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Sample records for r1 npp boreal

  1. Patterns of NPP, GPP, Respiration and NEP During Boreal Forest Succession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulden, Michael L.; McMillan, Andrew; Winston, Greg; Rocha, Adrian; Manies, Kristen; Harden, Jennifer W.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2010-12-15

    We deployed a mesonet of year-round eddy covariance towers in boreal forest stands that last burned in ~1850, ~1930, 1964, 1981, 1989, 1998, and 2003 to understand how CO2 exchange changes during secondary succession.The strategy of using multiple methods, including biometry and micrometeorology, worked well. In particular, the three independent measures of NEP during succession gave similar results. A stratified and tiered approach to deploying eddy covariance systems that combines many lightweight and portable towers with a few permanent ones is likely to maximize the science return for a fixed investment. The existing conceptual models did a good job of capturing the dominant patterns of NPP, GPP, Respiration and NEP during succession. The initial loss of carbon following disturbance was neither as protracted nor large as predicted. This muted response reflects both the rapid regrowth of vegetation following fire and the prevalence of standing coarse woody debris following the fire, which is thought to decay slowly. In general, the patterns of forest recovery from disturbance should be expected to vary as a function of climate, ecosystem type and disturbance type. The NPP decline at the older stands appears related to increased Rauto rather than decreased GPP. The increase in Rauto in the older stands does not appear to be caused by accelerated maintenance respiration with increased biomass, and more likely involves increased allocation to fine root turnover, root metabolism, alternative forms of respiration, mycorrhizal relationships, or root exudates, possibly associated with progressive nutrient limitation. Several studies have now described a similar pattern of NEP following boreal fire, with 10-to-15 years of modest carbon loss followed by 50-to-100 years of modest carbon gain. This trend has been sufficiently replicated and evaluated using independent techniques that it can be used to quantify the likely effects of changes in boreal fire frequency and stand age structure on regional carbon balance.

  2. Boreal Renewable Energy Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Development Jump to: navigation, search Name: Boreal Renewable Energy Development Place: Arlington, Massachusetts Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Solar, Wind Year...

  3. Boreal Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Boreal Renewable Energy Place: Acton, Massachusetts Zip: 1720 Sector: Hydro, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product: Renewable Energy...

  4. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-006 R1-(INL-13-019 R1-redline).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    06 R1 SECTION A. Project Title: Power Line Configuration - 2013-1 R1 SECTION B. Project Description: Rev 1 Based on recommendations by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office, the route of the insulated cables on the ground has been changed. The new route replaces Fig 1 in the original Environmental Checklist (EC) and is shown in the figure, below. The new route has been surveyed by both the INL CRM Office and Biological Resources personnel. All

  5. Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stith T.Gower

    2010-03-03

    A strong argument can be made that there is a greater need to study the effect of warming on boreal forests more than on any other terrestrial biome. Boreal forests, the second largest forest biome, are predicted to experience the greatest warming of any forest biome in the world, but a process-based understanding of how warming will affect the structure and function of this economically and ecologically important forest biome is lacking. The effects of warming on species composition, canopy structure and biogeochemical cycles are likely to be complex; elucidating the underlying mechanisms will require long-term whole-ecosystem manipulation to capture all the complex feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000, Rustad et al. 2001, Stromgren 2001). The DOE Program for Ecosystem Research funded a three year project (2002-2005) to use replicated heated chambers on soil warming plots in northern Manitoba to examine the direct effects of whole-ecosystem warming. We are nearing completion of our first growing season of measurements (fall 2004). In spite of the unforeseen difficulty of installing the heating cable, our heating and irrigation systems worked extremely well, maintaining environmental conditions within 5-10% of the specified design 99% of the time. Preliminary data from these systems, all designed and built by our laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, support our overall hypothesis that warming will increase the carbon sink strength of upland boreal black spruce forests. I request an additional three years of funding to continue addressing the original objectives: (1) Examine the effect of warming on phenology of overstory, understory and bryophyte strata. Sap flux systems and dendrometer bands, monitored by data loggers, will be used to quantify changes in phenology and water use. (2) Quantify the effects of warming on nitrogen and water use by overstory, understory and bryophytes. (3) Compare effects of warming on autotrophic respiration and above- and belowground net primary production (NPP) budgets. Autotrophic respiration budgets will be constructed using chamber measurements for each tissue and NPP and standard allometry techniques (Gower et al. 1999). (4) Compare microbial and root dynamics, and net soil surface CO2 flux, of control and warmed soils to identify causes that may explain the hypothesized minimal effect of soil warming on soil surface CO2 flux. Fine root production and turnover will be quantified using minirhizotrons, and microbial dynamics will be determined using laboratory mineralization incubations. Soil surface CO2 flux will be measured using automated soil surface CO2 flux systems and portable CO2 analyzers. The proposed study builds on the existing research programs Gower has in northern Manitoba and would not be possible without in-kind services and financial support from Manitoba Hydro and University of Wisconsin.

  6. TCP Final Report: Measuring the Effects of Stand Age and Soil Drainage on Boreal Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Goulden

    2007-05-02

    This was a 6-year research project in the Canadian boreal forest that focused on using field observations to understand how boreal forest carbon balance changes during recovery from catastrophic forest fire. The project began with two overarching goals: (1) to develop techniques that would all the year round operation of 7 eddy covariance sites in a harsh environment at a much lower cost than had previously been possible, and (2) to use these measurements to determine how carbon balance changes during secondary succession. The project ended in 2006, having accomplished its primary objectives. Key contributions to DOE during the study were: (1) Design, test, and demonstrate a lightweight, fully portable eddy flux system that exploits several economies of scale to allow AmeriFlux-quality measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange at many sites for a large reduction in cost (Goulden et al. 2006). (2) Added seven year-round sites to AmeriFlux, at a relatively low per site cost using the Eddy Covariance Mesonet approach (Goulden et al. 2006). These data are freely available on the AmeriFlux web site. (3) Tested and rejected the conventional wisdom that forests lose large amounts of carbon during the first decade after disturbance, then accumulate large amounts of carbon for {approx}several decades, and then return to steady state in old age. Rather, we found that boreal forests recovers quickly from fire and begins to accumulate carbon within {approx}5 years after disturbance. Additionally, we found no evidence that carbon accumulation declines in old stands (Goulden et al. 2006, Goulden et al. in prep). (4) Tested and rejected claims based on remote sensing observations (for example, Myneni et al 1996 using AVHRR) that regions of boreal forest have changed markedly in the last 20 years. Rather, we assembled a much richer data set than had been used in the past (eddy covariance observations, tree rings, biomass, NPP, AVHRR, and LandSat), which we used to establish that the forests in our study region have remained largely constant over the last 20 years after accounting for the effects of stand age and succession (McMillen et al. in review).

  7. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-11-005 R1 _INL-11-037 R1_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-005 R1 SECTION A. Descriptive Information: Abandonment of Corehole USGS 137 at the Idaho National Laboratory SECTION B. Project Description: The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initially proposed to drill a 2,000-foot deep geotechnical corehole (USGS 137) into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer (Environmental Checklist - INL-11-037). Geotechnical borehole USGS 137 is located 3.0 miles south of RWMC at the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, Section 31, Township 02 North, Range 29

  8. Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_R1_Draft_3.DOC | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy R1_Draft_3.DOC Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_R1_Draft_3.DOC PDF icon Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_R1_Draft_3.DOC More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_FINAL1.DOC WVDP Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation for the Concentrator Feed Makeup Tank and the Melter Feed Hold Tank Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Melter

  9. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Process of V1 NPP Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matejovic, Igor; Polak, Vincent

    2007-07-01

    Through the adoption of Governmental Resolution No. 801/99 the Slovak Republic undertook a commitment to shutdown units 1 and 2 of Jaslovske Bohunice V 1 NPP (WWER 230 reactor type) in 2006 and 2008 respectively. Therefore the more intensive preparation of a decommissioning documentation has been commenced. Namely, the VI NPP Conceptual Decommissioning Plan and subsequently the Environmental Impact Assessment Report of VI NPP Decommissioning were developed. Thus, the standard environmental impact assessment process was performed and the most suitable alternative of V1 NPP decommissioning was selected as a basis for development of further decommissioning documents. The status and main results of the environmental impact assessment process and EIA report are discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  10. Lessons learnt from Ignalina NPP decommissioning project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NAISSE, Jean-Claude

    2007-07-01

    The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) is located in Lithuania, 130 km north of Vilnius, and consists of two 1500 MWe RBMK type units, commissioned respectively in December 1983 and August 1987. On the 1. of May 2004, the Republic of Lithuania became a member of the European Union. With the protocol on the Ignalina Nuclear Power in Lithuania which is annexed to the Accession Treaty, the Contracting Parties have agreed: - On Lithuanian side, to commit closure of unit 1 of INPP before 2005 and of Unit 2 by 31 December 2009; - On European Union side, to provide adequate additional Community assistance to the efforts of Lithuania to decommission INPP. The paper is divided in two parts. The first part describes how, starting from this agreement, the project was launched and organized, what is its present status and which activities are planned to reach the final ambitious objective of a green field. To give a global picture, the content of the different projects that were defined and the licensing process will also be presented. In the second part, the paper will focus on the lessons learnt. It will explain the difficulties encountered to define the decommissioning strategy, considering both immediate or differed dismantling options and why the first option was finally selected. The paper will mention other challenges and problems that the different actors of the project faced and how they were managed and solved. The paper will be written by representatives of the Ignalina NPP and of the Project Management Unit. (author)

  11. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  12. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-004 R1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    04 R1 SECTION A. Project Description: High Density Fuel Material for Light Water Reactors (LWRs) SECTION B. Project Description: This project proposes to install glove boxes, laboratory equipment and laboratory hoods in the east wing of the Experimental Fuels Facility (EFF), building 794, at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The building was previously known as the Contaminated Equipment Storage Building (CESB). The purpose of this project is to

  13. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-009 R1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 R1 SECTION A. Project Title: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Project Sagebrush Atmospheric Tracer Dispersion Study Revision 1 SECTION B. Project Description: This revision of this EC is being prepared to provide estimated quantities of tracer emissions to account for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and to clarify that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) would report GHG emissions as required by Executive Order (EO) 13514. The National Oceanic and

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-14-020 R1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R1 SECTION A. Project Title: Central Facilities Area (CFA)-623/624 Electric Heat Conversion Project SECTION B. Project Description: This Environmental Checklist is being revised to include the specific measures that are needed to convert the CFA-601 warehouse to electric heat. The previous description included language about electrically heating the warehouses but specifics were not identified. CFA-601 warehouse will be converted to electrically supplied heat by installing a new pole-mounted 500

  15. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-14-042 R1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R1 SECTION A. Project Title: National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC)/Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Idaho High Frequency (HF) Shared Resources (SHARES) Station SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of this revision is to add road maintenance to the scope of the work. In order to install, access, and maintain the proposed communication system, approximately 75-80 linear yards of the road near the facility (see Figure 1) will

  16. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-013 R1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R1 SECTION A. Project Title: Test Reactor Area (TRA)-774 Substation Equipment Upgrades SECTION B. Project Description: This EC is being revised to capture the use of sulfur hexaflouride (SF 6 ) in the proposed new sectionalizer switch. Electricity for heat at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) heaters is fed from the substation yard TRA-774 on the northeast corner of TRA-670. The proposed action would replace equipment in TRA-774 to improve efficiency of the equipment and to improve safety during

  17. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-004 R1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 R1 SECTION A. Project Title: Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) High Frequency Test Bed (HFTB) Expansion SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: Revision 1 The original Environmental Checklist (EC) was completed in advance of completed drawings and plans. This EC identifies minor changes to the dimensions of the road and asphalt pad, occasional and temporary use of a mobile generator, addition of a pole- mounted solar panel, and occasional and temporary use of a mobile

  18. Historical trends and extremes in boreal Alaska river basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Katrina E.; Cannon, Alex J.; Hinzman, Larry

    2015-05-12

    Climate change will shift the frequency, intensity, duration and persistence of extreme hydroclimate events and have particularly disastrous consequences in vulnerable systems such as the warm permafrost-dominated Interior region of boreal Alaska. This work focuses on recent research results from nonparametric trends and nonstationary generalized extreme value (GEV) analyses at eight Interior Alaskan river basins for the past 50/60 years (1954/64–2013). Trends analysis of maximum and minimum streamflow indicates a strong (>+50%) and statistically significant increase in 11-day flow events during the late fall/winter and during the snowmelt period (late April/mid-May), followed by a significant decrease in the 11-day flow events during the post-snowmelt period (late May and into the summer). The April–May–June seasonal trends show significant decreases in maximum streamflow for snowmelt dominated systems (<–50%) and glacially influenced basins (–24% to –33%). Annual maximum streamflow trends indicate that most systems are experiencing declines, while minimum flow trends are largely increasing. Nonstationary GEV analysis identifies time-dependent changes in the distribution of spring extremes for snowmelt dominated and glacially dominated systems. Temperature in spring influences the glacial and high elevation snowmelt systems and winter precipitation drives changes in the snowmelt dominated basins. The Pacific Decadal Oscillation was associated with changes occurring in snowmelt dominated systems, and the Arctic Oscillation was linked to one lake dominated basin, with half of the basins exhibiting no change in response to climate variability. The paper indicates that broad scale studies examining trend and direction of change should employ multiple methods across various scales and consider regime dependent shifts to identify and understand changes in extreme streamflow within boreal forested watersheds of Alaska.

