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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework  

SciTech Connect

This is a working report drafted under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, describing statistical models of passives component reliabilities.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Layton, Robert F.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Sanborn, Scott E.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bridge design should take into account not only safety and functionality, but also the cost effectiveness of investments throughout a bridge life-cycle. This work presents a probabilistic approach to compute the life-cycle cost (LCC) of corroding reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue analysis. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel reinforcement is computed based on Ficks second law of diffusion. The proposed methodology accounts for the uncertainties in the ground motion parameters, the distance from source, the seismic demand on the bridge, and the corrosion initiation time. The statistics of the accumulated damage and the cost of repairs throughout the bridge life-cycle are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulation. As an illustration of the proposed approach, the effect of design parameters on the life-cycle cost of an example RC bridge is studied. The results are shown to be valuable in better estimating the condition of existing bridges (i.e., total accumulated damage at any given time) and, therefore, can help schedule inspection and maintenance programs. In addition, by taking into consideration the deterioration process over a bridge life-cycle, it is possible to make an estimate of the optimum design parameters by minimizing, for example, the expected cost throughout the life of the structure.

Kumar, Ramesh

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ation-potential-impact-commercial-markets-does-transfer Download Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage...

4

An experimental evaluation of S-N curves and validity of miner's cumulative damage hypothesis for an ACSR conductor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory simulation of aeolian vibrations was used in determining the fatigue characteristics of an ACSR conductor subjected to constant and varied amplitude loadings. Using linear regression analyses, S-N curves for first through fifth strand breaks were fit to the data, and a pseudo endurance limit of 21.31 MPa (3.09 ksi) estimated. Subjecting the conductor to three different types of load sequences revealed that Miner's Cumulative Damage hypothesis is somewhat conservative, but can be assumed valid for design purposes. This information, in conjunction with the actual load histories, will allow electric utility companies to more accurately design transmission lines.

Brunair, R.M.; Ramey, G. (Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (US)); Duncan, R.R. III (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Primer on Cumulative Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative impacts have become one of the most important aspects of environmental analysis and reporting in terms of transmission siting. This primer provides EPRI members with background information and fundamental understanding of the analysis process. The primer reviews the legal and regulatory framework, briefly examines case law that has helped to define both the cumulative impacts concept and subsequent analysis, and provides a structure for conducting or reviewing cumulative impacts analyses.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cumulative Impacts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumulative Impacts Cumulative Impacts Cumulative Impacts Selected documents on the topic of Cumulative Impacts and NEPA. June 24, 2005 Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis In this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality provides guidance on the extent to which agencies of the Federal government are required to analyze the environmental effects of past actions when they describe the cumulative environmental effect of a proposed action. May 1, 1999 Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on specific issues that are

7

Cumulative Crude Production Additions (Annual)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This graph shows the cumulative growth of the Atlantic Basin light sweet crude oil production relative to the growth in crude oil production from the rest of the ...

8

Report - Considering Cumulative Effects Under NEPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considering Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act Council on Environmental Quality January 1997 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY I INTRODUCTION TO CUMULATIVE EFFECTS ANALYSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Purpose of Cumulative Effect sAnalysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Agency Experience with Cumulative Effects Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Principles of Cumulative Effects Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 How Environmental EffectsAccumulate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Roadmap tothe Handbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2 SCOPING FOR CUMULATIVE EFFECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Identifying Cumulative Effects Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Bounding Cumulative Effects Analysis . . . . . . . . . .

9

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Cumulative Index | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Requirements Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Cumulative Index Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Cumulative Index Guidance Requirements Lessons...

10

Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework Draft Report Supporting Technology Inputs to the Risk- Informed Safety Margin Characterization Pathway of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Stephen D. Unwin Kenneth I. Johnson Robert F. Layton Peter P. Lowry Scott E. Sanborn Mychailo B. Toloczko PNNL-20596 July 2011 Physics-Based SCC Reliability Model in a Cumulative Damage Framework 2 Physics-Based SCC Reliability Model in a Cumulative Damage Framework 3 Table of Contents Executive Summary............................................................................... 4 1. Introduction .......................................................................... 5

11

Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). The methodology emerging from the RISMC pathway is not a conventional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)-based one; rather, it relies on a reactor systems simulation framework in which

12

Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). The methodology emerging from the RISMC pathway is not a conventional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)-based one; rather, it relies on a reactor systems simulation framework in which

13

Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity  

SciTech Connect

EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental...

15

Gait identification using cumulants of accelerometer data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes gait identification using cumulants of accelerometer data. Accelerometer data of three different walking speeds for each subject (normal, slow and fast) was acquired by a cell phone placed on the person's hip. Data analysis was based ... Keywords: accelerometer, body sensor, cumulants, gait identification, gait recognition, high-order statistics, pattern recognition

Sebastijan Sprager; Damjan Zazula

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

RESEARCH and RELATED BUDGET - Cumulative Budget  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumulative Budget Cumulative Budget 0 Totals ($) Section A, Senior/Key Person - $ Section B, Other Personnel - $ Total Number Other Personnel 0 Total Salary, Wages and Fringe Benefits (A+B) - $ Section C, Equipment - $ Section D, Travel - $ 1. Domestic - $ 2. Foreign - $ Section E, Participant/Trainee Support Costs - $ 1. Tuition/Fees/Health Insurance - $ 2. Stipends - $ 3. Travel - $ 4. Subsistence - $ 5. Other - $ 6. Number of Participants/Trainees 0 Section F, Other Direct Costs - $ 1. Materials and Supplies

17

Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 31, 2013 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through August 31, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

18

EPA: Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

how cumulative impacts are assessed in environmental impact analysis, CEQ developed a handbook entitled "Considering Cumulative Effects under the National Environmental Policy Act"...

19

Cumulative mass approach for column testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cumulative mass approach for laboratory column testing using an analytical solution for miscible transport through soil is presented. The cumulative mass approach differs from the more traditional approach for column testing in that the analysis of the measured data is in terms of mass of solute instead of solute concentration. The potential advantages of the cumulative mass approach are: (1) The influence of increment in effluent sample volume on the measured concentrations is removed from consideration; (2) the effluent sampling procedure is less labor-intensive, and therefore potentially more cost-effective; and (3) the retardation factor and effective porosity can be evaluated directly from plots of the test results. A comparison of analyses of measured data based on the cumulative mass approach with the more traditional concentration-based approach indicates slight differences (less than 3%) in the regressed values of the dispersion coefficient and retardation factor. These differences are attributed to greater scatter in the data for the more traditional approach and to slight errors involved in the traditional approach due to plotting the average, incremental concentrations at the pore volumes of flow corresponding to the middle of the sampling interval.

Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)] [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental Quality concerning the consideration of cumulative effects in analyses prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). It introduces the NEPA practitioner and other interested parties to the complex issue of cumulative effects, outlines general principles, presents useful steps, and provides information on methods of cumulative effects analysis and data sources. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act More Documents & Publications EIS-0333: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cumulative biological impacts of The Geysers geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cumulative nature of current and potential future biological impacts from full geothermal development in the steam-dominated portion of The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA are identified by the California Energy Commission staff. Vegetation, wildlife, and aquatic resources information have been reviewed and evaluated. Impacts and their significance are discussed and staff recommendations presented. Development of 3000 MW of electrical energy will result in direct vegetation losses of 2790 acres, based on an estimate of 11.5% loss per lease-hold of 0.93 acres/MW. If unmitigated, losses will be greater. Indirect vegetation losses and damage occur from steam emissions which contain elements (particularly boron) toxic to vegetation. Other potential impacts include chronic low-level boron exposure, acid rain, local climate modification, and mechanical damage. A potential exists for significant reduction and changes in wildlife from direct habitat loss and development influences. Highly erosive soils create the potential for significant reduction of aquatic resources, particularly game fish. Toxic spills have caused some temporary losses of aquatic species. Staff recommends monitoring and implementation of mitigation measures at all geothermal development stages.

Brownell, J.A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Crossover of aging dynamics in polymer glass: from cumulative aging to non-cumulative aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aging behavior of polymer glass, poly(methyl methacrylate), has been investigated through the measurement of ac dielectric susceptibility ata fixed frequency after a temperature shift $\\Delta T$ ($\\le $ 20 K)between two temperatures, $T_1$ and $T_2$. A crossover from cumulative aging to non-cumulative aging could be observed with increasing $\\Delta T$ using a twin temperature ($T$-) shift measurement. Based on a growth law of a dynamical coherent length given by activated dynamics, we obtained a unique coherent length for positive and negative $T$-shifts. The possibility of the existence of temperature chaos in polymer glasses is discussed.

Koji Fukao; Sinpei Yamawaki

2008-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

23

Figure 65. Cumulative growth in value of shipments from energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cumulative growth in value of shipments from energy-intensive industries in three cases, 2011-2040 ... Iron and steel Bulk Chemicals Glass Paper products Food products

24

Figure 67. Cumulative growth in value of shipments from energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cumulative growth in value of shipments from energy-intensive industries, 2011-2040, 2011-2025, and 2025 ... Iron and steel Bulk chemicals Glass Paper products Food ...

25

Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on specific issues that are critical in EPA's review of NEPA documents under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act. The guidance offers information on what issues to look for in the analysis, what practical considerations should be kept in mind when reviewing the analysis, and what should be said in EPA comments concerning the adequacy of the analysis. Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents More Documents & Publications

26

EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon This document presents information supplemental to the Environmental Assessment (EA), Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon (DOE/EA-1758) prepared by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). This document addresses potential impacts associated with other proposed future geothermal projects in the area of the Newberry National Volcanic Monument that may be cumulative with those described in the EA. Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis of Drilling, Testing, and

27

EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis : Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon This document presents information supplemental to the Environmental Assessment (EA), Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon (DOE/EA-1758) prepared by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). This document addresses potential impacts associated with other proposed future geothermal projects in the area of the Newberry National Volcanic Monument that may be cumulative with those described in the EA. Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis of Drilling, Testing, and

28

Convergence Characteristics of the Cumulant Expansion for Fourier Path Integrals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cumulant representation of the Fourier path integral method is examined to determine the asymptotic convergence characteristics of the imaginary-time density matrix with respect to the number of path variables $N$ included. It is proved that when the cumulant expansion is truncated at order $p$, the asymptotic convergence rate of the density matrix behaves like $N^{-(2p+1)}$. The complex algebra associated with the proof is simplified by introducing a diagrammatic representation of the contributing terms along with an associated linked-cluster theorem. The cumulant terms at each order are expanded in a series such that the the asymptotic convergence rate is maintained without the need to calculate the full cumulant at order $p$. Using this truncated expansion of each cumulant at order $p$, the numerical cost in developing Fourier path integral expressions having convergence order $N^{-(2p+1)}$ is shown to be approximately linear in the number of required potential energy evaluations making the method promising for actual numerical implementation.

Sharif D. Kunikeev; David L. Freeman; J. D. Doll

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

29

Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Double Cumulative and Lorenz Curves in Weather Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A graphical presentation of precipitation data has been used for some years in which the cumulative percentage of the total mass falling on various days of a sample of precipitation days, ordered from the largest to the smallest mass, is plotted ...

Edwin L. Crow

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A cumulative belief-degree approach for nuclear safeguards evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear safeguards are a set of activities to verify that a State is living up to its international undertakings not to use nuclear programs for nuclear weapons purposes. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses a hierarchical assessment system ... Keywords: cumulative belif degree, decision making, fuzzy linguistic terms, nuclear safeguards

zgr Kabak; Da Ruan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Draft annual report for the Cumulative Effects Study for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

33

Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that could support these fission yield experiments in the US, as well as at AWE and CEA. Considerations that will impact the final choice of experimental venues are: (1) Availability during the timeframe of interest; (2) Ability to accommodate special nuclear materials; (3) Cost; (4) Availability of counting facilities; and (5) Expected experimental uncertainties.

Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

A SAS-macro for estimation of the cumulative incidence using Poisson regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In survival analyses, we often estimate the hazard rate of a specific cause. Sometimes the main focus is not the hazard rates but the cumulative incidences, i.e., the probability of having failed from a specific cause prior to a given time. The cumulative ... Keywords: Competing risks, Cox regression, Cumulative incidence, Hazard rate, Poisson regression, Survival analysis

Berit Lindum Waltoft

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems  

SciTech Connect

Systems that allow users to store and retrieve spatial data, provide for analyses of spatial data, and offer highly detailed display of spatial data are referred to as geographic information systems, or more typically, GIS. Since their initial usage in the 1960s, GISs have evolved as a means of assembling and analyzing diverse data pertaining to specific geographical areas, with spatial locations of the data serving as the organizational basis for the information systems. The structure of GISs is built around spatial identifiers and the methods used to encode data for storage and manipulation. This paper examines how GIS has been used in typical environmental assessment, its use for cumulative impact assessment, and explores litigation that occurred in the United States Federal court system where GIS was used in some aspect of cumulative effects. The paper also summarizes fifteen case studies that range from area wide transportation planning to wildlife and habitat impacts, and draws together a few lessons learned from this review of literature and litigation.

Atkinson, Samuel F., E-mail: atkinson@unt.edu [Institute of Applied Science, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 310559, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Canter, Larry W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [Environmental Impact Training, P.O. Box 9143, Horseshoe Bay, TX 78657 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cambium Damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cambium Damage Cambium Damage Name: Jamie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If the bark from the lower part of trees (elm trees) is almost completly removed (in this case by animals)to a height of about 8ft, is it possible that the trees will still live? What can be done to help the trees? Replies: If the tree has been girdled, that is, the bark and cambium layer beneath it, has been removed completely around the tree, then it will die. If there is any portion of the bark remaining it may live, but if that remaining is small it probably will die fairly soon due to general decline. If the cambium layer has not been destroyed it may recover, but once the bark is stripped away it is most likely doomed because of the likelihood of invasion by fungi, insects, etc. A local forester or landscaper might be able to offer more help if they see it.

37

Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA Office of Federal Activities Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA Office of Federal Activities The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on specific issues that are critical in EPA's review of NEPA documents under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act. G-EPA-cumulative_impacts.pdf More Documents & Publications Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and

38

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

291 - 4300 of 26,777 results. 291 - 4300 of 26,777 results. Download EA-1767: Final Environmental Assessment Virginia State Energy Program's Cephas C&D Wastes Biomass Project Richmond, Virginia http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1767-final-environmental-assessment Download Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching... http://energy.gov/ne/downloads/physics-based-stress-corrosion-cracking-component-reliability-model Download JOBAID-SELF-RECORDING LEARNING EVENT The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step

39

Microsoft Word - SGIG FAQ SIPRIS Jobs cumulative 11222010 1300.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2010 1 Reporting of Jobs Created/Retained in SIPRIS November 2010 1 Reporting of Jobs Created/Retained in SIPRIS Reporting of Jobs Created/Retained in SIPRIS This FAQ compliments the DOE SGIG Reporting Guidance (Section 4) available at the following URL: http://www.oe.energy.gov/DocumentsandMedia/SGIG_DOE_REPORTING_GUIDANCE_OCT_2010.pdf For more information regarding SIPRIS reporting, please contact the SIPRIS Help Desk at 1-202-251- 4181 or siprishelpdesk@hq.doe.gov. For information regarding federalreporting.gov, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse at 1-888-363-7289 or http://www.energy.gov/recovery/ARRA_Reporting_Requirements.htm. Question: I will be reporting jobs data into SIPRIS for the first time in the next quarterly cycle. Do I report cumulative jobs created/retained or just jobs created/retained during the quarter?

40

May 19, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Meeting - HSS Project, Cumulative...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 HSS total directives: 107 (as of 312010) Safety and Security Directives Reform - Cumulative Progress (June 15, 2011) 90 100 Total - Directives with JMs Approved by DRB Total -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Status of Cumulative Risk Methods in Air-Based Risk Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developments in cumulative risk assessment practices and influence on public health and environmental regulation continue to increase. Primary drivers include stakeholder-based concerns over environmental justice, as well as recent initiatives to reevaluate the current regulatory risk assessment paradigm. The United States Environmental Protection Agencyalong with other state agencies, public health advocates, and researcherscontinues to strive toward application of cumulative risk methodologies capable ...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

42

Equality in cumulative voting: A systematic review with an improvement proposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Context: Prioritization is an essential part of requirements engineering, software release planning and many other software engineering disciplines. Cumulative Voting (CV) is known as a relatively simple method for prioritizing requirements on a ratio ... Keywords: Compositional data, Cumulative voting, Log-ratio, Prioritization, Requirements engineering

K. Rievi?S; R. Torkar

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

EPA: Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Federal Activities (2252A) EPA 315-R-99-002/May 1999 1. INTRODUCTION The combined, incremental effects of human activity, referred to as cumulative impacts, pose a serious threat to the environment. While they may be insignificant by themselves, cumulative impacts accumulate over time, from one or more sources, and can result in the degradation of important resources. Because federal projects cause or are affected by cumulative impacts, this type of impact must be assessed in documents prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent

44

Nonequilibrium time evolution of higher order cumulants of conserved charges and event-by-event analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the time evolution of higher order cumulants of conserved charges in a volume with the diffusion master equation. Applying the result to the diffusion of non-Gaussian fluctuations in the hadronic stage of relativistic heavy ion collisions, we show that the fourth-order cumulant of net-electric charge at LHC energy is suppressed compared with the recently observed second-order cumulant at ALICE, if the higher order cumulants at hadronization are suppressed compared with their values in the hadron phase in equilibrium. The significance of the experimental information on the rapidity window dependence of various cumulants in investigating the history of the dynamical evolution of the hot medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions is emphasized.

Masakiyo Kitazawa; Masayuki Asakawa; Hirosato Ono

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

Brown, D.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

Brown, D.W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China Authors biophysical effects of small (China's Nu River basin, and compare effects The hydropower sector currently comprises eighty percent of global capacity for renewable energy generation

Tullos, Desiree

48

Constraining the Ratio of Global Warming to Cumulative CO2 Emissions Using CMIP5 Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenarios and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Constraining the ratio of global warming to cumulative CO2 emissions using CMIP5 simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenario, and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

50

Characterization of Weekly Cumulative Rainfall Forecasts over Meteorological Subdivisions of India Using a GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weekly cumulative rainfall forecasts were made for the meteorologically homogeneous areas of the Indian subcontinent, divided into meteorological subdivisions, by performing 7-day integrations of the operational Indian T80 Global Spectral Model ...

S. A. Saseendran; S. V. Singh; L. S. Rathore; Someshwar Das

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Cumulative Impact of Cloud Droplet Nucleating Aerosols on Orographic Snowfall in Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hygroscopic pollution aerosols have the potential to alter winter orographic snowfall totals and spatial distributions by modification of high-elevation supercooled orographic clouds and the riming process. The authors investigate the cumulative ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; William R. Cotton; Jamie D. Fuller

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Schools - CPU Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of computers in a school computer lab that were being damaged.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Corrosion and Hydrogen Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments: Corrosion and Hydrogen Damage Sponsored by: TMS...

55

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

56

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mhlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four thin-film damage competitions organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (20042010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Supporting international entry decisions for construction firms using fuzzy preference relations and cumulative prospect theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper emphasizes on supporting international entry decisions for construction firms in a three-phase analysis process. Phase I identified significant factors as two categories, namely country and project factor levels. Phase II stuck on identifying ... Keywords: Alternative selection, Construction firms, Cumulative prospect theory, Fuzzy preference relations, International construction market

Min-Yuan Cheng; Hsing-Chih Tsai; Kai-Hsiang Chuang

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Interim Report on Cumulative Risk Assessment for Radiological and Chemical Constituents of Concern at Decommissioning Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning nuclear facilities focus extensive efforts on site characterization to demonstrate regulatory compliance in the termination of site licenses. Many decommissioning sites, while recognizing radiological characterization and assessment needs, lacked experience in chemical risk assessment. This report documents plant approaches for performing cumulative risk assessments of both radiological and non-radiological constituents of concern.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Risk decision analysis in emergency response: A method based on cumulative prospect theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency response of a disaster is generally a risk decision-making problem with multiple states. In emergency response analysis, it is necessary to consider decision-maker's (DM's) psychological behavior such as reference dependence, loss aversion ... Keywords: Cumulative prospect theory (CPT), Emergency response, Ranking, Risk decision-making

Yang Liu, Zhi-Ping Fan, Yao Zhang

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

RECOGNITION OF NOISY SPEECH USING CUMULANT-BASED LINEAR PREDICTION ANALYSIS K.K. Paliwal and M.M. Sondhi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. The cumulant-based LF analysis method can suppress the effects of ad&he Gaussiannoise whether white or colored to deal with thus problem [2,3,4, 5,6,7]. In this paper, we propose to use LF parameters derived through-order cumulants in thuspaper. However, the results reported in this paper can be extended to higher

63

Blind channel identification algorithms based on the Parafac decomposition of cumulant tensors: The single and multiuser cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we exploit the symmetry properties of 4th-order cumulants to develop new blind channel identification algorithms that utilize the parallel factor (Parafac) decomposition of cumulant tensors by solving a single-step (SS) least squares (LS) ... Keywords: Channel identification, Parameter estimation, Tensor decomposition, Underdetermined linear mixtures

Carlos Estvo R. Fernandes; Grard Favier; Joo Cesar M. Mota

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A cumulant-based method for gait identification using accelerometer data with principal component analysis and support vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a cumulant-based method for identification of gait using accelerometer data is presented. Acceleration data of three different walking speeds (slow, normal and fast) for each subject was acquired by the accelerometer embedded in cell phone ... Keywords: accelerometer, body sensor, cumulants, gait identification, gait recognition, high-order statistics, pattern recognition

Sebastijan Sprager; Damjan Zazula

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

CDFTBL: A statistical program for generating cumulative distribution functions from data  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the theory underlying the CDFTBL code and gives details for using the code. The CDFTBL code provides an automated tool for generating a statistical cumulative distribution function that describes a set of field data. The cumulative distribution function is written in the form of a table of probabilities, which can be used in a Monte Carlo computer code. A a specific application, CDFTBL can be used to analyze field data collected for parameters required by the PORMC computer code. Section 2.0 discusses the mathematical basis of the code. Section 3.0 discusses the code structure. Section 4.0 describes the free-format input command language, while Section 5.0 describes in detail the commands to run the program. Section 6.0 provides example program runs, and Section 7.0 provides references. The Appendix provides a program source listing. 11 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Eslinger, P.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Program on Technology Innovation: Cumulative Risk Assessment of Urban Air Toxics: Pilot Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative risk modeling for estimating the burden of exposure to urban air toxics requires consideration of a range of factors influencing population health. These factors include multiple toxic compounds, a variety of pollutant sources, background levels of air pollutants, and non-chemical stressors not historically considered in regulatory risk assessments. To date, quantitative methods to account for all these factors remain sporadic and relatively untested. However, the United States ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect

The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Earthquake Induced Damage Mechanism of Long Period Structures Using Energy Response  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method of expounding the damage of RC long period frame structure using energy analysis method. Since the damage of structures usually occurs under major earthquakes, the structure is assumed to be in elasto-plastic state, and degraded Bouc-Wen model is used to describe the hysteretic component of the restoring force. A double index damage criterion defined by the maximum drift and energy absorption is used as the damage criterion. The energy transferring relation in a structure is derived, and both momentary and cumulative energy response is used to reflect the delay of the collapse of a long period structure. The mechanism of collapse delay of the long period structure is suggested through a numerical example combing the energy response and time history response.

Du Yongfeng; Li Hui [Western Engineering Research Center for Disaster Mitigation in Civil Engineering of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou, 730050 (China); Institute of Earthquake Protection and Disaster Mitigation, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou, 730050 (China)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

Quark cluster contribution to cumulative proton emission in fragmentation of carbon ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the FRAGM experiment at heavy ion accelerator complex TWAC-ITEP, the proton yields at an angle 3.5$^\\circ$ have been measured at fragmentation of carbon ions at $T_0 = $ 0.6, 0.95 and 2.0 GeV/nucleon on beryllium target. The data are presented as invariant proton yields on cumulative variable $x$ in the range 0.9 carbon nuclei are estimated to be 8--12% for six-quark clusters and 0.2--0.6% for nine-quark clusters.

B. M. Abramov; P. N. Alekseev; Yu. A. Borodin; S. A. Bulychjov; I. A. Dukhovskoy; A. I. Khanov; A. P. Krutenkova; V. V. Kulikov; M. A. Martemyanov; M. A. Matsyuk; E. N. Turdakina

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

NEPA Lessons Learned Cumulative Index December 2012 1 DOE NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumulative Index December 2012 1 Cumulative Index December 2012 1 DOE NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report A Accident Analyses Sep 95/12; Dec 95/15; Sep 97/7; Sep 98/7; Dec 98/5; Jun 00/3, 8 guidance issued for preparation of Sep 02/16; Dec 02/20 Adaptive Management also see: Environmental Management Systems Dec 02/8; Jun 07/17; Jun 08/8 training Dec 06/16 Administrative Record also see: Legal Issues Mar 97/13; Sep 97/7; Jun 98/7; Dec 98/4 Advisory Council on Historic Preservation also see: National Historic Preservation Act Dec 98/11; Jun 99/3; Sep 99/2; Dec 00/6; Jun 01/8; Dec 01/6; Sep 02/17; Dec 03/13; Sep 04/16 Affected Environment Sep 95/12; Dec 98/7; Sep 00/8 Air Force Sep 11/10 Alternative Arrangements (emergency actions) see: Council on Environmental Quality: alternative arrangements

72

Assessing cumulative impacts to wintering Bald Eagles and their habitats in western Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) of Washington, the largest wintering population in the lower 48 states, are subject to numerous pressures and impacts from human activites. An evaluative method potential cumulative impacts of multiple hydroelectric development and logging activities on known and potential eagle use areas. Four resource components include food supply, roost sites, mature riparian forest, and disturbance. In addition to actual estimates of losses in food supply (fish biomass in kg) and habitat (km/sup 2/) in one river basin, impact levels from 0 (none) to 4 (high) were assigned for each development and for each component based on the impacts anticipated and the estimated value of the site to eagles. Midwinter eagle surveys, aerial photography, topographic and forest stand maps, and site visits were used in the analysis. Impacts were considered additive for all but the disturbance component, which was adjusted for potential synergism between developments. Adjustments were made for mitigation before the impacts were aggregated into a single, dimensionless cumulative impact score. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Witmer, G.W.; O'Neil, T.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Calculation of the cumulative reaction probability via a discrete variable representation with absorbing boundary conditions  

SciTech Connect

A new method is suggested for the calculation of the microcanonical cumulative reaction probability {ital via} flux autocorrelation relations. The Hamiltonian and the flux operators are computed in a discrete variable representation (DVR) and a well-behaved representation for the Green's operator, {ital G}({ital E}{sup +}), is obtained by imposing absorbing boundary conditions (ABC). Applications to a one-dimensional-model problem and to the collinear H+H{sub 2} reaction show that the DVR-ABC scheme provides a very efficient method for the {ital direct} calculation of the microcanonical probability, circumventing the need to compute the state-to-state dynamics. Our results indicate that the cumulative reaction probability can be calculated to a high accuracy using a rather small number of DVR points, confined to the vicinity of the transition state. Only limited information regarding the potential-energy surface is therefore required, suggesting that this method would be applicable also to higher dimensionality problems, for which the complete potential surface is often unknown.

Seideman, T.; Miller, W.H. (Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Market Damages and the Economic Waste Fallacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robert E. Scott, The Case for Market Damages; Revisiting thethey pay less than full market damages but when buyerssellers recover full market damages. As a consequence,

Scott, Robert E.; Schwartz, Alan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Appraising the sustainability of project alternatives: An increasing role for cumulative effects assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating and comparing development alternatives with regard to sustainability is an important goal for comprehensive project appraisal. In the United States, this component has been largely missing from standard environmental impact assessment practice. Cumulative effects assessment provides a way to appraise the sustainability of project alternatives in terms of their probable contributions to long-term trends affecting the condition of valued environmental components. Sustainability metrics and predictors are being developed as criteria for rating systems and evaluation processes that are applied to community planning, building design, and transportation infrastructure. Increasing interest in adaptive management is also providing cost-effective solutions to optimizing safety and function throughout the long-term operation of a facility or infrastructure. Recent federal legislation is making it easier to integrate sustainability features into development alternatives through early, community-based planning.

Senner, Robert, E-mail: robin.senner@ch2m.com

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

Matthews, K.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Multiple uses of indicators and indices in cumulative effects assessment and management  

SciTech Connect

Both environmental indicators and multi-metric indices are useful for describing baseline conditions and qualitatively predicting the cumulative consequences of multiple actions. Several examples and case studies associated with indicators and/or indices are presented herein. They can be easily modified for usage in CEAM. Habitat suitability models reflect special indices related to habitat needs and quality for specific species or broad habitat types. Such models have been used to address direct and indirect effects, and with some modification, they can be also used to address cumulative effects of multiple actions. This review has indicated that there are numerous examples of such tools which have been or could be used in both EIA and CEAM. Some key lessons are: (1) in conducting CEAM studies, it is useful to think from the mindset that 'I am the VEC or indicator, and what is my historical and current condition and how have I, or will I, be affected by multiple past, present, and future actions?'; (2) due to the likely absence of detailed information on future actions, the described tools can still be used to 'predict' future conditions by focusing on qualitative up-or-down changes in individual indicators or indices with their aggregated displays; and (3) numerous regional and site-specific tools are currently available, with one example being indices of biological integrity for specific watersheds and water bodies. Such tools, even though they may not have been developed for CEAM usage, can certainly benefit CEAM studies and practice. Finally, usage of selected and appropriate tools as described herein can aid in conducting science-based, systematic, and documentable CEAM studies.

Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma and Environmental Impact Training, Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Atkinson, S.F. [Institute of Applied Science, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

Identifying structural damage from images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photographs of damaged buildings in Bam, Iran. . . . . . . .patches of Bam, Iran. . . . . . . . . Photo pictures ofBitemporal images of an urban region of Bam, Iran. . . . .

Chen, ZhiQiang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Corrosion Damage Models and Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Corrosion Damage Models and Sustainability ... Abstract Scope, The ability of industry to make sustainable choices in the future that optimize...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Methodologies for Assessing the Cumulative Environmental Effects of Hydroelectric Development of Fish and Wildlife in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1, Recommendations, 1987 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume is the first of a two-part set addressing methods for assessing the cumulative effects of hydropower development on fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Species and habitats potentially affected by cumulative impacts are identified for the basin, and the most significant effects of hydropower development are presented. Then, current methods for measuring and assessing single-project effects are reviewed, followed by a review of methodologies with potential for use in assessing the cumulative effects associated with multiple projects. Finally, two new approaches for cumulative effects assessment are discussed in detail. Overall, this report identifies and reviews the concepts, factors, and methods necessary for understanding and conducting a cumulative effects assessment in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 will present a detailed procedural handbook for performing a cumulative assessment using the integrated tabular methodology introduced in this volume. 308 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

Stull, Elizabeth Ann

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy Research Information System. Volume 1, Number 4. cumulative indexes (project nos. 00000001 through 00000539). Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

This cumulative index includes a state location index, an organization index and a subject keyword index incorporating the indexes from Energy Research Information System (ERIS), Volume 1, Numbers 1, 2, and 3. This issue, plus the first three ERIS reports, comprise a set of 539 research project references for the states of the Old West Region -- Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.

Givens, B.M.; Boyd, C.A.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Cumulative impacts study of The Geysers KGRA: public-service impacts of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal development in The Geysers KGRA has affected local public services and fiscal resources in Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, and Napa counties. Each of these counties underwent rapid population growth between 1970 and 1980, some of which can be attributed to geothermal development. The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in The Geysers is identified. Using three different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in The Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdictions are examined and compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed, and a framework is presented for calculating mitigation costs per unit of public service.

Matthews, K.M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Excitation optimization for damage detection  

SciTech Connect

A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

Bement, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bewley, Thomas R [UCSD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS Francis A. Cucinotta 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Artem Ponomarev 3 , Shaowen Hu 3 , Jennifer Anderson 4 , Jane Harper 4 , and Peter O'Neill 4 1 NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA; 3 U.S.R.A., Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX, USA; 4 MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Didcot, UK Abstract: On space missions astronauts are exposed to a steady flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) consisting of high-energy protons and heavy ions. In the next decades long- term missions of up to 200 days to the Earth's moon and 1100 days to Mars are planed by NASA where cumulative doses will not be low (>100 mSv) albeit dose-

86

Energy Research Information System. Projects report. Volume 2, Number 4. Cumulative Indexes (Project Nos. 00000540 through 00001080)  

SciTech Connect

The Cumulative Indexes include a state-location index, a personal name index, an organization index and a subject keyword index incorporating the indexes from ERIS Volume 2, Nos. 1, 2, and 3. This issue, plus the entire contents of Volume 1 and Volume 2, comprise a set of 1080 research project references for the states of the Old West region - Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Nebraska.

Boyd, C.A.; Schillinger, L.A.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Microstructural Characterization of Damage Mechanisms of Graphite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanostructured Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries and for Supercapacitors. Presentation Title, Microstructural Characterization of Damage ...

88

Field Guide: Bearing Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1021780, Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Rotating Equipment, 2011 Update, is a comprehensive document on the subject of fluid film bearing damage modes. This field guide provides a pocket reference based upon the content of that report. ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a nuclear reactor in a realistic time frame. XMAT's delivery of fragment ions at fission fragment energies achieves 25 dpahr. Reactor materials experience a range of dose...

90

Candidate wind-turbine generator site cumulative meteorological data summary and data for January 1982 through September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarized cumulative hourly meteorological data for 20 new sites selected in early 1980 as part of the expanded candidate site program are presented. The reporting period is July 1980 through September 1982. The data collection program at some individual sites may not span this entire period, but will be contained within the reporting period. The purpose of providing the summarized data is to document the data collection program and to provide data that could be considered representative of longer-term meteorological conditions at each site. For each site, data are given in eight tables and in a topographic map showing the approximated location of the meteorological tower and turbine, if applicable. Use of the information from these tables, along with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for longer-term average wind energy production at each site. Two appendices of other data are provided. Appendix A contains summarized data collected at new and original sites during the period January 1982 through September 1982. Appendix B contains cumulative summarized data for those original sites selected in 1976 with data collection programs continuing into 1982.

Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.; Bradymire, S.L.; Gregory, J.L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Keeping track of the damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Archives: News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Keeping track of the damage Scientists resolve long-standing mystery of ion-solid interactions Reprinted with kind permission from ScienceWise - Science Magazine of the Australian National University JANUARY 27, 2009 Bookmark and Share Dr. Patrick Kluth and Claudia Schnohr. Silica (silicon dioxide) is the most abundant mineral in the earth's crust and consequently is a core component in many rocks. It's quite common for such rocks to also contain natural traces of materials like uranium that undergo slow radioactive decay. This radioactivity produces energetic particles that smash through the surrounding silica creating tracks of localized damage in their wake.

92

Field Guide: Turbine Steam Path Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam path damage, particularly of blades, has long been recognized as a leading cause of steam turbine unavailability for large fossil fuel plants. Damage to steam path components by various mechanisms continues to result in significant economic impact domestically and internationally. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report TR-108943, Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice, Volumes 1 and 2, was prepared to compile the most recent knowledge about turbine steam path damage: identifying th...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ductile damage model with void coalescence  

SciTech Connect

A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. Underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. Implementation of the model in hydrocodes is discussed.

Tonks, D.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Chemical damage due to drilling operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of geothermal wells can result in near wellbore damage of both the injection wells and production wells if proper precautions are not taken. Very little specific information on the chemical causes for drilling damage that can directly be applied to the drilling of a geothermal well in a given situation is available in the literature. As part of the present work, the sparse literature references related to the chemical aspects of drilling damage are reviewed. The various sources of chemically induced drilling damages that are related to drilling operations are summarized. Various means of minimizing these chemical damages during and after the drilling of a geothermal well are suggested also.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cumulative analysis of the association between the gravitational wave detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER and the gamma-ray bursts detected by BATSE and BeppoSAX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The statistical association between the output of the Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS and a list of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the satellite experiments BATSE and BeppoSAX has been analyzed using cumulative algorithms. GW detector data collected between 1991 and 1999 have been correlated to the GRB flux peak times. The cumulative analysis of a large number of GRBs (387) allows to push the upper bound for the corresponding GW burst amplitude down to $h = 2.5\\cdot10^{-19}$.

P. Astone; D. Babusci; M. Bassan; P. Carelli; E. Coccia; C. Cosmelli; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; F. Frontera; G. Giordano; C. Guidorzi; A. Marini; Y. Minenkov; I. Modena; G. Modestino; A. Moleti; E. Montanari; G. V. Pallottino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; A. Rocchi; F. Ronga; L. Sperandio; R. Terenzi; G. Torrioli; M. Visco

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68508; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis [PLS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551; Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Inst. Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, 5500 Argentina; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Schools - Electronic Equipment Damage Due to Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of damage to a school's phone equipment, security alarm, and network computer system during a lightning storm.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

WEB RESOURCE: Radiation Damage in Materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Topic Title: WEB RESOURCE: Radiation Damage in Materials Topic Summary: Allen, Todd. Lecture notes for Univ. of Wisconsin course

99

Detection and Location of Damage on Pipelines  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL has developed and successfully tested a real-time pipeline damage detection and location system. This system uses porous metal resistive traces applied to the pipe to detect and locate damage. The porous metal resistive traces are sprayed along the length of a pipeline. The unique nature and arrangement of the traces allows locating the damage in real time along miles of pipe. This system allows pipeline operators to detect damage when and where it is occurring, and the decision to shut down a transmission pipeline can be made with actual real-time data, instead of conservative estimates from visual inspection above the area.

Karen A. Moore; Robert Carrington; John Richardson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Natural Resource Damages Assessment | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Council Report Calls for Official Natural Resource Damage Assessment for LANL NRDA PreAssessment Screen, January 2010 Factsheet: Los Alamos National Laboratory...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wind Damage in Washington, DC, 1975  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a large region in the Eastern United States was subjected to severe winds. ... Bureau of Standards (NBS) conducted a limited study of wind damage to ...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Ceramic Matrix Composites: NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and .... used in cylindrical liners, pistons, rings and combustion chamber for...

103

Old SmNd ages for cumulate eucrites and redetermination of the solar system initial Maud Boyet a,b,c,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived 146 Sm­142 Nd and long-lived 147 Sm­143 Nd chronometers have been measured in three cumulate initial 146 Sm/144 Sm ratio is obtained using the five-point regression line determined for Binda. The 146 different groups of achondrites relative to ordinary chondrites. This work suggests that 146 Sm

Reiners, Peter W.

104

Damage from methamphetamine abuse documented  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dennis Tartaglia, 212 481-7000, dennist@mbooth.com or Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350 go to home page Dennis Tartaglia, 212 481-7000, dennist@mbooth.com or Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350 go to home page 01-16 March 1, 2001 Researchers Document Brain Damage, Reduction in Motor and Cognitive Function from Methamphetamine Abuse "Speed" Shows More Neurotoxic Effects Than Heroin, Cocaine, or Alcohol UPTON, NY -- Two studies by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory provide evidence for the first time that abuse of methamphetamine -- the drug commonly known as "speed" -- is associated with physiological changes in two systems of the human brain. The changes are evident even for abusers who have not taken the drug for a year or more. The studies also found that methamphetamine abusers have reduced cognitive and motor functions, even at one year after quitting the drug. The findings appear in the March issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

105

A plastic damage approach for confined concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many situations in which it is necessary to increase the capacity of structures in use. This need maybe either for a change of use or because the structures have suffered some damage or have shown little resistance in case of extreme loads ... Keywords: Concrete, Confinement, Damage, Dilation, Fiber reinforced composites, Plasticity

B. M. Luccioni; V. C. Rougier

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A new damage testing system for detailed evaluation of damage behavior of bulk KDP and DKDP  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new damage testing approach and instrumentation that provides quantitative measurements of bulk damage performance versus fluence for several frequencies. A major advantage of this method is that it can simultaneously provide direct information on pinpoint density and size, and beam obscuration. This allows for more accurate evaluation of material performance under operational conditions. Protocols for laser conditioning to improve damage performance can also be easily and rapidly evaluated.This damage testing approach has enabled us to perform complex experiments toward probing the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation and conditioning.

DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Carr, C W; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

107

RAPID DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Disaster impact modeling and analysis uses huge volumes of image data that are produced immediately following a natural or an anthropogenic disaster event. Rapid damage assessment is the key to time critical decision support in disaster management to better utilize available response resources and accelerate recovery and relief efforts. But exploiting huge volumes of high resolution image data for identifying damaged areas with robust consistency in near real time is a challenging task. In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique to identify areas of structural damage from high resolution optical satellite data using features based on image content.

Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Mtral, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

110

Assessing United States hurricane damage under different environmental conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hurricane activity between 1979 and 2011 was studied to determine damage statistics under different environmental conditions. Hurricanes cause billions of dollars of damage every year in the United States, but damage ...

Maheras, Anastasia Francis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Using Landsat to Identify Thunderstorm Damage in Agricultural Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 12 and 18 August 1999, severe thunderstorms produced damaging winds and hail that caused an estimated $50 million in damage to agriculture in west-central Illinois. Landsat-7 imagery was obtained to determine the arealextent of damage and ...

Mace L. Bentley; Thomas L. Mote; Paporn Thebpanya

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Schools - Lightning Causing Electric Equipment Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of damage to a school's electronic controls and integrated circuit boards within their fire alarm and clock/bell system when there are lightning storms.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Laser Damage Precursors in Fused Silica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a longstanding, and largely unexplained, correlation between the laser damage susceptibility of optical components and both the surface quality of the optics, and the presence of near surface fractures in an optic. In the present work, a combination of acid leaching, acid etching, and confocal time resolved photoluminescence (CTP) microscopy has been used to study laser damage initiation at indentation sites. The combination of localized polishing and variations in indentation loads allows one to isolate and characterize the laser damage susceptibility of densified, plastically flowed and fractured fused silica. The present results suggest that: (1) laser damage initiation and growth are strongly correlated with fracture surfaces, while densified and plastically flowed material is relatively benign, and (2) fracture events result in the formation of an electronically defective rich surface layer which promotes energy transfer from the optical beam to the glass matrix.

Miller, P; Suratwala, T; Bude, J; Laurence, T A; Shen, N; Steele, W A; Feit, M; Menapace, J; Wong, L

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

Thin Film Femtosecond Laser Damage Competition  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors, a damage competition was started at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state of the art of high laser resistance coatings since they are tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. In 2009 a high reflector coating was selected at a wavelength of 786 nm at normal incidence at a pulse length of 180 femtoseconds. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials and layer count, and spectral results will also be shared.

Stolz, C J; Ristau, D; Turowski, M; Blaschke, H

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many homeowners need help caring for or removing damaged trees after a natural disaster. This publication explains what a certified arborist is and how to select one. It also cautions against burning debris downed by a storm.

Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many homeowners need help caring for or removing damaged trees after a natural disaster. This publication explains what a certified arborist is and how to select one. It also cautions against burning debris downed by a storm.

Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

117

Tornado Damage Estimation Using Polarimetric Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of tornadic debris signature (TDS) parameters to estimate tornado damage severity using Norman, Oklahoma (KOUN), polarimetric radar data (polarimetric version of the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler radar). ...

David J. Bodine; Matthew R. Kumjian; Robert D. Palmer; Pamela L. Heinselman; Alexander V. Ryzhkov

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume II, Technical Information, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study to determine the potential cumulative effects of proposed small hydro development on the fisheries of the Swan River drainage. This report contains technical information and is a support document for the main report (Leathe and Enk, 1985). Consequently, discussion of results was minimized. The sections on fish population monitoring, streambed monitoring, habitat survey comparisons, and water temperature are the only portions that were not discussed in the main report. 5 refs., 55 figs., 44 tabs.

Leathe, Stephen A.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a process for etching a material such as LiNbO{sub 3} by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

Arnold, G.W. Jr.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.

1988-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

120

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Reference Poster: Turbine Bearing Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage to turbine and generator bearings accounts for a significant amount of lost generation in the power industry. There are numerous known damage mechanisms affecting these bearings, and as part of EPRIs technology transfer efforts, we have developed a reference poster. This poster provides clear, concise, and visual information for a wide variety of mechanisms and is meant to supplement related EPRI projects. By providing an overview of various issues as well as information on how to ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

122

R-damage cassette (incorporated brass sleeve)  

SciTech Connect

The R-Damage series of ten experiments is part of a long-term collaboration with RFNC/VNIIEF in pulsed power technology. These experiments use a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage, which allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions and post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis. Dynamic in-situ experimental velocimetry diagnostics are also employed. LANL is responsible for the design of the experimental load and velocimetry system. VNIIEF is responsible for the design and construction of the driving explosive magnetic generator. Eight of the experiments in the planned series have been completed. Thus far, data has been collected about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. The final two experiments will continue the study of material recollected after complete failure. The load assembly shown is similar to that employed in the previous two experiments, with some modiflications for easier assembly.

Griego, Jeffrey Randall [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

ABSTRACT: Ion-Induced Damage Accumulation and Electron-Beam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007... Ion-Induced Damage Accumulation and Electron-Beam-Enhanced ... damage accumulation in strontium titanate from 1.0 MeV Au irradiation

124

Clustered DNA Damage Spectrum in Primary Human Hematopoietic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

94805 Villejuif Cedex France Clustered DNA Damages Induced by Low Radiation Doses Irradiation of cells with low doses of X- or -rays induces clustered damages in mammalian...

125

Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental monitoring stations, canyons Stations supporting Santa...

126

Reactor Loose Part Damage Assessments on Steam Generator Tube Sheets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??PROCTOR, WILLIAM CYRUS. Reactor Loose Part Damage Assessments on Steam Generator Tube Sheets. (Under the direction of Joseph Michael Doster). Damage from loose parts inside (more)

Proctor, William Cyrus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Damage tracker: a cloud and mobile system for collecting damage information after natural disasters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tornadoes and other natural disasters frequently cause large amounts of damage to buildings and infrastructure. An important part of learning from these events is assessing key damage-indicators within the affected area. Researchers can analyze these ... Keywords: cloud, geo-tagging, natural disaster, tornado

Chris Hodapp, Matt Robbins, Jeff Gray, Andrew Graettinger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Application of a model to the evaluation of flood damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the initial results of a common methodology for the evaluation of damage produced by a flood. A model has been developed for flood damage estimation based on a geographic information system (GIS). It could be used by land administration ... Keywords: Damage evaluation, Flood, GIS, Hydraulic modelling, Stage---damage curves

F. Luino; C. G. Cirio; M. Biddoccu; A. Agangi; W. Giulietto; F. Godone; G. Nigrelli

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents i TEXAS WILDLIFE DAMAGE MANAGMENT.............................................................................................................................. 2 #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page 1 TEXAS WILDLIFE-651-2880 karen.s.dulaney@usda.gov #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page

Wilkins, Neal

130

EFFECT OF CREVICE FORMER ON CORROSION DAMAGE PROPAGATION  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) To determine the effect of the crevice former on the localized corrosion damage propagation; (2) FOCUS on post initiation stage, crevice propagation and arrest processes; (3) Determine the evolution of damage--severity, shape, location/distribution, damage profile; and (4) Model of crevice corrosion propagation, i.e. the evolution of the crevice corrosion damage profile.

J.H. Payer; U. Landau; X. Shan; A.S. Agarwal

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Assessing Hail and Freeze Damage to Field Corn and Sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a crop has been damaged by hail, it is important to be able to gauge the extent of the damage, the potential for recovery of the damaged crop, and the actions that might be necessary to maximize the recovery process. This publication tells how to assess hail damage.

Livingston, Stephen

1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Radiation-damage calculations with NJOY  

SciTech Connect

Atomic displacement, gas production, transmutation, and nuclear heating can all be calculated with the NJOY nuclear data processing system using evaluated data in ENDF/B format. Using NJOY helps assure consistency between damage cross sections and those used for transport, and NJOY provides convenient interface formats for linking data to application codes. Unique features of the damage calculation include a simple momentum balance treatment for radiative capture and a new model for (n, particle) reactions based on statistical model calculations. Sample results for iron and nickel are given and compared with the results of other methods.

MacFarlane, R.E.; Muir, D.W.; Mann, F.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Tornado Damage Survey at Moore, Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 4 May 1999, the Wind Science and Engineering Research Center at Texas Tech University dispatched three survey teams to the Oklahoma City area to conduct a tornado damage survey. The author was the leader of one of the teams whose purpose was ...

Timothy P. Marshall

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Quantitative study of oilfield casing damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carrying on the analysis to the cause of casing failure based on engineering factors and geological factors, and choosing the improved analytic hierarchy process to have a quantitative study for oilfield of the casing failure, improved the influence ... Keywords: analytical hierarchy process (AHP), casing damage, quantitative analysis

Deng Rui; Zhang Liang; Guo Haimin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As advances continue to be made in laser technology there is an increasing demand for materials that have high thresholds for laser-induced damage. Laser damage occurs when light is absorbed, creating defects in the crystal lattice. These defects can lead to the emission of atoms, ions and molecules from the sample. One specific field where laser damage is of serious concern is semiconductor lithography, which is beginning to use light at a wavelength of 157 nm. CaF2 is a candidate material for use in this new generation of lithography. In order to prevent unnecessary damage of optical components, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for laser damage and the factors that serve to enhance it. In this research, we study various aspects of laser interactions with CaF2, including impurity absorbance and various forms of damage caused by incident laser light. Ultraviolet (UV) laser light at 266 nm with both femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) pulse widths is used to induce ion and neutral particle emission from cleaved samples of CaF2. The resulting mass spectra show significant differences suggesting that different mechanisms for desorption occur following excitation using the different pulse durations. Following irradiation by ns pulses at 266 nm, multiple single-photon absorption from defect states is likely responsible for ion emission whereas the fs case is driven by a multi-photon absorption process. This idea is further supported by the measurements made of the transmission and reflection of fs laser pulses at 266 nm, the results of which reveal a non-linear absorption process in effect at high incident intensities. In addition, the kinetic energy profiles of desorbed Ca and K contaminant atoms are different indicating that a different mechanism is responsible for their emission as well. Overall, these results show that purity plays a key role in the desorption of atoms from CaF2 when using ns pulses. On the other hand, once the irradiance reaches high levels, like that of the fs case, significant desorption is possible due to multi-photon absorption by the intrinsic material.

Espana, A.; Joly, A.G.; Hess, W.P.; Dickinson, J.T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Minimizing formation damage during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well. The method comprises: filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; perforating the casing; and introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

140

Effect of Operational Transients on Boiler Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is increasingly the case that utility systems demand more flexibility in a unit's ability to respond to dispatch requirements, which can create a conflict between maximizing efficient operation and limiting damage accumulation. A boiler can be operated in various cycling modes and can be subjected to planned and unplanned transients associated with load following, minimum load operation, forced cooling, variable pressure operation, increased ramp rates, increased attemperation, over-temperature operat...

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Modeling Coal Seam Damage in Cast Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A discrete element computer program named DMC_BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting (Preece & Taylor, 1989). This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in two dimensions. DMC_BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts (Preece et al, 1993). Coal seam chilling refers to the shattering of a significant portion of the coal leaving unusable fines. It is also refereed to as coal damage. Chilling is caused during a blast by a combination of explosive shock energy and movement of the adjacent rock. Chilling can be minimized by leaving a buffer zone between the bottom of the blastholes and the coal seam or by changing the blast design to decrease the powder factor or by a combination of both. Blast design in coal mine cast blasting is usually a compromise between coal damage and rock fragmentation and movement (heave). In this paper the damage to coal seams from rock movement is examined using the discrete element computer code DMC_BLAST. A rock material strength option has been incorporated into DMC_BLAST by placing bonds/links between the spherical particles used to model the rock. These bonds tie the particles together but can be broken when the tensile, compressive or shear stress in the bond exceeds the defined strength. This capability has been applied to predict coal seam damage, particularly at the toe of a cast blast where drag forces exerted by movement of the overlying rock can adversely effect the top of the coal at the bench face. A simulation of coal mine cast blasting has been performed with special attention being paid to the strength of the coal and its behavior at t he bench face during movement of the overlying material.

Chung, S.H.; Preece, D.S.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation of Coal Combustion Product Damage Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published an assessment that identified 67 coal combustion product (CCP) management with groundwater or surface water impacts that were categorized as proven or potential damage cases. This report provides further evaluation of these cases, including additional data obtained from power companies and public sources. Volume 1 provides an overview and summary of findings, and Volume 2 provides descriptions of individual cases.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing from a gas condensate reservoir. Questions were raised about whether flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. In the most recent work done by Adedeji Ayoola Adeyeye, this subject was studied when the effects of reservoir depletion were minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. He also used an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture along with a linear model as an adequate analogy. He concluded that the skin due to liquid build-up is not enough to prevent lower flowing bottomhole pressures from producing more gas. This current study investigated the condensate damage at the face of the hydraulic fracture in transient and boundary dominated periods when the effects of reservoir depletion are taken into account. As a first step, simulation of liquid flow into the fracture was performed using a 2D 1-phase simulator in order to help us to better understand the results of gas condensate simulation. Then during the research, gas condensate models with various gas compositions were simulated using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Reza, Rostami Ravari

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Evaluation of Coal Combustion Product Damage Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published an assessment that identified 67 coal combustion product (CCP) management facilities with groundwater or surface water impacts that were categorized as proven or potential damage cases. This report provides further evaluation of these cases, including additional data obtained from power companies and public sources. Volume 1 provides an overview and summary of findings, and Volume 2 provides descriptions of individual cases.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fast Neutron Radioactivity and Damage Studies on Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

McClellan, CA 95652 and J. Volk, FNAL, Batavia, Il 60510,current range Wolf and J. Volk, Radiation Damage StudiesJ. Spencer, Z. Wolf and J. Volk, Radiation Damage diation

Spencer, J.; Anderson, S. D.; Wolf, Z.; Volk, J. T.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Damages to DNA that result in neoplastic transformation  

SciTech Connect

Some topics discussed are: correlation between carcinogens and mutagens; defective DNA repair in uv-damaged xeroderma pigmentosum cells; analysis of nucleotide damage to DNA following exposure to chemicals or radiations; photoreactivation in uv-irradiated Escherichia coli; tumor development in fish; excision repair as an aid in identifying damage; detection of excision repair; role of endonucleases in repair of uv damage; and alkylation products and tumors. (HLW)

Setlow, R.B.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation damage of materials has long been of fundamental interest, especially since the growth of laser technology. One such source of damage comes from UV laser light. Laser systems continue to move into shorter wavelength ranges, but unfortunately are limited by the damage threshold of their optical components. For example, semiconductor lithography is making its way into the 157nm range and requires a material that can not only transmit this light (air cannot), but also withstand the highly energetic photons present at this shorter wavelength. CaF2, an alkaline earth halide, is the chosen material for vacuum UV 157 nm excimer radiation. It can transmit light down to 120 nm and is relatively inexpensive. Although it is readily available through natural and synthetic sources, it is often times difficult to find in high purity. Impurities in the crystal can result in occupied states in the band gap that induce photon absorption [2] and ultimately lead to the degradation of the material. In order to predict how well CaF2 will perform under irradiation of short wavelength laser light, one must understand the mechanisms for laser-induced damage. Laser damage is often a two-step process: initial photons create new defects in the lattice and subsequent photons excite these defects. When laser light is incident on a solid surface there is an initial production of electron-hole (e-h) pairs, a heating of free electrons and a generation of local heating around optically absorbing centers [3]. Once this initial excitation converts to the driving energy for nuclear motion, the result is an ejection of atoms, ions and molecules from the surface, known as desorption or ablation [3]. Secondary processes further driving desorption are photoabsorption, successive excitations of self-trapped excitons (STE's) and defects, and ionization of neutrals by incident laser light [3]. The combination of laser-induced desorption and the alterations to the electronic and geometrical structure of the lattice result in defect formation. In the material CaF2 some of these defects take the form of F-centers, an electron trapped at a halogen vacancy [4], and H-centers, a F2- molecular ion at a single lattice site [5]. While the F-centers are stable, the H-centers are transient but can form into aggregates that are stable. There are many different configurations the defects can take based on the relative position of F and H centers in the lattice and this is extensively discussed in literature [1,4,5]. Once these defects have formed they cause further absorption of light, which ultimately induces particle emission and the production of even more defects. Various forms of laser-induced damage of CaF2 have been studied. For example, the mechanism for photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of F+ from CaF2 (111) is discussed in ref. 6 and the energy threshold, distribution and kinetics governing electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) is investigated in ref. 7. The desorption of neutral Ca and F atoms has also been explored [1]. In this paper I focus on the emission of ions and neutrals from CaF2 under the irradiation of pulsed laser light at 266 nm, in addition to a brief study of its purity and transmittance.

Espana, Aubrey L.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Dickinson, J T.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ductile damage modeling based on void coalescence and percolation theories  

SciTech Connect

A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included, and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. The underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. The model is intended for hydrocode based computer simulation. An experimental program is underway to validate the model.

Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing a gas condensate reservoir and questions were raised about how much drop in flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. Previous attempts to answer these questions have been from the perspective of a radial model. Condensate builds up in the reservoir as the reservoir pressure drops below the dewpoint pressure. As a result, the gas moving to the wellbore becomes leaner. With respect to the study by El-Banbi and McCain, the gas production rate may stabilize, or possibly increase, after the period of initial decline. This is controlled primarily by the condensate saturation near the wellbore. This current work has a totally different approach. The effects of reservoir depletion are minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. It also assumes an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture and uses a linear model. During the research, gas condensate simulations were performed using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, most treatises about steam turbines have concentrated on thermo-dynamics or design. In contrast, the primary focus of this book is on the problems that occur in the turbine steam path. Some of these problems have been long known to the industry, starting as early as A. Stodola's work at the turn of the century in which mechanisms such as solid particle erosion, corrosion and liquid droplet damage were recognized. What we have tried to do here is to provide, in a single, comprehensive refere...

