempstead, T. Jensen, D. R. Johnson, H. Kagan, R. Kass, F. Morrow, and J. Whitmore Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 W.-Y. Chen, J. Dominick, R. L. Mc...

Baringer, Philip S.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Radiation Field on Superspace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

483

Radiation.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115,Performance QualityRadiation August

484

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#:Synchrotron Radiation The following is

485

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

486

Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

487

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive radiation model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 35 CHAPTER 7. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT We examine in this chapter the role played by atmospheric gases in Summary: , we...

488

American Journal of Botany 91(2): 228246. 2004. ADAPTIVE RADIATION OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assimilation rate (Amax) ranges from 0.17 to 0.35 mol CO2 · g 1 · s 1 . Across species, Amax, dark respiration rate (R), Michaelis-Menten constant (k), light compensation point, specific leaf area (SLA), maximum low- light species at high PFD and vice versa at low PFD. Amax-mass has little relationship to leaf

Givnish, Thomas J.

489

Origin, adaptive radiation and diversification of the Hawaiian lobeliads (Asterales: Campanulaceae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA 3 Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL 60532, USA 4 Director, Snake River Plains Herbarium, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725, USA 5 National Tropical Botanical Garden

Sytsma, Kenneth J.

490

Evidence of molecular adaptation to extreme environments and applicability to space environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is initial study of a gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the life in extreme Earth environments. We present a results on ID of the clusters of COGs common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile: E.coli.K12, will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme T. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0C (M.frigidum and M.burtonii) and 110C (M.kandleri). Not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. Highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim is to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The following hyperthermophile genomes incorporated in our software were used for these studies: M.jannaschii, M.kandleri, A.fulgidus and 3 species of Pyrococcus. Common genes were annotated and grouped according to their roles in cellular processes when information was available and proteins not previously implicated in the heat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additional experimental data is needed in order to learn more about these proteins. To address a non-gene based components of thermal adaptation, all sequenced extremophiles were analysed for their GC contents and aminoacid hydrophobicity. We develop a prediction model for optimal growth temperature.

M. D. Filipovic; S. Ognjanovic; M. Ognjanovic

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

491

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

492

RADIATIVE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g., at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H II region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick 'adiabatic' regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved, for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state and derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability condition.

Jacquet, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Mineralogie et Cosmochimie de Museum (LMCM), CNRS and Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7202, 57 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris (France); Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr, E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL] [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL] [ORNL; Phillips, Rick [ORNL] [ORNL; Erickson, Marjorie A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kirk, Mark T [ORNL] [ORNL; Stevens, Gary L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

The Building Adaptive Re-Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

81 The Building 7.0 #12;82 Adaptive Re-Use 7.1 7.1.1 Retaining the Ruskin Building's Facades building fabric. The need for a fully accessible and environmentally sustainable building led the team to a solution that requires the full reconstruction of the Ruskin Building, save its primary facades

Flynn, E. Victor

496

Relativistic MHD with Adaptive Mesh Refinement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a new computer code to solve the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) equations using distributed parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The fluid equations are solved using a finite difference Convex ENO method (CENO) in 3+1 dimensions, and the AMR is Berger-Oliger. Hyperbolic divergence cleaning is used to control the $\

Matthew Anderson; Eric Hirschmann; Steven L. Liebling; David Neilsen

2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

497

Adaptive Scheduling Algorithms for Planet Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-precision radial velocity planet searches have surveyed over ~2000 nearby stars and detected over ~200 planets. While these same stars likely harbor many additional planets, they will become increasingly challenging to detect, as they tend to have relatively small masses and/or relatively long orbital periods. Therefore, observers are increasing the precision of their observations, continuing to monitor stars over decade timescales, and also preparing to survey thousands more stars. Given the considerable amounts of telescope time required for such observing programs, it is important use the available resources as efficiently as possible. Previous studies have found that a wide range of predetermined scheduling algorithms result in planet searches with similar sensitivities. We have developed adaptive scheduling algorithms which have a solid basis in Bayesian inference and information theory and also are computationally feasible for modern planet searches. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations of plausible planet searches to test the power of adaptive scheduling algorithms. Our simulations demonstrate that planet searches performed with adaptive scheduling algorithms can simultaneously detect more planets, detect less massive planets, and measure orbital parameters more accurately than comparable surveys using a non-adaptive scheduling algorithm. We expect that these techniques will be particularly valuable for the N2K radial velocity planet search for short-period planets as well as future astrometric planet searches with the Space Interferometry Mission which aim to detect terrestrial mass planets.

Eric B. Ford

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

498

Reservation Price Estimation by Adaptive Conjoint Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservation Price Estimation by Adaptive Conjoint Analysis Christoph Breidert1 , Michael Hahsler1 applied the eco- nomic definition of reservation price in combination with a conjoint study on product pricing. In this paper we present a novel approach to estimate the economic reser- vation price using

Schmidt-Thieme, Lars

499

CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC Climate change will affect both sea level and the temporal and spatial distribution of runoff

500

Adaptive Personalisation for Researcher-Independent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Personalisation for Researcher-Independent Brain-Body Interface Usage Abstract In this case study, we report what we believe to be the first prolonged in-situ use of a brain-body interface for rehabilitation of individuals with severe neurological impairment due to traumatic brain injury

Boetticher, Gary D.