  19. Historical trends and extremes in boreal Alaska river basins

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bennett, Katrina E.; Cannon, Alex J.; Hinzman, Larry

    2015-05-12

    Climate change will shift the frequency, intensity, duration and persistence of extreme hydroclimate events and have particularly disastrous consequences in vulnerable systems such as the warm permafrost-dominated Interior region of boreal Alaska. This work focuses on recent research results from nonparametric trends and nonstationary generalized extreme value (GEV) analyses at eight Interior Alaskan river basins for the past 50/60 years (1954/64–2013). Trends analysis of maximum and minimum streamflow indicates a strong (>+50%) and statistically significant increase in 11-day flow events during the late fall/winter and during the snowmelt period (late April/mid-May), followed by a significant decrease in the 11-day flowmore » events during the post-snowmelt period (late May and into the summer). The April–May–June seasonal trends show significant decreases in maximum streamflow for snowmelt dominated systems (<–50%) and glacially influenced basins (–24% to –33%). Annual maximum streamflow trends indicate that most systems are experiencing declines, while minimum flow trends are largely increasing. Nonstationary GEV analysis identifies time-dependent changes in the distribution of spring extremes for snowmelt dominated and glacially dominated systems. Temperature in spring influences the glacial and high elevation snowmelt systems and winter precipitation drives changes in the snowmelt dominated basins. The Pacific Decadal Oscillation was associated with changes occurring in snowmelt dominated systems, and the Arctic Oscillation was linked to one lake dominated basin, with half of the basins exhibiting no change in response to climate variability. The paper indicates that broad scale studies examining trend and direction of change should employ multiple methods across various scales and consider regime dependent shifts to identify and understand changes in extreme streamflow within boreal forested watersheds of Alaska.« less

  20. DOE Acquisition Guide Chapter 16.2R1 (June 2014)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chapter 16.2R1 (June 2014) Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non- Management and Operating Contracts [Reference: FAR 6, FAR 16, FAR 22, FAR 32, FAR 46, DEAR 915.404-4-72, DEAR 916.405-2, DEAR 970.1504-1, and Acquisition Guide Chapter 16.1] Overview The policy of the DOE is to maximize contractor performance and to align costs with performance through the use of performance-based management as a strategic contract management tool to plan for, manage, and

  1. Draft genome sequence of Raoultella terrigena R1Gly, a diazotrophic endophyte

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schicklberger, M.; Shapiro, N.; Loqué, D.; Woyke, T.; Chakraborty, R.

    2015-06-11

    Raoultella terrigena R1Gly is a diazotrophic endophyte isolated from surface-sterilized roots of Nicotiana tabacum. The whole-genome sequence was obtained to investigate the endophytic characteristics of this organism at the genetic level, as well as to compare this strain with its close relatives. To our knowledge, this is the first genome obtained from the Raoultella terrigena species and only the third genome from the Raoultella genus, after Raoultella ornitholytic and Raoultella planticola. This genome will provide a foundation for further comparative genomic, metagenomic, and functional studies of this genus.

  2. DOE Acquisition Guide Chapter 16.2R1 (June 2014)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chapter 16.2R1 (June 2014) Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non- Management and Operating Contracts [Reference: FAR 6, FAR 16, FAR 22, FAR 32, FAR 46, DEAR 915.404-4-72, DEAR 916.405-2, DEAR 970.1504-1, and Acquisition Guide Chapter 16.1] Overview The policy of the DOE is to maximize contractor performance and to align costs with performance through the use of performance-based management as a strategic contract management tool to plan for, manage, and

  3. Draft genome sequence of Raoultella terrigena R1Gly, a diazotrophic endophyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schicklberger, M.; Shapiro, N.; Loqu, D.; Woyke, T.; Chakraborty, R.

    2015-06-11

    Raoultella terrigena R1Gly is a diazotrophic endophyte isolated from surface-sterilized roots of Nicotiana tabacum. The whole-genome sequence was obtained to investigate the endophytic characteristics of this organism at the genetic level, as well as to compare this strain with its close relatives. To our knowledge, this is the first genome obtained from the Raoultella terrigena species and only the third genome from the Raoultella genus, after Raoultella ornitholytic and Raoultella planticola. This genome will provide a foundation for further comparative genomic, metagenomic, and functional studies of this genus.

  4. Preparation for Early Termination of Ignalina NPP Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poskas, P.; Poskas, R.

    2003-02-26

    Seimas (Parliament of Lithuania) approved updated National Energy strategy where it is indicated that first Unit will be shutdown before the year 2005 and second Unit in 2009 if funding for decommissioning is available from EU and other donors. In accordance to Ignalina NPP Unit 1 Closure Law the Government of Lithuania approved the Ignalina NPP Unit 1 Decommissioning Program until year 2005. For enforcement of this program, the plan of measures for implementation of the program was prepared and approved by the Minister of Economy. The plan consists of two parts, namely technical- environmental and social-economic. Technical-environmental measures are mostly oriented to the safe management of spent nuclear fuel and operational radioactive waste stored at the plant and preparation of licensing documents for Unit 1 decommissioning. Social-economic measures are oriented to mitigate negative social and economic impact on Lithuania, inhabitants of the region, and, particularly, o n the staff of Ignalina NPP by means of creating favorable conditions for a balanced social and economic development of the region. In this paper analysis of planned activities, licensing requirements for decommissioning, progress in preparation of the Final Decommissioning Plan is discussed.

  5. FEASIBILITY AND EXPEDIENCE TO VITRIFY NPP OPERATIONAL WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LIFANOV, F.A.; OJOVAN, M.I.; STEFANOVSKY, S.V.; BURCL, R.

    2003-02-27

    Operational radioactive waste is generated during routine operation of NPP. Process waste is mainly generated by treatment of water from reactor or ancillaries including spent fuel storage pools and some decontamination operations. Typical process wastes of pressurized water reactors (PWR or WWER) are borated water concentrates, whereas typical process wastes of boiling and RBMK type reactors are water concentrates with no boron content. NPP operational wastes are classified as low and intermediate level waste (LILW). NPP operational waste must be solidified in order to ensure safe conditions of storage and disposal. Currently the most promising solidification method for this waste is the vitrification technology. Vitrification of NPP operational waste is a relative new option being developed for last years. Nevertheless there is already accumulated operational experience on vitrifying low and intermediate level waste in Russian Federation at Moscow SIA ''Radon'' vitrification plant. This plant uses the most advanced type induction high frequency melters that facilitate the melting process and significantly reduce the generation of secondary waste and henceforth the overall cost. The plant was put into operation by the end of 1999. It has three operating cold crucible melters with the overall capacity up to 75 kg/h. The vitrification technology comprises a few stages, starting with evaporation of excess water from liquid radioactive waste, followed by batch preparation, glass melting, and ending with vitrified waste blocks and some relative small amounts of secondary waste. First of all since the original waste contain as main component water, this water is removed from waste through evaporation. Then the remaining salt concentrate is mixed with necessary technological additives, thus a glass-forming batch is formed. The batch is fed into melters where the glass melting occurs. From here there are two streams: one is the glass melt containing the most part of radioactivity and second is the off gas flow, which contains off gaseous and aerosol airborne. The melt glass is fed into containers, which are slowly cooled in an annealing tunnel furnace to avoid accumulation of mechanical stresses in the glass. Containers with glass are the final processing product containing the overwhelming part of waste contaminants. The second stream from melter is directed to gas purification system, which is a rather complex system taking into account the necessity to remove from off gas not only radionuclides but also the chemical contaminants. Operation of this purification system leads to generation of a small amount of secondary waste. This waste stream slightly contaminated with volatilized radionuclides is recycled in the same technological scheme. As a result only non-radioactive materials are produced. They are either discharged into environment or reused. Based on the experience gained during operation of vitrification plant one can conclude on high efficiency achieved through vitrification method. Another significant argument on vitrifying NPP operational waste is the minimal impact of vitrified radioactive waste onto environment. Solidified waste shall be disposed of into a near surface disposal facility. Waste forms disposed of in a near-surface wet repository eventually come into contact with groundwater. Engineered structures used or designed to prevent or postpone such contact and the subsequent radionuclide release are complex and often too expensive. Vitrification technologies provide waste forms with excellent resistance to corrosion and gave the basic possibility of maximal simplification of engineered barrier systems. The most simple disposal option is to locate the vitrified waste form packages directly into earthen trenches provided the host rock has the necessary sorption and confinement properties. Such an approach will significantly make simpler the disposal facilities thus contributing both to enhancing safety and economic al efficiency.

  6. Joint probability safety assessment for NPP defense infrastructure against extreme external natural hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilin, L.; Defu, L.; Huajun, L.; Fengqing, W.; Tao, Z.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing tendency of natural hazards, the typhoon, hurricane and tropical Cyclone induced surge, wave, precipitation, flood and wind as extreme external loads menacing Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) in coastal and inland provinces of China. For all of planned, designed And constructed NPP the National Nuclear Safety Administration of China and IAEA recommended Probable Maximum Hurricane /Typhoon/(PMH/T), Probable Maximum Storm Surge (PMSS), Probable Maximum Flood (PMF), Design Basis Flood (DBF) as safety regulations for NPP defense infrastructures. This paper discusses the joint probability analysis of simultaneous occurrence typhoon induced extreme external hazards and compare with IAEA 2006-2009 recommended safety regulation design criteria for some NPP defense infrastructures along China coast. (authors)

  7. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDIES FOR TANK 241-AN-107 CORE 309 SEGMENTS 21R1 & 21R2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-11-13

    Liquid waste in tank 241-AN-107 is below Technical Safety Requirements Administrative Control 5.16 (AC 5.16) limits. Electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on Core 309, Segments 21R1 and 21R2, to provide information on the conductivity and corrosive tendencies of the tank saltcake and interstitial liquid. This report describes data obtained under the execution of RPP-PLAN-29001, 'Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Tank 241-AN-107 Core 309, Segments 21R1 and 21R2'. Analytical results are presented that show supernatant was within the limits while the interstitial liquid remained below the limits for the analytical cores. Applicable AC 5.16 chemistry control limits for AN-107 are presented.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Radiosondes for NPOESS/NPP Validation - NSA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Radiosondes for NPOESS/NPP Validation - NSA Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Radiosondes for NPOESS/NPP Validation - NSA 2012.07.09 - 2017.12.31 Lead Scientist : Lori Borg For data sets, see below. Abstract This is a satellite validation project involving the use of satellite overpass coincident radiosonde launches. This is analogous to previous IOPs performed for AIRS on the NASA Aqua platform and

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Radiosondes for NPOESS/NPP Validation - SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Radiosondes for NPOESS/NPP Validation - SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ARM Radiosondes for NPOESS/NPP Validation - SGP 2012.07.09 - 2017.12.31 Lead Scientist : Lori Borg For data sets, see below. Abstract This is a satellite validation project involving the use of satellite overpass coincident radiosonde launches. This is analogous to previous IOPs performed for AIRS on the NASA Aqua platform and

  10. ON THE INSTABILITY OF TROPICAL WESTERN PACIFIC WARM POOL DURING THE BOREAL WINTER AND SPRING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARR-KUMARAKULASINGHE,S.A.

    1998-03-23

    A source of instability in the western Pacific warm pool is shown to be due to sea surface elevation variations caused by changes in the zonal sea-surface temperature (SST) gradient and the changes in the Pacific Ocean basin length in relation to the warm pool latitudinal location. The variation of the sea-surface elevation is measured by using the thermocline depth response calculated from a two-layer ocean. The warm pool is shown to be barely at equilibrium during the boreal late winter and early spring by comparing the measured thermocline at 110{degree}W, 0{degree}E with the calculated thermocline depth. Based on this analysis, a failure or reversal of the climatological zonal winds are apparently not a necessary precursor for the instability of the warm pool and initiation of a warm event. A warm event can be initiated by an increase in the size of the warm pool and/or an increase in zonal SST differences during the boreal/winter spring. This mechanism could be an alternate mechanism for El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) dynamics to that postulated by Bjeknes (1969).

  11. Evaluation of Radiation Impacts of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP - 13495

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paskevych, Sergiy; Batiy, Valiriy; Sizov, Andriy; Schmieman, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Radiation effects are estimated for the operation of a new dry storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP RBMK reactors. It is shown that radiation exposure during normal operation, design and beyond design basis accidents are minor and meet the criteria for safe use of radiation and nuclear facilities in Ukraine. (authors)

  12. C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) at IR wavelengths and the variability of CO abundances among Oort Cloud comets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Bonev, B. P.; DiSanti, M. A.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Gibb, E. L.

    2014-08-20

    We report production rates, rotational temperatures, and related parameters for gases in C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using the Near InfraRed SPECtrometer at the Keck Observatory, on six UT dates spanning heliocentric distances (R{sub h} ) that decreased from 1.35 AU to 1.16 AU (pre-perihelion). We quantified nine gaseous species (H{sub 2}O, OH*, CO, CH{sub 4}, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, NH{sub 3}, and NH{sub 2}) and obtained upper limits for two others (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO). Compared with organics-normal comets, our results reveal highly enriched CO, (at most) slightly enriched CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and HCN, and CH{sub 4} consistent with {sup n}ormal{sup ,} yet depleted, NH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}CO. Rotational temperatures increased from ?50 K to ?70 K with decreasing R{sub h} , following a power law in R{sub h} of 2.0 0.2, while the water production rate increased from 1.0 to 3.9 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup 1}, following a power law in R{sub h} of 4.7 0.9. The ortho-para ratio for H{sub 2}O was 3.01 0.49, corresponding to spin temperatures (T {sub spin}) ? 29 K (at the 1? level). The observed spatial profiles for these emissions showed complex structures, possibly tied to nucleus rotation, although the cadence of our observations limits any definitive conclusions. The retrieved CO abundance in Lovejoy is more than twice the median value for comets in our IR survey, suggesting this comet is enriched in CO. We discuss the enriched value for CO in comet C/2013 R1 in terms of the variability of CO among Oort Cloud comets.