1999-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

153

Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions  

SciTech Connect

This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

Surdutovich, Eugene [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gallagher, David C. [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Solov'yov, Andrey V. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Connecting Chromatin Modifying Factors to DNA Damage Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Cells are constantly damaged by factors that can induce DNA damage. Eukaryotic cells must rapidly load DNA repair proteins onto damaged chromatin during the DNA damage response (DDR). Chromatin-remodeling complexes use the energy from ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have well-established functions in transcription. Emerging lines of evidence indicate that chromatin-remodeling complexes are important and may remodel nucleosomes during DNA damage repair. New studies also reveal that ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is involved in cell cycle progression, signal transduction pathways, and interaction and modification of DDR-related proteins that are specifically and intimately connected with the process of DNA damage. This article summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of the interplay between chromatin remodeling and DNA damage response.

Weiwei Lai; Hongde Li; Shuang Liu; Yongguang Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Application of nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy to discern material damage  

SciTech Connect

Materials containing structural damage have a far greater nonlinear elastic response than materials with no structural damage. This is the basis for nonlinear wave diagnostics of damage, methods which are remarkably sensitive to the detection and progression of damage in materials. Here the authors describe one nonlinear method, the application of harmonics and sum and difference frequency to discern damage in materials. The method is termed Nonlinear Wave Modulation Spectroscopy (NWMS). It consists of exciting a sample with continuous waves of two separate frequencies simultaneously, and inspecting the harmonics of the two waves, and their sum and difference frequencies (sidebands). Undamaged materials are essentially linear in their response to the two waves, while the same material, when damaged, becomes highly nonlinear, manifested by harmonics and sideband generation. The authors illustrate the method by experiments on uncracked and cracked plexiglass and sandstone samples, and by applying it to intact and damaged engine components.

Johnson, P.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sutin, A. [Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States); Abeele, K.E.A. van den [Catholic Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Building Physics

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Proton damage effects on light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the effects of 16-MeV proton irradiation on the performance of a variety of light emitting diodes (LED's) emitting between 820 and 1300 nm. Total light output and current were measured at room temperature as a function of forward bias prior to and following a sequence of room temperature 16-MeV proton irradiations. Our results indicate that the relative amount of proton-induced degradation from one LED type to another is similar to that observed for neutron and gamma irradiations. More specifically, the most sensitive device is the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED which is characterized by a long preirradiation minority carrier lifetime. The most resistant LEDs are the high radiance GaAlAs (820 nm) and InGaAsP (1300 nm) LEDs. As in the case of Si devices, the degradation rate per irradiating particle fluence is significantly greater for proton irradiation of these LEDs than it is for neutron exposure. Neutron damage data presented herein indicate that the ratio of proton-to-neutron degradation rates can be as high as 100. Lifetime-damage constant products for constant current operation are calculated for each LED type and vary from 1.5 x 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 2//p for the InGaAsP LED to 1.1 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 2//p for the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED.

Rose, B.H.; Barnes, C.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as salmon) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Radiation Damage in Polarized Ammonia Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid NH3 and ND3 provide a highly polarizable, radiation resistant source of polarized protons and deuterons and have been used extensively in high luminosity experiments investigating the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past twenty years, the UVA polarized target group has been instrumental in producing and polarizing much of the material used in these studies, and many practical considerations have been learned in this time. In this discussion, we analyze the polarization performance of the solid ammonia targets used during the recent JLab Eg4 run. Topics include the rate of polarization decay with accumulated charge, the annealing procedure for radiation damaged targets to recover polarization, and the radiation induced change in optimum microwave frequency used to polarize the sample. We also discuss the success we have had in implementing frequency modulation of the polarizing microwave frequency.

K. Slifer

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pavements are a major part of the infrastructure in the United States. Moisture damage of these pavements is a significant problem. To predict and prevent this kind of moisture damage a great deal of research has been performed on this issue in past. This study validates an analytical approach based on surface energy aimed at assessing moisture damage. Two types of bitumen and three aggregates are evaluated in the study. The two types of bitumen represent very different chemical extremes and the three aggregates (a limestone, siliceous gravel, and granite) represent a considerable range in mineralogy. Moisture damage was monitered as a change in dynamic modulus with load cycles. The analysis demonstrates the need to consider mixture compliance as well as bond energy in order to predict moisture damage. Mixtures with the two types of bitumen and each aggregate with and without hydrated lime were evaluated. The hydrated lime substantially improved the resistance of the mixture to moisture damage.

Shah, Brij D.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could double by 2050 Researcher tackles unprecedented county-by-county economic loss forecast Research in impacts,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Rate-Theory Approach to Irradiation Damage Modeling with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors II. Presentation Title, A Rate-Theory Approach to Irradiation Damage Modeling...

162

Brief Review of Building Damage by The 2011 Tohoku Japan ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the coast of Japan, damages of many buildings and residential land by ... BRI) and the National Institute for Land & Infrastructure Management (NILIM ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

MEASUREMENT OF MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF DAMAGED ENERGETIC MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

We recently conducted damaged experiments on three explosives (mechanical damage on LX-04 and thermal experiments on HPP and PBXN-9) and characterized the effect of damage on some material properties. The MTS equipment was used to apply compressive cycling to LX-04 pressed parts and the results showed that older LX-04 parts became mechanically weaker than newer parts. After repeated compressive cycling for over 20,000 times, older LX-04 parts failed but newer LX-04 parts survived. Thermal insults were applied to PBXN-9 and HPP at 180 C and 200 C, respectively in unconfined conditions for several hours. The thermally-damaged HPP sample suffered 12.0% weight losses and a volume expansion of 20% was observed. Porosity of the damaged HPP increased to 25% after thermal exposure, which led to higher gas permeability. Burn rates of damaged PBXN-9 were 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of pristine samples but burn rates of damaged HPP were only slightly higher than those of pristine HPP. Small-scale safety tests (impact, friction, and spark) showed no significant sensitization when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature. Gas permeation measurements showed that gas permeability in damaged materials was several orders of magnitude higher than that in pristine materials. In-situ measurements of gas permeability at high temperatures were made on HPP samples and the results showed that the gas permeability increased by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude.

Hsu, P C; Hust, G; Dehaven, M; Chidester, S; Glascoe, L; Hoffman, M; Maienschein, J L

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

COURSE NOTES: Radiation Damage in Metals (NEEP 541)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... "Radiation Damage in Metals (NEEP 541)." Department of Engineering Physics. Fall 2005. University of Wisconsin-Madison. Launch Site

165

Neutronics and radiation damage calculations for fusion reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the neutronics calculations that have been carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess radiation damage problems in fusion reactors are presented and discussed.

Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Gabriel, T.A.; Santoro, R.T.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Understanding How Damages Are Determined in Patent Litigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding How Damages Are Determined in Patent Litigation. Arnold B. Silverman. The owner of a U.S. patent has the right to prevent others from making ,...

167

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Low Dose Radiation Francis Cucinotta NASA Johnson Space Center Abstract Modular systems...

168

Identification of Damage Modes in Ceramic Matrix Composites ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis and Modeling of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in Ceramic Matrix ... and Microstructure of Alumina Composites for Energy Efficient Sliding Systems.

169

Lumber-Wood Products - ASDs and Lighting Ballasts Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of equipment damage to adjustable speed drives (ASDs) and lighting ballasts at a hardwood floor manufacturing facility.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

{sup 137}Cs concentration in soil samples from an early survey of Hiroshima atomic bomb and cumulative dose estimation from the fallout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low background gamma-ray measurement has been performed to determine the {sup 137}Cs content in soil samples collected in a very early survey of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. These soil samples were collected just 3 d after the explosion within 5 km from the hypocenter and were not exposed to the global fallout from nuclear weapon tests. Out of 22 samples, {sup 137}Cs was detected for 11 samples, and their radionactivities ranged from 0.16-10.6mBq g{sup {minus}1} at the time of the measurement. A comparison of the {sup 137}Cs deposition with the rainfall area within Hiroshima city indicates that the rainfall area was wider than the previously proposed one. Cumulative exposure by the fallout has been estimated to be 0.31 mC kg{sup {minus}1} (0.12 R) 1.0 mC kg{sup {minus}1} (4 R) in the heavy fallout area. 20 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi [Hiroshima Univ., Kagamiyama (Japan)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

An analysis of the kinetics of thermal damage and movement of damage front in laser irradiated egg white  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some of the major applications of laser surgery involve the photocoagulation of diseased tissue, with minimal or no damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. There is a growing need for a model for the quantification of thermal damage. The models presently available in the literature assume biological tissue to be composed of a single component having a single rate of damage. But recent studies have shown that a distribution of rate parameters rather than a single rate parameter, best describes the process of thermal coagulation. This study assumes tissue to be composed of two or more components, having different rates of damage. The results of this model are then used to find an effective rate of damage for a single rate model which would yield the same end concentrations as the multi rate model. Results indicate that the difference between the single rate and the multi rate predictions is highly predominant for relatively lower power settings, for the biokinetic coefficient values used in this research. As the power is increased, a single rate model effectively describes a multi rate model, in the prediction of damage and movement of damage front. The movement of damage front was also studied experimentally using Digital Image Processing techniques. The damage model predicted by this study qualitatively follows the theoretical models available in the literature.

Azeemi, Aamer Amjed

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers  

SciTech Connect

Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

Wise, J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Detection of Storm Damage Tracks with EOS Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The damage surveys conducted by the NWS in the aftermath of a reported tornadic event are used to document the location of the tornado ground damage track (pathlength and width) and an estimation of the tornado intensity. This study explores the ...

Gary J. Jedlovec; Udaysankar Nair; Stephanie L. Haines

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Micro-crack Damage Evolution of Fracturing Rock Chaotic Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chaotic theory and bifurcation of modern nonlinear science were used to study the evolution of micro-cracks under the hydraulic fracturing of the rock mass characteristics, the tensor damage variable which described the chao evolution of micro-cracks ... Keywords: chaos theory, bifurcation theory, damage evolution

Zhaowan Chun; Wang Tingting

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation Speaker(s): Eliyahu Ne'eman Date: June 7, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This Presentation is based on CIE Publication 157:2004 which has been recently published. It is the report of CIE Technical Committee 3-22 with the same title. Leading experts on Museum lighting from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Japan, Germany, Great Britain, New Zealand and the USA, took part in writing this document. The two processes by which exposure to light may cause damage are photochemical action and radiant heating effect. These processes are examined and the characteristics of damage caused to museum objects are described. Recent research, which has aimed to relate the extent of exposure of materials to measures of damage

177

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Denise Munoz 1 , Albert Davalos 1 , Francis Rodier 1 , Misako Kawahara 1 , Judith Campisi 1,2 and Steven Yannone 1,3 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 84-171, Berkeley CA 94720; 2 Buck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Boulevard, Novato CA 94945; 3 Corresponding author Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytologically detectable as large nuclear foci that contain phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), the adaptor protein 53BP1, and several other proteins that participate in the sensing and processing of DNA damage (DNA damage foci). In normal human cells, moderately high IR (0.5-1 Gy) doses cause the rapid appearance of these foci (acute DNA damage foci), which gradually disappear

178

Underground infrastructure damage for a Chicago scenario  

SciTech Connect

Estimating effects due to an urban IND (improvised nuclear device) on underground structures and underground utilities is a challenging task. Nuclear effects tests performed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the era of nuclear weapons testing provides much information on how underground military structures respond. Transferring this knowledge to answer questions about the urban civilian environment is needed to help plan responses to IND scenarios. Explosions just above the ground surface can only couple a small fraction of the blast energy into an underground shock. The various forms of nuclear radiation have limited penetration into the ground. While the shock transmitted into the ground carries only a small fraction of the blast energy, peak stresses are generally higher and peak ground displacement is lower than in the air blast. While underground military structures are often designed to resist stresses substantially higher than due to the overlying rocks and soils (overburden), civilian structures such as subways and tunnels would generally only need to resist overburden conditions with a suitable safety factor. Just as we expect the buildings themselves to channel and shield air blast above ground, basements and other underground openings as well as changes of geology will channel and shield the underground shock wave. While a weaker shock is expected in an urban environment, small displacements on very close-by faults, and more likely, soils being displaced past building foundations where utility lines enter could readily damaged or disable these services. Immediately near an explosion, the blast can 'liquefy' a saturated soil creating a quicksand-like condition for a period of time. We extrapolate the nuclear effects experience to a Chicago-based scenario. We consider the TARP (Tunnel and Reservoir Project) and subway system and the underground lifeline (electric, gas, water, etc) system and provide guidance for planning this scenario.

Dey, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Rabdall J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice, Volume 2: Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, most treatises about steam turbines have concentrated on thermo-dynamics or design. In contrast, the primary focus of this book is on the problems that occur in the turbine steam path. Some of these problems have been long known to the industry, starting as early as A. Stodola's work at the turn of the century in which mechanisms such as solid particle erosion, corrosion and liquid droplet damage were recognized. What we have tried to do here is to provide, in a single, comprehensive refere...

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Damage Development on Stone Armored Breakwaters and Revetments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method to calculate damage progression on a rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, or jetty trunk armor layer. The methods apply to uniform-sized armor stone (0.75W50 ? W50 ? 1.25W50, W50 = median weight of armor stone) as well as riprap (0.125W50 ? W50 ? 4W50) exposed to depthlimited wave conditions. The equations discussed herein are primarily intended to be used as part of a life-cycle analysis, to predict the damage for a series of storms throughout the lifetime of the structure. This lifecycle analysis including damage prediction allows engineers to balance initial cost with expected maintenance costs in order to reduce the overall cost of the structure. The equations are intended to provide a tool for accurate damage estimates in order to reduce the possibility of unexpected maintenance costs. INTRODUCTION: Rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, and jetty projects require accurate damage prediction as part of life-cycle analyses. But few studies have been conducted to determine damage progression on stone armor layers for variable wave conditions over the life of a structure. Previous armor stability lab studies were intended to determine damage for the peak of a design storm. As such, most previous laboratory studies were begun with an undamaged

Jeffery A. Melby

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Feasibility of impact-acoustic emissions for detection of damaged wheat kernels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A non-destructive, real time device was developed to detect insect damage, sprout damage, and scab damage in kernels of wheat. Kernels are impacted onto a steel plate and the resulting acoustic signal analyzed to detect damage. The acoustic signal was ... Keywords: Acoustic emissions, Insect damage kernels, Neural network, Sorting, Spectral analysis

Tom C. Pearson; A. Enis Cetin; Ahmed H. Tewfik; Ron P. Haff

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High energy neutron and charged particle radiation cause microstructural and mechanical degradation in structural metals and alloys, such as phase segregation, void swelling, embrittlement and creep. Radiation induced damages typically limit nuclear materials to a lifetime of about 40 years. Next generation nuclear reactors require materials that can sustain over 60 - 80 years. Therefore it is of great significance to explore new materials with better radiation resistance, to design metals with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe. Such systems obtain high volume fraction of boundaries, which are considered sinks to radiation induced defects. From the viewpoint of nanomechanics, it is of interest to investigate the plastic deformation mechanisms of nanostructured films, which typically show strong size dependence. By controlling the feature size (layer thickness, twin spacing and grain size), it is applicable to picture a deformation mechanism map which also provides prerequisite information for subsequent radiation hardening study. And from the viewpoint of radiation effects, it is of interest to explore the fundamentals of radiation response, to examine the microstructural and mechanical variations of irradiated nanometals and to enrich the design database. More importantly, with the assistance of in situ techniques, it is appealing to examine the defect generation, evolution, annihilation, absorption and interaction with internal interfaces (layer interfaces, twin boundaries and grain boundaries). Moreover, well-designed nanostructures can also verify the speculation that radiation induced defect density and hardening show clear size dependence. The focus of this thesis lies in the radiation response of Ag/Ni multilayers and nanotwinned Ag subjected to charged particles. The radiation effects in irradiated nanograined Fe are also investigated for comparison. Radiation responses in these nanostructured metallic films suggest that immiscible incoherent Ag/Ni multilayers are more resistant to radiation in comparison to their monolithic counterparts. Their mechanical properties and radiation response show strong layer thickness dependence in terms of radiation hardening and defect density. Coherent twin boundaries can interact with stacking fault tetrahedral and remove them effectively. Twin boundaries can actively absorb radiation induced defects and defect clusters resulting in boundary migration. Size dependence is also found in nanograins where fewer defects exhibit in films with smaller grains.

Yu, Kaiyuan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Sources of Data on Freezing Rain and Resulting Damages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freezing rain produces major damages each year in the United States, and various affected groups continue to seek data on the incidence and losses produced by freezing rain. The various kinds of data available about freezing rain and related ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Tamara G. Creech

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Damage to residential structures from surface mine blasting  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines has studied the problem of cracking in residential structure walls from vibrations produced by blasting in surface mines. Direct observations were made of blasting damage consisting primarily of cosmetic cracking.

Siskind, D.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect

Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

Koller, Darcie D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, Ill, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of Damage Tolerant Inco 718 for High Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

697-712. 7. M. Chang et al, Damage tolerance of alloy 718 turbine disc material,. Superalloys. 92, ed. S. Antolovitch et al. (Warrendale,. PA : TMS 1992) 446-456.

187

Spectral identification of ozone-damaged pine needles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Needles were collected from ponderosa and Jeffrey pine trees at three sites in the Sierra Nevada, and were assembled into 504 samples and grouped according to five dominant live needle conditions-green, winter fleck, sucking insect damage, scale insect ...

A. V. Di Vittorio; G. S. Biging

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 4/27/2011 12:00:00 AM... Concerns about the damage that volcanic ash clouds can inflict on aircraft engines resulted in last year's $2 billion...

189

Windspeed Analyses of Tornadoes Based on Structural Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Documentation is presented for the tornadoes of 28 June 1979 in the Iowa towns of Manson and Algona. Analyses of failed engineered and nonengineered structures are presented with an emphasis on those studies of observed damage that can form the ...

Amde M. Wolde-Tinsae; Max L. Porter; Donald I. McKeown

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fast neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Spencer, Z. Wolf and J. Volk, Radiation Damage StudiesMcClellan, CA 95652 and J. Volk, FNAL, Batavia, Il 60510,PI), James E. Spencer, James T. Volk and Zachary R. Wolf,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radiation Damage Studies with Hadrons on Materials and Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SLAC-PUB-10534 July 2004 Radiation Damage Studies withJ. Spencer. , Z. Wolf, SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA M.J. Spencer ? Z. Wolf, SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fast neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-Level Dosimeters used in the SLAC Photon andNeutron Fields, SLAC-PUB-8517, 2002. [7] G. Gross, J.SLAC-PUB-11219 May2005 Fast Neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Activation and radiation damage in the environment of hadron accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A component which suffers radiation damage usually also becomes radioactive, since the source of activation and radiation damage is the interaction of the material with particles from an accelerator or with reaction products. However, the underlying mechanisms of the two phenomena are different. These mechanisms are described here. Activation and radiation damage can have far-reaching consequences. Components such as targets, collimators, and beam dumps are the first candidates for failure as a result of radiation damage. This means that they have to be replaced or repaired. This takes time, during which personnel accumulate dose. If the dose to personnel at work would exceed permitted limits, remote handling becomes necessary. The remaining material has to be disposed of as radioactive waste, for which an elaborate procedure acceptable to the authorities is required. One of the requirements of the authorities is a complete nuclide inventory. The methods used for calculation of such inventories are presented,...

Kiselev, Daniela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Microsoft Word - SWPAIceStormDamage_021009.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE), continues to make steady progress in its efforts to restore transmission lines in Arkansas and Missouri damaged during an ice storm on January 26-27,...

197

Microsoft Word - SWPAIceStormDamage_020609.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE), continues to make steady progress in its efforts to restore transmission lines in Arkansas and Missouri damaged during a January 27-28, 2009 ice...

198

Conservation of Severely Damaged Paper Using Passivation Polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work examined the use of passivation polymers in the conservation of severely damaged paper. It specifically investigated the use of this functional polymer treatment to address the issues of damage to paper caused by waterlogging, mold, and internal acidity. Several experiments were designed and conducted to examine the effects of the polymers in the conservation of papers compromised by these conditions. Paper artifacts from the Bonfire Memorabilia Collection were selected and conserved using treatment protocols that included the use of the passivation polymers. The conservation of some of the damaged papers from this culturally important site demonstrated the effectiveness of the polymer treatment in real-world conservation situations. This dissertation established that the use of passivation polymers adds strength and stability to severely damaged paper.

Eilert, Eloise

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Normalized Hurricane Damages in the United States: 192595  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricanes are the costliest natural disasters in the United States. Understanding how both hurricane frequencies and intensities vary from year to year as well as how this is manifested in changes in damages that occur is a topic of great ...

Roger A. Pielke Jr.; Christopher W. Landsea

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. and Gupta, R. , Radiation Resistant Magnets for the RIARADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS A. F.HTS materials in high radiation environments requires that

Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, A.; Heilbronn, L.H.; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency Arnold C. Huang,1,2 Chantal Courtemanche,1,2 Nicole Kerry,1,2 Susan T. Mashiyama,1,2 Michael Fenech,3...

202

Tropical Cyclone Damages in China 19832006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on damage records released by the Department of Civil Affairs of China, direct economic losses and casualties associated with tropical cyclones that made landfall over China during 19832006 are examined. In an average year, landfalling ...

Qiang Zhang; Qiufeng Liu; Liguang Wu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Insured Lightning-Caused Property Damage in Three Western States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Insurance claims resulting from lightning damage in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming were analyzed during the period from 1987 to 1993. Most claims were from personal accounts, while some were commercial.

Ronald L. Holle; Ral E. Lpez; Lowell J. Arnold; John Endres

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evaluation of Explosive Cleaning Damage in Ferritic Boiler Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have reported boiler tube damage after explosive cleaning to control or remove slag deposits. The damage typically consists of tube crushing, denting, microcracking, and inner diameter (ID) initiated cracking. Because the latter two might not propagate through tube wall thickness initially, these types of cracking are not commonly detected during the cleaning process. However, tube failures after the boiler resumed service have been attributed to these ID-related cracking. Many utilities have r...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques  

SciTech Connect

A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Moisture Damage Test Methods for Evaluatingart and Critical Review of Test Methods. NCAT Report No.Pavement Moisture-Damage Test. Transportation Research

Lu, Qing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Header and Drum Damage: Theory and Practice: Volume 1: Information Common to All Damage Types; Volume 2: Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Headers and drums represent two of the largest and most expensive components in boilers. Particularly in the case of high-temperature headers, there are considerable safety concerns when operating aging plants, and some notable failures have occurred. For these reasons, understanding the types of damage that can accumulate and dealing with that damage are vital to the safe and economic operation of fossil power plants.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

Furmanski, Jevan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Daniel Tito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, George T. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Length-scale Effects in Cascade Damage Production in Iron  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics simulations provide an atomistic description of the processes that control primary radiation damage formation in atomic displacement cascades. An extensive database of simulations describing cascade damage production in single crystal iron has been compiled using a modified version of the interatomic potential developed by Finnis and Sinclair. This same potential has been used to investigate primary damage formation in nanocrystalline iron in order to have a direct comparison with the single crystal results. A statistically significant number of simulations were carried out at cascade energies of 10 keV and 20 keV and temperatures of 100 and 600K to make this comparison. The results demonstrate a significant influence of nearby grain boundaries as a sink for mobile defects during the cascade cooling phase. This alters the residual primary damage that survives the cascade event. Compared to single crystal, substantially fewer interstitials survive in the nanograined iron, while the number of surviving vacancies is similar or slightly greater than the single crystal result. The fraction of the surviving interstitials contained in clusters is also reduced. The asymmetry in the survival of the two types of point defects is likely to alter damage accumulation at longer times.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Kamenski, Paul J [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J. [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

211

Properly designed underbalanced drilling fluids can limit formation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling fluids for underbalanced operations require careful design and testing to ensure they do not damage sensitive formations. In addition to hole cleaning and lubrication functions, these fluids may be needed as kill fluids during emergencies. PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. used a systematic approach in developing and field testing a nondamaging drilling fluid. It was for use in underbalanced operations in the Glauconitic sandstone in the Westerose gas field in Alberta. A lab study was initiated to develop and test a non-damaging water-based drilling fluid for the horizontal well pilot project. The need to develop an inexpensive, nondamaging drilling fluid was previously identified during underbalanced drilling operations in the Weyburn field in southeastern Saskatchewan. A non-damaging fluid is required for hole cleaning, for lubrication of the mud motor, and for use as a kill fluid during emergencies. In addition, a nondamaging fluid is required when drilling with a conventional rig because pressure surges during connections and trips may result in the well being exposed to short periods of near balanced or overbalanced conditions. Without the protection of a filter cake, the drilling fluid will leak off into the formation, causing damage. The amount of damage is related to the rate of leak off and depth of invasion, which are directly proportional to the permeability to the fluid.

Churcher, P.L.; Yurkiw, F.J. [PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

A simplified implementation of a gradient-enhanced damage model with transient length scale effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gradient-enhanced damage models with constant gradient activity suffer from spurious damage growth at high deformation levels. This issue was resolved by Geers et al. (Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 160(1---2):133---153, 1998) by expressing the gradient ... Keywords: Continuum damage mechanics, Gradient-enhanced damage models, Regularized media, Transient internal length scale

S. Saroukhani; R. Vafadari; A. Simone

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging William Dynan Medical College of Georgia Abstract There is considerable overlap between cellular and molecular changes that occur in response to low doses of ionizing radiation and those that occur during aging. Both processes are characterized by accumulation of persistent DNA damage ("wear and tear" on the genome), accumulation of protein and lipid oxidation products, loss of regenerative capacity at the cellular and tissue level, and increased incidence of cancer. These observations support a hypothesis that exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation accelerates normal, aging-related tissue changes. We have investigated this hypothesis using a genetically tractable model organism, the Japanese medaka fish. The medaka is a whole-animal vertebrate

214

DNA damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic instability David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Secretory clusterin (sCLU) is a glycoprotein secreted from cells following exposure to genotoxic stress, and sCLU expression is elevated in many different disease states. sCLU is a pro-survival protein that acts as a molecular chaperone to remove cell debris caused by trauma to cells and tissues in vivo. sCLU expression is extremely sensitive to oxidative stress and DNA damage and can be induced by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), as low as 2 cGy. We previously demonstrated that sCLU was induced after LDIR by activation of the Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF-1R), and downstream stimulation of Src/MAPK/Erk-1/2 to promote binding of the Egr-1

215

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award April 22, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An exceptional waste management project at a Texas Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site following Hurricane Ike in 2008 has won a DOE Environmental Sustainability (EStar) Award for Waste/Pollution Prevention. The award recognizes the SPR Storm Recovery Debris Waste Management Project at the Big Hill storage complex near Beaumont, Texas, which was heavily impacted by Hurricane Ike in September 2008. Selected annually by an independent panel of judges, EStar awards recognize environmental sustainability projects and programs that reduce risks and impacts, protect

216

Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Protects against DNA Damage in Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Protects against DNA Damage in Low Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Protects against DNA Damage in Low Dose γ-Irradiated Cells Edouard Azzam New Jersey Medical School Cancer Center Abstract We have previously shown that exposure to low dose/low dose rate γ-rays can protect normal human and rodent cells against oxidative/clastogenic damages induced spontaneously or by a subsequent challenge dose of ionizing radiation. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying these effects, we used amine-specific isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based approach to identify induced proteolytic events. Intriguingly, the Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) was significantly up-regulated after 10cGy (0.2cGy/h) but not after 4 Gy (1 Gy/min) in several strains of normal human fibroblasts maintained in 2- or

217

Effects of ballistic damage on the dynamics of composite driveshafts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to study the dynamics of a composite driveshaft before and after ballistic damage is incurred. Driveshafts are tested under static and dynamic loads to obtain material, mechanical, and vibrational characteristics. In the dynamic tests, driveshafts with and without ballistic damage are observed to determine the critical speeds. The torsional modulus, the longitudinal modulus, and Poisson's ratio are determined from the static tests. Computational models are used to perform parametric studies and to complement the experimental program. Numerical simulations incorporate both beam and shell theory into the analysis. Additionally, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) was used to help determine the extent of the damage caused by the projectile.

Ayers, Thomas Ray

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences 35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences <8 J/cm{sup 2} could be improved >35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume III, Fish and Habitat Inventory of Tributary Streams, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study of the fisheries of the Swan River drainage in relation to potential small hydro development. This information was collected in order to obtain a reliable basin-wide database which was used to evaluate the potential cumulative effects of a number of proposed small hydro developments on the fisheries of the drainage. For each named tributary stream there is a reach-by-reach narrative summary of general habitat characteristics, outstanding features of the stream, and fish populations and spawning use. An attempt was made to rank many of the measured parameters relative to other surveyed stream reaches in the drainage. 3 refs.

Leathe, Stephen A.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

BDS Thin Film UV Antireflection Laser Damage Competition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV antireflection coatings are a challenging coating for high power laser applications as exemplified by the use of uncoated Brewster's windows in laser cavities. In order to understand the current laser resistance of UV AR coatings in the industrial and university sectors, a double blind laser damage competition was performed. The coatings have a maximum reflectance of 0.5% at 355 nm at normal incidence. Damage testing will be performed using the raster scan method with a 7.5 ns pulse length on a single testing facility to facilitate direct comparisons. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes and coating materials will also be shared.

Stolz, C J

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

222

Analysis of Building Damages of Paste Backfill Mining under Villages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to realize coal mining in safety without moving villages, increase coal recovery ratio, solve the conflict of mining and panel relays, the scheme of paste backfill mining under villages in Xiaotun coal mine is executed, and the surface subsidence ... Keywords: Mining under Villages, Paste Backfilling, Damage Assessment, Displacement, Deformation

Chai Hua-bin; Zou You-feng; Guo Wen-bing; Chen Jun-jie

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Displacement Damage in Silicon Carbide Irradiated in Fission Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Calculations are performed for displacement damage in SiC due to irradiation in the neutron environments of various types of nuclear reactors using the best available models and nuclear data. The displacement damage calculations use recently developed damage functions for SiC that are based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations of displacement events1. Displacements per atom (DPA) cross sections for SiC have been calculated as a function of neutron energy, and they are presented here in tabular form to facilitate their use as the standard measure of displacement damage for irradiated SiC. DPA cross sections averaged over the neutron energy spectrum are calculated for neutron spectra in the cores of typical commercial reactors and in the test sample irradiation regions of several materials test reactors used in both past and present irradiation testing. Particular attention is focused on a next-generation high-temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor, for which the high-temperature properties of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites are well suited. Calculated transmutations and activation levels in a pebble bed reactor are compared to those in other reactors.

Heinisch, Howard L.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Weber, William J.; Williford, Rick E.

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

224

Methods for globally treating silica optics to reduce optical damage  

SciTech Connect

A method for preventing damage caused by high intensity light sources to optical components includes annealing the optical component for a predetermined period. Another method includes etching the optical component in an etchant including fluoride and bi-fluoride ions. The method also includes ultrasonically agitating the etching solution during the process followed by rinsing of the optical component in a rinse bath.

Miller, Philip Edward; Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Bude, Jeffrey Devin; Shen, Nan; Steele, William Augustus; Laurence, Ted Alfred; Feit, Michael Dennis; Wong, Lana Louie

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

Considerations for Planting Corn into Damaged Fields of Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many folks are still assessing the condition of wheat fields damaged by the low temperatures of the past week. In some situations, additional damage to wheat has occurred from standing water in fields due to frequent rains this winter and spring. Some growers may decide replanting damaged wheat fields to corn is a viable economic option. Some of the key considerations for doing so are described in this article. Killing the Remaining Stand of Wheat For damaged wheat fields that will be planted to corn, complete and timely control of the existing wheat is more important than if planting to soybean. Corn is more sensitive to early-season weed competition than soybean. Living wheat plants are essentially weeds and can absorb nitrogen and make it unavailable for the corn plants during the same growing season. Use of a glyphosate-based burndown program should include the use of glyphosate at 1.5 lb ae/A + 2.4-D at 1-2 pts/A. The herbicide 2,4-D is needed to control glyphosateresistant marestail which is very prevalent in southern Indiana and help with control of emerged common lambsquarter and ragweed. Apply in a spray volume of 10 to 15 GPA

Bill Johnson; Tony Vyn; Jim Camberato; Christian Krupke; Rl (bob Nielsen; Depts Of Botany; Plant Pathology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Global Warming Effects on U.S. Hurricane Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While many studies of the effects of global warming on hurricanes predict an increase in various metrics of Atlantic basin-wide activity, it is less clear that this signal will emerge from background noise in measures of hurricane damage, which ...

Kerry Emanuel

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Crop-Hail Damage in the Midwest Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail damage in the ten Midwest corn belt states is examined during the period 195781. Estimates of crop losses due to hail are made from hail insurance data for each state and each significant crop in the region. The crop-hail losses are ...

Harry J. Hillaker Jr.; Paul J. Waite

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Computational simulation of electromigration induced damage in copper interconnects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current density levels are expected to increase by orders of magnitude in next generation power electronics and nanoelectronics. Electromigration which occur under high current density is the major concern for the nanoelectronics industry. Using a general ... Keywords: copper interconnects, damage mechanics, electromigration, electronics packaging reliability, thin film

Cemal Basaran; Minghui Lin; Shidong Li

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Probabilistic fatigue damage prognosis using maximum entropy approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al., 1979). Therefore, fatigue damage accumulation is stochastic in nature. Several physical models, parameter estimation and future inspection and maintenance need to be carefully included for risk assessment studies have been reported to combine the information obtained from inspection with the physical model

Liu, Yongming

232

Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Propagation of Reactions in Thermally-damaged PBX-9501  

SciTech Connect

A thermally-initiated explosion in PBX-9501 (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) is observed in situ by flash x-ray imaging, and modeled with the LLNL multi-physics arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALE3D. The containment vessel deformation provides a useful estimate of the reaction pressure at the time of the explosion, which we calculate to be in the range 0.8-1.4 GPa. Closely-coupled ALE3D simulations of these experiments, utilizing the multi-phase convective burn model, provide detailed predictions of the reacted mass fraction and deflagration front acceleration. During the preinitiation heating phase of these experiments, the solid HMX portion of the PBX-9501 undergoes a {beta}-phase to {delta}-phase transition which damages the explosive and induces porosity. The multi-phase convective burn model results demonstrate that damaged particle size and pressure are critical for predicting reaction speed and violence. In the model, energetic parameters are taken from LLNL's thermochemical-kinetics code Cheetah and burn rate parameters from Son et al. (2000). Model predictions of an accelerating deflagration front are in qualitative agreement with the experimental images assuming a mode particle diameter in the range 300-400 {micro}m. There is uncertainty in the initial porosity caused by thermal damage of PBX-9501 and, thus, the effective surface area for burning. To better understand these structures, we employ x-ray computed tomography (XRCT) to examine the microstructure of PBX-9501 before and after thermal damage. Although lack of contrast between grains and binder prevents the determination of full grain size distribution in this material, there are many domains visible in thermally damaged PBX-9501 with diameters in the 300-400 {micro}m range.

Tringe, J W; Glascoe, E A; Kercher, J R; Willey, T M; Springer, H K; Greenwood, D W; Molitoris, J D; Smilowitz, L; Henson, B F; Maienschein, J L

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

234

DAMAGE TO COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS EXPOSED TO NUCLEAR EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

One equipment control building designed to be blast resistant and two each of three standardized types of metal warehouse or utility buildings were exposed to the effects of a nuclear device detonation. One of the utility buildings was frameless, with deeply corrugated wall and roof sections; a second was very largely frameless, utilizing interlocking channel sections; and in the third the aluininum-panel wall and roof covering was supported by girts and purlins, which in turn were supported by steel frames. Because of atmospheric conditions at the time of an earlier detonation in the test series, one of each of the three types of utility buildings was exposed to approximately 0.7 psi overpressure before the planned test. In the planned test one of each of the three types was exposed to approximately 3.0 psi overpressure and one to 1.3 psi, with the intention of bracketing their overpressure survival range and obtaining data for possible economic redesign for improved blast resistance. The equipment control building utilized continuous-welded steel frames and reinforced-gypsum curtain-wall construction. The control building was exposed to approximately 4.1 psi, in the anticipated fringe zone of major structural damage, to determine its protective capabilities. The blast-resistant equipment control building was nat structurally damaged by the blast, thus exceeding the expectations of the design. Each of the three utility buildings received severe damage at the near range, one being completely destroyed, whereas at the far range the damage in every case was repairable. The test results are discussed, and recommendations for improved designs are made. Damage records during the unexpected test and at the far range in the planned test are correlated by means of dynamic analyses with pressuretime data and studies of structural resintance. Pressure-time information is appended. (auth)

Johnston, B.G.

1956-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The discrepancies in multistep damage evolution of yttria-stabilized zirconia irradiated with different ions  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports a comprehensive investigation of structural damage in yttria-stabilized zirconia irradiated with different ions over a wide fluence range. A similar multistep damage accumulation exists for the irradiations of different ions, but the critical doses for occurrence of second damage step, characterized by a faster increase in damage fraction, and the maximum elastic strain at the first damage step are varied and depend on ion mass. For irradiations of heavier ions, the second damage step occurs at a higher dose with a lower critical elastic strain. Furthermore, larger extended defects were observed in the irradiations of heavy ions at the second damage step. Associated with other experiment results and multistep damage accumulation model, the distinct discrepancies in the damage buildup under irradiations of different ions were interpreted by the effects of electronic excitation, energy of primary knock-on atom and chemistry contributions of deposited ions.

Yang, Tengfei [Peking University; Taylor, Caitlin A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kong, Shuyan [Peking University; Wang, Chenxu [Peking University; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Huang, Xuejun [Peking University; Xue, Jianming [Peking University; Yan, Sha [Peking University; Wang, Yugang [Peking University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Dual wavelength laser damage testing for high energy lasers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As high energy laser systems evolve towards higher energies, fundamental material properties such as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the optics limit the overall system performance. The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories uses a pair of such kiljoule-class Nd:Phosphate Glass lasers for x-ray radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator. These two systems, the Z-Beamlet system operating at 527nm/ 1ns and the Z-Petawatt system operating at 1054nm/ 0.5ps, can be combined for some experimental applications. In these scenarios, dichroic beam combining optics and subsequent dual wavelength high reflectors will see a high fluence from combined simultaneous laser exposure and may even see lingering effects when used for pump-probe configurations. Only recently have researchers begun to explore such concerns, looking at individual and simultaneous exposures of optics to 1064 and third harmonic 355nm light from Nd:YAG [1]. However, to our knowledge, measurements of simultaneous and delayed dual wavelength damage thresholds on such optics have not been performed for exposure to 1054nm and its second harmonic light, especially when the pulses are of disparate pulse duration. The Z-Backlighter Facility has an instrumented damage tester setup to examine the issues of laser-induced damage thresholds in a variety of such situations [2] . Using this damage tester, we have measured the LIDT of dual wavelength high reflectors at 1054nm/0.5ps and 532nm/7ns, separately and spatially combined, both co-temporal and delayed, with single and multiple exposures. We found that the LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps can be significantly lowered, from 1.32J/cm{sup 2} damage fluence with 1054/0.5ps only to 1.05 J/cm{sup 2} with the simultaneous presence of 532nm/7ns laser light at a fluence of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2}. This reduction of LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps continues as the fluence of 532nm/7ns laser light simultaneously present increases. The reduction of LIDT does not occur when the 2 pulses are temporally separated. This paper will also present dual wavelength LIDT results of commercial dichroic beam-combining optics simultaneously exposed with laser light at 1054nm/2.5ns and 532nm/7ns.

Atherton, Briggs W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Neutron damage reduction in a traveling wave reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traveling wave reactors are envisioned to run on depleted or natural uranium with no need for enrichment or reprocessing, and in a manner which requires little to no operator intervention. If feasible, this type of reactor has significant advantages over conventional nuclear power systems. However, a practical implementation of this concept is challenging as neutron irradiation levels many times greater than those in conventional reactors appear to be required for a fission wave to propagate. Radiation damage to the fuel and cladding materials presents a significant obstacle to a practical design. One possibility for reducing damage is to soften the neutron energy spectrum. Here we show that using a uranium oxide fuel form will allow a shift in the neutron spectrum that can result in at least a three fold decrease in dpa levels for fuel cladding and structural steels within the reactor compared with the dpa levels expected when using a uranium metal fuel. (authors)

Osborne, A. G.; Deinert, M. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mass spectrometric studies of laser damage in calcium fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both electron impact- and laser-ionization-mass spectrometry have been used to prove the material spalled from CaF/sub 2/ surfaces by the fundamental (1.06..mu..) and harmonic (355 nm and 266 nm) outputs from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. We have identified a number of gas phase products, including Ca, CaF and tentatively, CaF/sub 2/, and have measured their translational and internal energy distributions. Results suggest that while the 1.06..mu.. experiments can be adequately modeled in terms of a single damage mechanism (likely avalanche breakdown), the short-wavelength results suggest the onset of second mechanism, perhaps multiphoton absorption. This is consistent with both the observed bimodal velocity distribution following short-wavelength damage, and with the decrease in CaF vibrational and rotational excitation.

Nogar, N.S.; Apel, E.C.; Estler, R.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Database of average-power damage thresholds at 1064 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have completed a database of average-power, laser-induced, damage thresholds at 1064 nm on a variety of materials. Measurements were made with a newly constructed laser to provide design input for moderate and high average-power laser projects. The measurements were conducted with 16-ns pulses at pulse-repetition frequencies ranging from 6 to 120 Hz. Samples were typically irradiated for time ranging from a fraction of a second up to 5 minutes (36,000 shots). We tested seven categories of samples which included antireflective coatings, high reflectors, polarizers, single and multiple layers of the same material, bare and overcoated metal surfaces, bare polished surfaces, and bulk materials. The measured damage threshold ranged from 46 J/cm/sup 2/ for a bare polished glass substrate. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Rainer, F.; Hildum, E.A.; Milam, D.

1987-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

240

Influence of radiation damage on ruby as a pressure gauge  

SciTech Connect

This study tackles the question if ruby crystals, irradiated with energetic heavy ions, can still be used as reliable pressure sensors. The problem is linked to novel irradiation experiments, exposing pressurized samples to swift heavy-ion beams. In order to test and quantify a possible influence of radiation damage on the laser-induced fluorescence lines of ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}), small crystals were exposed to different heavy ions (Xe, Au, and U) with kinetic energies of several giga-electron volt at ambient as well as high-pressure conditions. With increasing fluence (ions/cm{sup 2}), the R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines shift both to lower wavelengths which leads to an underestimation of the pressure. An empirical correction term {epsilon} is proposed to include the irradiation damage effect into the commonly employed ruby calibration scale.

Schuster, B. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Weikusat, C.; Miletich, R. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 234-236, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Trautmann, C.; Neumann, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Fujara, F. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural completions - overcoming the damage caused by drilling and perforations  

SciTech Connect

Natural completions are suggested as a way to avoid or overcome damage to the formation caused by drilling and perforating. Formation damage may take the form of plugged passageways which remain closed because formation pressure does not exceed that of the plug material. Natural completions refer to using maximum differential pressure toward the wellbore, so that such obstructions in passageways can less easily exist. The method allows the formation pressure to backsurge perforation tunnels immediately following detonation of the guns, with the objectives of obtaining deep, clean perforations with the crushed zone and debris completely removed from the perforations. Procedures for natural completions are described and illustrated. A case history is given where the natural completion method restores productivity of a well.

Perry, G.; Smith, G.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Summary of radiation damage studies on rare earth permanent magnets  

SciTech Connect

With the proposed use of permanent magnets for both the NLC and the VLHC the issue flux loss due to radiation damage needs to be fully understood. There exist many papers on the subject. There are many difficulties in drawing conclusions from all of these data. First there is the difference methods of dosimetry, second different types of magnets and magnetic arrangements, and third different manufacturers of magnet material. This paper provides a summary of the existing literature on the subject.

J. T. Volk

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

A micromechanics based ductile damage model for anisotropic titanium alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hot-workability of Titanium (Ti) alloys is of current interest to the aerospace industry due to its widespread application in the design of strong and light-weight aircraft structural components and engine parts. Motivated by the need for accurate simulation of large scale plastic deformation in metals that exhibit macroscopic plastic anisotropy, such as Ti, a constitutive model is developed for anisotropic materials undergoing plastic deformation coupled with ductile damage in the form of internal cavitation. The model is developed from a rigorous micromechanical basis, following well-known previous works in the field. The model incorporates the porosity and void aspect ratio as internal damage variables, and seeks to provide a more accurate prediction of damage growth compared to previous existing models. A closed form expression for the macroscopic yield locus is derived using a Hill-Mandel homogenization and limit analysis of a porous representative volume element. Analytical expressions are also developed for the evolution of the internal variables, porosity and void shape. The developed yield criterion is validated by comparison to numerically determined yield loci for specific anisotropic materials, using a numerical limit analysis technique developed herein. The evolution laws for the internal variables are validated by comparison with direct finite element simulations of porous unit cells. Comparison with previously published results in the literature indicates that the new model yields better agreement with the numerically determined yield loci for a wide range of loading paths. Use of the new model in continuum finite element simulations of ductile fracture may be expected to lead to improved predictions for damage evolution and fracture modes in plastically anisotropic materials.

Keralavarma, Shyam Mohan

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

EPRI-SQUG Damage-Indicating Parameter Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information assembled for the purpose of developing damage-indicating parameters (DIPs) for power plant equipment. An existing Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) seismic experience database is used to develop candidate DIP values associated with two database sites subjected to earthquake events. The two sites are described, the candidate DIPs are derived from the recorded site motions, and the equipment items at these sites are categorized according to performance during an ear...

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

245

Damage tolerance design procedures for an automotive composite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the durability issues of concern in the use of composites in automobile structures is the damaging effects that low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) might have on strength and stiffness. This issue was experimentally investigated, and recommended design evaluation procedures were developed for a candidate automotive structural composite--a structural reaction injection-molded polyurethane reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. Two test facilities were built to cover the range of impacts of interest--a pendulum device to characterize the effects of relative heavy objects at low velocities and an air gun to characterize the effects of relatively light objects at higher velocities. In all cases, the test specimen was a 9 x 9 x 1/8-in.-thick plate clamped on an 8-in.-diam circle. Sixty-five impact tests were performed. Included were tests using various impactor sizes and weights, tests at {minus}40 F, and tests on specimens that has been presoaked in water or exposed to battery acid. Damage areas were determined using ultrasonic C-scans, and the resulting areas were found to correlate with the quantity impactor mass to a power times velocity. A design curve was derived from the correlation and validated using dropped brick tests. To evaluate strength and stiffness reductions, the impacted plate specimens were cut into tensile, compressive, and fatigue test specimens that were used to determine reductions as a function of damage area. It was found that for design purposes, the strength reduction could be determined by representing the damage area by a circular hole of equivalent area.

Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Douglas Boreham McMaster University Abstract This research is focused on assessing the radiation risk associated with positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It has been suggested that low dose medical imaging, such as PET scans, carry an added biological risk because they expose the patient to ionizing radiation. PET scanning is an increasingly used nuclear medicine procedure that requires the administration of isotope 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG, E=250 keV β and 511 keV γ) and results in an effective dose to the patient ranging from 7-22 mSv. The radiation induced DNA damage associated with a PET scan was studied in 7-9 week old female wild type Trp53 +/+ mice. Mice were given a PET scan with 18F-FDG and the biological response was assessed in bone marrow using

247

Damage Survey of Hurricane Andrew and Its Relationship to the Eyewall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A damage map documenting Hurricane Andrew's destructive land fall over southern Florida is presented. Vectors that represent the direction of winds causing damage to trees and structures are shown along with an F-scale rating in order to assess ...

Roger M. Wakimoto; Peter G. Black

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Regulation of DNA damage tolerance : studies of the translesion synthesis DNA ploymerase eta in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All organisms must control the effects of DNA damage to protect the integrity of their genomes. In addition to DNA repair, this requires DNA damage tolerance pathways, which allow the continuation of essential processes ...

Woodruff, Rachel Van Etten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Piezoelectric-based in-situ damage detection of composite materials for structural health monitoring systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This thesis presents the conclusions of an analytical and experimental survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage ...

Kessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1 Donglin Li Tongwen Chen2 hierarchical LEC structure and apply it to a typ- ical boiler system. There are two damage models

Marquez, Horacio J.

252

Lightning Casualties and Damages in the United States from 1959 to 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightning-caused fatalities, injuries, and damage reports for the United States are listed in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration publication Storm Data. Previously published studies of lightning casualties and damages in the ...

E. Brian Curran; Ronald L. Holle; Ral E. Lpez

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

In Situ Study of Radiation Damage in Pure Zr and Zircaloy-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In Situ Study of Radiation Damage in Pure Zr and Zircaloy-2 ... cascades at the early stages of damage development at very low dose (0.01...

254

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study, AFM was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to a Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage and increased conductivity in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam.

Teague, L.; Duff, M.

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Low permeability filter cake limits damage from high-pH drilling fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing the particle size distribution in high-pH drilling fluids and perforating underbalanced helped protect sensitive reservoirs from formation damage. In several wells drilled in a carboniferous reservoir system in China, invasion of the high-pH filtrate from the drilling and workover fluids seriously damaged the formation. An in-depth reservoir study determined the cause of the formation damage and led to the development of new field procedures to prevent damage in future wells. Details are described.

Wu, Z.; Hu, Y. [Southwest Petroleum Inst., Nanchong (China)

1997-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

256

Heavy ion radiation damage simulations for CMOS image sensors Henok Mebrahtua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy ion radiation damage simulations for CMOS image sensors Henok Mebrahtua , Wei Gaoa , Paul J, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada ABSTRACT Damage in CMOS image sensors caused by heavy ions and range of ions in matter) simulation results of heavy ion radiation damage to CMOS image sensors

Hornsey, Richard

257

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. However, a better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between CO2, water, and formation rock is necessary before sequestration. These interactions can be evaluated by the change in mineral content in the water before and after injection, or from the change in well injectivity during CO2 injection. It may affect the permeability positively due to rock dissolution, or negatively due to precipitation. Several physical and chemical processes cover the CO2 injection operations; multiphase flow in porous media is represented by the flow of the brine and CO2, solute transportation is represented by CO2 dissolution in the brine forming weak carbonic acid, dissolution-deposition kinetics can be seen in the rock dissolution by the carbonic acid and the deposition of the reaction products, hydrodynamic instabilities due to displacement of less viscous brine with more viscous CO2 (viscous fingering), capillary effects and upward movement of CO2 due to gravity effect. The objective of the proposed work is to correlate the formation damage to the other variables, i.e. pressure, temperature, formation rock type, rock porosity, water composition, sulfates concentration in the water, CO2 volume injected, water volume injected, CO2 to water volumetric ratio, CO2 injection rate, and water injection rate. In order to achieve the proposed objective, lab experiments will be conducted on different rock types (carbonates, limestone and dolomite, and sandstone) under pressure and temperature that simulate the field conditions. CO2 will be used at the supercritical phase and different CO2-water-rock chemical interactions will be addressed. Quantitative analysis of the experimental results using a geochemical simulator (CMG-GEM) will also be performed. The results showed that for carbonate cores, maintaining the CO2/brine volumetric ratio above 1.0 reduced bicarbonate formation in the formation brine and helped in minimizing precipitation of calcium carbonate. Additionally, increasing cycle volume in WAG injection reduced the damage introduced to the core. Sulfate precipitation during CO2 sequestration was primarily controlled by temperature. For formation brine with high total dissolved solids (TDS), calcium sulfate precipitation occurs, even at a low sulfate concentration. For dolomite rock, temperature, injection flow rate, and injection scheme don't have a clear impact on the core permeability, the main factor that affects the change in core permeability is the initial core permeability. Sandstone cores showed significant damage; between 35% and 55% loss in core permeability was observed after CO2 injection. For shorter WAG injection the damage was higher; decreasing the brine volume injected per cycle, decreased the damage. At higher temperatures, 200 and 250 degrees F, more damage was noted than at 70 degrees F.

Mohamed, Ibrahim 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

259

Rapid Damage Assessment Using High-resolution Remote Sensing Imagery: Tools and Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Accurate damage assessment caused by major natural and anthropogenic disasters is becoming critical due to increases in human and economic loss. This increase in loss of life and severe damages can be attributed to growing population, as well as human migration to disaster prone regions of the world. Rapid damage assessment and dissemination of accurate information is critical for creating an effective emergency response. Remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) based techniques and tools are important in disaster damage assessment and reporting activities. In this review, we will look into the state of the art techniques in damage assessment using remote sensing and GIS.

Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL; Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Graesser, Jordan B [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Benefits of Damage Engineering for PMOS Junction Stability  

SciTech Connect

As CMOS devices continue to shrink, the formation of ultra shallow junction (USJ) in the source/drain extension remains to be a key challenge requiring high dopant activation, shallow dopant profile and abrupt junctions. The next generations of sub nano-CMOS devices impose a new set of challenges such as elimination of residual defects resulting in higher leakage, difficulty to control lateral diffusion, junction stability post anneal and junction formation in new materials. To address these challenges for advanced technological nodes beyond 32 nm, it is imperative to explore novel species and techniques. Molecular species such as Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}), a novel doping species and a promising alternative to monomer Boron is of considerable interest due to the performance boost for 22 nm low power and high performance devices. Also, to reduce residual defects, damage engineering methodologies have generated a lot of attention as it has demonstrated significant benefits in device performance. Varian proprietary techniques to perform implants at cold temperatures (PTC II) have demonstrated lower junction leakage, enhanced activation, reduced dopant diffusion and less dopant deactivation due to the reduction of self-interstitial atoms present at the end-of-range (EOR) with low implant temperatures. In this paper, for the first time, there is a comprehensive study of the effect of implant temperature on defect engineering affecting deactivation/reactivation, and it is well established in this paper that colder the implant temperature the better it is for damage engineering with reduced EOR defects and better amorphization. The effect has been studied over a wide range of implant temperature. To understand any difference in deactivation between molecular and monomer Boron and to provide direct comparison equivalent Boron implants, co-implanted with Carbon were also studied. Implants with wide range of temperatures are implemented using PTC II. This paper will also show how damage reduction correlates with optimum junction formation and stability.

Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc. 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The damage function approach for estimating fuel cycle externalities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the methodology used in a study of fuel cycle externalities sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Commission of the European Communities. The methodology is the damage function approach. This paper describes that approach and discusses its application and limitations. The fuel cycles addressed are those in which coal, biomass, oil, hydro, natural gas and uranium are used to generate electric power. The methodology is used to estimate the physical impacts of these fuel cycles on environmental resources and human health, and the external costs and benefits of these impacts.

Lee, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Blade reliability collaborative : collection of defect, damage and repair data.  

SciTech Connect

The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

Minimizing formation damage under adverse conditions during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well comprising: (a) filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; (b) placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; (c) setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; (d) perforating the casing; (e) introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids where the agent is a gel; (f) causing the blocking agent to solidify while forming a solidified plug within the well and a solid mass within the adjacent washed out portion of the formation; (g) removing the first tubing from the well; (h) placing within the well a second tubing having a slotted portion therein sufficient to allow gravel packing of the well and the formation; (i) removing the solidified plug from the wellbore along with solidified gel from the washed-out portion of the formation; and (j) placing a gravel pack within the well and the washed-out portion of the formation via the second tubing which consolidates the formation.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.; Shu, P.

1989-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Characterization and control of formation damage during waterflooding of a high-clay-content reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Permeability damage was suspected as a factor contributing to postcompletion production declines observed during waterflooding of a friable to unconsolidated sandstone. A loss in water injectivity also indicated that near-wellbore damage may have been occurring. This paper summarizes the laboratory studies undertaken to evaluate and understand permeability damage in this formation. The experimental program consisted of primarily coreflooding experiments to evaluate the influence of injection fluid composition, temperature, mineralogy, and flow velocity on permeability damage. The significance of damage during brine injection was observed to be a strong function of mineralogy and injection rate. Permeability losses of greater than or equal to60% were observed in cores from some sand intervals, while little or no damage was apparent in cores from a second zone in identical wells. In the sands that were susceptible to brine damage, a critical velocity below which permeability damage did not occur was repeatedly established. The occurrence of a critical velocity, along with other observations, indicated that the primary damage mechanism was fines migration. Damage could be controlled by maintaining velocities below the critical value or reducing the pH of the injected brine.