  13. Composition of carbonaceous smoke particles from prescribed burning of a Canadian boreal forest: 1. Organic aerosol characterization by gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Laterza, C.; Newman, L.; Daum, P.; Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S.; Winstead, E.L.

    1995-06-01

    In this study we examine the molecular organic constituents (C8 to C40 lipid compounds) collected as smoke particles from a Canadian boreal forest prescribed burn. Of special interest are (1) the molecular identity of polar organic aerosols, and (2) the amount of polar organic matter relative to the total mass of aerosol particulate carbon. Organic extracts of smoke aerosol particles show complex distributions of the lipid compounds when analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The molecular constituents present as smoke aerosol are grouped into non-polar (hydrocarbons) and polar {minus}2 oxygen atoms) subtractions. The dominant chemical species found in the boreal forest smoke aerosol are unaltered resin compounds (C20 terpenes) which are abundant in unburned conifer wood, plus thermally altered wood lignins and other polar aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results show that smoke aerosols contain molecular tracers which are related to the biofuel consumed. These smoke tracers can be related structurally back to the consumed softwood and hardwood vegetation. In addition, combustion of boreal forest materials produces smoke aerosol particles that are both oxygen-rich and chemically complex, yielding a carbonaceous aerosol matrix that is enriched in polar substances. As a consequence, emissions of carbonaceous smoke particles from large-scale combustion of boreal forest land may have a disproportionate effect on regional atmospheric chemistry and on cloud microphysical processes.

  14. Chernobyl NPP: Completion of LRW Treatment Plant and LRW Management on Site - 12568

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Denis; Adamovich, Dmitry [SIA 'RADON', Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimenko, I.; Taranenko, L. [IVL Engineering, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2012-07-01

    Since a beginning of ChNPP operation, and after a tragedy in 1986, a few thousands m3 of LRW have been collected in a storage tanks. In 2004 ChNPP started the new project on creation of LRW treatment plant (LRWTP) financed from EBRD fund. But it was stopped in 2008 because of financial and contract problems. In 2010 SIA RADON jointly with Ukrainian partners has won a tender on completion of LRWTP, in particular I and C system. The purpose of LRTP is to process liquid rad-wastes from SSE 'Chernobyl NPP' site and those liquids stored in the LRWS and SLRWS tanks as well as the would-be wastes after ChNPP Power Units 1, 2 and 3 decommissioning. The LRTP design lifetime - 20 years. Currently, the LRTP is getting ready to perform the following activities: 1. retrieval of waste from tanks stored at ChNPP LWS using waste retrieval system with existing equipment involved; 2. transfer of retrieved waste into LRTP reception tanks with partial use of existing transfer pipelines; 3. laboratory chemical and radiochemical analysis of reception tanks contest to define the full spectrum of characteristics before processing, to acknowledge the necessity of preliminary processing and to select end product recipe; 4. preliminary processing of the waste to meet the requirements for further stages of the process; 5. shrinkage (concentrating) of preliminary processed waste; 6. solidification of preliminary processed waste with concrete to make a solid-state (end product) and load of concrete compound into 200-l drums; 7. curing of end product drums in LRTP curing hall; 8. radiologic monitoring of end product drums and their loading into special overpacks; 9. overpack radiological monitoring; 10. send for disposal (ICSRM Lot 3); The current technical decisions allow to control and return to ChNPP of process media and supporting systems outputs until they satisfy the following quality norms: salt content: < 100 g/l; pH: 1 - 11; anionic surface-active agent: < 25 mg/l; oil dissipated in the liquid: < 2 mg/l; overall gamma-activity: < 3,7 x10{sup 5} Bq/l. (authors)

  15. The resilience and functional role of moss in boreal and arctic ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turetsky, Merritt; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Euskirchen, Eugenie S.; Talbot, Julie; Frolking, Steve; McGuire, A. David; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2012-08-24

    Mosses in boreal and arctic ecosystems are ubiquitous components of plant communities, represent an important component of plant diversity, and strongly influence the cycling of water, nutrients, energy and carbon. Here we use a literature review and synthesis as well as model simulations to explore the role of moss in ecological stability and resilience. Our literature review of moss community responses to disturbance showed all possible responses (increases, decreases, no change) within most disturbance categories in boreal and arctic regions. Our modeling simulations suggest that loss of moss within northern plant communities will reduce soil carbon accumulation primarily by influencing decomposition rates and soil nitrogen availability. While two models (HPM and STM-TEM) showed a significant effect of moss removal, results from the Biome-BGC and DVM-TEM models suggest that northern, moss-rich ecosystems would need to experience extreme perturbation before mosses were eliminated. We highlight a number of issues that have not been adequately explored in moss communities, such as functional redundancy and singularity, relationships between response and effect traits, phenotypical plasticity in traits, and whether the effects of moss on ecosystem processes scale with local abundance. We also suggest that as more models explore issues related to ecological resilience, issues related to both parameter and conceptual uncertainty should be addressed: are the models more limited by uncertainty in the parameterization of the processes included or by what is not represented in the model at all? It seems clear from our review that mosses need to be incorporated into models as one or more plant functional types, but more empirical work is needed to determine how to best aggregate species.

  16. Principles on Radiological Characterization of the Unit 1 at Ignalina NPP for Decommissioning Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poskas, P.; Zujus, R.; Drumstas, G.; Poskas, R.; Simonis, V.

    2008-07-01

    There is only one nuclear power plant in Lithuania - Ignalina NPP (INPP). The INPP operated two similar units with installed capacity of 1500 MW(each). They were commissioned in 12/1983 and 08/1987, and the original design lifetime was projected out to 2010 and 2015 respectively. But the first Unit of Ignalina NPP was shutdown December 31, 2004, and second Unit will be closed down before 2010 taking into consideration substantial long-term financial assistance from the EU, G7 and other states as well as international institutions. Implementation of dismantling activities requires detailed knowledge of the radiological situation at the Unit 1. General Programme of Radiological Survey for Ignalina NPP Unit 1 based on NUREG-1575 was prepared in 2005- 2006 by Consortium led by Lithuanian Energy Institute and approved by Regulatory Bodies. It includes such main steps as historical site assessment, scoping, characterization, remedial actions/decontamination support surveys and final status surveys. General Programme of Radiological Survey defines content and principles of the surveys, and preliminary survey considerations, including identification of the contaminants, establishment of the free release levels, principles on areas classification depending on contamination potential, identification of the final survey units, criteria for selection survey instrumentation, techniques and methods etc. So, in the paper information on these principles and the content of the different stages in General Programme of Radiological Survey is presented. (authors)

  17. Preparation and properties of (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2. 2. 2)oct-3-yl- (R)-(+)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(4-( sup 125 I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate and (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2. 2. 2)oct-3-yl-(S)-(-)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha- (4-( sup 125 I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate as potential radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, V.I.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Gibson, R.E.; Fan, L.H.; Reba, R.C. )

    1989-10-01

    rac-4-Nitrobenzilic acid was synthesized and resolved with quinidine and quinine to give the corresponding (R)- and (S)-salts. The resolved diastereomeric salts were converted to (R)- and (S)-4-nitrobenzilic acids and subsequent esterification gave their corresponding ethyl esters. Transesterification with (R)-(-)-3-quinuclidinol afforded (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(R)-(+)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha- (4-nitrophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate and (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(S)-(-)-alpha-hydroxy- alpha-(4-nitrophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate. After hydrogenation, the (R,R)- and (R,S)-amines were converted to the respective triazene derivatives. The triazene derivatives reacted with sodium ({sup 125}I)iodide to give (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(R)-(+)- alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(4-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate and (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(S)-(-)-alpha-hydroxy- alpha-(4-(125I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate. The evaluation of their affinities to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MAcChR) shows that (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(S)-(-)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(4- ({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate exhibits an affinity for the MAcChR from corpus striatum that is approximately threefold lower than that of (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(R)-(+)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(4- ({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate.

  18. Reactivity-worth estimates of the OSMOSE samples in the MINERVE reactor R1-MOX, R2-UO2 and MORGANE/R configurations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Z.; Klann, R. T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-03

    An initial series of calculations of the reactivity-worth of the OSMOSE samples in the MINERVE reactor with the R2-UO2 and MORGANE/R core configuration were completed. The calculation model was generated using the lattice physics code DRAGON. In addition, an initial comparison of calculated values to experimental measurements was performed based on preliminary results for the R1-MOX configuration.

  19. OVERVIEW ON BNL ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

    2007-04-01

    A study was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), to determine the applicability of established soil-structure interaction analysis methods and computer programs to deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. This paper provides an overview of the BNL study including a description and discussions of analyses performed to assess relative performance of various SSI analysis methods typically applied to NPP structures, as well as the importance of interface modeling for DEB structures. There are four main elements contained in the BNL study: (1) Review and evaluation of existing seismic design practice, (2) Assessment of simplified vs. detailed methods for SSI in-structure response spectrum analysis of DEB structures, (3) Assessment of methods for computing seismic induced earth pressures on DEB structures, and (4) Development of the criteria for benchmark problems which could be used for validating computer programs for computing seismic responses of DEB NPP structures. The BNL study concluded that the equivalent linear SSI methods, including both simplified and detailed approaches, can be extended to DEB structures and produce acceptable SSI response calculations, provided that the SSI response induced by the ground motion is very much within the linear regime or the non-linear effect is not anticipated to control the SSI response parameters. The BNL study also revealed that the response calculation is sensitive to the modeling assumptions made for the soil/structure interface and application of a particular material model for the soil.

  20. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

    2012-01-01

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink strength of boreal forests. It is also important for large-scale biogeochemical and earth system models to include organic soil dynamics in applications to assess regional C dynamics of boreal forests responding to warming and changes in fire regime.

  1. U*2-5-~~~~ D0E10R1DOE/OR/20722-77 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    U*2-5-~~~~ D0E10R1DOE/OR/20722-77 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722 POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT FOR THE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES ON DAVISON AND LATHAM STREETS Maywood, New Jersey I February 1986 Bechtel National, Inc. Advanced Technology Division LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees,

  2. Overview of Remote Handling Equipment Used for the NPP A1 Decommissioning - 12141

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravarik, K.; Medved, J.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M.; Michal, V.; Vargovcik, L.

    2012-07-01

    The first Czechoslovak NPP A1 was in operation from 1972 to 1977 and it was finally shutdown due to an accident (level 4 according to the INES). The presence of radioactive, toxic or hazardous materials limits personnel access to facilities and therefore it is necessary to use remote handling technologies for some most difficult characterization, retrieval, decontamination and dismantling tasks. The history of remote handling technologies utilization started in nineties when the spent nuclear fuel, including those fuel assemblies damaged during the accident, was prepared for the transport to Russia. Subsequent significant development of remote handling equipment continued during implementation of the NPP A1 decommissioning project - Stage I and ongoing Stage II. Company VUJE, Inc. is the general contractor for both mentioned stages of the decommissioning project. Various remote handling manipulators and robotics arms were developed and used. It includes remotely controlled vehicle manipulator MT-15 used for characterisation tasks in hostile and radioactive environment, special robust manipulator DENAR-41 used for the decontamination of underground storage tanks and multi-purposes robotics arms MT-80 and MT-80A developed for variety of decontamination and dismantling tasks. The heavy water evaporator facility dismantling is the current task performed remotely by robotics arm MT-80. The heavy water evaporator is located inside the main production building in the room No. 220 where loose surface contamination varies from 10 Bq/cm{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 3} Bq/cm{sup 2}, dose rate is up to 1.5 mGy/h and the feeding pipeline contained liquid RAW with high tritium content. Presented manipulators have been designed for broad range of decommissioning tasks. They are used for recognition, sampling, waste retrieval from large underground tanks, decontamination and dismantling of technological equipments. Each of the mentioned fields claims specific requirements on design of manipulator, their operation and control systems as well as tools of manipulators. Precise planning of decontamination and dismantling tasks is necessary for its successful performance by remotely controlled manipulator. The example of the heavy water evaporator demonstrates typical procedure for decommissioning of contaminated technological equipment by remotely controlled manipulators - planning of decommissioning tasks, preparatory tasks, modification of applied tools and design of specific supporting constructions for manipulator and finally decontamination and dismantling themselves. Due to the particularly demanding conditions in highly contaminated A1 NPP, a team of experts with special know-how in the field of decommissioning has grown up, and unique technological equipment enabling effective and safe work in environment with a high radiation level has been developed. (authors)

  3. doeid11129r1.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap November 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Using domestic, plant-derived resources to meet our fuel, power, and chemical needs for Agricultural Biomass Feedstock Supply in the United States DOE/NE-ID-11129 Revision 1 1 Product Disclaimer References herein to, or depictions of, any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

  4. 06 Run R1.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 11 14 AP 7 8 8 15 16 13 AP 12 11 14 MA 1 6 AP 1 16 MA 6 8 9 2 9 12 MA AP 21 25 26 24 23 22 20 Dwn 4pm 24 26 29 28 27 27 28 29 30 2 4 3 10 3 8 9 26 27 23 24 25 3 MA 7 3 3 4 1 1...