Leone, J.A.; Scott, E.M. (Arco Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A New Definition on Fractal Porous Rock Damage Variable and Study on Evolution Characteristics of Porosity-permeability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considered the fractal characteristic of rock with porosity structure, a rock damage variable which describes rock damage of the reservoir of fractal structure with hydraulic fracturing is defined, and this damage variable that describes the state of ... Keywords: hydraulic fracturing, damage variable, fractal, porosity pore structure, permeability evolving

Zhaowan Chun; Wang Tingting; Ai Chi; Sun Chengyan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Microsoft Word - SWPAIceStormDamage_030209.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/02/09 3/02/09 Contacts: Beth Nielsen William Hiller Phone: 918-595-6762 918-595-6697 Email: elizabeth.nielsen@swpa.gov william.hiller@swpa.gov 1 of 1 TULSA, OK - All the poles have been set in place to restore one of the last two transmission line segments remaining out of service following a January ice storm that damaged 300 miles of transmission line and more than 400 structures owned by Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern). The 22 miles that separate Malden and New Madrid, Missouri, are ready to be fitted with new conductor, and the 37.2 mile stretch from New Madrid to Kennett, Missouri, continues to see progress as new transmission structures are constructed daily. Staff from Southwestern's Operations Division reports that the efforts of Southwestern crews and

268

Clues about Rheumatoid Arthritis Damage | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Clues about Rheumatoid Arthritis Damage JANUARY 7, 2013 Bookmark and Share Type II collagen fibrils decomposed into their basic aggregates (viewed via X-ray diffraction and TEM). Some parts of the antibody treated samples maintain a loose alignment of the thin-fibrils allowing them to be analyzed with small angle X-ray diffraction (A), and insert B. An 11 and 4.5 nm packing function are apparent, which appear to correspond to the approximate diameter of the thin-fibrils (insert of C) and microfibrils (D). Native thick fibrils are shown in C as a comparison to the decomposition product (thin-fibrils). From O. Antipova and J.P.R.O. Orgel,

269

Microsoft Word - SWPAIceStormDamage_021109.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1/09 1/09 Contacts: Beth Nielsen William Hiller Phone: 918-595-6762 918-595-6697 Email: elizabeth.nielsen@swpa.gov william.hiller@swpa.gov 1 of 1 TULSA, OK - A major segment of 161-kilovolt (kV) transmission line was returned to service around 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 10, 2009, as Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern), an agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), continued its efforts to repair damage caused by a January 26-27, 2009 ice storm in Arkansas and Missouri that affected 300 miles of Southwestern's 1,380-mile, high-voltage transmission system. Southwestern Operations reported early February 11, 2009, that repairs to the line stretching from Dardanelle Dam, near Russellville, Arkansas, to the Hilltop Switching Station near Marshall,

270

Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [Materials Technology Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Karim, Julia Abdul [Reactor Physics Section, Nuclear Power Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

MDM Project: Analysis of the Micromechanics Damage Model Suite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report extends a previous study of core algorithms and portability considerations associated with the Micromechanics Damage Model computer software developed by the AFRL Materials Directorate at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. 1 The MDM analysis suite is comprised of four fracture mechanics codes used to establish design criteria for newly developed composite materials, particularly for brittle, heat-resistant composites associated with the fabrication of turbine blades. The MDM codes are based on a semi-analytical approach in which single coated fibers and the surrounding composite material are represented as a nested set of concentric shells (Fig. 1). Stresses and displacements at prescribed points along the length of the cylinder are determined by evaluation of a polynomial function. Numerically challenging conditions arise during the construction of this function. The calculation of matrix exponentials in terms of the full spectrum of eigenvalues associated with the pri...

D. C. O' neal; R. Luczak; N. J. Pagano; H. W. Brown Iii; G. P. Tandon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Case Study in Porting Strategy: The Axisymmetric Damage Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The axisymmetric damage model (ADM) is one of four micromechanical stress field models developed and maintained by N. J. Pagano's group at the AFRL Materials Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB. These models serve to establish rigorous field theories to compute accurate stresses and energy release rates for fracture mechanics problems in composite bodies. In turn, these solutions, coupled with experimental research, can establish appropriate failure criteria to be used in the design of composite structures for air and space vehicles. Each of these models is based on Reissner's variational theorem (Reissner, 1950). ADM (Pagano, 1991) is associated with axisymmetric cracking and boundary conditions. Others support fundamentally different cases, i.e. axisymmetric problems incorporating the effects of friction (Tandon and Pagano, 1996), transverse and shear loading and associated cracking patterns in composite cylinders (Pagano and Tandon, 1994), and transverse cracking and delamination pro...

David O' Neal; N. J. Pagano; G. A. Schoeppner; G. P. Tandon

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Monitoring genetic damage to ecosystems from hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

Applications of ecological toxicity testing to hazardous waste management have increased dramatically over the last few years, resulting in a greater awareness of the need for improved biomonitoring techniques. Our laboratory is developing advanced techniques to assess the genotoxic effects of environmental contamination on ecosystems. We have developed a novel mutagenesis assay using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is potentially applicable for multimedia studies in soil, sediment, and water. In addition, we are conducting validation studies of a previously developed anaphase aberration test that utilizes sea urchin embryos. Other related efforts include field validation studies of the new tests, evaluation of their potential ecological relevance, and analysis of their sensitivity relative to that of existing toxicity tests that assess only lethal effects, rather than genetic damage.

Anderson, S.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cumulative Gasoline Price Pass-through  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

relatively quickly at retail in the Midwest. However, it's important to note that this process still takes a total of 7 weeks, and that the lag is fairly consistent in both...

277

Cumulative attestation kernels for embedded systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are increasing deployments of networked embedded systems and rising threats of malware intrusions on such systems. To mitigate this threat, it is desirable to enable commonly-used embedded processors known as flash MCUs to provide remote attestation ...

Michael LeMay; Carl A. Gunter

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modeling Air-Pollution Damages from Fossil Fuel Use in Urban...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

important indoor pollution sources. We have taken one such model, prepared by the World Bank, and modified it to incorporate damages estimates from human exposure to air...

279

He Ion Irradiation Damage in Fe/W Nanolayer Films - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He Ion Irradiation Damage in Fe/VV N anolayer Films. Nan Li, X. Zhang. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station,...

280

Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in Response to Notice of Inquiry, Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation -75 FR 43945

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

282

The Role of Interfaces on Shock-induced Damage in Two-phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of lead precipitates at copper grain boundaries on damage nucleation and evolution will be investigated using shock loading and release...

283

An NDE Study of Impact Damage in Multi-Layered Transparent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For both transparent and opaque protective systems, low velocity impact damage compromises the structural integrity and increases the likelihood of further...

284

Radiation Damage Study in Mo by in situ TEM/Ion Irradiation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identical material was previously neutron-irradiated at 80C in the HFIR. A direct comparison of defect microstructure was made to correlate damage...

285

Investigating amino acid residue-level damage using novel proteomic approaches, with application to wool proteins.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Damage to wool is derived from the modification of its constituent proteins, as the dry matter of wool is principally made up of protein. A (more)

Grosvenor, Anita J.

286

Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pavement Moisture-Damage Test. Transportation Researchgreater than five years. 6. Test sections may be necessaryand Parker, F. (1998). Test for Plastic Fines in Aggregates

Harvey, John T; Lu, Qing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Role of ATM kinase in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATM kinase in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage response in human neural stemprogenitor cells and differentiated cell types Adayabalam Balajee Columbia University Medical...

288

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Fast Neutron Radioactivity and Damage Studies on Materials  

SciTech Connect

Many materials and electronics need to be tested for the radiation environment expected at linear colliders (LC) to improve reliability and longevity since both accelerator and detectors will be subjected to large fluences of hadrons, leptons and gammas. Examples include NdFeB magnets, considered for the damping rings, injection and extraction lines and final focus, electronic and electro-optic devices to be utilized in detector readout, accelerator controls and the CCDs required for the vertex detector, as well as high and low temperature superconducting materials (LTSMs) because some magnets will be superconducting. Our first measurements of fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC Davis McClellan Nuclear Reactor Center (UCD MNRC) were presented for NdFeB materials at EPAC04 where the damage appeared proportional to the distances between the effective operating point and Hc. We have extended those doses, included other manufacturer's samples and measured induced radioactivities. We have also added L and HTSMs as well as a variety of relevant semiconductor and electro-optic materials including PBG fiber that we studied previously only with gamma rays.

Anderson, S.; Spencer, J.; Wolf, Z.; /SLAC; Gallagher, G.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.; /UC, Davis; Volk, J.; /Fermilab

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

291

Radiation Damage Study for PHENIX Silicon Stripixel Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silicon stripixel sensors which were developed at BNL will be installed as part of the RHIC-PHENIX silicon vertex tracker (VTX). RHIC II operations provide luminosity up to 2x10^32 /cm2/s so the silicon stripixel sensors will be exposed to a significant amount of radiation. The most problematic radiation effect for VTX is the increase of leakage current, which degrades the signal to noise ratio and may saturate the readout electronics. We studied the radiation damage using the same diodes as CERN-RD48. First, the proportionality between the irradiation fluence and the increase of leakage current of CERN-RD48 was reproduced. Then beam experiments with stripixel sensor were done in which leakage current was found to increase in the same way as that of thereference diode. A stripixel sensor was also irradiated at the PHENIX interaction region (IR) during the 2006 run. We found the same relation between the integrated luminosity and determined fluence from increase of leakage current. The expected fluence is 3-6x10^12 Neq/cm2 (1 MeV neutron equivalent) in RHIC II operations for 10 years. Due to this expected exposure, setting the operating temperature in PHENIX to T< 0 deg. C to suppress leakage current is needed to avoid saturation of preamplifiers.

J. Asai; S. Batsouli; K. Boyle; V. Castillo; V. Cianciolo; D. Fields; C. Haegeman; M. Hoeferkamp; Y. Hosoi; R. Ichimiya; Y. Inoue; M. Kawashima; T. Komatsubara; K. Kurita; Z. Li; D. Lynch; M. Nguyen; T. Murakami; R. Nouicer; H. Ohnishi; R. Pak; K. Sakashita; T. -A. Shibata; K. Suga; A. Taketani; J. Tojo

2007-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

Neutron measurements and radiation damage calculations for fusion materials studies  

SciTech Connect

Fusion reactors will generate intense neutron fields, especially at the inner surfaces of containment vessels. With a typical wall loading of 1 MW/m/sup 2/, the yearly neutron fluence will be about 10/sup 26/ n/m/sup 2/. In a material like stainless steel this irradiation will produce about 10 atomic displacements-per-atom (DPA), 100 appM helium, 500 appM hydrogen, and various other transmutations. The gas-to-DPA ratios are very high compared to fission reactors due to the 14 MeV neutrons from the d-t fusion reaction. No existing neutron source can produce both the high fluence and high gas rates needed to simulate fusion damage. Consequently, fusion material studies are underway in a variety of facilities including fission reactors and accelerator-based neutron sources. A Subtask Group has been created by DOE to characterize these diverse facilities in terms of neutron flux and energy spectrum and to calculate DPA and transmutation for specific irradiations. Material property changes can then be correlated between facilities and extrapolated to fusion reactor conditions.

Greenwood, L.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

RESULTS FROM CAVITATION DAMAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH MERCURY SPALLATION TARGETS AT THE LANSCE WNR IN 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage assessment from proton beam induced cavitation experiments on mercury spallation targets done at the LANSCE WNR facility has been completed. The experiments investigated two key questions for the Spallation Neutron Source target, namely, how damage is affected by flow velocity in the SNS coolant channel geometry, and how damage scales with proton beam intensity at a given constant charge per pulse. With regard to the former question, prior in-beam experiments indicated that the coolant channel geometry with stagnant mercury was especially vulnerable to damage which might warrant a design change. Yet other results indicated a reduction in damage with the introduction of flow. Using more prototypic to the SNS, the 2008 experiment damage results show the channel is less vulnerable than the bulk mercury side of the vessel wall. They also show no benefit from increasing channel flow velocity beyond nominal SNS speeds. The second question probed a consensus belief that damage scales with beam intensity (protons per unit area) by a power law dependence with exponent of around 4. Results from a 2005 experiment did not support this power law dependence but some observations were inconsistent and unexplained. These latest results show weaker damage dependence.

Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL; Wendel, Mark W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Acoustic emission beamforming for enhanced damage detection Gregory C. McLaskeya,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the structure such as cracking or corrosion, but the severity of this problem is not known, and the evolution for detecting damage, such as cracking, as it occurs on or in a structure. In order to gain meaningful the beamforming technique, the azmuthal direction of the location of the damage may be estimated by the stress

Glaser, Steven D.

295

A knowledge-based decision support system for shipboard damage control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational complexity of modern ships requires the use of advanced applications, called damage control systems (DCSs), able to assist crew members in the effective handling of dangerous events and accidents. In this article we describe the development ... Keywords: Damage control system, Decision support system, Expert system, Kill card, Knowledge-based system, Shipboard management

F. Calabrese; A. Corallo; A. Margherita; A. A. Zizzari

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Estimation of radiation damage at the structural materials of a hybrid reactor by probabilistic neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new approach based on probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) for the radiation damage parameters at the structural material of a nuclear fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have recently been introduced ... Keywords: Atomic displacement, Helium generation, Hybrid reactor, Probabilistic neural networks (PNNs), Radiation damage

Elif Derya beyli; Mustafa beyli

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Seismic damage identification in buildings using neural networks and modal data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seismic damage identification method intended for buildings with steel moment-frame structure is presented in this paper. The method has a statistical approach and is based on artificial neural networks and modal variables. It consists of two main ... Keywords: Mass sensitivity, Modal data, Neural networks, Seismic damage identification, Steel frames, Transmission of errors

Mara P. Gonzlez; Jos L. Zapico

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Damage detection by an adaptive real-parameter simulated annealing genetic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective algorithm, which combined an adaptive real-parameter genetic algorithm with simulated annealing, is proposed to detect damage occurrence in beam-type structures. The proposed algorithm uses the displacements of static response and natural ... Keywords: Adaptive mechanism, Damage detection, Genetic algorithm, Optimization, Simulated annealing

Rong-Song He; Shun-Fa Hwang

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Free Vibration Analysis of Kirchoff Plates with Damaged Boundaries by the Chebyshev Collocation Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Vibration Analysis of Kirchoff Plates with Damaged Boundaries by the Chebyshev Collocation for the free vibration analysis of slender Kirchoff plates with both mixed and damaged boundaries an important role in applications of mechanical, aerospace and civil engineering. Studying the free vibration

Butcher, Eric A.

300

The Study of Permeability Change of Fractal Under Fracturing Basing on Damage Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to research the evolution of permeability and damage of fractal rock under hydraulic fracturing, a new damage variable that describing relative reduction of pore amounts as radius is bigger than r any fracturing stage is defined. Assuming the ... Keywords: damagey, fracta, permeabilit

Zhao Wanchun; Ai Chi

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Application of a damage model for rock fragmentation to the Straight Creek Mine blast experiments  

SciTech Connect

Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried past the fragmentation limit. More recently, the improved damage model PRONTO has allowed finite element calculations which remain stable and yield good agreement between calculated fragmented regions and excavated crater profiles for blasting experiments in granite. Application of this damage model to blast experiments at the Straight Creek Mine in Bell County, Kentucky were complicated by anisotropic conditions and uncertainties in material properties. It appears that significant modifications to the damage model and extensive material testing may be necessary in order to estimate damage in these anisotropic materials. 18 refs., 18 figs.

Thorne, B.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Application of Nonlinear Elastic Resonance Spectroscopy For Damage Detection In Concrete: An Interesting Story  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy experiments conducted on concrete cores, one chemically and mechanically damaged by alkali-silica reactivity, and one undamaged, show that this material displays highly nonlinear wave behavior, similar to many other damaged materials. They find that the damaged sample responds more nonlinearly, manifested by a larger resonant peak and modulus shift as a function of strain amplitude. The nonlinear response indicates that there is a hysteretic influence in the stress-strain equation of state. Further, as in some other materials, slow dynamics are present. The nonlinear response they observe in concrete is an extremely sensitive indicator of damage. Ultimately, nonlinear wave methods applied to concrete may be used to guide mixing, curing, or other production techniques, in order to develop materials with particular desired qualities such as enhanced strength or chemical resistance, and to be used for damage inspection.

Byers, Loren W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ten Cate, James A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Rapid Damage eXplorer (RDX): A Probabilistic Framework for Learning Changes From Bitemporal Images  

SciTech Connect

Recent decade has witnessed major changes on the Earth, for example, deforestation, varying cropping and human settlement patterns, and crippling damages due to disasters. Accurate damage assessment caused by major natural and anthropogenic disasters is becoming critical due to increases in human and economic loss. This increase in loss of life and severe damages can be attributed to the growing population, as well as human migration to the disaster prone regions of the world. Rapid assessment of these changes and dissemination of accurate information is critical for creating an effective emergency response. Change detection using high-resolution satellite images is a primary tool in assessing damages, monitoring biomass and critical infrastructures, and identifying new settlements. In this demo, we present a novel supervised probabilistic framework for identifying changes using very high-resolution multispectral, and bitemporal remote sensing images. Our demo shows that the rapid damage explorer (RDX) system is resilient to registration errors and differing sensor characteristics.

Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

First results from electron-photon damage equivalence studies on a generic ethylene-propylene rubber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a simulator adequacy assessment program, the relative effectiveness of electrons and photons to produce damage in a generic ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) has been investigated. The investigation was limited in extent in that a single EPR material, in three thickness, was exposed to Cobalt-60 photons and three electron beam energies. Basing material damage on changes in the EPR mechanical properties elongation and tensile strength, we observed that EPR damage was a smoothly varying function of absorbed energy and independent of irradiating particle type. EPR damage tracked equally well as a function of both incident particle energy and material front surface dose. Based on these preliminary data, we tentatively concluded that a correlation between particle, particle energy, and material damage (as measured by changes in material elongation and/or tensile strength) has been demonstrated. 14 figs.

Buckalew, W.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

S1219 residue of 53BP1 is phosphorylated by ATM kinase upon DNA damage and required for proper execution of DNA damage response  

SciTech Connect

53BP1 is phosphorylated by the protein kinase ATM upon DNA damage. Even though several ATM phosphorylation sites in 53BP1 have been reported, those sites have little functional implications in the DNA damage response. Here, we show that ATM phosphorylates the S1219 residue of 53BP1 in vitro and that the residue is phosphorylated in cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Transfection with siRNA targeting ATM abolished IR-induced phosphorylation at this residue, supporting the theory that this process is mediated by the kinase. To determine the functional relevance of this phosphorylation event, a U2OS cell line expressing S1219A mutant 53BP1 was established. IR-induced foci formation of MDC1 and {gamma}H2AX, DNA damage signaling molecules, was reduced in this cell line, implying that S1219 phosphorylation is required for recruitment of these molecules to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, overexpression of the mutant protein impeded IR-induced G2 arrest. In conclusion, we have shown that S1219 phosphorylation by ATM is required for proper execution of DNA damage response.

Lee, Haemi; Kwak, Hee-Jin; Cho, Il-taeg [Reseach Institute, National Cancer Center, 111 Jungbalsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang, Gyeonggi, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seok Hee [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hun [Reseach Institute, National Cancer Center, 111 Jungbalsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang, Gyeonggi, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chlee@ncc.re.kr

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Multiple factors affect pest and pathogen damage on 31 Populus clones in South Carolina.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Populus species and hybrids have many practical applications, but there is a paucity of data regarding selections that perform well in the southeastern US. We compared pest susceptibility of 31 Populus clones over 3 years in South Carolina, USA. Cuttings were planted in spring 2001 on two study sites. Clones planted in the bottomland site received granular fertilizer yearly and irrigation the first two years only, while those on the sandy, upland site received irrigation and fertilization throughout each growing season. Foliar damage by the cottonwood leaf beetle (Chrysomela scripta), cottonwood leafcurl mite (Tetra lobulifera), and poplar leaf rust (Melampsora medusae) was visually monitored several times each growing season. Damage ratings differed significantly among clones, and clonal rankings changed from year to year. Irrigation increased C. scripta and M. medusae damage, but had no effect on T. lobulifera damage. Certain clones received greater pest damage at a particular study site. Temporal damage patterns were evident among individual clones and on each site. At the upland site, OP367 and 7300502 were highly resistant to all three pests; I45/51 was highly resistant to C. scripta and M. medusae; NM6 and 1529 were highly resistant to M. medusae; and 7302801 was highly resistant to T. lobulifera and M. medusae. At the bottomland site, NM6, Eridano, I45/51, and 7302801 were highly resistant to all three pests; clone 7300502 was highly resistant to M. medusae only. Based on this preliminary 3-year study of pest damage l

Coyle, David R.; Coleman, Mark D.; Durant, Jaclin A.; Newman, Lee A.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Experimental determination of the relationship between permeability and microfracture-induced damage in bedded salt  

SciTech Connect

The development of deep underground structures (e.g., shafts, mines, storage and disposal caverns) significantly alters the stress state in the rock near the structure or opening. The effect of such an opening is to concentrate the far-field stress near the free surface. For soft rock such as salt, the concentrating effect of the opening induces deviatoric stresses in the salt that may be large enough to initiate microcracks which then propagate with time. The volume of rock susceptible to damage by microfracturing is often referred to as the disturbed rock zone and, by its nature, is expected to exhibit high permeability relative to that of the native, far-field rock. This paper presents laboratory data that characterize microfracture-induced damage and the effect this damage has on permeability for bedded salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant located in southeastern New Mexico. Damage is induced in the salt through a series of tertiary creep experiments and quantified in terms of dilatant volumetric strain. The permeability of damaged specimens is then measured using nitrogen gas as the permeant. The range in damage investigated included dilatant volumetric strains from less than 0.03 percent to nearly 4.0 percent. Permeability values corresponding to these damage levels ranged from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2}. Two simple models were fitted to the data for use in predicting permeability from dilatant volumetric strain.

Pfeifle, T.W. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Brodsky, N.S.; Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ensemble-Based Exigent Analysis. Part I: Estimating Worst-Case Weather-Related Forecast Damage Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exigent analysis supplements an ensemble forecast of weather-related damage with a map of the worst-case scenario (WCS), a multivariate confidence bound of the damage. For multivariate Gaussian ensembles, ensemble-based exigent analysis uses a ...

Daniel Gombos; Ross N. Hoffman

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A damage model for rock fragmentation and comparison of calculations with blasting experiments in granite  

SciTech Connect

Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried to late times. An improved damage model allows finite element calculations which remain stable at late times. Reasonable agreement between crater profiles calculated with this model using the PRONTO finite element program and excavated crater profiles from blasting experiments in granite demonstrate a successful application of this model. Detailed instructions for use of this new damage model with the PRONTO finite element programs are included. 18 refs., 16 figs.

Thorne, B.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Experimental Determination of Damage Threshold Characteristics of IR Compatible Optical Materials  

SciTech Connect

The accelerating gradient in a laser-driven dielectric accelerating structure is often limited by the laser damage threshold of the structure. For a given laser-driven dielectric accelerator design, we can maximize the accelerating gradient by choosing the best combination of the accelerator's constituent material and operating wavelength. We present here a model of the damage mechanism from ultrafast infrared pulses and compare that model with experimental measurements of the damage threshold of bulk silicon. Additionally, we present experimental measurements of a variety of candidate materials, thin films, and nanofabricated accelerating structures.

Soong, Ken

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

Laser-induced damage in dielectrics with nanosecond to subpicosecond pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report extensive measurements of damage thresholds for fused silica and calcium fluoride at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations [tau] ranging from 270 fs to 1 ns. Qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated [tau][sup 1/2] scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for [tau][le]10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for [tau][gt]100 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in good agreement with experimental results.

Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Shore, B.W.; Perry, M.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-443, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

Laser-induced damage in dielectrics with nanosecond to subpicosecond pulses. I. Experimental. Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report extensive laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics at 1053 and 526 mm for pulse durations, {tau}, ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}{sup 1/2} scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for {tau}>50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in good agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

Stuart, B.C.; Herman, S.; Perry, M.D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fluence thresholds for laser-induced damage of optical components in the injector laser of the SSRL gun test facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluence thresholds for laser-induced damage of optical components in the injector laser of the SSRL gun test facility

Bolton, P

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Workshop on the Application of Remote Sensing Technologies to Disaster Response Rapid Damage Mapping for Post-Earthquake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop on the Application of Remote Sensing Technologies to Disaster Response Rapid Damage Technologies to Disaster Response September 12 2003 #12;Workshop on the Application of Remote Sensing Technologies to Disaster Response 12 September 2003 Rapid Damage Mapping for post-Earthquake Building Damage

Shinozuka, Masanobu

315

Effects of clone, silvicultural, and miticide treatments on cottonwood leafcurl mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) damage in plantation Populus  

SciTech Connect

Aculops lobuliferus (Keifer) is a little known pest of plantation Populus spp., which is capable of causing substantial damage. This is the first documented occurrence of A. lobuliferus in South Carolina. Previous anecdotal data indicated clonal variation in Populus susceptibility to A. lobuliferus damage. A damage rating scale was created to monitor mite damage in 2000-2001 in a short-rotation woody crop plantation; damage descriptions and seasonal phenology also were recorded. Foliar damage and terminal mortality were monitored on two Populus deltoides Bartr. clones, ST66 and S7C15, receiving one of three silvicultural treatments (irrigated, fertilized or both) or no treatment (control). In 2001, early season foliar damage ratings were significantly higher on clone S7C15; however, damage on clone ST66 was greater after miticide treatments later in the year. Terminal mortality did not differ between clones. Silvicultural treatments significantly affected foliar damage levels in both clones. Application of a commercially available miticide significantly reduced A. lobuliferus damage levels. This study demonstrates that A. lobuliferus damage levels can be influenced by Populus clone and silvicultural treatment. Foliar and terminal damage levels observed in this study indicate the potential for substantial economic impact of A. lobuliferus on plantation Populus. Although an effective control method may be to select and plant resistant Populus clones, chemical control remains a viable option.

Coyle, David, R.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

316

Field damage assessments as a design tool for information and communications technology systems that are resilient to natural disasters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses how to perform field damage assessments after natural disasters as a systematic design tool to achieve information and communications technology (ICT) systems that are more resilient to natural disasters. Hence, damage assessments ... Keywords: damage assessment, information and communication technology systems, natural disasters

Alexis Kwasinski

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

DAMAGE TO CONVENTIONAL AND SPECIAL TYPES OF RESIDENCES EXPOSED TO NUCLEAR EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

Ten residential structures of wood, brick, lightweight reinforced concrete block, and lightweight precast concrete slabs were exposed in pairs to the effects of a nuclear device of approximately 30 kt yield, detonated atop a 500-ft tower. The houses represented various structural types, and two houses of each type were tested. One house was located at an anticipated overpressure at which collapse or major damage might be expected and the other was located at an anticipated overpressure at which damage without collapse might be expected. The one-story reinforced lightweight concrete block house and the one-story precast lightweight concrete house suffered only minor structural damage. Photographs are included of the houses both before and after damage. Motion pictures were made during the event and were analyzed for information on thermal and blast effects. Recommendations are included for strengthening the structures within the limits of practical economy and so providing increased protection to dwelling structures. (C.H.)

Randall, P.A.

1961-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Normalized Damage from Major Tornadoes in the United States: 18901999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical records of damage from major tornadoes in the United States are taken and adjusted for inflation and wealth. Such adjustments provide a more reliable method to compare losses over time in the context of significant societal change. ...

Harold E. Brooks; Charles A. Doswell III

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage Modulating radiation induced TGFβ and ATM signaling in the DNA damage response Jennifer A. Anderson Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology Abstract Both the ATM and TGFβ signal transduction pathways are essential for cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFβ signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. Numerous studies have linked the p38 MAPK signaling pathway with the ATM DNA damage response, and others have shown that TGFβ stimulation results in the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Our aim is to perturb potential crosstalk between ATM, TGFβ and p38 MAPK at the DNA damage level and

320

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Larry Toburen East Carolina University Why This Project Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on (MC) Monte Carlo simulations of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many MC codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical Circuits Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications Contact BES Home 04.27.12 Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical Circuits Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Designed chemical interactions of liquid-metal-filled microcapsules target areas of microstructural damage and restore conductive pathways. Significance and Impact Selective self-healing mechanism extends the lifetime and reliability of electronic devices including battery electrodes. Research Details Liquid Indium-Gallium metal-filled microcapsules restore nearly 99% of the

322

Vibration testing of the I-40 bridge before and after the introduction of damage  

SciTech Connect

Because the bridges over the Rio Grande were to be razed, the investigators were able to introduce simulated cracks in four stages of increasing length into the structure. This paper summarizes the results of ambient and conventional, measured-input, modal analyses, performed on the undamaged structure. Also summarized are the results of conventional modal analyses performed after each stage of damage had been introduced. These tests were intended to quantify the amount of damage necessary to produce changes in the global dynamic properties of the bridge and to form a data base that can be used by other investigators to develop damage identification algorithms. Conventional modal analysis identified changes in the global dynamic properties of the structure only after the final stage of a damage.

Farrar, C.R.; Cone, K.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Quantifying structural damage from self-irradiation in a plutonium superconductor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

damage. In particular, the Pu L III -edge data indicate ain samples with mostly 239 Pu [5]. Curro et al. [7] havedue to the position of Pu at the transition between local

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Mechanistic investigation of an anticancer agent that damages DNA and interacts with the androgen receptor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 11[beta] molecule comprises a ligand for the androgen receptor (AR), which is crucial to progression and survival of many prostate cancers, tethered to a DNA-damaging aniline mustard. The compound was designed to exhibit ...

Proffitt, Kyle David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Radar and Damage Analysis of Severe Bow Echoes Observed during BAMEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines damaging-wind production by bow-shaped convective systems, commonly referred to as bow echoes. Recent idealized numerical simulations suggest that, in addition to descending rear inflow at the bow echo apex, low-level ...

Dustan M. Wheatley; Robert J. Trapp; Nolan T. Atkins

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Lightning Casualties and Property Damage in Colorado from 1950 to 1991 Based on Storm Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty-two years of lightning casualty and damage reports in Colorado are summarized. The data are from NOAA's Storm Data, which is compiled monthly by the National Weather Service.

Ral E. Lpez; Ronald L. Holle; Todd A. Heitkamp

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

On the Effect of Ramp Rate in Damage Accumulation of the CPV Die-Attach: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is commonly understood that thermal cycling at high temperature ramp rates may activate unrepresentative failure mechanisms. Increasing the temperature ramp rate of thermal cycling, however, could dramatically reduce the test time required to achieve an equivalent amount of thermal fatigue damage, thereby reducing overall test time. Therefore, the effect of temperature ramp rate on physical damage in the CPV die-attach is investigated. Finite Element Model (FEM) simulations of thermal fatigue and thermal cycling experiments are made to determine if the amount of damage calculated results in a corresponding amount of physical damage measured to the die-attach for a variety of fast temperature ramp rates. Preliminary experimental results are in good agreement with simulations and reinforce the potential of increasing temperature ramp rates. Characterization of the microstructure and resulting fatigue crack in the die-attach suggest a similar failure mechanism across all ramp rates tested.

Bosco, N. S.; Silverman, T. J.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Seismic damage estimation for buried pipelines - challenges after three decades of progress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the evolution over the past three decades of seismic damage estimation for buried pipelines and identifies some challenges for future research studies on the subject. The first section of this paper presents a chronological description of the evolution since the mid-1970s of pipeline fragility relations - the most common tool for pipeline damage estimation - and follows with a careful analysis of the use of several ground motion parameters as pipeline damage indicators. In the second section of the paper, four gaps on the subject are identified and proposed as challenges for future research studies. The main conclusion of this work is that enhanced fragility relations must be developed for improving pipeline damage estimation, which must consider relevant parameters that could influence the seismic response of pipelines.

Pineda-porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Najafi, Mohammand [U. OF TEXAS

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Lessons Learned from the Damage Produced by the Tornadoes of 3 May 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the tornadoes of 3 May 1999, the Federal Emergency Management Agency formed a Building Performance Assessment Team (BPAT) to examine the main tornado paths during the outbreak and to make recommendations based on the damage they saw. This ...

Charles A. Doswell III; Harold E. Brooks

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Crack Growth in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Materials: From Discrete to Continuum Damage Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the cracking problem of glass and ceramic materials used in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Analyses of an internal crack and of an interface crack between dissimilar materials were conducted using a modified boundary layer modeling approach. In this approach, fracture is allowed to occur in a small process window situated at an initial crack tip. Elastic displacement crack-tip fields are prescribed as remote boundary conditions. Crack propagation was first modeled discretely. Next, a continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model for brittle materials was developed to capture damage and crack growth in the process window. In particular, the damage model was applied to a glass-ceramic material that had been developed in-house for sealing purposes. Discrete and continuum damage solutions were then compared. Finally, the CDM model was used to determine the crack propagation direction as a function of a mode mixity measure.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Koeppel, Brian J.; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Singh, Prabhakar

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Statistical Forecast Model of Weather-Related Damage to a Major Electric Utility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized linear model (GLM) has been developed to relate meteorological conditions to damages incurred by the outdoor electrical equipment of Public Service Electric and Gas, the largest public utility in New Jersey. Utilizing a perfect-...

Brian J. Cerruti; Steven G. Decker

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

On the Use of SRIM/TRIM for Computing Radiation Damage Exposure  

SciTech Connect

The SRIM (formerly TRIM) Monte Carlo simulation code is widely used to compute a number of parameters relevant to ion beam implantation and ion beam processing of materials. It also has the capability to compute a common radiation damage exposure unit known as atomic displacements per atom (dpa). Since dpa is a standard measure of primary radiation damage production, most researchers who employ ion beams as a tool for inducing radiation damage in materials use SRIM to determine the dpa associated with their irradiations. The use of SRIM for this purpose has been evaluated and comparisons with an internationally-recognized standard definition of dpa, as well as more detailed atomistic simulations of atomic displacement cascades have been made. Differences between the standard and SRIM-based dpa are discussed and recommendations for future usage of SRIM in radiation damage studies are made.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Was, Gary [University of Michigan; Certain, Alicia [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Dwaraknath, Shyam [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Structural-Damage Detection by Distributed Piezoelectric Transducers and Tuned Electric Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel technique for damage detection of structures is introduced and discussed. It is based on purely electric measurements of the state variables of an electric network coupled to the main structure through a distributed set of piezoelectric patches. The constitutive parameters of this auxiliary network are optimized to increase the sensitivity of global measurements- as the frequency, response functions relative to selected electric degrees of freedom-with respect to a given class of variations in the structural-mechanical properties. Because the proposed method is based on purely electric input and output measurements, it allows for accurate results in the identification and localization of damages. Use of the electric frequency-response function to identify the mechanical damage leads to nonconvex optimization problems; therefore the proposed sensitivity-enhanced identification procedure becomes computationally efficient if an a priori knowledge about the damage is available.

dell'Isola, F; Vidoli, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Structural-Damage Detection by Distributed Piezoelectric Transducers and Tuned Electric Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel technique for damage detection of structures is introduced and discussed. It is based on purely electric measurements of the state variables of an electric network coupled to the main structure through a distributed set of piezoelectric patches. The constitutive parameters of this auxiliary network are optimized to increase the sensitivity of global measurements- as the frequency, response functions relative to selected electric degrees of freedom-with respect to a given class of variations in the structural-mechanical properties. Because the proposed method is based on purely electric input and output measurements, it allows for accurate results in the identification and localization of damages. Use of the electric frequency-response function to identify the mechanical damage leads to nonconvex optimization problems; therefore the proposed sensitivity-enhanced identification procedure becomes computationally efficient if an a priori knowledge about the damage is available.

F. dell'Isola; F. Vestroni; S. Vidoli

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

336

Development of high damage threshold optics for petawatt-class short-pulse lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations, {tau}, ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Damage thresholds of gold coatings are limited to 500 mJ/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}1/2 scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for {tau}>50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Boyd, R.D. [and others

1995-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Precipitation and Damaging Floods: Trends in the United States, 193297  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The poor relationship between what climatologists, hydrologists, and other physical scientists call floods, and those floods that actually cause damage to life or property, has limited what can be reliably said about the causes of observed trends ...

Roger A. Pielke Jr.; Mary W. Downton

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Topographic Speed-Up Effects and Observed Roof Damage on Bermuda following Hurricane Fabian (2003)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the impacts of the topography of Bermuda on the damage patterns observed following the passage of Hurricane Fabian over the island on 5 September 2003 are considered. Using a linearized model of atmospheric boundary layer flow over ...

Craig Miller; Michael Gibbons; Kyle Beatty; Auguste Boissonnade

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Analysis of Tornado Damage Tracks from the 3 May Tornado Outbreak Using Multispectral Satellite Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing (RS) and geographic information systems (GIS) techniques are applied to high-resolution satellite imagery to determine characteristics of tornado damage from the 3 May 1999 tornado outbreak. Three remote sensing methods, including ...

May Yuan; Melany Dickens-Micozzi; Michael A. Magsig

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The role of ClpXP-mediated proteolysis in resculpting the proteome after DNA damage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When faced with environmental assaults, E. coli can take extreme measures to survive. For example, starving bacteria consume their own proteins, and bacteria with severe DNA damage introduce mutations into their genomes. ...

Neher, Saskia B. (Saskia Byerly)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Tension, Free Space, and Cell Damage in a Microfluidic Wound Healing Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a novel, microfluidics-based technique to deconstruct the classical wound healing scratch assay, decoupling the contribution of free space and cell damage on the migratory dynamics of an epithelial sheet. This method ...

Murrell, Michael

342

Damage to Utility Boilers by Cycling and Flexible Operation: Report on the State of Knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this report was twofold. First, the initial concept and implementation of a boiler component and damage mechanism ranking were developed, based on the effects of cycling. This state-of-knowledge ranking can be used for determining the emphasis of future research on components most affected by cycling. Second, the groundwork for these boiler components and damage mechanisms was laid for the development in the second phase of this project of the report, The Impact of Flexible ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Life Management of Creep Strength Enhanced Grade 91 Steel: Damage Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Creep damage depends on stress, temperature, and material. This project established a database of creep data for Grade 91 steels and reviewed representative materials relationships that provide a best fit to the database. The relationships from several expert sources have been used in a Microsoft Excel-based damage calculator. This calculator allows comparison of component performance for selected operating conditions and material creep properties. The approach facilitates comparison of life ...

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Property Damage Risk Assessment Scoping Study: for South Texas Project Electric Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the South Texas Project Electric Generating Station (STPEGS), EPRI assessed the financial risks of on-site property damage from component failures and accidents and the effectiveness of available insurance in mitigating such risks. This report quantifies the risks of nuclear and nonnuclear accidents and the resulting property damage incurred. The report is a companion document to EPRI's Nuclear Property Insurance Study (TR-108061), which discusses five options for alternate insurance co...

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Joint Assessment of Cable Damage and Quantification of Effects from Fire (JACQUE-FIRE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 1 of this report documents the results of a Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise that was undertaken on fire-induced electrical circuit failures that may occur in nuclear power plants when cables are damaged by fires. Volume 2 documents the PRA expert elicitation results and will include the best estimate conditional probabilities of hot short-induced spurious operations of control circuits, given fire damage to associated cables. This program was sponsored ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Review of Weld Repair Options for Grade 91, Part 2: Damage Development and Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the likely creep damage distributions in weld repairs in Grade 91 steel. Information is provided in terms of the various weld metals that may be used, including nickel-based, matching P91 (B9), and standard P9 (B8) weld metals. The different damage distributions for each type, with associated implications for nondestructive evaluation, are discussed. In particular, the limitations of using surface ...

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response of the Columbia River Response of the Columbia River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish ­ presence, abundance, res. time, diet, growth rate, fitness Exchange ­ plant biomass, TOC, NOAA Fisheries, Hammond, OR Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Estuary Science

348

Assessing Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Consequences of Damage to Critical Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Since the publication of 'Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructure,' there has been a keen understanding of the complexity, interdependencies, and shared responsibility required to protect the nation's most critical assets that are essential to our way of life. The original 5 sectors defined in 1997 have grown to 18 Critical Infrastructures and Key Resources (CIKR), which are discussed in the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and its supporting sector-specific plans. The NIPP provides the structure for a national program dedicated to enhanced protection and resiliency of the nation's infrastructure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides in-depth, multi-disciplinary assessments of threat, vulnerability, and consequence across all 18 sectors at scales ranging from specific facilities to infrastructures spanning multi-state regions, such as the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) sector. Like many of the CIKR sectors, the ONG sector is comprised of production, processing, distribution, and storage of highly valuable and potentially dangerous commodities. Furthermore, there are significant interdependencies with other sectors, including transportation, communication, finance, and government. Understanding the potentially devastating consequences and collateral damage resulting from a terrorist attack or natural event is an important element of LLNL's infrastructure security programs. Our work began in the energy sector in the late 1990s and quickly expanded other critical infrastructure sectors. We have performed over 600 physical assessments with a particular emphasis on those sectors that utilize, store, or ship potentially hazardous materials and for whom cyber security is important. The success of our approach is based on building awareness of vulnerabilities and risks and working directly with industry partners to collectively advance infrastructure protection. This approach consists of three phases: The Pre-Assessment Phase brings together infrastructure owners and operators to identify critical assets and help the team create a structured information request. During this phase, we gain information about the critical assets from those who are most familiar with operations and interdependencies, making the time we spend on the ground conducting the assessment much more productive and enabling the team to make actionable recommendations. The Assessment Phase analyzes 10 areas: Threat environment, cyber architecture, cyber penetration, physical security, physical penetration, operations security, policies and procedures, interdependencies, consequence analysis, and risk characterization. Each of these individual tasks uses direct and indirect data collection, site inspections, and structured and facilitated workshops to gather data. Because of the importance of understanding the cyber threat, LLNL has built both fixed and mobile cyber penetration, wireless penetration and supporting tools that can be tailored to fit customer needs. The Post-Assessment Phase brings vulnerability and risk assessments to the customer in a format that facilitates implementation of mitigation options. Often the assessment findings and recommendations are briefed and discussed with several levels of management and, if appropriate, across jurisdictional boundaries. The end result is enhanced awareness and informed protective measures. Over the last 15 years, we have continued to refine our methodology and capture lessons learned and best practices. The resulting risk and decision framework thus takes into consideration real-world constraints, including regulatory, operational, and economic realities. In addition to 'on the ground' assessments focused on mitigating vulnerabilities, we have integrated our computational and atmospheric dispersion capability with easy-to-use geo-referenced visualization tools to support emergency planning and response operations. LLNL is home to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). NA

Suski, N; Wuest, C

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

349

Impact of substrate surface scratches on the laser damage resistance of multilayer coatings  

SciTech Connect

Substrate scratches can limit the laser resistance of multilayer mirror coatings on high-peak-power laser systems. To date, the mechanism by which substrate surface defects affect the performance of coating layers under high power laser irradiation is not well defined. In this study, we combine experimental approaches with theoretical simulations to delineate the correlation between laser damage resistance of coating layers and the physical properties of the substrate surface defects including scratches. A focused ion beam technique is used to reveal the morphological evolution of coating layers on surface scratches. Preliminary results show that coating layers initially follow the trench morphology on the substrate surface, and as the thickness increases, gradually overcoat voids and planarize the surface. Simulations of the electrical-field distribution of the defective layers using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method show that field intensification exists mostly near the top surface region of the coating near convex focusing structures. The light intensification could be responsible for the reduced damage threshold. Damage testing under 1064 nm, 3 ns laser irradiation over coating layers on substrates with designed scratches show that damage probability and threshold of the multilayer depend on substrate scratch density and width. Our preliminary results show that damage occurs on the region of the coating where substrate scratches reside and etching of the substrate before coating does not seem to improve the laser damage resistance.

Qiu, S; Wolfe, J; Monterrosa, A; Teslich, N; Feit, M; Pistor, T; Stolz, C

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

Dynamics of lattice damage accumulation for MeV ions in silicon  

SciTech Connect

Although the domination of electronic stopping over nuclear stopping may be regarded as an important practical advantage for high energy (MeV) ion processing, exact knowledge of the doping introduced into the active regions as well as of the process-associated defects and their thermal stability is essential for an understanding of device performance. In the present work we review that the results of our recent investigations into lattice damage accumulation in single crystal Si resulting from high energy ion implantation in the implantation temperature range between liquid nitrogen temperature and 200{degrees}C. The ion species used were 1 MeV O{sup +}, 1.25 MeV Si{sup +} and 4.8 MeV Er{sup +}. Ion implantation was carried out using virgin Si as well as Si containing pre-existing damage. The lattice damage was studied using Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results are correlated with the predictions of the model of Hecking and Te Kaat. The temperature dependence of the damage accumulation in the virgin Si suggests that the annihilation of simple defects via intra-cascade and inter-cascade recombination processes is controlled mainly by the T, while the nucleation of defect clusters during implantation appears to be influenced by spatial proximity effects related to the deposited energy density. Finally, the dynamics of damage accumulation is shown to be strongly influenced by the pre-existing damage structure.

Golanski, A. (Centre National d'Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET), 38 - Meylan (France)); Grob, A.; Grob, J.J. (Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67 (France). Centre de Recherches Nucleaires); Holland, O.W.; Pennycook, S.J.; White, C.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Microstructural damage produced by helium in aged /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microstructural damage is produced in aged /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuels used to power radioisotopic heat sources by the generation and release of the helium arising from alpha decay of the fuel. We obtained information about the nature and extent of this damage from metallographic examination of fuel pellets ranging in density from 87 to 94% with a grain size range of 6 to 30 ..mu..m that either were stored at ambient temperature for 18 months and then heated at 900, 1150, or 1360/sup 0/C or were stored at 900, 1150, or 1350/sup 0/C for 27 months. Microstructural damage was not observed in the fuel pellets stored at ambient temperature and then heated at 900/sup 0/C, but grain boundary bubble damage was observed in the pellets stored at ambient temperature and then heated at either 1150 or 1350/sup 0/C. More extensive damage occurred in those pellets heated at 1350/sup 0/C. Four of the higher density pellets (92 and 94% dense) stored at 900/sup 0/C shattered during storage and the rest appeared to be highly strained. The pellets stored at 1150/sup 0/C were damaged only slightly but were somewhat strained and appeared to have released their helium inventory only partially. All pellets stored at 1350/sup 0/C showed swelling and extensive void agglomeration. These data suggest that the best fuel operating temperature, as far as helium damage is concerned, would be approx. 1200/sup 0/C because below this temperature the fuel becomes highly strained and above this temperature the fuel swells ad becomes somewhat friable. Both these situations could adversely affect the impact behavior of the fuel from the standpoint of strength and fines generation.

Land, C.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE TO WASTE PACKAGES CAUSED BY SEISMIC EVENTS DURING POST-CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents methodology and results of an analysis of damage due to seismic ground motion for waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A series of three-dimensional rigid body kinematic simulations of waste packages, pallets, and drip shields subjected to seismic ground motions was performed. The simulations included strings of several waste packages and were used to characterize the number, location, and velocity of impacts that occur during seismic ground motion. Impacts were categorized as either waste package-to-waste package (WP-WP) or waste package-to-pallet (WP-P). In addition, a series of simulations was performed for WP-WP and WP-P impacts using a detailed representation of a single waste package. The detailed simulations were used to determine the amount of damage from individual impacts, and to form a damage catalog, indexed according to the type, angle, location and force/velocity of the impact. Finally, the results from the two analyses were combined to estimate the total damage to a waste package that may occur during an episode of seismic ground motion. This study addressed two waste package types, four levels of peak ground velocity (PGV), and 17 ground motions at each PGV. Selected aspects of waste package degradation, such as effective wall thickness and condition of the internals, were also considered. As expected, increasing the PGV level of the vibratory ground motion increases the damage to the waste packages. Results show that most of the damage is caused by WP-P impacts. TAD-bearing waste packages with intact internals are highly resistant to damage, even at a PGV of 4.07 m/s, which is the highest level analyzed.

Alves, S W; Blair, S C; Carlson, S R; Gerhard, M; Buscheck, T A

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

Thermo-Poroelastic Modeling of Reservoir Stimulation and Microseismicity Using Finite Element Method with Damage Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stress and permeability variations around a wellbore and in the reservoir are of much interest in petroleum and geothermal reservoir development. Water injection causes significant changes in pore pressure, temperature, and stress in hot reservoirs, changing rock permeability. In this work, two- and three-dimensional finite element methods were developed to simulate coupled reservoirs with damage mechanics and stress-dependent permeability. The model considers the influence of fluid flow, temperature, and solute transport in rock deformation and models nonlinear behavior with continuum damage mechanics and stress-dependent permeability. Numerical modeling was applied to analyze wellbore stability in swelling shale with two- and three-dimensional damage/fracture propagation around a wellbore and injection-induced microseismic events. The finite element method (FEM) was used to solve the displacement, pore pressure, temperature, and solute concentration problems. Solute mass transport between drilling fluid and shale formation was considered to study salinity effects. Results show that shear and tensile failure can occur around a wellbore in certain drilling conditions where the mud pressure lies between the reservoir pore pressure and fracture gradient. The fully coupled thermo-poro-mechanical FEM simulation was used to model damage/fracture propagation and microseismic events caused by fluid injection. These studies considered wellbore geometry in small-scale modeling and point-source injection, assuming singularity fluid flux for large-scale simulation. Damage mechanics was applied to capture the effects of crack initiation, microvoid growth, and fracture propagation. The induced microseismic events were modeled in heterogeneous geological media, assuming the Weibull distribution functions for modulus and permeability. The results of this study indicate that fluid injection causes the effective stress to relax in the damage phase and to concentrate at the interface between the damage phase and the intact rock. Furthermore, induced-stress and far-field stress influence damage propagation. Cold water injection causes the tensile stress and affects the initial fracture and fracture propagation, but fracture initiation pressure and far-field stress are critical to create a damage/fracture plane, which is normal to the minimum far-field stress direction following well stimulation. Microseismic events propagate at both well scale and reservoir-scale simulation; the cloud shape of a microseismic event is affected by permeability anisotropy and far-field stress, and deviatoric horizontal far-field stress especially contributes to the localization of the microseismic cloud.

Lee, Sang Hoon

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Effect of Load Phase Angle on Wind Turbine Blade Fatigue Damage: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the importance of phase angle variations with respect to fatigue damage. The operating loads on a generic conventional three-bladed upwind 1.5-MW wind turbine blade were analyzed over a range of operating conditions, and an aggregate probability distribution for the actual phase angles between the in-plane (lead-lag) and out-of-plane (flap) loads was determined. Using a finite element model of a generic blade and Miner's Rule, the accumulated theoretical damage (based on axial strains) resulting from a fatigue test with variable phase angles was compared to the damage resulting from a fatigue test with a constant phase angle. The nodal damage distribution at specific blade cross-sections are compared for the constant and variable phase angle cases. The sequence effects of various phase angle progressions were also considered. For this analysis, the finite element results were processed using the nonlinear Marco-Starkey damage accumulation model. Each phase angle sequence was constrained to have the same overall phase angle distribution and the same total number of cycles but the order in which the phase angles were applied was varied.

White, D. L.; Musial, W. D.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Rehabilitation of notch damaged steel beam using a carbon fiber reinforced multiphase-matrix composite  

SciTech Connect

The retrofit of notch damaged steel beams is investigated via the experimental testing of nine wide-flange steel beam specimens and finite element simulation. Three notch configurations representing various damage levels were identified, and the beam specimens were retrofitted using CFRP laminates and a recently developed polymeric matrix composite - CarbonFlex - that exhibits superior energy dissipation and ductility properties, where the peak-load deflections were between 49.4% and 65.2% higher using the CarbonFlex-retrofitted beams. The results are attributed to the substantially higher damage tolerance capability of CarbonFlex than conventional CFRP. Finite element models were developed to investigate the damage processes and strain/ stress distributions near the notch tips. The numerical results match closely with the experimentally determined load-deflection curves and the strain fields obtained by the digital imaging correlations (DIC) system. Both experimental and numerical results clearly indicate the effectiveness of CarbonFlex, as a candidate retrofitting material, to retrofit damaged steel structures. Lastly, the micro-mechanisms by which CarbonFlex could sufficiently sustain a significant amount of the peak strength at large displacement ductility values are discussed with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures.

Zhou, HongYu [Arizona State University; Attard, Dr. Thomas L. [Arizona State University; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Interplay between Np95 and Eme1 in the DNA damage response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mus81 (methyl methansulfonate UV sensitive clone 81) and Eme1 (essential meiotic endonuclease 1, also known as MMS4) form a heterodimeric endonuclease that is critical for genomic stability and the response to DNA crosslink damage and replication blockade. However, relatively little is known as to how this endonuclease is regulated following DNA damage. Here, we report mammalian Eme1 interacts with Np95, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in chromatin modification, replication-linked epigenetic maintenance and the DNA damage response. Np95 and Eme1 co-localize on nuclear chromatin following exposure of cells to camptothecin, an agent that promotes the collapse of replication forks. The observed co localization following DNA damage was found to be dependent on an intact RING finger, the structural motif that encodes the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Np95. Taken together, these findings link Mus81-Eme1 with the replication-associated chromatin modifier functions of Np95 in the cellular response to DNA damage.

Mistry, Helena; Gibson, Lianne; Yun, J.W.; Sarras, Haya; Tamblyn, Laura [Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada); McPherson, John Peter [Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada)], E-mail: peter.mcpherson@utoronto.ca

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

RNF8 Transduces the DNA-Damage Signal Via Histone Ubiquitylation And Checkpoint Protein Assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DNA-damage signaling utilizes a multitude of posttranslational modifiers as molecular switches to regulate cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA repair, cellular senescence, and apoptosis. Here we show that RNF8, a FHA/RING domain-containing protein, plays a critical role in the early DNA-damage response. We have solved the X-ray crystal structure of the FHA domain structure at 1.35 {angstrom}. We have shown that RNF8 facilitates the accumulation of checkpoint mediator proteins BRCA1 and 53BP1 to the damaged chromatin, on one hand through the phospho-dependent FHA domain-mediated binding of RNF8 to MDC1, on the other hand via its role in ubiquitylating H2AX and possibly other substrates at damage sites. Moreover, RNF8-depleted cells displayed a defective G2/M checkpoint and increased IR sensitivity. Together, our study implicates RNF8 as a novel DNA-damage-responsive protein that integrates protein phosphorylation and ubiquitylation signaling and plays a critical role in the cellular response to genotoxic stress.

Huen, M.S.Y.; Grant, R.; Manke, I.; Minn, K.; Yu, X.; Yaffe, M.B.; Chen, J.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An X-ray Vortex on the Horizon? An X-ray Vortex on the Horizon? How Two Drops Become One Scientists Discover How Nanocluster Contaminants Increase Risk of Spreading Mobile RNA is Poised and Ready Glass Does a Double-Take Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells MAY 5, 2008 Bookmark and Share The ABH2-DNA complex. A team of University of Chicago scientists has shown how two proteins locate and repair damaged genetic material inside cells. Because one of the proteins detects and repairs DNA damage that may result from a certain type of cancer therapy, the researchers raised the possibility of designing a molecule that could interfere with the repair process, making cancer

362

Radiation damage induced by GeV electrons in W-Re and Cu targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 UCRL-JC-148049 July 2002 Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes Radiation Damage Induced by GeV Electrons in W-Re Targets for Next Generation Linear Colliders M.-J. Caturla 1* , S. Roesler 2 , V. K. Bharadwaj 3 , D. C. Schultz 3 , J. C. Sheppard 3 , J. Marian 1 , B. D. Wirth 1 , W. Stein 1 and A. Sunwoo 1 1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA 2 CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland 3 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Menlo Park, California s: We have studied the structural damage of W-Re targets produced by electrons with energies of several GeV and under different conditions of total number of electrons, beam shape and target depth. We report the differences in damage levels for different designs considered in the construction of the next generation of linear accelerators, and discuss the possible effects in the lifetime

363

Erosion damage of nearby plasma-facing components during a disruption on the divertor plate  

SciTech Connect

Intense energy flow from the disrupting plasma during, a thermal quench will cause a sudden vapor cloud to form above the exposed divertor area. The vapor-cloud layer has been proved to significantly reduce the subsequent energy flux of plasma particles to the original disruption location. However, most of the incoming plasma energy is quickly converted to intense photon radiation emitted by heating of the vapor cloud. This radiation energy can cause serious erosion damage of nearby components not directly exposed to the disrupting, plasma. The extent of this ``secondary damage`` will depend on the divertor design, disrupting plasma parameters, and design of nearby components. The secondary erosion damage of these components due to intense radiation can exceed that of the original disruption location.

Hassanein, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Konkashbaev, I. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Low Dose Radiation Francis A. Cucinotta 1 , Yongfeng Li 2 , Minli Wang 2 , Claudio Carra 2 , Janice Pluth 3 , and Peter O'Neill 4 1 NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 2 U.S.R.A. Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX 3 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 4 Oxford University, Oxford UK Abstract: Modular systems biology (MSB) describes the complexity of biological systems using well defined modules that represent distinct biological response pathways or sub-systems within pathways. We review mathematical concepts from control theory that can be used to identify and construct well defined modules for describing complex biological processes. The DNA damage response and TGFbeta/Smad signaling are two important response pathways following

365

Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System Yanrong Su, Jarah Meador and Adayabalam S. Balajee Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West, 168th Street, New York, NY 10032. Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) inflicts a wide variety of lesions in the genomic DNA. Among them, DNA double strand break (DSB) is considered to be the critical lesion for most of the deleterious radiation effects including carcinogenesis. Much of our knowledge on induction and repair kinetics of DSB has come from studies in two dimensional cell culture systems. However, the damage signaling and repair responses to DSB in tissue microenvironment are largely unknown. Knowledge of tissue responses to

366

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency. Authors: Chantal Courtemanche, Arnold C. Huang, Nicole Kerry, Bernice Ng, and Bruce N. Ames. Institutions: Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, California. Our overall goal is to understand and quantify the real effects of low-dose radiation by measuring direct and specific cellular changes. However, since the background dose of radiation to which most individuals are exposed is well below the levels where significant biological effects, such as mutation or tumor induction, are observed, our novel approach is to compare the consequences of radiation to those of specific nutritional deficiencies. By determining which of these two common stresses at physiologically relevant doses leads to a greater amount of DNA damage, we

367

The low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends low dose damage response pathways in the mouse mammary glands depends on genotype, tissue compartment, exposure regimen, and sampling times Joe Gray & Andrew Wyrobek Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The objectives of this research are to characterize the early and persistent low-dose and adaptive response (AR) damage surveillance networks in mammary glands of radiation sensitive and resistant strains of mice to identify the molecular signatures/mechanisms associated with nonlinear modifications of risk for mammary gland cancer. Our approach uses low-dose exposure regimens that have been reported to induce mammary gland cancer in sensitive strains to determine whether low-dose induced pathways are differentially expressed in epithelial or stromal cells and to determine

368

Identifying the Impact of the Built Environment on Wildfire Property Damage in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildfires are a natural hazard that present an increasing risk to communities in fire-prone areas. This study examines the impacts of the municipal-level built environment upon fire damages in California, a particularly fire-vulnerable state. This study uses a multivariate linear regression model to isolate the effects of the human built environment upon reported monetary wildfire damages. Reported monetary losses from wildfires for the years 2007 to 2010 are examined against relevant built environment variables, while statistically controlling for biophysical and socio-economic variables. The fully-specified regression model indicates that wildfire property damage is driven primarily by the built environment. Socioeconomic and biophysical variables contribute comparatively little explanatory power to the model. Findings from this study will be of particular interest to fire management officials, land developers, and urban planners interested in creating a more fire-resilient future for cities within California.