  5. Failure Forewarning in NPP Equipment NERI2000-109 Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hively, LM

    2004-03-26

    The objective of this project is forewarning of machine failures in critical equipment at next-generation nuclear power plants (NPP). Test data were provided by two collaborating institutions: Duke Engineering and Services (first project year), and the Pennsylvania State University (Applied Research Laboratory) during the second and third project years. New nonlinear methods were developed and applied successfully to extract forewarning trends from process-indicative, time-serial data for timely, condition-based maintenance. Anticipation of failures in critical equipment at next-generation NPP will improve the scheduling of maintenance activities to minimize safety concerns, unscheduled non-productive downtime, and collateral damage due to unexpected failures. This approach provides significant economic benefit, and is expected to improve public acceptance of nuclear power. The approach is a multi-tiered, model-independent, and data-driven analysis that uses ORNL's novel nonlinear method to extract forewarning of machine failures from appropriate data. The first tier of the analysis provides a robust choice for the process-indicative data. The second tier rejects data of inadequate quality. The third tier removes signal artifacts that would otherwise confound the analysis, while retaining the relevant nonlinear dynamics. The fourth tier converts the artifact-filtered time-serial data into a geometric representation, that is then transformed to a discrete distribution function (DF). This method allows for noisy, finite-length datasets. The fifth tier obtains dissimilarity measures (DM) between the nominal-state DF and subsequent test-state DFs. Forewarning of a machine failure is indicated by several successive occurrences of the DM above a threshold, or by a statistically significant trend in the DM. This paradigm yields robust nonlinear signatures of degradation and its progression, allowing earlier and more accurate detection of the machine failure.

  6. The Management of the Radioactive Waste Generated by Cernavoda NPP, Romania, an Example of International Cooperation - 13449

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barariu, Gheorghe

    2013-07-01

    The design criteria and constraints for the development of the management strategy for radioactive waste generated from operating and decommissioning of CANDU Nuclear Units from Cernavoda NPP in Romania, present many specific aspects. The main characteristics of CANDU type waste are its high concentrations of tritium and radiocarbon. Also, the existing management strategy for radioactive waste at Cernavoda NPP provides no treatment or conditioning for radioactive waste disposal. These characteristics embodied a challenging effort, in order to select a proper strategy for radioactive waste management at present, when Romania is an EU member and a signatory country of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The helping of advanced countries in radioactive waste management, directly or into the frame of the international organizations, like IAEA, become solve the aforementioned challenges at adequate level. (authors)

  7. Comparison of Candidate Sites for installation of Landfill facility at Ignalina NPP Site Using Fuzzy Logic Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poskas, P.; Kilda, R.; Poskas, G.

    2008-07-01

    There is only one nuclear power plant in Lithuania - Ignalina NPP (Nuclear Power Plant). Two similar units with installed capacity of 1500 MW (each) were commissioned in 1983 and 1987 respectively. But the first Unit of Ignalina NPP was finally shutdown December 31, 2004, and second Unit is planned to be shutdown before 2010. Operational radioactive waste of different activities is generated at Ignalina NPP. After closure of INPP a waste from decommissioning should be managed also. According to Lithuanian regulatory requirements (1) the waste depending on the activity must be managed in different ways. In compliance with this Regulation very low-level radioactive waste (VLLW) could be disposed of in a Landfill facility. In such case very simple engineered barriers are required. A cap on the top of the repository is necessary from long-term safety point of view. Experience has shown that the effective and safe isolation of waste depends on the performance of the overall disposal system, which is formed by three major components: the site, the disposal facility and the waste form. The basic objective of the siting process is to select a suitable site for disposal and demonstrate that this site has characteristics which provide adequate isolation of radionuclides from the biosphere for desired periods of time. The methodology and results on evaluation and comparison of two candidate sites intended for construction of Landfill facility at Ignalina NPP site are presented in the paper. Criteria for comparison are based on the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) recommendations (2). Modeling of the radionuclide releases has been performed using ISAM (Improving of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal facilities) methodology (3). For generalization of the information and elaboration of the recommendations Fuzzy Logic approach was used (4). (authors)

  8. Restoration of water environment contaminated by radioactive cesium released from Fukushima Daiichi NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeshita, K.; Takahashi, H.; Jinbo, Y.; Ishido, A.

    2013-07-01

    In the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident, large amounts of volatile radioactive nuclides, such as {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, were released to the atmosphere and huge areas surrounding the nuclear site were contaminated by the radioactive fallout. In this study, a combined process with a hydrothermal process and a coagulation settling process was proposed for the separation of radioactive Cs from contaminated soil and sewage sludge. The coagulation settling operation uses Prussian Blue (Ferric ferrocyanide) and an inorganic coagulant. The recovery of Cs from sewage sludge sampled at Fukushima city (100.000 Bq/kg) and soil at a nearby village (55.000 Bq/kg), was tested. About 96% of Cs in the sewage sludge was removed successfully by combining simple hydrothermal decomposition and coagulation settling. However, Cs in the soil was not removed sufficiently by the combined process (Cs removal is only 56%). The hydrothermal decomposition with blasting was carried out. The Cs removal from the soil was increased to 85%. When these operations were repeated twice, the Cs recovery was over 90%. The combined process with hydrothermal blasting and coagulation settling is applicable to the removal of Cs from highly contaminated soil.

  9. A Radiological Survey Approach to Use Prior to Decommissioning: Results from a Technology Scanning and Assessment Project Focused on the Chornobyl NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milchikov, A.; Hund, G.; Davidko, M.

    1999-10-20

    The primary objectives of this project are to learn how to plan and execute the Technology Scanning and Assessment (TSA) approach by conducting a project and to be able to provide the approach as a capability to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) and potentially elsewhere. A secondary objective is to learn specifics about decommissioning and in particular about radiological surveying to be performed prior to decommissioning to help ChNPP decision makers. TSA is a multi-faceted capability that monitors and analyzes scientific, technical, regulatory, and business factors and trends for decision makers and company leaders. It is a management tool where information is systematically gathered, analyzed, and used in business planning and decision making. It helps managers by organizing the flow of critical information and provides managers with information they can act upon. The focus of this TSA project is on radiological surveying with the target being ChNPP's Unit 1. This reactor was stopped on November 30, 1996. At this time, Ukraine failed to have a regulatory basis to provide guidelines for nuclear site decommissioning. This situation has not changed as of today. A number of documents have been prepared to become a basis for a combined study of the ChNPP Unit 1 from the engineering and radiological perspectives. The results of such a study are expected to be used when a detailed decommissioning plan is created.

  10. Lysine N[superscript zeta]-Decarboxylation Switch and Activation of the [beta]-Lactam Sensor Domain of BlaR1 Protein of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borbulevych, Oleg; Kumarasiri, Malika; Wilson, Brian; Llarrull1, Leticia I.; Lee, Mijoon; Hesek, Dusan; Shi, Qicun; Peng, Jeffrey; Baker, Brian M.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-10-29

    The integral membrane protein BlaR1 of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus senses the presence of {beta}-lactam antibiotics in the milieu and transduces the information to the cytoplasm, where the biochemical events that unleash induction of antibiotic resistance mechanisms take place. We report herein by two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments of the sensor domain of BlaR1 in solution and by determination of an x-ray structure for the apo protein that Lys-392 of the antibiotic-binding site is posttranslationally modified by N{sup {zeta}}-carboxylation. Additional crystallographic and NMR data reveal that on acylation of Ser-389 by antibiotics, Lys-392 experiences N{sup {zeta}}-decarboxylation. This unique process, termed the lysine N{sup {zeta}}-decarboxylation switch, arrests the sensor domain in the activated ('on') state, necessary for signal transduction and all the subsequent biochemical processes. We present structural information on how this receptor activation process takes place, imparting longevity to the antibiotic-receptor complex that is needed for the induction of the antibiotic-resistant phenotype in methicillin-resistant S. aureus.

  11. ENG-RCAL-028-r1.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington, to Portsmouth, Ohio. The radiological risk is determined for both incident-free transport and transport involving potential accidents. The toxicological consequences...

  12. NPP financial and regulatory risks-Importance of a balanced and comprehensive nuclear law for a newcomer country considering nuclear power programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manan, J. A. N. Abd Mostafa, N. A.; Salim, M. F.

    2015-04-29

    The nature of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) projects are: long duration (10-15 years for new build), high capital investment, reasonable risks and highly regulated industries to meet national and international requirement on Safety, Security, Safeguards (3S) and Liabilities. It requires long term planning and commitment from siting to final disposal of waste/spent fuel. Potential financial and regulatory risks are common in massive NPP projects and will be magnified in the case of using unproven technology. If the risks are not properly managed, it can lead to high project and operation costs, and, fail to fulfil its objectives to provide compatible electricity prices and. energy security. To ensure successful, the government and investors need to ensure that the NPP project is bankable with low cost of project and funding, have fair treatment and proper risk mitigation, and able to complete on time with no cost overrun. One of the requirements as prerequisite for the development of NPP as stipulated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the establishment of a Legal and Regulatory Framework. The main objective of nuclear law is to ensure that the activities and projects carried-out in the country are legal and compliant to national and international requirements. The law should also be able to provide fair treatment of risks on its activities that is acceptable to investors. The challenge for a newcomer country is to develop a balanced and comprehensive national nuclear law that meet these objectives while taking into consideration various stakeholders’ interest without compromising on safety, security, safeguard, liability requirements and other international obligations. This paper highlights the nature of NPP projects, its potential and associated financial and regulatory risks, and its major concerns and challenges. It proposes possible risks treatment and mitigation through the formulation of a balanced and comprehensive legislation by clear understanding of various requirements of public, regulators, investors, financial institutions, international community, operator and other important stakeholders. Ambiguities and uncertainties, especially with regards to certain conditions and requirements should be minimised by emulating good practices of experienced nuclear regulators. The imposition of various financial requirements such as funds for decommissioning, radioactive waste management, financial security, nuclear liabilities and licensing fees are necessary, but at the same time the quantum needs to be clearly defined. Concerns on absolute liability of the operators need to be addressed through a creation of necessary and proper nuclear insurance legislations to mitigate operator S nuclear liability obligations and other financial risks. Another major risk to investors is the possibility of public resistance which will not only can hinder the construction but can also stop operation of the nuclear power plant which will contribute to huge losses to investors and countries. This may require a provision in the legislation that provide proper compensation for these situations and at the same time to allow operators to engage in nuclear promotional activities, such as community benefit and public consultation as voluntary initiatives. Through proper planning, research, consultation and execution, the proposed nuclear law shall be able to promote good regulatory practices for public and investors’ confidence and benefit. Early involvement of various stakeholders is essential as a platform for regular communications between regulators and interested parties. Stakeholders’ participation in the NPP programme and law developments will also promote transparency of the projects while upholding the independency of the regulators.

  13. Assessment of Hard-to-Detect Radionuclide Levels in Decommissioning Waste From the Bohunice NPP-A1, Slovakia, for Clearance and Disposal Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slavik, O.; Moravek, J.; Stubna, M.

    2002-02-26

    For assessments of hard-to-detect radionuclides (HD-RN) contents in various type of radwastes at the NPP-A1, available empirical data referenced to 137Cs (actinides, 90Sr, 99Tc, 63Ni, 14C) and the theoretical assessment for the remaining HD-RN using calculated RN inventory and a simple model with effective relative (137Cs) spent fuel release fractions was applied. The analytical data of extended radiochemical analysis for the existing available operational radwaste forms have been reviewed for this purpose. 137Cs, 90Sr and 241Am were set up as release markers for partial spent fuel release groups of HD-RNs within which the total fractions of HD-RN released to the operational radwastes were assumed to be constant. It was shown by the assessment carried out that 137Cs and HD-RNs 129I, 99Tc, and partly 79Se and 14C are the main contributors to the disposal dose limit for the radioactive concentrate at NPP A-1. In the case of the radioactive sludge from the operational radwaste system the role of predominant dose contributors belongs to actinides 239,240Pu and 241Am. In the case of clearance of radioactive material from the NPP-A1 site, only the reference radionuclide, 137Cs was predicted to be the most dominant dose contributor. In all of these cases the estimated contributions of other hard-to-detect radionuclides to respective disposal or release dose limit are lower by 2 and more orders of magnitude. As a lesson learned, the most attention is proposed to focus on the control and measurement of the critical HD-RNs indicated by the assessment. For the control of less important HD-RNs, the developed release coefficient method is sufficient to be applied.

  14. Application of 'Six Sigma{sup TM}' and 'Design of Experiment' for Cementation - Recipe Development for Evaporator Concentrate for NPP Ling AO, Phase II (China) - 12555

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehrmann, Henning [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH (Germany); Perdue, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Company (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Cementation of radioactive waste is a common technology. The waste is mixed with cement and water and forms a stable, solid block. The physical properties like compression strength or low leach ability depends strongly on the cement recipe. Due to the fact that this waste cement mixture has to fulfill special requirements, a recipe development is necessary. The Six Sigma{sup TM}' DMAIC methodology, together with the Design of experiment (DoE) approach, was employed to optimize the process of a recipe development for cementation at the Ling Ao nuclear power plant (NPP) in China. The DMAIC offers a structured, systematical and traceable process to derive test parameters. The DoE test plans and statistical analysis is efficient regarding the amount of test runs and the benefit gain by getting a transfer function. A transfer function enables simulation which is useful to optimize the later process and being responsive to changes. The DoE method was successfully applied for developing a cementation recipe for both evaporator concentrate and resin waste in the plant. The key input parameters were determined, evaluated and the control of these parameters were included into the design. The applied Six Sigma{sup TM} tools can help to organize the thinking during the engineering process. Data are organized and clearly presented. Various variables can be limited to the most important ones. The Six Sigma{sup TM} tools help to make the thinking and decision process trace able. The tools can help to make data driven decisions (e.g. C and E Matrix). But the tools are not the only golden way. Results from scoring tools like the C and E Matrix need close review before using them. The DoE is an effective tool for generating test plans. DoE can be used with a small number of tests runs, but gives a valuable result from an engineering perspective in terms of a transfer function. The DoE prediction results, however, are only valid in the tested area. So a careful selection of input parameter and their limits for setting up a DoE is very important. An extrapolation of results is not recommended because the results are not reliable out of the tested area. (authors)

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - TWCB Summary Aug12r1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summary Tank Waste Corporate Board Summary www.em.doe.gov 1 Tank Waste Corporate Board Summary Tank Waste Corporate Board Summary Ken Picha, Deputy Assistant Secretary Office of Tank Waste & Nuclear Material Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting August 1 August 1- -2, 2012 < > Idaho Falls 2, 2012 < > Idaho Falls TWCB Meeting Overview August 1-2, 2012 meeting in Idaho Falls 41 participants from HQ and Field; DOE, Contractors, and Labs * EM-20,

  16. Microsoft Word - V-ESR-G-00003_R1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESR-G-00003 Revision 1 Waste Removal Technology Baseline: Technology Development Description T. B. Caldwell 15 June 2011 Savannah River Remediation, LLC Closure Project Engineering Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC09-09SR22505 Waste Removal Technology Baseline: V-ESR-G-00003 Technology Development Description Revision 1 15 June 2011 Page 3 of 50 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES

  17. 2210R1 ES&H Staff Assignments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Staff Assigned to ES&H Activities 1.0 Purpose This appendix provides information for current Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) related staff positions at Jefferson Lab. Other ...