Makino, Takashi Michael

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Investigation of hydrogen-burn damage in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

About 10 hours after the March 28, 1979 Loss-of-Coolant Accident began at Three Mile Island Unit 2, a hydrogen deflagration of undetermined extent occurred inside the reactor building. Examinations of photographic evidence, available from the first fifteen entries into the reactor building, yielded preliminary data on the possible extent and range of hydrogen burn damage. These data, although sparse, contributed to development of a possible damage path and to an estimate of the extent of damage to susceptible reactor building items. Further information gathered from analysis of additional photographs and samples can provide the means for estimating hydrogen source and production rate data crucial to developing a complete understanding of the TMI-2 hydrogen deflagration. 34 figures.

Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Eidem, G.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

New perspectives on the damage estimation for buried pipeline systems due to seismic wave propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past three decades, seismic fragility fonnulations for buried pipeline systems have been developed following two tendencies: the use of earthquake damage scenarios from several pipeline systems to create general pipeline fragility functions; and, the use of damage scenarios from one pipeline system to create specific-system fragility functions. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of both tendencies are analyzed and discussed; in addition, a summary of what can be considered the new challenges for developing better pipeline seismic fragility formulations is discussed. The most important conclusion of this paper states that more efforts are needed to improve the estimation of transient ground strain -the main cause of pipeline damage due to seismic wave propagation; with relevant advances in that research field, new and better fragility formulations could be developed.

Pineda Porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation  

SciTech Connect

This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

Claytor, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atterbury, Marie K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the first full-length high-temperature test (FLHT-1) performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The test is part of a series of experiments being performed for the NRC as a part of their Severe Fuel Damage Program and is one of several planned for PNL`s Coolant Boilaway and Damage Progression Program. The report summarizes the test design and test plan. it also provides a summary and discussion of the data collected during the test and of the photos taken during the post-test examination. All objectives for the test were met. The key objective was to demonstrate that severe fuel damage tests on full-length fuel bundles can be safely conducted in the NRU reactor.

Rausch, W.N.; Hesson, G.M.; Pilger, J.P.; King, L.L.; Goodman, R.L.; Panisko, F.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Damage detection algorithms applied to experimental modal data from the I-40 Bridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the I-40 Bridges over the Rio Grande were to be razed during the summer of 1993, the investigators were able to introduce damage into the structure in order to test various damage identification methods. To support this research effort, New Mexico State University (NMSU) contracted Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform experimental modal analyses, and to develop experimentally verified numerical models of the bridge. Previous reports (LA-12767-MS and LA-12979-MS) summarize the results of the experimental modal analyses and the results obtained from numerical modal analyses conducted with finite element models. This report summarizes the application of five damage identification algorithms reported in the technical literature to the previously reported experimental and numerical modal data.

Farrar, C.; Jauregui, D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Uncertainty Quantification of Composite Laminate Damage with the Generalized Information Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a survey of five theories to assess the uncertainty of projectile impact induced damage on multi-layered carbon-epoxy composite plates. Because the types of uncertainty dealt with in this application are multiple (variability, ambiguity, and conflict) and because the data sets collected are sparse, characterizing the amount of delamination damage with probability theory alone is possible but incomplete. This motivates the exploration of methods contained within a broad Generalized Information Theory (GIT) that rely on less restrictive assumptions than probability theory. Probability, fuzzy sets, possibility, and imprecise probability (probability boxes (p-boxes) and Dempster-Shafer) are used to assess the uncertainty in composite plate damage. Furthermore, this work highlights the usefulness of each theory. The purpose of the study is not to compare directly the different GIT methods but to show that they can be deployed on a practical application and to compare the assumptions upon which these theories are based. The data sets consist of experimental measurements and finite element predictions of the amount of delamination and fiber splitting damage as multilayered composite plates are impacted by a projectile at various velocities. The physical experiments consist of using a gas gun to impact suspended plates with a projectile accelerated to prescribed velocities, then, taking ultrasound images of the resulting delamination. The nonlinear, multiple length-scale numerical simulations couple local crack propagation implemented through cohesive zone modeling to global stress-displacement finite element analysis. The assessment of damage uncertainty is performed in three steps by, first, considering the test data only; then, considering the simulation data only; finally, performing an assessment of total uncertainty where test and simulation data sets are combined. This study leads to practical recommendations for reducing the uncertainty and improving the prediction accuracy of the damage modeling and finite element simulation.

J. Lucero; F. Hemez; T. Ross; K.Kline; J.Hundhausen; T. Tippetts

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repairing oxidative damages induced by antitumor drug adriamycin  

SciTech Connect

Adriamycin (ADM) is a widely used antineoplastic drug. However, the increasing cellular resistance has become a serious limitation to ADM clinical application. The most important mechanism related to ADM-induced cell death is oxidative DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway in the repair of DNA single strand break (SSB) and oxidized base. In this study, we firstly applied the murine embryo fibroblasts wild-type (pol {beta} +/+) and homozygous pol {beta} null cell (pol {beta} -/-) as a model to investigate ADM DNA-damaging effects and the molecular basis underlying these effects. Here, cellular sensitivity to ADM was examined using colorimetric assay and colony forming assay. ADM-induced cellular ROS level and the alteration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by commercial kits. Further, DNA strand break, chromosomal damage and gene mutation were assessed by comet assay, micronucleus test and hprt gene mutation assay, respectively. The results showed that pol {beta} -/- cells were more sensitive to ADM compared with pol {beta} +/+ cells and more severe SSB and chromosomal damage as well as higher hprt gene mutation frequency were observed in pol {beta} -/- cells. ROS level in pol {beta} -/- cells increased along with decreased activity of SOD. These results demonstrated that pol {beta} deficiency could enable ROS accumulation with SOD activity decrease, further elevate oxidative DNA damage, and subsequently result in SSB, chromosome cleavage as well as gene mutation, which may be partly responsible for the cytotoxicity of ADM and the hypersensitivity of pol {beta} -/- cells to ADM. These findings suggested that pol {beta} is vital for repairing oxidative damage induced by ADM.

Liu Shukun; Wu Mei [Department of Environmental Health, Sichuan University, West China School of Public Health, Chengdu (China); Zhang Zunzhen, E-mail: zhangzunzhen@163.co [Department of Environmental Health, Sichuan University, West China School of Public Health, Chengdu (China)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Fuel damage during off-normal transients in metal-fueled fast reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fuel damage during off-normal transients is a key issue in the safety of fast reactors because the fuel pin cladding provides the primary barrier to the release of radioactive materials. Part of the Safety Task of the Integral Fast Reactor Program is to provide assessments of the damage and margins to failure for metallic fuels over the wide range of transients that must be considered in safety analyses. This paper reviews the current status of the analytical and experimental programs that are providing the bases for these assessments. 13 refs., 2 figs.

Kramer, J.M.; Bauer, T.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Contribution of radiation damage to the study of basic atomic motion in solids  

SciTech Connect

Radiation damage is a powerful tool for the study of point-defect interactions in solids. The large numbers of point defects produced during irradiation and subsequent annealing aggregate to form planar and linear defects. A study of the nature of these defects provides basic understanding of the mechanics of defect formation in solids. Defects in ion-bombarded silicon are studied using the transmission electron microscope. A mechanism for the formation of the observed defects is proposed. The utility of radiation damage studies in the understanding of atom motion in solids is demonstrated. (auth)

Seshan, K.

1973-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Effect of Tube Bend Geometry on the Development of Corrosion Fatigue Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion fatigue cracking in supply and riser tubing has occurred in a range of fossil plants. Tubing of this type can run outside the boiler so that, in some cases, the failures result in significant damage and risk for the safety of personnel. The overall EPRI effort in examining corrosion fatigue damage in supply and riser tube systems is aimed at the following: Developing a set of case studies in which the background is collated on plants exhibiting problems as well as plants where no significant da...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nonlinear damage effect in graphene synthesis by C-cluster ion implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present few-layer graphene synthesis by negative carbon cluster ion implantation with C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 4} at energies below 20 keV. The small C-clusters were produced by a source of negative ion by cesium sputtering with medium beam current. We show that the nonlinear effect in cluster-induced damage is favorable for graphene precipitation compared with monomer carbon ions. The nonlinear damage effect in cluster ion implantation shows positive impact on disorder reduction, film uniformity, and the surface smoothness in graphene synthesis.

Zhang Rui; Zhang Zaodi; Wang Zesong; Wang Shixu; Wang Wei; Fu Dejun; Liu Jiarui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Materials of Ministry of Education and Accelerator Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072 Wuhan (China)

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Radiation damage to amorphous carbon thin films irradiated by multiple 46.9 nm laser shots below the single-shot damage threshold  

SciTech Connect

High-surface-quality amorphous carbon (a-C) optical coatings with a thickness of 45 nm, deposited by magnetron sputtering on a silicon substrate, were irradiated by the focused beam of capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar extreme ultraviolet laser (CDL=capillary-discharge laser; XUV=extreme ultraviolet, i.e., wavelengths below 100 nm). The laser wavelength and pulse duration were 46.9 nm and 1.7 ns, respectively. The laser beam was focused onto the sample surface by a spherical Sc/Si multilayer mirror with a total reflectivity of about 30%. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.4 to 40 muJ on the sample surface. The irradiation was carried out at five fluence levels between 0.1 and 10 J/cm{sup 2}, accumulating five different series of shots, i.e., 1, 5, 10, 20, and 40. The damage to the a-C thin layer was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Nomarski differential interference contrast (DIC) optical microscopy. The dependence of the single-shot-damaged area on pulse energy makes it possible to determine a beam spot diameter in the focus. Its value was found to be equal to 23.3+-3.0 mum using AFM data, assuming the beam to have a Gaussian profile. Such a plot can also be used for a determination of single-shot damage threshold in a-C. A single-shot threshold value of 1.1 J/cm{sup 2} was found. Investigating the consequences of the multiple-shot exposure, it has been found that an accumulation of 10, 20, and 40 shots at a fluence of 0.5 J/cm{sup 2}, i.e., below the single-shot damage threshold, causes irreversible changes of thin a-C layers, which can be registered by both the AFM and the DIC microscopy. In the center of the damaged area, AFM shows a-C removal to a maximum depth of 0.3, 1.2, and 1.5 nm for 10-, 20- and 40-shot exposure, respectively. Raman microprobe analysis does not indicate any change in the structure of the remaining a-C material. The erosive behavior reported here contrasts with the material expansion observed earlier [L. Juha et al., Proc. SPIE 5917, 91 (2005)] on an a-C sample irradiated by a large number of femtosecond pulses of XUV high-order harmonics.

Juha, L.; Hajkova, V.; Vorlicek, V. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Chalupsky, J. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Ritucci, A.; Reale, A.; Zuppella, P. [Department of Physics, University of L'Aquila, gc Laboratorio Nazionale del Gran Sasso (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-INFN), 67010 Coppito, L'Aquila (Italy); Stoermer, M. [GKSS Research Center, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Review of Existing Technology for Detection of Graphitization Damage in Carbon and Carbon-Molybhenum Steel Piping and Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unanticipated, and often catastrophic, damage continues to be observed in high-energy piping components of fossil-fuel-fired boilers. This damage is a significant source of concern for owner/operators. Specifically, the concerns for continued operation of potentially degraded components arise from the uncertainties associated with the identification of all anticipated active damage mechanisms, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and procedures used to detect and quantify all possible active ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Parens Patriae Litigation to Redress Societal Damages from the BP Oil Spill: The Latest Stage in the Evolution of Crimtorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil slick polluted "the precious wetlands, bays, and estuaries of Louisiana'sLouisiana seeks compensation for damages caused by the oil spill to its "marshes, wetlands,

Rustad, Michael L.; Koenig, Thomas H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evolutionary algorithms, chaotic excitations, and structural health monitor : on global search methods for improved damage detection via tailored inputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of detecting damage to offshore oil platforms were lessincreases. If an offshore oil platform is modeled as a 1DOFto monitor offshore oil platforms: feature selection,

Olson, Colin C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

LMS-based method for damage detection applied to Phase II of Structural Health Monitoring benchmark problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is the process of monitoring the state of a structure to determine the existence, location, and degree of damage that may exist within the entire structure. A structure?s health or level of damage can be monitored by identifying changes in structural or modal parameters. In this research, the structure?s health is monitored by identifying changes in structural stiffness. The Adaptive Least Mean Square (LMS) filtering approach is used to directly identify changes in structural stiffness for the IASC-ASCE Structural Health Monitoring Task Group Benchmark problem for both Phase I and II. The research focuses primarily on Phase II of the benchmark problem. In Phase II, modeling error and noise is introduced to the problem making the problem more realistic. The research found that the LMS filter approach can be used to detect damage and distinguish relative severity of the damage in Phase II of the benchmark problem in real time. Even though the LMS filter approach identified damage, a threshold below which damage is hard to identify exists. If the overall stiffness changes less than 10%, then identifying the presence and location of damage is difficult. But if the time of damage is known, then the presence and location can be determined. The research is of great interest to those in the structural health monitoring community, structural engineers, and inspection practitioners who deal with structural damage identification problems.

Preston, Robin Huckaby

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Study on Damage Assessment of Terminal-Sensitive Projectile Firing at Armored Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terminal-sensitive projectile is one kind of sensing instrument initiation cluster ammunition. According to the performance characteristics of terminal-sensitive projectile, the target vulnerability of mechanized gun was analyzed in this paper. On that ... Keywords: efficiency assessment, terminal-sensitive projectile, mechanized gun, damage probability, Monte-Carlo method

Rui Guo; Rong-zhong Liu; Jun Zhang; Gang Li

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

On-Line Evidence for Context Use by Right-Brain-Damaged Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of right-brain-damaged (RBD) patients to use on-line contextual information in a word-monitoring task was examined. Subjects were required to monitor for target words in the contexts of both normal and semantically anomalous sentences. Similar ...

Carol L. Leonard; Shari R. Baum

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Learning to fall: Designing low damage fall sequences for humanoid soccer robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology for the analysis and design of fall sequences of robots that minimize joint/articulation injuries, and the damage of valuable body parts is proposed. These fall sequences can be activated/triggered by the robot in case of a detected unintentional ... Keywords: Complex humanoid robots simulation, Fall management, Full-body motion control, Humanoid soccer robots, Nao humanoid robots

J. Ruiz-del-Solar; R. Palma-Amestoy; R. Marchant; I. Parra-Tsunekawa; P. Zegers

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Relay node placement in structurally damaged wireless sensor networks via triangular steiner tree approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have many applications which operate in hostile environments. Due to the harsh surroundings, WSNs may suffer from a large scale damage that causes many nodes to fail simultaneously and the network to get partitioned into ... Keywords: Fault-tolerance, Network segmentation, Relay node placement, Wireless sensor networks

Fatih Senel; Mohamed Younis

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Characteristics of 15 MeV and fission neutron damage in niobium  

SciTech Connect

Displacement damage by 15 MeV (d-Be source) and fission neutrons at 30$sup 0$C in high purity niobium single crystals has been studied by transmission electron microscopy. The fluence of the 15 MeV neutrons was 1.5-- 2.0 x 10$sup 17$ n/cm$sup 2$ and the fluence of the fission neutrons (5 x 10$sup 17$ n/cm$sup 2$) was chosen so that samples from both types of irradiations had approximately the same damage energy. In both 15 MeV and fission neutron irradiated specimens, the loops were observed to be about $sup 2$/$sub 3$ interstitial and $sup 1$/$sub 3$ vacancy type. The analysis of Burgers vectors of the dislocation loops showed that more than $sup 2$/$sub 3$ of the loops were perfect a/2(111) and that the rest were a/2(110) faulted. It is concluded that at equal damage energies, the detailed nature of the damage is the same for 15 MeV and fission neutron irradiated niobium. (auth)

Narayan, J.; Ohr, S.M.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Post Storm Damage Assessment and Vegetation Monitoring Using Remote Sensing Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an EPRI study of remote sensing technology as a tool for environmental monitoring and assessment along power line corridors and at utility systems and to view facilities damaged during storms. The report provides a technology overview, details application-oriented field studies at two sites, and offers conclusions and recommendations concerning existing and emerging technologies.

1998-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

Damaging Surface Wind Mechanisms within the 10 June 2003 Saint Louis Bow Echo during BAMEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed radar and damage survey analyses of a severe bow echo event that occurred on 10 June 2003 during the Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) Experiment are presented. A bow echo formed just east of Saint Louis, Missouri, and ...

Nolan T. Atkins; Christopher S. Bouchard; Ron W. Przybylinski; Robert J. Trapp; Gary Schmocker

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Investigation of Various Condition Monitoring Techniques Based on a Damaged Wind Turbine Gearbox  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a continuation of a 2009 paper presented at the 7th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring that described various wind turbine condition-monitoring techniques. This paper presents the results obtained by various condition- monitoring techniques from a damaged Gearbox Reliability Collaborative test gearbox.

Sheng, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Compilation of radiation damage test data materials used around high-energy accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

Beynel, Paul; Schnbacher, Helmut

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Damaging Downburst Prediction and Detection Algorithm for the WSR-88D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of predicting the onset of damaging downburst winds from high-reflectivity storm cells that develop in an environment of weak vertical shear with Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) is examined. Ninety-one storm cells ...

Travis M. Smith; Kimberly L. Elmore; Shannon A. Dulin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the twelfth in a series of Quarterly Technical Progress Reports on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) which is one element of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program, conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The first eight reports in this series were numbered DOE/ET-0065/1 through 8.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Evaluating and Avoiding Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Damage Caused by Duct Burners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), supplemental firing in duct burners introduces the potential for serious HRSG tube failure and damage. Duct burners that are specified, designed, and operated properly can produce a number of significant benefits. This report will assist operators in accruing these benefits.

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

Potential for Hepa filter damage from water spray systems in filter plenums  

SciTech Connect

The water spray systems in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums that are used in nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for protection against fire was designed under the assumption that the HEPA filters would not be damaged by the water sprays. The most likely scenario for filter damage involves filter plugging by the water spray, followed by the fan blowing out the filter medium. A number of controlled laboratory tests that were previously conducted in the late 1980s are reviewed in this paper to provide a technical basis for the potential HEPA filter damage by the water spray system in HEPA filter plenums. In addition to the laboratory tests, the scenario for HEPA filter damage during fires has also occurred in the field. Afire in a four-stage, HEPA filter plenum at Rocky Flats in 1980 caused the first three stages of HEPA filters to blow out of their housing and the fourth stage to severely bow. Details of this recently declassified fire are presented in this paper. Although these previous findings suggest serious potential problems exist with the current water spray system in filter plenum , additional studies are required to confirm unequivocally that DOE`s critical facilities are at risk.

Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.; Slawsld, J.W.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Semi-Span Test Article With and Without Discrete Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AS&M, Inc. performed finite element analysis, with and without discrete damage, of a composite semi-span test article that represents the Boeing 220-passenger transport aircraft composite semi-span test article. A NASTRAN bulk data file and drawings ...

Lovejoy Andrew E.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

HOW TO MINIMIZE PESTICIDE DAMAGE OF HONEY BEES Greg Hunt and Christian Krupke, Extension Entomologists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of pesticides. Bees are very sensitive to pesticides and are vulnerable when foraging. It is a label violation to apply pesticides toxic to bees when bees are foraging on the crop. Honey bees and the beekeeper to minimize pesticide damage. Cucurbit pollination: Crops like melons, cucumbers, squash

Ginzel, Matthew

402

Damage monitoring in fibre reinforced mortar by combined digital image correlation and acoustic emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerns, building facades tend to include multi-layered components such as outer thermal insulation correlation and acoustic emission, Construction and Building Materials vol. 38, pp. 317-380. http for the detection and monitoring of damage and frac- tures in building materials in the prospects of energetic

403

Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Peach Bottom, Unit 2  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the internal event initiated accident sequence analyses for Peach Bottom, Unit 2; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Peach Bottom, Unit 2, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provided additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Peach Bottom core damage frequency estimate. The mean core damage frequency at Peach Bottom was calculated to be 8.2E-6. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) were found to dominate the overall results. Anticipated Transient Without Scram accidents were also found to be non-negligible contributors. The numerical results are largely driven by common mode failure probability estimates and to some extent, human error. Because of significant data and analysis uncertainties in these two areas (important, for instance, to the most dominant scenario in this study), it is recommended that the results of the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses be considered before any actions are taken based on this analysis.

Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Ferrell, W.L.; Cathey, N.G.; Najafi, B.; Harper, F.T.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The effect of enzymes and starch damage on wheat flour tortilla quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific enzymes have been used to improve flour quality for bread but enzyme action in tortilla flour has not been investigated. Two different wheat flours were prepared into tortillas using laboratory-scale, commercial equipment with fixed processing parameters. Dough and tortilla properties were evaluated using subjective and objective methods. Tortillas were stored in plastic bags at 22?°C for evaluation. The effects of nine enzymes (amyloglucosidase 1, amyloglucosidase 2, bacterial 1, bacterial 2, fungal, maltogenic 1, maltogenic 2, malted barley and xylanase) on quality of wheat flour tortillas were evaluated. Dough absorption was adjusted to attain uniform dough for tortillas. Enzyme addition to tortilla flour did not significantly affect tortilla weight, moisture and pH. Bacterial 2 amylase extended shelf stability while maltogenic 1 and xylanase exhibited smaller improvements in shelf stability and other tortilla properties. Addition of 0.05 activity unit bacterial 2 amylase improved tortilla diameter and improved tortilla shelf life from 12 to 28 days. Maltogenic 1 at 280 ppm improved tortilla diameter, opacity and shelf life. Addition of 100 ppm of xylanase effectively improved tortilla diameter and shelf life. Bacterial 1 amylase at 60 ppm improved tortilla diameter but did not improve shelf stability. Amyloglucosidase 2, maltogenic 2 and malted barley amylase did not improve tortilla quality at any of the evaluated levels. Amyloglucosidase 1 and fungal amylase reduced overall tortilla quality at all the evaluated levels. Bread-making quality of wheat flour is correlated with the damaged starch present in the flour. Damage was induced by grinding the samples for 0, 1, 4 and 8 hr to determine the effects of starch damage on tortilla quality. Processing increased starch damage of control tortilla flour from 5.4% to 12.6%. Damage starch increased dough water absorption, toughness and press rating and reduced diameter and opacity of tortillas. Damage starch improved tortilla rollability at higher levels but did not improve tortilla properties in combination with bacterial 2 amylase. Overall tortilla quality was not improved due to additional starch damage. Improved tortilla quality using bacterial 2 amylase at very low levels could be commercialized.

Arora, Sapna

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Effects of operating damage of labyrinth seal on seal leakage and wheelspace hot gas ingress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The labyrinth seal is widely used in turbomachinery to minimize or control leakage between areas of different pressure. The present investigation numerically explored the effect of damage and wear of the labyrinth seal on the turbomachinery flow and temperature fields. Specifically, this work investigated: (1) the effect of rubgroove downstream wall angle on seal leakage, (2) the effect of tooth bending damage on the leakage, (3) the effect of tooth "????mushrooming"??? damage on seal leakage, and (4) the effect of rub-groove axial position and wall angle on gas turbine ingress heating. To facilitate grid generation, an unstructured grid generator named OpenCFD was also developed. The grid generator is written in C++ and generates hybrid grids consisting primarily of Cartesian cells. This investigation of labyrinth seal damage and wear was conducted using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) to simulate the flows. The high- Reynolds k - Model and the standard wall function were used to model the turbulence. STAR-CD was used to solve the equations, and the grids were generated using the new code OpenCFD. It was found that the damage and wear of the labyrinth seal have a significant effect on the leakage and temperature field, as well as on the flow pattern. The leakage increases significantly faster than the operating clearance increase from the wear. Further, the specific seal configuration resulting from the damage and wear was found to be important. For example, for pure-bending cases, it was found that the bending curvature and the percentage of tooth length that is bent are important, and that the mushroom radius and tooth bending are important for the mushrooming damage cases. When an abradable labyrinth seal was applied to a very large gas turbine wheelspace cavity, it was found that the rub-groove axial position, and to a smaller degree, rub-groove wall angle, alter the magnitude and distribution of the fluid temperature.

Xu, Jinming

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

Aglan, H.

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

407

Breaker concentrations required to improve the permeability of proppant packs damaged by concentrated linear and borate-crosslinked fracturing fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the concentrations of an oxidative breaker required to reduce significantly the proppant-pack permeability damage caused by aqueous hydraulic fracturing fluids. Long-term, proppant-pack permeability testing was used to evaluate linear and borate-crosslinked gels. Results indicate that increasing the breaker concentration can reduce proppant-pack permeability damage very effectively.

Brannon, H. (BJ Services (United States)); Pulsinelli, R.J. (Dowell Schlumberger, Tulsa, OK (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN  

SciTech Connect

The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can be used by operators to guide treatment selection in wells with significant non-darcy damage component. In addition, the effectiveness of the remediation treatment designed to reduce damage caused by the inorganic precipitate siderite was measured, and the benefits of this work are extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry. Similarly the potential benefits realized from more effective identification and treatment of wells with significant nondarcy damage component are also presented, and these benefits are also extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry.

J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Relative Damaging Ability Of Galactic Cosmic Rays Determined Using Monte Carlo Simulations Of Track Structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy deposition characteristics of heavy ions vary substantially compared to those of photons. Many radiation biology studies have compared the damaging effects of different types of radiation to establish relative biological effectiveness among them. These studies are dependent on cell type, biological endpoint, radiation type, dose, and dose rate. The radiation field found in space is much more complicated than that simulated in most experiments, both from a point of dose-rate as well as the highly mixed field of radiative particles encompassing a broad spectrum of energies. To establish better estimates for radiation risks on long-term, deep space missions, the damaging ability of heavy ions requires further understanding. Track structure studies provide significant details about the spatial distribution of energy deposition events in and around the sensitive targets of a mammalian cell. The damage imparted by one heavy ion relative to another can be established by modeling the track structures of ions that make up the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spectrum and emphasizing biologically relevant target geometries. This research was undertaken to provide a better understanding of the damaging ability of GCR at the cellular level. By comparing ions with equal stopping power values, the differences in track structure will illuminate variations in cell particle traversals and ionization density within cell nuclei. For a cellular target, increased particle traversals, along with increased ionization density, are key identifiers for increased damaging ability. Performing Monte Carlo simulations with the computer code, FLUKA, this research will provide cellular dosimetry data and detail the track structure of the ions. As shown in radiobiology studies, increased ionizations within a cell nucleus generally lead to increased DNA breaks and increased free radical production, resulting in increased carcinogenesis and cell death. The spatial distribution of dose surrounding ions tracks are compared for inter- and intracellular regions. A comparison can be made for many different ions based upon dose and particle fluence across those different regions to predict relative damaging ability. This information can be used to improve estimates for radiation quality and dose equivalent from the space radiation environment.

Cox, Bradley

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Signaling Peter O'Neill University of Oxford Abstract The ATM and TGFbeta signal transduction pathways are essential to cellular and tissue control responses to ionizing radiation (IR) and aberrant modifications to these pathways are extensive in cancer. We hypothesize that the ATM and TGFbeta signaling pathways are fully induced at high doses of acute low-LET radiation, whereas only partially induced at low doses. As a consequence of partial stimulation of these pathways important questions arise not only on the validity of the linear no-threshold assumption used in radiation regulations, but also on our ability to extrapolate experimental and human epidemiology data from high to low doses. The

411

Structure test results from SLAC (NLCTA) show breakdown and damage at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test results from SLAC (NLCTA) show breakdown and damage at test results from SLAC (NLCTA) show breakdown and damage at gradients well below expectations from single cavity tests. The papers and presentations listed here illustrate some recent work on the topic. SLAC meeting notes are found here. Overview - Basic understanding of the role of particulate contaminants (Hasan Padamsee, PAC97) Literature study - Field emission and high voltage breakdown - (presentation by D. Burke 1996) References listed in D. Burke summary: SLAC Breakdown in S-band structures (Loew and Wang 1988) High Gradient studies in structures (Loew and Wang 1990) High Gradient tests (Wang et.al. 1994) Properties of Periodic Accelerating Structures for Linear Colliders (Wang 1989) Field emission in high gradient structures - (Loew and Wang -School 1997)

412

Valuing Energy Security: Customer Damage Function Methodology and Case Studies at DoD Installations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Valuing Energy Security: Valuing Energy Security: Customer Damage Function Methodology and Case Studies at DoD Installations J. Giraldez, S. Booth, K. Anderson, and K. Massey Produced under direction of the Department of Defense by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement IAG 10-1788 and Task No WFH9.1009. Technical Report NREL/ TP-7A30-55913 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Valuing Energy Security: Customer Damage Function

413

A Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Critical Examination of the Adaptive Response for Cytogenetic Damage in Human Cells, and Insights into the Adaptive Response Mechanism Björn E. Rydberg Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Task 1 of the Berkeley Lab SFA is designed to identify adaptive response (AR) mechanisms that may affect risk of developing radiation-induced cancer and to assess the linearity with dose of processes that influence mammary gland carcinogenesis. We use both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems in a parallelogram strategy. Our human cell culture model will elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the AR and investigate the relationships in target vs. non-target cells between a range of cancer-relevant endpoints potentially affected by adaptation such

414

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal F0 Germline Irradiation Authors: J.E. Baulch and O.G. Raabe Institutions: Center for Health and the Environment, University of California, Davis, CA. The main goal of this grant is to evaluate heritable, transgenerational effects of low dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (0.1 Gy attenuated 137Cs gamma rays) on Type B spermatogonia in 129SVE mice; wild-type and heterozygous for Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). The ATM heterozygotes are carriers for a genetic mutation (AT mutated, ATM) that is thought to predispose both humans and mice to radiation sensitivity. Experiments conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated heritable effects of paternal germline exposure to ionizing radiation in mice using 1.0 Gy of

415

Predicting and Mitigating Corrosion Related Damage in Geothermal Facilities, Phase-I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion related damage (CRD) is probably the most important and costly damage mechanism for components operating in geothermal fields. This problem is further complicated as steam chemistry in such fields changes continuously with season, time, and load. Unfortunately, such changes are not predictable. The problem is further complicated in the area where early condensate (first moisture) forms. The chemistry of these first droplets is significantly different from that of built steam and this, again, cannot be predicted with reasonable accuracy. Therefore, a formidable challenge facing the geothermal field operators remains in knowing the chemistry of the condensate and, more importantly, how it affects specific field equipment such as rotor, piping, valves, etc. This project showed that testing in such an environment is feasible and concluded that continuous monitoring of steam conditions is needed to detect and prevent conditions leading to CRD of components. This project also developed tools and techniques for continuous monitoring of corrosion potential and detection of pitting events.

M. Shirmohamadi; S. Bratt; J. Ridgely

2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Influence of Grain Boundary Type upon Damage Evolution at Grain Boundary Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a prior work, it was found that grain boundary structure strongly influences damage evolution at grain boundaries in copper samples subjected to either shock compression or incipient spall. Here, several grain boundaries with different grain boundary structures, including a {Sigma}3 (10-1) boundary, are interrogated via conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to investigate the effects of atomic-scale structural differences on grain boundary strength and mobility. Boundaries are studied both before and after shock compression at a peak shock stress of 10 GPa. Results of the TEM and HRTEM work are used in conjunction with MD modeling to propose a model for shock-induced damage evolution at grain boundary interfaces that is dependent upon coincidence.

Perez-Bergquist, Alejandro G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brandl, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Escobedo, Juan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray III, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

417

Program on Technology Innovation: Proceedings of the Expert Workshop on Creep-Fatigue Damage Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities adopt operating practices that involve more severe cycles, it becomes increasingly important to assess the creep-fatigue performance of traditional boiler and turbine components. EPRI brought together key industry experts for the Expert Workshop on Creep-Fatigue Damage Interaction to: Assess and document current creep-fatigue test methods Evaluate analytical methodologies with respect to crack initiation and growth Discuss life prediction methodologies for different applications Assess defi...

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Damage tolerance of well-completion and stimulation techniques in coalbed methane reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs are characterized as naturally fractured, dual porosity, low permeability, and water saturated gas reservoirs. Initially, the gas, water and coal are at thermodynamic equilibrium under prevailing reservoir conditions. Dewatering is essential to promote gas production. This can be accomplished by suitable completion and stimulation techniques. This paper investigates the efficiency and performance of the openhole cavity, hydraulic fractures, frack and packs, and horizontal wells as potential completion methods which may reduce formation damage and increase the productivity in coalbed methane reservoirs. Considering the dual porosity nature of CBM reservoirs, numerical simulations have been carried out to determine the formation damage tolerance of each completion and, stimulation approach. A new comparison parameter named as the normalized productivity index is defined as the ratio of the productivity index of a stimulated well to that of a nondamaged vertical well as a function of time. Typical scenarios have been considered to evaluate the CBM properties, including reservoir heterogeneity, anisotropy, and formation damage, for their effects on this index over the production time. The results for each stimulation technique show that the value of the index declines over the time of production with a rate which depends upon the applied technique and the prevailing reservoir conditions. The results also show that horizontal wells have the best performance if drilled orthogonal to the butt cleats. Open-hole cavity completions outperform vertical fractures if the fracture conductivity is reduced by any damage process. When vertical permeability is much lower than horizontal permeability, production of vertical wells will improve while productivity of horizontal wells will decrease.

Jahediesfanjani, H.; Civan, F. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Three Mile Island Plugged Tube Severance: A Study of Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During Fall 2001 outages, eddy-current inspections at Three Mile Island Unit 1 and Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 1 revealed wear scars on tubes surrounding previously plugged tubes. In both cases, investigations determined that the plugged tubes had severed and impacted neighboring tubes. As a result, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Information Notice 2002-02, which did not require a response but did suggest the industry investigate the generic problem of plugged tubes damaging neighboring t...

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

Procurement Specification for Horizontal Gas Path Heat Recovery Steam Generator: Avoiding Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with F-class gas turbines that are also subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures because of excessive thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mitigation of Boiler Tubing Damage from Use of Explosive Cleaning Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion of fossil fuels results in formation of slags that cover boiler tubes. Efficient boiler operation requires periodic removal of these slags, and explosive cleaning is an excellent cleaning method. While boiler tube cleaning using explosives is an established technology, a number of cases of tube damage have been reported, including cracking and denting of boiler tubes. This report details the work accomplished in Phase I of this project to capture the current understanding and practice of explo...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Tertiary nitrogen heterocyclic material to reduce moisture-induced damage in asphalt-aggregate mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Asphalt-aggregate roads crack when subjected to freezing and thawing cycles. Herein, the useful life of asphalts are substantially improved by a minor amount of a moisture damage inhibiting agent selected from compounds having a pyridine moiety, including acid salts of such compounds. A shale oil fraction may serve as the source of the improving agent and may simply be blended with conventional petroleum asphalts.

Plancher, Henry (Laramie, WY); Petersen, Joseph C. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Plant Component Assessment for Creep-Fatigue Damage: Component Assessment Methodologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is part of an ongoing Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project to document the current state of knowledge and to address the creep-fatigue assessment of components. An international group of industry and academic experts led by EPRI has assessed and documented creep-fatigue evaluation, analytical and life prediction methodologies, and deficiencies in the current understanding and prediction of creep-fatigue damage. This led to the identification of issues for future research and devel...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

Demonstration of Ultrasonic Guided Wave Examination Capability for FAC Damage and Circumferential Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection and monitoring of flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) is a significant cost to the power generation industry. Identifying technologies that can improve results and reduce the cost of FAC monitoring will be beneficial to the industry. The objective of this project was to determine the capability of ultrasonic guided waves to identify locations of FAC damage. Additionally, this project looked at the capability of ultrasonic guided waves in identifying circumferential-radial planar flaws such as ...

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

425

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

On the formulation, parameter identification and numerical integration of the EMMI model :plasticity and isotropic damage.  

SciTech Connect

In this report we present the formulation of the physically-based Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) . The specific version of the model treated here describes the plasticity and isotropic damage of metals as being currently applied to model the ductile failure process in structural components of the W80 program . The formulation of the EMMI constitutive equations is framed in the context of the large deformation kinematics of solids and the thermodynamics of internal state variables . This formulation is focused first on developing the plasticity equations in both the relaxed (unloaded) and current configurations. The equations in the current configuration, expressed in non-dimensional form, are used to devise the identification procedure for the plasticity parameters. The model is then extended to include a porosity-based isotropic damage state variable to describe the progressive deterioration of the strength and mechanical properties of metals induced by deformation . The numerical treatment of these coupled plasticity-damage constitutive equations is explained in detail. A number of examples are solved to validate the numerical implementation of the model.

Bammann, Douglas J.; Johnson, G. C. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marin, Esteban B.; Regueiro, Richard A. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A study of radiation damage effects on the magnetic structure of bulk Iron  

SciTech Connect

Defects, defect interactions, and defect dynamics in solids created by fast neutrons are known to have significant impact on the performance and lifetime of structural materials. A fundamental understanding of the radiation damage effects in solids is therefore of great importance in assisting the development of improved materials - materials with ultrahigh strength, toughness, and radiation resistance. In this presentation, we show our recent theoretical investigation on the magnetic structure evolution of bulk iron in the region of the radiation defects. We applied a linear scaling ab-initio method based on density functional theory with local spin density approximation, namely the locally self-consistent multiple scattering method (LSMS), to the study of magnetic moment distributions in a cascade at the damage peak and for a series of time steps as the interstitials and vacancies recombined. Atomic positions correspond to those in a low energy cascade in a 10|000 atom sample, in which the primary damage state and the evolution of all defects produced were simulated using molecular dynamics with empirical, embedded-atom inter-atomic potentials. We will discuss how a region of affected moments expands and then recedes in response to a cascade evolution.

Wang Yang [Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Nicholson, D. M. C.; Stocks, G. M.; Rusanu, Aurelian; Eisenbach, Markus; Stoller, R. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

A study of radiation damage effects on the magnetic structure of bulk Iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defects, defect interactions, and defect dynamics in solids created by fast neutrons are known to have significant impact on the performance and lifetime of structural materials. A fundamental understanding of the radiation damage effects in solids is therefore of great importance in assisting the development of improved materials - materials with ultrahigh strength, toughness, and radiation resistance. In this presentation, we show our recent theoretical investigation on the magnetic structure evolution of bulk iron in the region of the radiation defects. We applied a linear scaling ab-initio method based on density functional theory with local spin density approximation, namely the locally self-consistent multiple scattering method (LSMS), to the study of magnetic moment distributions in a cascade at the damage peak and for a series of time steps as the interstitials and vacancies recombined. Atomic positions correspond to those in a low energy cascade in a 10|000 atom sample, in which the primary damage state and the evolution of all defects produced were simulated using molecular dynamics with empirical, embedded-atom inter-atomic potentials. We will discuss how a region of affected moments expands and then recedes in response to a cascade evolution. VC 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3553937

Wang, Yang Nmn [ORNL; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Rusanu, Aurelian [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A study of radiation damage effects on the magnetic structure of bulk Iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defects, defect interactions, and defect dynamics in solids created by fast neutrons are known to have significant impact on the performance and lifetime of structural materials. A fundamental understanding of the radiation damage effects in solids is therefore of great importance in assisting the development of improved materials - materials with ultrahigh strength, toughness, and radiation resistance. In this presentation, we show our recent theoretical investigation on the magnetic structure evolution of bulk iron in the region of the radiation defects. We applied a linear scaling ab-initio method based on density functional theory with local spin density approximation, namely the locally self-consistent multiple scattering method (LSMS), to the study of magnetic moment distributions in a cascade at the damage peak and for a series of time steps as the interstitials and vacancies recombined. Atomic positions correspond to those in a low energy cascade in a 10|000 atom sample, in which the primary damage state and the evolution of all defects produced were simulated using molecular dynamics with empirical, embedded-atom inter-atomic potentials. We will discuss how a region of affected moments expands and then recedes in response to a cascade evolution.

Wang, Yang [Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Rusanu, Aurelian [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Damage-expectancy uncertainties for deeply buried targets. Technical report 1 Jan-10 Jul 89  

SciTech Connect

This targeting uncertainties methodology quantifies the effect of systematic errors on the targeting prediction measure damage expectancy. The methodology, developed specifically to support the SEPW Phase 2 Study, evaluates and ranks the effect of uncertainties for applications involving a single buried target and a single earth penetrating weapon. This methodology models the penetration of the EPW, the ground shock environment, and the probability of damage to the underground target. Potential error sources treated in the methodology are impact velocity, geology, depth of burst, target hardness, ground shock prediction model, ground shock depth-to-effect, weapon aiming accuracy, distance damage prediction model, and target depth, location and size. The methodology makes minimal use of assumed distributions and Monte Carlo techniques; instead it uses three points to describe the inherent dispersion for all but one error source. The values are sorted and used to define a distribution for DE. In addition, and analysis of variance technique is used to calculate the relative contributions of each error source to the uncertainty in DE. The added benefit of ranking the error sources in terms of their contribution to the uncertainty in DE can provide insight into deeply buried targeting problems.

Wright, S.C.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Effects of Pulse Duration on Bulk Laser Damage in 350-nm Raster-Scanned DKDP  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present the results of bulk damage experiments done on Type-I1 DKDP triple harmonic generator crystals that were raster conditioned with 351-355 nm wavelengths and pulse durations of 4 and 23.2 ns. In the first phase of experiments 20 different scan protocols were rastered into a sample of rapid growth DKDP. The sample was then rastered at damage-causing fluences to determine the three most effective protocols. These three protocols were scanned into a 15-cm sample of conventional-growth DKDP and then exposed to single shots of a I-cm beam from LLNL's Optical Sciences Laser at fluences ranging from 0.5 - 1.5X of the 10% damage probability fluence and nominal pulse durations of 0.1,0.3,0.8,3.2,7.0 and 20 ns. The experiment showed that pulse durations in the 1-3 ns range were much more effective at conditioning than pulses in the 16.3 ns range and that the multiple pass 'peak fluence' scan was more effective than the single pass 'leading edge' scan for 23.2 ns XeF scans.

Runkel, M; Bruere, J; Sell, W; Weiland, T; Milam, D; Hahn, D E; Nostrand, M C

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

An investigation of the effectiveness of anhydrous mud acid to remove damage in sandstone formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this experimental research was to determine the reactivity of anhydrous mud acid with clay minerals present in sandstone formations and its ability to remove damage in sandstone acidizing. Berea core flood experiments were conducted with a mixture of carbon dioxide, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride. These tests were carried out with oven dried cores and cores at irreducible water saturation. Anhydrous mud acid appears to be reactive with all the cores tested. However, it does not have the ability to reduce damage as hoped. The aqueous phase is required to transport the products of the reaction. To confirm this, other tests with a mixture of 75% C02 and 25% aqueous acid by volume were done and again found to be reactive with the cores tested but were unable to remove the products of the reactions. Salt water afterflushes were done on these cores and the dissolved material was able to be transported out of the core. Therefore, it appears aqueous acid is required in an amount greater than 25% by volume to remove damage effectively in sandstone mud acidizing treatments utilizing C02 as a conjugate fluid.

Haase, Dalan David

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Atomistic simulation of damage production by atomic and molecular ion irradiation in GaN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied defect production during single atomic and molecular ion irradiation having an energy of 50 eV/amu in GaN by molecular dynamics simulations. Enhanced defect recombination is found in GaN, in accordance with experimental data. Instantaneous damage shows non-linearity with different molecular projectile and increasing molecular mass. Number of instantaneous defects produced by the PF{sub 4} molecule close to target surface is four times higher than that for PF{sub 2} molecule and three times higher than that calculated as a sum of the damage produced by one P and four F ion irradiation (P+4 Multiplication-Sign F). We explain this non-linearity by energy spike due to molecular effects. On the contrary, final damage created by PF{sub 4} and PF{sub 2} shows a linear pattern when the sample cools down. Total numbers of defects produced by Ag and PF{sub 4} having similar atomic masses are comparable. However, defect-depth distributions produced by these species are quite different, also indicating molecular effect.

Ullah, M. W.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Karaseov, P. A.; Titov, A. I. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Quantitative analysis of damage in PBX 9501 subjected to a linear thermal gradient  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a series of experiments in which a cylinder of PBX 9501 is placed in a specially designed fixture with each end fixed at a different temperature. This arrangement sets up a thermal gradient in the explosive that is carefully controlled and maintained for a specified amount of time. This configuration has a number of advantages over thermally damaging separate pieces at a series of different temperatures, the principal one being that damage in this experiment is a continuous function of position. This makes analysis and distinction of regions easier and more straightforward. For the experiments reported in this paper, the explosive samples have been subjected to a series of different analysis techniques. We have used polarized light microscopy, physical adsorption, Raman spectroscopy, and small angle neutron and x-ray scattering in an attempt to characterize the particle morphology, porosity distribution, crack and void formation, and chemical state as a function of thermal treatment. While not all of the efforts were informative, the data clearly show trends and form a basis for understanding the effects of thermal damage on explosive behavior.

Asay, B. W. (Blaine W.); Henson, B. F. (Bryan F.); Peterson, P. D. (Paul D.); Mang, J. T. (Joseph T.); Smilowitz, L. B. (Laura B.); Dickson, P. M. (Peter M.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

X-ray Topography to Characterize Surface Damage on CdZnTe Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals can be used for room temperature detection of {gamma}-radiation. Structural/morphological heterogeneities within CZT, such as twinning, secondary phases (often referred to as inclusions or precipitates), and poly-crystallinity can affect detector performance. As part of a broader study using synchrotron radiation techniques to correlate detector performance to microstructure, x-ray topography (XRT) has been used to characterize CZT crystals. We have found that CZT crystals almost always have a variety of residual surface damage, which interferes with our ability to observe the underlying microstructure for purposes of crystal quality evaluation. Specific structures are identifiable as resulting from fabrication processes and from handling and shipping of sample crystals. Etching was found to remove this damage; however, our studies have shown that the radiation detector performance of the etched surfaces was inferior to the as-polished surface due to higher surface currents which result in more peak tailing and less energy resolution. We have not fully investigated the effects of the various types of inducible damage on radiation detector performance. (authors)

Black, David; Woicik, Joseph [NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States); Duff, Martine C.; Hunter, Douglas B. [SRNL, Aiken, South Carolina (United States); Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael [Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

X-ray Topography to Characterize Surface Damage on CdZnTe Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals can be used for room temperature detection of {gamma}-radiation. Structural/morphological heterogeneities within CZT, such as twinning, secondary phases (often referred to as inclusions or precipitates), and poly-crystallinity can affect detector performance. As part of a broader study using synchrotron radiation techniques to correlate detector performance to microstructure, x-ray topography (XRT) has been used to characterize CZT crystals. We have found that CZT crystals almost always have a variety of residual surface damage, which interferes with our ability to observe the underlying microstructure for purposes of crystal quality evaluation. Specific structures are identifiable as resulting from fabrication processes and from handling and shipping of sample crystals. Etching was found to remove this damage; however, our studies have shown that the radiation detector performance of the etched surfaces was inferior to the as-polished surface due to higher surface currents which result in more peak tailing and less energy resolution. We have not fully investigated the effects of the various types of inducible damage on radiation detector performance.

Black, David; Woicik, Joseph; Duff, Martine C.; Hunter, Douglas B.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael (SRNL); (SBU); (NIST); (Fisk U)

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

Influence of radiation damage and isochronal annealing on the magnetic susceptibility of Pu(1-x)Am(x) alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of radiation damage in Pu and Pu{sub 1-x}Am{sub x} alloys studied with magnetic susceptibility, {chi}(T), and resistivity are presented. Damage accumulated at low temperatures increases {chi}(T) for all measured alloys, with the trend generally enhanced as the lattice expands. There is a trend towards saturation observable in the damage induced magnetic susceptibility data, that is not evident in similar damage induced resistivity data taken on the same specimen. A comparison of isochronal annealing curves measured by both resistivity and magnetic susceptibility on a 4.3at% Ga stabilized {delta}-Pu specimen show that Stage I annealing, where interstitials begin to move, is largely transparent to the magnetic measurement. This indicates that interstitials have little impact on the damage induced increase in the magnetic susceptibility. The isochronal annealing curves of the Pu{sub 1-x}Am{sub x} alloys do not show distinct annealing stages as expected for alloys. However, samples near 20% Am concentration show an unexpected increase in magnetization beginning when specimens are annealed to 35K. This behavior is also reflected in a time dependent increase in the magnetic susceptibility of damaged specimens indicative of first order kinetics. These results suggest there may be a metastable phase induced by radiation damage and annealing in Pu{sub 1-x}Am{sub x} alloys.

McCall, S; Fluss, M; Chung, B; Haire, R

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

438

Evaluation of Common Angling-Induced Sources of Epithelial Damage for Popular Freshwater Sport Fish using Fluorescein  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Angling is a popular recreational activity across the globe and a large proportion of fish captured by anglers are released due to voluntary or mandatory catch-and-release practices. The handling associated with hook removal and return of the fish to their environment can cause physical damage to the epidermal layer of the fish which may affect the condition and survival of released fish. This study investigated possible sources of epithelial damage associated with several different handling methods (i.e. landing net types, interactions with different boat floor surfaces, tournament procedures) commonly used in recreational angling for two popular freshwater sport fish species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius). Epithelial damage was examined using fluorescein, a non-toxic dye, which has been shown to detect latent epithelial damage. Northern pike exhibited extensive epithelial damage after exposure to several of the induced treatments (i.e., interaction with a carpeted surface, knotted nylon net, and line rolling) but relatively little epithelial damage when exposed to others (i.e., knotless rubber nets, smooth boat surfaces, or lip gripping devices). Largemouth bass did not show significant epithelial damage for any of the treatments, with the exception of fish caught in a semi-professional live release tournament. The detection of latent injuries using fluorescein can be an important management tool as it provides visual examples of potential damage that can be caused by different handling methods. Such visualizations can be used to encourage fish friendly angler behaviour and enhance the survival and welfare of released fish. It can also be used to test new products that are intended to or claim to reduce injury to fish that are to be released. Future research should evaluate the relationship between different levels of epithelial damage and mortality across a range of environmental conditions.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Cooke, Steven J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, A status report. Volume 17, Main report and Appendix A  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 {times} 10E-06 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1992 are considered to be precursors to potential core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to rank precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

Cox, D.F.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Cross-Dial, A.E.; Morris, R.H.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Jansen, J.M.; Minarick, J.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lau, W.; Salyer, W.D. [Reliability and Performance Associates (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Original paper: Detection of Fusarium damaged kernels in Canada Western Red Spring wheat using visible/near-infrared hyperspectral imaging and principal component analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusarium damage in wheat reduces the quality and safety of food and feed products. In this study, the use of hyperspectral imaging was investigated to detect fusarium damaged kernels (FDK) in Canadian wheat samples. Eight hundred kernels of Canada Western ... Keywords: Fusarium damage, Spectral imaging, Wheat

Muhammad A. Shahin; Stephen J. Symons

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "r7-compatible cumulative damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Job Title: 2 PhD positions, Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) on Chronic DNA Damage in Ageing Reference: EMBO Young Investigator PHD position  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Job Title: 2 PhD positions, Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) on Chronic DNA DamageD candidates will be part of a Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) that aims to implement an integrated defects in genome maintenance thus pointing towards damage in (nuclear) DNA as a major culprit of ageing

442

The role of mismatch repair and recombination in cellular responses to the DNA damaging anticancer drug Cisplatin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(ll)) is a successful DNA-damaging anticancer drug used in the treatment of testicular, ovarian and other tumors. In the past decade, several mutually non-exclusive hypotheses have ...

Zdraveski, Zoran Z. (Zoran Zare), 1969-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Improvement of Laser Damage Resistance and Diffraction Efficiency of Multilayer Dielectric Diffraction Gratings by HF-Etchback Linewidth Tailoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings for Petawatt-class laser systems possess unique laser damage characteristics. Details of the shape of the grating lines and the concentration of absorbing impurities on the surface of the grating structures both have strong effects on laser damage threshold. It is known that electric field enhancement in the solid material comprising the grating lines varies directly with the linewidth and inversely with the line height for equivalent diffraction efficiency. Here, they present an overview of laser damage characteristics of MLD gratings, and describe a process for post-processing ion-beam etched grating lines using very dilute buffered hydrofluoric acid solutions. This process acts simultaneously to reduce grating linewidth and remove surface contaminants, thereby improving laser damage thresholds through two pathways.

Nguyen, H T; Larson, C C; Britten, J A

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Comments on Influence of Location, Population, and Climate on Building Damage and Fatalities due to Australian Bushfire: 19252009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absence of an upward trend in normalized building damage in Australian bushfires may reflect reduced vulnerability (due to improved weather forecasts and other factors) offsetting increases in the frequency or intensity of bushfires.

Neville Nicholls

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The cardiotoxicity and myocyte damage caused by small molecule anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors is correlated with lack of target specificity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of the new anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) has revolutionized the treatment of certain cancers. However, the use of some of these results in cardiotoxicity. Large-scale profiling data recently made available for the binding of 7 of the 9 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases has allowed us to correlate kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with TKI-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The tyrosine kinase selectivity scores, but not the serine-threonine kinase scores, were highly correlated with the myocyte damaging effects of the TKIs. Additionally, we showed that damage to myocytes gave a good rank order correlation with clinical cardiotoxicity. Finally, strength of TKI binding to colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) was highly correlated with myocyte damage, thus possibly implicating this kinase in contributing to TKI-induced cardiotoxicity.

Hasinoff, Brian B., E-mail: B_Hasinoff@UManitoba.c [Faculty of Pharmacy, Apotex Centre, University of Manitoba, 750 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 0T5 (Canada)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Assessment of extent and degree of thermal damage to polymeric materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes assumptions and procedures used to perform thermal damage analysis caused by post loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) hydrogen deflagration at Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor. Examination of available photographic evidence yields data on the extent and range of thermal and burn damage. Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, we assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. A control pendant from the polar crane located in the top of the reactor building sustained asymmetric burn damage of decreasing degree from top to bottom. Evidence suggests the polar-crane pendant side that experienced heaviest damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations approximate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building and support for an estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen.

Alvares, N.J.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Coupled Micromechanical Model of Moisture-Induced Damage in Asphalt Mixtures: Formulation and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deleterious effect of moisture on the structural integrity of asphalt mixtures has been recognized as one of the main causes of early deterioration of asphalt pavements. This phenomenon, usually referred to as moisture damage, is defined as the progressive loss of structural integrity of the mixture that is primarily caused by the presence of moisture in liquid or vapor state. Moisture damage is associated with the development of different physical, mechanical, and chemical processes occurring within the microstructure of the mixture at different intensities and rates. Although there have been important advancements in identifying and characterizing this phenomenon, there is still a lack of understanding of the damage mechanisms occurring at the microscopic level. This situation has motivated the research work reported in this dissertation. The main objective of this dissertation is to formulate and apply a numerical micromechanical model of moisture-induced damage in asphalt mixtures. The model focuses on coupling the effects of moisture diffusionone of the three main modes of moisture transport within asphalt mixtureswith the mechanical performance of the microstructure. Specifically, the model aims to account for the effect of moisture diffusion on the degradation of the viscoelastic bulk matrix of the mixture (i.e., cohesive degradation) and on the gradual deterioration of the adhesive bonds between the aggregates and the asphalt matrix (i.e., adhesive degradation). The micromechanical model was applied to study the role of some physical and mechanical properties of the constitutive phases of the mixtures on the susceptibility of the mixture to moisture damage. The results from this analysis suggest that the diffusion coefficients of the asphalt matrix and aggregates, as well as the bond strength of the aggregate-matrix interface, have the most influence on the moisture susceptibility of the mixtures. The micromechanical model was further used to investigate the influence of the void phase of asphalt mixtures on the generation of moisture-related deterioration processes. Two different probabilistic-based approaches were used to accomplish this objective. In the first approach, a volumetric distribution of air voids sizes measured using X-Ray Computed Tomography in a dense-graded asphalt mixture was used to generate probable void structures in a microstructure of an asphalt mixture. In the second approach, a stochastic modeling technique based on random field theory was used to generate probable air voids distributions of the mixture. In this second approach, the influence of the air voids was accounted for by making the physical and mechanical properties of the asphalt matrix dependent on probable voids distributions. Although both approaches take into consideration the characteristics of the air void phase on the mechanical response of the mixtures subjected to moist environments, the former explicitly introduces the air phase within the microstructure while the latter indirectly includes its effects by modifying the material properties of the bulk matrix. The results from these simulations demonstrated that the amount, variability and location of air voids are decisive in determining the moisture-dependent performance of asphalt mixtures. The results from this dissertation provide new information on the kinetics of moisture damage mechanisms in asphalt mixtures. In particular, the results obtained from applying the micromechanical model permitted identification of the relative influence of the characteristics of the constitutive phases of a mixture on its moisture-related mechanical performance. This information can be used as part of design methodologies of asphalt mixtures, and/or as an input in life-cycle analysis models and maintenance programs of road infrastructure.

Caro Spinel, Silvia

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

449

Negative effect of crystallization on the mechanism of laser damage in a HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elucidation of the mechanisms of laser damage is indispensable in realizing high resistance mirrors for the next generation of ultra-short pulse high intensity lasers. In this study, the surface and a section of the laser-damaged area of a laser mirror were observed with a laser microscope and a transmission electron microscope (cross-sectional TEM), respectively. A grain boundary of HfO{sub 2} microcrystal was observed in the damaged area. This observation and an evaluation of the mirror's damage resistance showed that the formation of crystals in the multilayer mirror is one of the major determinants of damage resistance.

Tateno, Ryo [Shimadzu Corporation, 1, Nishinokyo-Kuwabaracho Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Okada, Hajime; Otobe, Tomohito; Kawase, Keigo; Koga, James K.; Kosuge, Atsushi; Nagashima, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Akira [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kashiwagi, Kunihiro [Department of Electrical and