  18. Microsoft Word - TWCB meeting minutes Aug12r1 web

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (TWCB) Meeting Minutes, August 1-2, 2012 F. Lockhart, TWCB Staff Coordinator, 202-731-5659 Page 1 of 5 The first Tank Waste Corporate Board (TWCB) meeting since the Office of ...

  19. DOE_OR_21548_702_R_1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  20. DOE_OR_21548_765_R_1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  1. DOE_OR_21548_789_R_1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  2. DOE_OR_21548_910_R_1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  3. DOE_OR_21548_283_R_1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  4. Microsoft Word - 2015 Tech Exchange Biosketches R1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Interagency Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice 2015 Annual Technical Exchange Meeting Presenters Biographical Sketches Jane Hedges Jane A. Hedges is the Program Manager for the Washington State Department of Ecology's (Ecology) Nuclear Waste Program. In her role with Ecology, Ms Hedges is responsible for managing a program of 70 staff that oversees the cleanup of the Hanford Nuclear Facility in Eastern Washington, regulates other facilities which store, handle or dispose of

  5. Radioecologycal study of {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of {sup 239/240}Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suseno, Heny; Wisnubroto, Djarot S.

    2014-03-24

    Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on {sup 239/240}Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope {sup 239/240}Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg{sup ?1} and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg{sup ?1} respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m{sup ?3} and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m{sup ?3}.

  6. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Application September 2013 Update_FillableR.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (EM SSAB) Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board Application No. (Please leave blank) ______________ 1 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION (September 2013) The EM SSAB provides meaningful opportunity for collaborative dialogue among the diverse communities at the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) clean-up sites. At the request of the Assistant Secretary or the Site Manager/Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, the

  7. Microsoft Word - Final Draft FY-13 LWRS IPP R1 Clean Angie KAM...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    means the prudent use of resources - in this case, our nation's commercial nuclear power plants. Sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic...

  8. Photovoltaic Array Field Characterization Report. University of Toledo R1 Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, Timothy J.; McNutt, Peter; Wohlgemuth, John

    2015-09-01

    We inspected two 6.2kW systems of CdTe modules that had been deployed for approximately eight years. The report summarizes the findings, lists the observed defects and links one of these defects to a significant loss in performance in some modules.

  9. 272-AW_Bldg_Renovation_Mod1_CX-00017 r1.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  10. Microsoft Word - CBU-PIT-2004-00010_R1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CBU-PIT-2004-00010 REVISION: 0 12/17/04 KEYWORDS Tank Closure, Tank 17, Tank 20, Modeling, Errata, Closure Module, General Closure Plan, Waste Characterization Report RETENTION: PERMANENT CLASSIFICATION: U Does not contain UCNI Tanks 17 and 20 Closure Errata B. A. Martin December 17, 2004 Westinghouse Savannah River Company Closure Business Unit Planning Integration & Technology Department Aiken, SC 29808 ________________________________________________________________________ Prepared for

  11. Microsoft Word - SRR-CWDA-2011-00054_R1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comment Response Matrix SRR-CWDA-2011-00054 for NRC Staff Comments on the Draft Basis for Section 3116 Revision 1 Determination and Associated Performance Assessment for the June 2011 F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site E Page 2 of 388 REVISION SUMMARY REV. # DESCRIPTION DATE OF ISSUE 0 Initial issue 5/2011 1 Updated reference document information in the responses to RAI-MEP-1 through RAI-MEP-6, CC- MEP-2, and in the reference list, for the following reference documents: DOE/SRS-WD-2011-001

  12. Microsoft Word - SRR-CWDA-2012-00026_R1_Text.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    26 Revision 1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS FOR REMOVAL OF ADDITIONAL HIGHLY RADIOACTIVE RADIONUCLIDES FROM TANK 18 F-AREA TANK FARM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE March 2012 Prepared by: Savannah River Remediation LLC Closure and Waste Disposal Authority Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract No. DE-AC09-09SR22505 Cost-Benefit Analysis for Removal of SRR-CWDA-2012-00026 Additional Highly Radioactive Radionuclides Revision 1 from Tank 18 March 7, 2012 Page 3 of 81 REVISION SUMMARY

  13. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling R1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for handling and opening full-sized dry storage casks in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's plan for confirmatory dry storage project for high burnup fuel.

  14. OSMOSE program : statistical review of oscillation measurements in the MINERVE reactor R1-UO2 configuration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoven, G.; Klann, R.; Zhong, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-28

    The OSMOSE program is a collaboration on reactor physics experiments between the United States Department of Energy and the France Commissariat Energie Atomique. At the working level, it is a collaborative effort between the Argonne National Laboratory and the CEA Cadarache Research Center. The objective of this program is to measure very accurate integral reaction rates in representative spectra for the actinides important to future nuclear system designs, and to provide the experimental data for improving the basic nuclear data files. The main outcome of the OSMOSE measurement program will be an experimental database of reactivity-worth measurements in different neutron spectra for the heavy nuclides. This database can then be used as a benchmark to verify and validate reactor analysis codes. The OSMOSE program (Oscillation in Minerve of isotopes in Eupraxic Spectra) aims at improving neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels through oscillation measurements in the MINERVE facility on samples containing the following separated actinides: {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 244}Cm, and {sup 245}Cm. The first part of this report provides an overview of the experimental protocol and the typical processing of a series of experimental results which is currently performed at CEA-Cadarache. In the second part of the report, improvements to this technique are presented, as well as the program that was created to process oscillation measurement results from the MINERVE facility in the future.

  15. Microsoft Word - SRR-CWDA-2012-00045_R1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) consultative review, as part of DOE's consultation with NRC under the Ronald W. Reagan...

  16. Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_R1_Draft_3.DOC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 8-1 Decommissioning Organization Quality Assurance ... RCRA facility investigation S&G sand and gravel SAIC Science ... Lavery till WMA waste management area WSMS Washington ...

  17. LLNL Data Disk Evaluation Report and Information Gathering Document #449.R1.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BeLue, A.

    2015-09-29

    This is a report on Data Storage Disk Evaluation and characterization. The purpose of this memo is to capture new recipients due to some recent characterization issues with the Hammer Mill process. The Data Storage Disk Evaluation report was generated utilizing data acquired during 2009 and 2010 from submitted storage media.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - SRSCRO_Forum_01_27_2011R1.ppt [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Programs Naval Reactors Maintain a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile to help ensure the security of the U.S. and its allies, deter ...

  19. Microsoft Word - 2014-1-1 RCA Qtr 1 Metrics Attachment_R1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 First Quarter Overall Root Cause Analysis (RCA)/Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Performance Metrics 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2014 Target FY 2014 Projected FY 2014 Pre- & Post-CAP* Projected Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90% 75% Construction 81% Cleanup 67% 67% Pre-CAP 75% Post-CAP Based on 3-year rolling period (FY12 to FY14) TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project

  20. Microsoft Word - 2014-5-27 RCA Qtr 2 Metrics Attachment_R1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Second Quarter Overall Root Cause Analysis (RCA)/Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Performance Metrics 1 Contract/Project Management Performance Metric FY 2014 Target FY 2014 Projected FY 2014 Pre- & Post-CAP* Projected Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90% 75% Construction 81% Cleanup 67% 67% Pre-CAP 75% Post-CAP Based on 3-year rolling period (FY12 to FY14) TPC is Total Project Cost. Contract/Project

  1. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C...

  2. New Generation Dresden NPP Demineralizer Vault Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, M.S.; CET, Ph.D.; Forrester, K.; Azar, M.

    2008-07-01

    Electro-coagulation (EC) is a technique that facilitates rapid destabilization and flocculation of colloidal suspensions to cause the suspended solids to separate from slurry phase. It is generally accepted that coagulation is brought about primarily by the reduction of the net surface charge to a point where the colloidal particles, previously stabilized by electrostatic repulsion, can approach closely enough for van der Waals forces to hold them together and allow aggregation. In the EC process, the coagulant is generated in situ by electrolytic oxidation of an appropriate anode material (aluminum in this case). In this process, charged ionic species, metals or otherwise, and suspended solids are removed from wastewater by allowing them to interact with an ion having opposite charge, or with floc of metallic hydroxides generated electrochemically within the effluent. Typically, no supplementary organic polymer coagulant addition is required. Thus, electro-coagulation (EC) was found to be an attractive treatment option to rapidly destabilize the colloidal particulate phase, allowing more facile particulate removal by decantation and/or coarse filtration. However, the liquid medium must have some conductivity (> 100 {mu}mho is preferred), in order to allow effective electrical coupling with the EC electrodes. A very small amount of aluminum or sodium sulfate salts can be added to the feed slurry, adjusting the water quality parameters to a conductivity of >100 {mu}mho and a pH value near 6.0-7.0. The EC-treated vault slurry had a pH value near 6.5 (within the pH range for minimal solubility of amphoteric aluminum hydroxide). In contrast to untreated wastewater, the agglomerated particles in the EC-treated aliquot could be filtered relatively rapidly, yielding a clear filtrate, indicating that the flocs that have been formed are now > 20- {mu}m in size, are pumpable (high shear strength), and filterable/dewaterable with ease (low water content). Final waste volumes also show that the actual volumetric fraction of solids produced are relatively small. In order to estimate the amount of material (Al or Fe depending on the electrode material) added by the EC process, a rough rule of thumb has been found to be {approx}15 ppm per amp-minute. It was found with most wastewaters that Cs seeding (if that step is required) added {approx} 100 ppm Cs Seed and 10-15 ppm/amp minute additional floc from the electrodes. In a typical BWR wastewater case, where the TSS represented {<=} 0.15 wt% ({approx}1500 ppm). At 1.5 amp-min., the Al (III) added by the EC process would be {approx} 20 ppm, or {approx} 60 ppm as Al(OH){sub 3}. It was found the relatively low floc [{approx} 40 ppm as dried Al(OH){sub 3}] worked quite well for the high colloid level present ({approx}1500 ppm), and would be even more enhanced with the use of recycle. Even at that relatively low treatment dose, the colloidal TSS in the wastewater was effectively flocculated to yield agglomerates that were easily filtered and dewatered. Another rule of thumb is that, empirically, TDS (in mg/l) is typically {approx}0.5 X conductivity (in umho/cm). For instance, a conductivity reading of 100 umho/cm corresponds to about 50 ppm of TDS. As can be seen, the amount of material actually added in this vault cleanup of {approx}15 ppm per amp-min compared to the existing {approx}1500 ppm of TDS present (0.5 X conductivity of 3000 {mu}mho/cm) is minimal. In this vault cleanup, as a precautionary measure, the HIC was a specially designed Press-Pak with internal sheet filters, final dewatering leg, and a expandable, outer bladder if needed for final dewatering. It was found after filling the first HIC, of two, that the material dewatered and passed final dewatering tests without the need for the precautionary Press-Pak feature. Original estimates by the evaluation team estimated it would take some 11 to 12 HICs to remove the vault contents to a remote location for treatment, dewatering and final shipment. With the use of the SAFE{sup TM} Solution, the project was completed dur

  3. A computerized main control room for NPP: Development and investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anokhin, A. N.; Marshall, E. C.; Rakitin, I. D.; Slonimsky, V. M.

    2006-07-01

    An ergonomics assessment of the control room at Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant has been undertaken as part of an international project funded by the EU TACIS program. The project was focused on the upgrading of the existing control facilities and the installation of a validation facility to evaluate candidate refurbishment proposals before their implementation at the plant. The ergonomics methodology applied in the investigation was wide ranging and included an analysis of reported events, extensive task analysis (including novel techniques) and validation studies using experienced operators. The paper addresses the potential difficulties for the human operator associated with fully computerized interfaces and shows how the validation facility and the outcomes from ergonomics assessment will be used to minimise any adverse impact on performance that may be caused by proposed control room changes. (authors)

  4. Packaging, Transportation and Recycling of NPP Condenser Modules - 12262

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polley, G.M. [Perma-Fix Environmental Services, 575 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Perma-Fix was awarded contract from Energy Northwest for the packaging, transportation and disposition of the condenser modules, water boxes and miscellaneous metal, combustibles and water generated during the 2011 condenser replacement outage at the Columbia Generating Station. The work scope was to package the water boxes and condenser modules as they were removed from the facility and transfer them to the Perma-Fix Northwest facility for processing, recycle of metals and disposition. The condenser components were oversized and overweight (the condenser modules weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lb]) which required special equipment for loading and transport. Additional debris waste was packaged in inter-modals and IP-1 boxes for transport. A waste management plan was developed to minimize the generation of virtually any waste requiring landfill disposal. The Perma-Fix Northwest facility was modified to accommodate the ?15 m [50-ft] long condenser modules and equipment was designed and manufactured to complete the disassembly, decontamination and release survey. The condenser modules are currently undergoing processing for free release to a local metal recycler. Over three millions pounds of metal will be recycled and over 95% of the waste generated during this outage will not require land disposal. There were several elements of this project that needed to be addressed during the preparation for this outage and the subsequent packaging, transportation and processing. - Staffing the project to support 24/7 generation of large components and other wastes. - The design and manufacture of the soft-sided shipping containers for the condenser modules that measured ?15 m X 4 m X 3 m [50 ft X 13 ft X 10 ft] and weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lbs] - Developing a methodology for loading the modules into the shipping containers. - Obtaining a transport vehicle for the modules. - Designing and modifying the processing facility. - Movement of the modules at the processing facility. If any of these issues were not adequately resolved prior to the start of the outage, costly delays would result and the re-start of the power plant could be impacted. The main focus of this project was to find successful methods for keeping this material out of the landfills and preserving the natural resources. In addition, this operation provided a significant cost savings to the public utility by minimizing landfill disposal. The onsite portion of the project has been completed without impact to the overall outage schedule. By the date of presentation, the majority of the waste from the condenser replacement project will have been processed and recycled. The goals for this project included helping Energy Northwest maintain the outage schedule, package and characterize waste compliantly, perform transportation activities in compliance with 49CFR (Ref-1), and minimize the waste disposal volume. During this condenser replacement project, over three millions pounds of waste was generated, packaged, characterized and transported without injury or incident. It is anticipated that 95% of the waste generated during this project will not require landfill disposal. All of the waste is scheduled to be processed, decontaminated and recycled by June of 2012. (authors)

  5. Title V Semi-Annual Emissions Report for Permit P100R1 July 1, 2011 - December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whetham, Walter

    2012-03-15

    Reports of actual emissions from permitted sources in Section 2.0 shall be submitted on a 6 month basis. Reports shall not include emissions from insignificant activities. Emission estimates of criteria pollutants NOx, CO, SO2, PM and VOCs shall not include fugitive emissions. Emission estimates of HAPs shall include fugitive emissions. The reports shall include a comparison of actual emissions that occurred during the reporting period with the facility-wide allowable emission limits specified in Section 2.11 of this permit. The report required by Condition 4.1 shall be submitted within 90 days from the end of the reporting period. The semiannual report required by Condition 4.2 shall be submitted within 45 days from the end of the reporting period. The reporting periods are January 1st to June 30th and July 1st to December 31st. This condition is pursuant to 20.2.70.302.E.1 NMAC.

  6. Thermolysis of (1R,2R)-1,2-dideuteriocyclobutane. An application of vibrational circular dichroism to kinetic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chickos, J.S.; Annamalai, A.; Keiderling, T.A.

    1986-07-23

    The relative rates of geometric isomerization to racemization have been studied for the title compound by using a combination of infrared (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies, respectively. The results are interpreted with a kinetic and mechanistic scheme which parallels that used by Berson, Pedersen, and Carpenter on a similar study of chiral cyclopropane-d/sub 2/ thermolysis. Relative rates of isomerization to stereomutation of 1.5 +/- 0.4 were obtained which can be interpreted to be consistent with a mechanism best described by random methylene rotation in tetramethylene-d/sub 2/. This is the first application of VCD to kinetic analysis, and the advantages of IR techniques over the more usually employed UV spectroscopies to this type of basic mechanistic problem are illustrated.

  7. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTS FOR TANK 241-AY-101 CORE 325 SEGMENTS 16R1 & 16R2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; WYRWAS RB

    2007-11-14

    The interstitial liquid in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 settled solids layer is below the hydroxide chemistry control limit required by HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements, Administrative Control 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation Controls'. Operating tanks outside of the specification may increase the propensity corrosion of the carbon steel wall. This report is concerned with generalized electrochemical corrosion mechanism that may occur at specific loci. All cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans exhibited a negative hysteresis, scan reversing at lower current density, indicating that there was no pitting propensity. The general electrochemical corrosion rates ranged from 4.4E-02 to 1.5E-03 mpy with the first round of coupons, while the second round yielded corrosion rates of 2.5E-03 to 2.9E-02 mpy.

  8. The resilience and functional role of moss in boreal and arctic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    influence the cycling of water, nutrients, energy and carbon. Here we use a literature review and synthesis as well as model simulations to explore the role of moss in ecological...

  9. Gas Generation and Release in Near-Surface Repository at Armenian NPP - 13372

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Gondakyan, Y.

    2013-07-01

    The potential nuclear waste repository at Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) can store Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive waste (LL/ILW). In this kind of near-surface repository for radioactive waste, significant quantities of gases may be generated as a result of microbial degradation and corrosion. A discussion is presented of the microbial and chemical degradation of cellulose. For the release of gas, it is assumed that the complete conversion of cellulosic wastes to gases by the action of microbes, is, in principle, permitted. Released radioactive gases such as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CH{sub 4} could have a direct pathway to the atmosphere. The potential impact of gas generation, accumulation and migration on the long-term of repository, should therefore be assessed properly. We present here safety assessment result of gas producing radioactive waste disposal by the inhalation dose to a maximally exposed individual above ground, based on some conservative assumptions about release from waste as well as gas generation calculations. (authors)

  10. The Radioactivity Characteristics of the NPP Charcoal Sample Contaminated by Carbon-14 - 13531

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hee Reyoung

    2013-07-01

    The radioactivity of {sup 14}C-contaminated charcoal sample was analyzed by using a high temperature oxidation and liquid scintillation counting method. The radioactivity of the sample was monotonically increased according to the increase of the combustion time at each temperature where the experimental uncertainty was calculated in the 95 % confidence level. It showed that the {sup 14}C radioactivity was not completely extracted from the sample by simply increasing the combustion time unless the combustion temperature was high enough. The higher the combustion temperature was, the higher the recovery during the first 30 minutes was. The first 30 minute recoveries were 100 % at a temperature equal to or greater than 450 deg. C. The ratios of the recovery during the first 30 minutes to the total recovery during whole duration were more than 90 % at each experiment temperature. It was understood that the temperature was a critical factor for the complete removal of the {sup 14}C from the waste sample. (authors)

  11. Cost estimation of HVDC transmission system of Bangkas NPP candidates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liun, Edwaren Suparman

    2014-09-30

    Regarding nuclear power plant development in Bangka Island, it can be estimated that produced power will be oversupply for the Bangka Island and needs to transmit to Sumatra or Java Island. The distance between the regions or islands causing considerable loss of power in transmission by alternating current, and a wide range of technical and economical issues. The objective of this paper addresses to economics analysis of direct current transmission system to overcome those technical problem. Direct current transmission has a stable characteristic, so that the power delivery from Bangka to Sumatra or Java in a large scale efficiently and reliably can be done. HVDC system costs depend on the power capacity applied to the system and length of the transmission line in addition to other variables that may be different.

  12. REVIEW OF PRACTICE FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED/BURIED NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SEISMIC LOADINGS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.HOFMAYER,C.MILLER,C.GRAVES,H.

    2004-03-24

    Motivated by many design considerations, several conceptual designs for advanced reactors have proposed that the entire reactor building and a significant portion of the steam generator building will be either partially or completely embedded below grade. For the analysis of seismic events, the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effect and passive earth pressure for these types of deeply embedded structures will have a significant influence on the predicted seismic response. Sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a research program to assess the significance of these proposed design features for advanced reactors, and to evaluate the existing analytical methods to determine their applicability and adequacy in capturing the seismic behavior of the proposed designs. This paper summarizes a literature review performed by BNL to determine the state of knowledge and practice for seismic analyses of deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear containment type structures. Included in the paper is BNL's review of the open literature of existing standards, tests, and practices that have been used in the design and analysis of DEB structures. The paper also provides BNL's evaluation of available codes and guidelines with respect to seismic design practice of DEB structures. Based on BNL's review, a discussion is provided to highlight the applicability of the existing technologies for seismic analyses of DEB structures and to identify gaps that may exist in knowledge and potential issues that may require better understanding and further research.

  13. The LBB methodology application results performed on the safety related piping of NPP V-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupca, L.; Beno, P.

    1997-04-01

    A broad overview of the leak before break (LBB) application to the Slovakian V-1 nuclear power plant is presented in the paper. LBB was applied to the primary cooling circuit and surge lines of both WWER 440 type units, and also used to assess the integrity of safety related piping in the feed water and main steam systems. Experiments and calculations performed included analyses of stresses, material mechanical properties, corrosion, fatigue damage, stability of heavy component supports, water hammer, and leak rates. A list of analysis results and recommendations are included in the paper.

  14. The Use of Tritiated Wastewater from NPP Cernavoda to Estimate Maximum Soluble Pollutants on Danube-Black Sea Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varlam, Carmen; Stefanescu, Ioan; Patrascub, Vasile; Varlam, Mihai; Raceanu, Mircea; Enache, Adrian; Bucur, Cristina

    2005-07-15

    In this paper we propose to use tritiated liquid effluents from a CANDU type reactor as a tracer, to study hydrodynamics on Danube-Black Sea Channel. Tritiated water can be used to simulate the transport and dispersion of solutes in mentioned Channel, because it has the same physical characteristic as water. Measured tracer response curves produced from controlled evacuations provide an efficient method of obtaining necessary data. This paper presents the establishing of proper mixing length, and the base line of tritium concentration in studied area. These first steps were used to construct the unit-peak attenuation (UPA) curve for a sector of the Danube-Black Sea Channel.

  15. Managing the Night Off-Peak Power Demand in the Central Region UPS with Newly Commissioned NPP Capacities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Pron, D. M.

    2014-01-15

    The use of hydrogen technologies as a controlled-load consumer based on the newly commissioned base-load nuclear power plants to level out the daily load profile is justified for the Unified Power System (UPS) of the Central Region of Russia, as an example, for the period till 2020.

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? The resilience and functional role of moss in boreal and arctic ecosystems Turetsky, Merritt ;...

  18. cet20121127-doe_dayabay.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forward - Gives rise to very high IOCPU ratios - Typical HEP OO code (C++, Python, Java) - Analysis Blinding: * AD mass (Measured at fill) * Neutrino Flux (Derived from NPP...

  19. Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Complete system validation * Lotung (14 scale containment model) LSST tests * Fukushima-Daiichi NPP data * Japanese NUPEC tests Slide from, Jeremic, High Performance, High ...

  20. PRELIMINARY DEMONSTRATION REACTOR POINT DESIGN FOR THE FLUORIDE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    HIGH-TEMPERATURE REACTOR Authors: Qualls, A L 1 ; Betzler, Benjamin R 1 ; Brown, Nicholas R 1 ; Carbajo, Juan 1 ; Greenwood, Michael Scott 1 ; Hale, Richard...

  1. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Dehoff, Ryan R. 1 ; Watkins, Thomas R. 1 ; List, III, Frederick Alyious 1 ; Carver, Keith 1 ; England, Roger 2 + Show Author Affiliations Oak Ridge National Lab. ...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Collider Project Office (United States) Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, ... Elliott, Steven R. (1) Finnerty, P. (1) Kidd, Mary (1) Rielage, Keith R. (1) Ronquest, ...

  3. Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

    2001-11-01

    With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

  4. arm07_poster.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7). Ocean surface energy budget averaged over the southern ITCZ region (180E-130W, 10S-5S) shows that strong cloud radiative forcing in boreal winter and spring in the Exp helps...

  5. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport, Aging, and Removal of a Boreal Fire Smoke Plume Over Oklahoma Ghan, S.(a), Chapman, E.(a), Easter, R.(a), Reid, J.(b), and Justice, C.(c), Pacific Northwest National...

  6. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal...

  7. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2015 [Facility News, Feature Stories and Releases] Seeing the Forest Through the Trees-And to the Aerosols Bookmark and Share End of the Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate Campaign in Finland Finnish scientists are measuring aerosols on branches as they grow in the boreal forests. Image courtesy of Juho Aalto. Finnish scientists are measuring aerosols on branches as they grow in the boreal forests. Image courtesy of Juho Aalto. Nine months in the icy, cold forests of Finland

  8. Evaluation of the Parameters of Radioactive Contamination of Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panasyuk M.I.; Skorbun A.D.; Klyuchnikov O.O.

    2002-02-26

    After Chornobyl NPP (ChNPP) accident the territory near destroyed Unit 4 (that now with the special confinement has the name the ''Shelter'' object) is contaminated of fuel fallouts. During liquidation of the accident consequences this territory was covered with pure earth, concrete, etc. As a result a contaminated anthropogenic layer of the soil on the depth up to 10 m was formed. Now the problem of contamination estimation and the soils management arose. For this tasks a gamma logging method was modified conformably to ChNPP conditions. The methods for necessary coefficients receiving and log treatment have been suggested.

  9. Variation and Trends of Landscape Dynamics, Land Surface Phenology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The NPP increased by 2.68 gC m-2yr-2 in more Appalachian Mountains regions from 1981 to 2000. The comparison with the North America reveals the effects of topography and ...

  10. NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sets include global maps for predicted fluxes of soil nitrogen gases (N2O and NO), methane (CH4), and carbon monoxide (CO), plus predictions of net primary production (NPP) and...

  11. RAVEN as Control Logic and Probabilistic Risk Assessment Driver for RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Rabiti; A. Alfonsi; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Martineau

    2012-11-01

    The Next Generation of System Analysis Code (NGSAC) [1] aims to model and simulate the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) thermo-hydraulic behavior with high level of accuracy. In this respect, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing a NGSAC (known as RELAP-7) which will allow to model NPP responses for a set of accident scenarios (e.g., loss of off-site power).

  12. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun (2) Lu, Wenquan (2) Vissers, Donald R (1) Vissers, Donald R. (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions for a way ...

  13. Radiochemistry Results from the IER-163 COMET Irradiation (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of six of these foils are presented. Authors: Jackman, Kevin R. 1 ; Bredeweg, Todd Allen 1 ; Schake, Ann R. 1 ; Oldham, Warren J. 1 ; Bounds, John Alan 1 ; Sanchez,...

  14. Analysis of Kuosheng Station Blackout Accident Using MELCOR 1.8.4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.-J.; Chien, C.-S.; Wang, T.-C.; Chiang, K.-S

    2000-11-15

    The MELCOR code, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a fully integrated, relatively fast-running code that models the progression of severe accidents in commercial light water nuclear power plants (NPPs).A specific station blackout (SBO) accident for Kuosheng (BWR-6) NPP is simulated using the MELCOR 1.8.4 code. The MELCOR input deck for Kuosheng NPP is established based on Kuosheng NPP design data and the MELCOR users' guides. The initial steady-state conditions are generated with a developed self-initialization algorithm. The main severe accident phenomena and the fission product release fractions associated with the SBO accident were simulated. The predicted results are plausible and as expected in light of current understanding of severe accident phenomena. The uncertainty of this analysis is briefly discussed. The important features of the MELCOR 1.8.4 are described. The estimated results provide useful information for the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of Kuosheng NPP. This tool will be applied to the PRA, the severe accident analysis, and the severe accident management study of Kuosheng NPP in the near future.

  15. The Pleistocene biogeography of eastern North America: A nonmigration scenario for deciduous forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loehle, C.; Iltis, H.

    1998-12-31

    The current reconstruction of the vegetation of eastern North America at the last glacial maximum postulates a very wide zone of tundra and boreal forest south of the ice. This reconstruction requires that the deciduous forest retreated far to the south. The authors believe that this reconstruction is seriously in error. Geologic evidence for glacial activity or tundra is absent from the southern Appalachians. Positive evidence for boreal forest is based on pollen identifications for Picea, Betula, and Pinus, when in reality southern members of these genera have pollen that cannot be distinguished from that of northern members. Further, pollen of typical southern species such as oaks and hickories occurs throughout profiles that past authors had labeled boreal. Pollen evidence for a far southern deciduous forest refuge is lacking. Data on endemics are particularly challenging for the scenario in which deciduous forest migrated to the south and back. The southern Appalachian region is rife with endemics that are often extreme-habitat specialists unable to migrate. The previously glaciated zone is almost completely lacking in endemics. Outlier populations, range boundaries, and absence of certain hybrids all argue against a large boreal zone. The new reconstruction postulates a cold zone no more than 75--100 miles wide south of the ice in the East.

  16. Cognitive decision errors and organization vulnerabilities in nuclear power plant safety management: Modeling using the TOGA meta-theory framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappelli, M.; Gadomski, A. M.; Sepiellis, M.; Wronikowska, M. W.

    2012-07-01

    In the field of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety modeling, the perception of the role of socio-cognitive engineering (SCE) is continuously increasing. Today, the focus is especially on the identification of human and organization decisional errors caused by operators and managers under high-risk conditions, as evident by analyzing reports on nuclear incidents occurred in the past. At present, the engineering and social safety requirements need to enlarge their domain of interest in such a way to include all possible losses generating events that could be the consequences of an abnormal state of a NPP. Socio-cognitive modeling of Integrated Nuclear Safety Management (INSM) using the TOGA meta-theory has been discussed during the ICCAP 2011 Conference. In this paper, more detailed aspects of the cognitive decision-making and its possible human errors and organizational vulnerability are presented. The formal TOGA-based network model for cognitive decision-making enables to indicate and analyze nodes and arcs in which plant operators and managers errors may appear. The TOGA's multi-level IPK (Information, Preferences, Knowledge) model of abstract intelligent agents (AIAs) is applied. In the NPP context, super-safety approach is also discussed, by taking under consideration unexpected events and managing them from a systemic perspective. As the nature of human errors depends on the specific properties of the decision-maker and the decisional context of operation, a classification of decision-making using IPK is suggested. Several types of initial situations of decision-making useful for the diagnosis of NPP operators and managers errors are considered. The developed models can be used as a basis for applications to NPP educational or engineering simulators to be used for training the NPP executive staff. (authors)

  17. Activities for the remediation of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Hirofumi; Kometani, Yutaka; Asano, Takashi; Ishiwata, Masayuki; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Nagumo, Yasushi; Kani, Yuko; Matsui, Tetsuya

    2013-07-01

    With the aim of fulfilling recovery work for the Fukushima Daiichi NPP, technological efforts have been made for the development of a survey robot system, adequate communication infrastructure technologies, high radiation environment compatible gamma cameras, heavy machinery-type robots (ASTACO-SoRa), remote decontamination devices (AROUNDER), and contaminated waste water treatment system. We have developed a new type of absorbents which remove cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) simultaneously at a high removal rate of 99 % or more. We will provide valuable solutions and rational systems for waste water treatment using this developed adsorbent as well as other various adsorbents for the recovery of Fukushima Daiichi NPP.

  18. Plant maintenance and outage management issue, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2005-01-15

    The focus of the January-February issue is on plant maintenance and outage managment. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Dawn of a new era, by Joe Colvin, Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI); Plant profile: Beloyarsk NPP, Russia, by Nikolai Oshkanov, Beloyarsk NPP, Russia; Improving economic performance, by R. Spiegelberg-Planner, John De Mella, and Marius Condu, IAEA; A model for improving performance, by Pet Karns, MRO Software; ASME codes and standards, by Shannon Burke, ASME International; and, Refurbishment programs, by Craig S. Irish, Nuclear Logistics, Inc.

  19. Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

    2006-07-01

    The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

  20. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heather D. Medema; Ronald K. Farris

    2012-09-01

    This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making, planning, and preparation of a business case.

  1. Review of maintenance personnel practices at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chockie, A.D.; Badalamente, R.V.; Hostick, C.J.; Vickroy, S.C.; Bryant, J.L.; Imhoff, C.H.

    1984-05-01

    As part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored Maintenance Qualifications and Staffing Project, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted a preliminary assessment of nuclear power plant (NPP) maintenance practices. As requested by the NRC, the following areas within the maintenance function were examined: personnel qualifications, maintenance training, overtime, shiftwork and staffing levels. The purpose of the assessment was to identify the primary safety-related problems that required further analysis before specific recommendations can be made on the regulations affecting NPP maintenance operations.

  2. Summary of Investigations on Technical Feasibility of Direct Disposal of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dual-Purpose Canisters R1 | Department of Energy Summary of Investigations on Technical Feasibility of Direct Disposal of Dual-Purpose Canisters R1 Summary of Investigations on Technical Feasibility of Direct Disposal of Dual-Purpose Canisters R1 This study has evaluated the technical feasibility of direct disposal in a geologic repository, of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) of existing designs. The investigation considered waste isolation safety,

  3. Investigations of Dual-Purpose Canister Direct Disposal Feasibility (FY14)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    R1 | Department of Energy Investigations of Dual-Purpose Canister Direct Disposal Feasibility (FY14) R1 Investigations of Dual-Purpose Canister Direct Disposal Feasibility (FY14) R1 Results continue to support the earlier conclusion that direct disposal of DPCs is technically feasible, at least for some DPCs, and for some disposal concepts (geologic host media). Much of the work performed has reached a point where site-specific information would be needed for further resolution. Several

  4. Response to Office of Science and Technology Policy Request for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    John L. 1 ; Grider, Gary A. 1 ; Archer, Billy J. 1 ; Wampler, Cheryl L. 1 ; Lee, Stephen R. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication...

  5. Cuttings Analysis At Imperial Valley Geothermal Area (1976) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  6. Cuttings Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1976...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Cuttings Analysis At Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (1976) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  8. Cuttings Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  9. Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1976...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  10. Cuttings Analysis At Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  11. The Science of Battery Degradation. (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan 1 ; Sugar, Joshua Daniel ; Talin, Albert Alec ; Tenney, Craig M 1 ; Zavadil, Kevin R. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Laboratories, ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Behbahani, Siavosh R. (1) Behbahani, Siavosh R. Theory Group, SLAC National Accelerator ... Mirbabayi, Mehrdad (1) Mirbabayi, Mehrdad CCPP, Physics Department, New York ...

  13. Document Library | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cask Handling R1 This report evaluates existing capabilities at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for...

  14. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Sagar (1) Hoffmann, Michael R. (1) Koffas, Mattheos (1) Santos, Christine (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or ...

  15. Coherence resonance in excitable and oscillatory systems: The...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Pradines, Joeel R. 1 ; Osipov, Grigory V. 1 ; Collins, James J. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Center for BioDynamics and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston ...

  16. Abuse Tolerance Improvements (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Christopher J. 1 ; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan 1 ; Fenton, Kyle R. 1 ; Allcorn, Eric 1 + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United...

  17. The Cray XT4 Quad-core : A First Look (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These experiences were gained while porting a broad set of scientific application programs to Jaguar. Authors: Alam, Sadaf R 1 ; Barrett, Richard F 1 ; Eisenbach, Markus 1 ; ...

  18. Vibration cancellation in a Stirling-cooled HPGe detector (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Mascarenas, David L 1 ; Johnson, William R 1 ; Long, Rose G 1 ; Nelson, Mark W 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gent, Peter R. (1) Ghan, Steven J. (1) Hack, James (1) Hoffman, Matthew J. (1) Holland, ... Development and Applications of the Community Ice Sheet Model Hoffman, Matthew J. ; ...

  20. Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    extension over broad areas of the northern Basin and Range. References Dumitru, T.; Miller, E.; Savage, C.; Gans, P.; Brown, R. (1 April 1993) Fission track evidence for...

  1. Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    extension over broad areas of the northern Basin and Range. References Dumitru, T.; Miller, E.; Savage, C.; Gans, P.; Brown, R. (1 April 1993) Fission track evidence for...

  2. Platforms and Methods for In Situ Characterization of Li-ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron Transmission X-ray Microscopies. Abstract not provided. Authors: Sullivan, John P ; Bartelt, Norman C. ; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid ; Fenton, Kyle R 1 ;...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sun, Shenfang (1) Waterman, Michael R. (1) Yoshimoto, Francis K. (1) Save Results Save ... Pradeep S. ; Wang, Chunxue ; Lei, Li ; Yoshimoto, Francis K. ; Auchus, Richard J. ; ...

  4. Double-exchange selection rule for the c-axis conductivity in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Li, Qing'An 1 ; Gray, K. E. 1 ; Mitchell, J. F. 1 ; Berger, A. 1 ; Osgood, R. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Materials Sciences Division, Argonne National ...

  5. Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    area Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R. (1 January 2010) IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES IN GEOTHERMAL AREAS USING MICROEARTHQUAKE DATA Additional...

  6. Single line-of-sight dual energy backlighter for mix width experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    S. A. ; Felker, S. ; Seugling, R. ; Doane, D. ; Wallace, R. 1 ; Guymer, T. M. ; Moore, A. S. 2 ; Whiting, N. ; Sorce, C. 3 + Show Author Affiliations Lawrence Livermore ...

  7. High Resolution Lithium Mapping Using Fe State of Charge in Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fenton, Kyle R 1 ; Kotula, Paul G. 1 ; Sullivan, John P. ; Bartelt, Norman C. ; Chueh, William ; Tyliszczak, Tolek + Show Author Affiliations (Sandia National Laboratories,...

  8. High Resolution Lithium Mapping Using Fe State of Charge in Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bartelt, Norman C. ; Kotula, Paul G. 1 ; Fenton, Kyle R 1 ; Sullivan, John P. ; Chueh, William + Show Author Affiliations (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)...

  9. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 regulates fibronectin isoform...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Han Fei 1 ; Gilbert, James R. 1 ; Harrison, Gerald 1 ; Adams, Christopher S. 1 ; Freeman, Theresa 1 ; Tao Zhuliang 1 ; Zaka, Raihana 2 ; Liang Hongyan 3 ; ...

  10. Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Slininger, Patricia J. 1 ; Shea-Andersh, Maureen A. 1 ; Thompson, Stephanie R. 1 ; Dien, Bruce S. 1 ; Kurtzman, Cletus P. 2 ; Balan, Venkatesh 3 ; da Costa ...

  11. Tetrahydroquinoline Derivatives as Potent and Selective Factor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    E. ; Peterson, Tara ; Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar ; Rendina, Alan R. ; Rossi, Karen A. ; Watson, Carol A. ; Wei, Anzhi ; Zhang, Ge ; Seiffert, Dietmar ; Wexler, Ruth R. 1 + Show ...

  12. Project Final Report: HPC-Colony II (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Jones, Terry R 1 ; Kale, Laxmikant V 2 ; Moreira, Jose 3 + Show Author Affiliations ORNL University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign IBM T. J. Watson Research Center ...

  13. Investigation of Containment Flooding Strategy for Mark-III Nuclear Power Plant with MAAP4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su Weinian; Wang, S.-J.; Chiang, S.-C

    2005-06-15

    Containment flooding is an important strategy for severe accident management of a conventional boiling water reactor (BWR) system. The purpose of this work is to investigate the containment flooding strategy of the Mark-III system after a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) breach. The Kuosheng Power Plant is a typical BWR-6 nuclear power plant (NPP) with Mark-III containment. The Severe Accident Management Guideline (SAMG) of the Kuosheng NPP has been developed based on the BWR Owners Group (BWROG) Emergency Procedure and Severe Accident Guidelines, Rev. 2. Therefore, the Kuosheng NPP is selected as the plant for study, and the MAAP4 code is chosen as the tool for analysis. A postulated specific station blackout sequence for the Kuosheng NPP is cited as a reference case for this analysis. Because of the design features of Mark-III containment, the debris in the reactor cavity may not be submerged after an RPV breach when one follows the containment flooding strategy as suggested in the BWROG generic guideline, and the containment integrity could be challenged eventually. A more specific containment flooding strategy with drywell venting after an RPV breach is investigated, and a more stable plant condition is achieved with this strategy. Accordingly, the containment flooding strategy after an RPV breach will be modified for the Kuosheng SAMG, and these results are applicable to typical Mark-III plants with drywell vent path.

  14. US graphite reactor D&D experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide exchange in bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fried, A.; Klinger, L.F.; Erickson, D.J. III (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1993-01-22

    Measurements of Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes were carried out on bog microcosms using chamber sampling and tunable diode laser analysis. Intact bog microcosms (vascular plants, mosses, and peat) removed ambient levels of OCS in the light and dark with rates from [minus]2.4 to [minus]8.1 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2]. Peat and peat plus mosses emitted OCS in the light with rates of 17.4 and 10.9 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2], respectively. In the dark, the mosses apparently removed OCS at a rate equivalent to the peat emissions. A 3-D numerical tracer model using this data indicated that boreal bog ecosystems remove at most 1% of ambient OCS, not sufficient to account for an observed OCS depletion in boreal air masses. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. frisch(1)-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effect of Cumulus Cloud Formation on Boundary Layer Turbulence A. S. Frisch, B. E. Martner, and B. W. Orr National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. H. Lenschow National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) 35-GHz Doppler radar measured the turbulent motions in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over the boreal forest as a contribution to the

  17. Scientific Objective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate Scientific Objective Aerosols in the sky are essential to Earth's climate because they can reflect light into space, cooling the atmosphere, or they can combine with other particles to create clouds that have both warming and cooling effects. Biogenic aerosols are emitted by the biosphere directly, or are formed from biogenic volatile gases in gas-to-particle conversion. Examples include dead cells and pollen spores. Boreal forests are among the

  18. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual Radiological Control Managers' Council Nevada Test Site Effects of ionizing radiation on the boreal forest: Canada's FIG experiment, with implications for radionuclides Amiro, B.D.; Sheppard, S.C Assessment of atmospheric metallic pollution in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, Brazil, employing Tillandsia usneoides L. as

  19. DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases | OSTI,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases Information Bridge : Natural materials for carbon capture. ... Realistic costs of carbon capture ... Technology and international climate policy Energy Citations Database : What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions ... Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest ...

  20. Simulation of the intraseasonal variability over the Eastern Pacific ITCZ

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in climate models (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Simulation of the intraseasonal variability over the Eastern Pacific ITCZ in climate models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation of the intraseasonal variability over the Eastern Pacific ITCZ in climate models During boreal summer, convective activity over the eastern Pacific (EPAC) inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) exhibits vigorous intraseasonal variability (ISV). Previous observational studies identified two

  1. Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguire, David; Kicklighter, David W.; Gurney, Kevin R; Burnside, Todd; Melillo, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - ACOE Regional HydroPower Conference Presentation.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HYDROPOWER CONFERENCE Tulsa, Oklahoma June 10 - 11, 2009 NERC Requirements for Generator Owner and Operator Sarah M. Blankenship, NERC Compliance Officer How do we create a culture that combines Processes, Policies and Procedures, PEOPLE and Technology? Development of an Internal NERC Compliance Program Applicable NERC Requirements for Functions GOP GO BAL-005-0 R1 CIP-001-1 R1R2 R3R4 (Sabotage Reporting) COM-002-2 R1(Communications) EOP-004-1 R2 R3 (Disturbance Reporting) Can be combined into

  3. Research subjects for analytical estimation of core degradation at Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagase, F.; Ishikawa, J.; Kurata, M.; Yoshida, H.; Kaji, Y.; Shibamoto, Y.; Amaya, M; Okumura, K.; Katsuyama, J.

    2013-07-01

    Estimation of the accident progress and status inside the pressure vessels (RPV) and primary containment vessels (PCV) is required for appropriate conductance of decommissioning in the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP. For that, it is necessary to obtain additional experimental data and revised models for the estimation using computer codes with increased accuracies. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, considering previously obtained information, conditions specific to the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP accident, and recent progress of experimental and analytical technologies. As a result, research and development items have been picked up in terms of thermal-hydraulic behavior in the RPV and PCV, progression of fuel bundle degradation, failure of the lower head of RPV, and analysis of the accident. This paper introduces the selected phenomena to be reviewed and developed, research plans and recent results from the JAEA's corresponding research programs. (authors)

  4. Improving Outage Performance: Outage Optimization Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaPlatney, Jere J. [AREVA NP (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Planned outage performance is a key measure of how well an Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is operated. Performance during planned outages strongly affects virtually all of a plant's performance metrics. In recognition of this fact, NPP operators worldwide have and continue to focus on improving their outage performance. The process of improving outage performance is commonly referred to as 'Outage Optimization' in the industry. This paper starts with a summary of the principles of Outage Optimization. It then provides an overview of a process in common use in the USA and elsewhere to manage the improvement of planned outages. The program described is comprehensive in that it involves managing improvement in both the Preparation and Execution phases of outage management. (author)

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program FY13 Status Update for EPRI - RISMC Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced "RISMC toolkit" that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in order to focus on applications of interest to the U.S. nuclear power industry. This report documents the collaboration activities performed between INL and EPRI during FY2013.

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  7. LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  8. A reactor core on-line monitoring program - COMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.

    2012-07-01

    A program named COMP is developed for on-line monitoring PWRs' in-core power distribution in this paper. Harmonics expansion method is used in COMP. The Unit 1 reactor of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant (Daya Bay NPP) in China is considered for verification. The numerical results show that the maximum relative error between measurement and reconstruction results from COMP is less than 5%, and the computing time is short, indicating that COMP is capable for online monitoring PWRs. (authors)

  9. LWR Sustainability: Assessment of Aging of Nuclear Power Plant Safety Related Concrete Strutures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves III, Herman; Naus, Dan J

    2013-01-01

    Current regulatory testing and inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience is presented. Techniques commonly used to inspect NPP concrete structures to assess and quantify age-related degradation are summarized. An approach for conduct of condition assessments of structures in NPPs is presented. Criteria, based primarily on visual indications, are provided for use in classification and assessment of concrete degradation. Materials and techniques for repair of degraded structures are generally discussed.

  10. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-14-049 Iowa State University EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    49 SECTION A. Project Title: Advanced Models for Nondestructive Evaluation of Aging Nuclear Power Plant Cables - Iowa State University SECTION B. Project Description Iowa State University will perform R&D related to modeling the aging of two major NPP cable polymers - ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE). The cable polymers will be aged under various conditions e.g. elevated temperature, neutron/gamma irradiation, and water immersion. The testing using

  11. Artificial photosynthesis combines biology with technology for sustainable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy transformation Artificial photosynthesis combines biology with technology for sustainable energy transformation Authors: Moore, T.A., Moore, A.L., and Gust, D. Title: Artificial photosynthesis combines biology with technology for sustainable energy transformation Source: AIP Conf. Proc. Year: 2013 Volume: 1519 Pages: 68-72 ABSTRACT: Photosynthesis supports the biosphere. Currently, human activity appropriates about one fourth of terrestrial photosynthetic net primary production (NPP)

  12. Export Control Guide: Loose Parts Monitoring Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langenberg, Donald W.

    2012-12-01

    This report describes a typical LPMS, emphasizing its application to the RCS of a modern NPP. The report also examines the versatility of AE monitoring technology by describing several nuclear applications other than loose parts monitoring, as well as some non-nuclear applications. In addition, LPMS implementation requirements are outlined, and LPMS suppliers are identified. Finally, U.S. export controls applicable to LPMSs are discussed.

  13. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Hallbert

    2012-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  14. Comparison of Severe Accident Results Among SCDAP/RELAP5, MAAP, and MELCOR Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T.-C.; Wang, S.-J.; Teng, J.-T

    2005-05-15

    This paper demonstrates a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) sequence of the Kuosheng nuclear power plant (NPP) and station blackout sequence of the Maanshan NPP with the SCDAP/RELAP5 (SR5), Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP), and MELCOR codes. The large-break sequence initiated with double-ended rupture of a recirculation loop. The main steam isolation valves (MSIVs) closed, the feedwater pump tripped, the reactor scrammed, and the assumed high-pressure and low-pressure spray systems of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) were not functional. Therefore, all coolant systems to quench the core were lost. MAAP predicts a longer vessel failure time, and MELCOR predicts a shorter vessel failure time for the large-break LOCA sequence. The station blackout sequence initiated with a loss of all alternating-current (ac) power. The MSIVs closed, the feedwater pump tripped, and the reactor scrammed. The motor-driven auxiliary feedwater system and the high-pressure and low-pressure injection systems of the ECCS were lost because of the loss of all ac power. It was also assumed that the turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater pump was not functional. Therefore, the coolant system to quench the core was also lost. MAAP predicts a longer time of steam generator dryout, time interval between top of active fuel and bottom of active fuel, and vessel failure time than those of the SR5 and MELCOR predictions for the station blackout sequence. The three codes give similar results for important phenomena during the accidents, including SG dryout, core uncovery, cladding oxidation, cladding failure, molten pool formulation, debris relocation to the lower plenum, and vessel head failure. This paper successfully demonstrates the large-break LOCA sequence of the Kuosheng NPP and the station blackout sequence of the Maanshan NPP.

  15. Benchmark Report on Key Outage Attributes: An Analysis of Outage Improvement Opportunities and Priorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, Shawn St.; Farris, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC), is a multi-year pilot project targeted at Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) outage improvement. The purpose of this pilot project is to improve management of NPP outages through the development of an AOCC that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report documents the results of a benchmarking effort to evaluate the transferability of technologies demonstrated at Idaho National Laboratory and the primary pilot project partner, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The initial assumption for this pilot project was that NPPs generally do not take advantage of advanced technology to support outage management activities. Several researchers involved in this pilot project have commercial NPP experience and believed that very little technology has been applied towards outage communication and collaboration. To verify that the technology options researched and demonstrated through this pilot project would in fact have broad application for the US commercial nuclear fleet, and to look for additional outage management best practices, LWRS program researchers visited several additional nuclear facilities.

  16. Public opinion and nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealey, S.M.; Melber, B.D.; Rankin, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Public acceptance of a nuclear power plant (NPP) built near one's residence has declined steadily since the early 1970's. Following the TMI accident, this acceptance decreased dramatically. There has been some attitude rebound, however, and through mid-1981, the % who supported continued NPP construction in USA was 5 to 10% more than those in opposition. Men's and women's attitudes are different and were differentially affected by the TMI accident. Beliefs and attitudes about specific nuclear power issues were explored using questionnaires. Reactor-safety concerns were found to be more important than nuclear-waste concerns. Nuclear fuel-supply considerations are believed to be a major advantage of nuclear power. The public was largely unaware of the breeder-reactor concept. The US public generally does not favor selling US reactors abroad. It also greatly underestimates how long it takes to build a NPP. Most people believed solar-generated electricity is cheapest. The public has little information or has misinformation about some areas of nuclear power. (DLC)

  17. Analysis of PWR RCS Injection Strategy During Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.-J. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, K.-S. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, S.-C. [Taiwan Power Company, Taiwan (China)

    2004-05-15

    Reactor coolant system (RCS) injection is an important strategy for severe accident management of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Maanshan is a typical Westinghouse PWR nuclear power plant (NPP) with large, dry containment. The severe accident management guideline (SAMG) of Maanshan NPP is developed based on the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) SAMG.The purpose of this work is to analyze the RCS injection strategy of PWR system in an overheated core condition. Power is assumed recovered as the vessel water level drops to the bottom of active fuel. The Modular Accident Analysis Program version 4.0.4 (MAAP4) code is chosen as a tool for analysis. A postulated station blackout sequence for Maanshan NPP is cited as a reference case for this analysis. The hot leg creep rupture occurs during the mitigation action with immediate injection after power recovery according to WOG SAMG, which is not desired. This phenomenon is not considered while developing the WOG SAMG. Two other RCS injection methods are analyzed by using MAAP4. The RCS injection strategy is modified in the Maanshan SAMG. These results can be applied for typical PWR NPPs.

  18. Multidisciplinary framework for human reliability analysis with an application to errors of commission and dependencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barriere, M.T.; Luckas, W.J.; Wreathall, J.; Cooper, S.E.; Bley, D.C.; Ramey-Smith, A.

    1995-08-01

    Since the early 1970s, human reliability analysis (HRA) has been considered to be an integral part of probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Nuclear power plant (NPP) events, from Three Mile Island through the mid-1980s, showed the importance of human performance to NPP risk. Recent events demonstrate that human performance continues to be a dominant source of risk. In light of these observations, the current limitations of existing HRA approaches become apparent when the role of humans is examined explicitly in the context of real NPP events. The development of new or improved HRA methodologies to more realistically represent human performance is recognized by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a necessary means to increase the utility of PRAS. To accomplish this objective, an Improved HRA Project, sponsored by the NRC`s Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), was initiated in late February, 1992, at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop an improved method for HRA that more realistically assesses the human contribution to plant risk and can be fully integrated with PRA. This report describes the research efforts including the development of a multidisciplinary HRA framework, the characterization and representation of errors of commission, and an approach for addressing human dependencies. The implications of the research and necessary requirements for further development also are discussed.

  19. Seawood Designs Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Seawood Designs Inc Address: 201 Marine Drive Cobble Hill Place: Vancouver Island Zip: V0R 1L1 Region: Canada Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    De la Torre, Angeles G. (1) Leon-Reina, Laura (1) Losilla, Enrique R. (1) Martin-Sedeno, M. Carmen (1) Merlini, Marco (1) Ordonez, Luis M. (1) Porras-Vazquez, Jose M. (1) Save ...

  1. OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International Jump to: navigation, search Name: OZZ Solar Inc. (Sky Ozz International) Place: Concord, Ontario, Canada Zip: L4K 4R1 Sector: Solar Product:...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... Filter by Author Abrikosov, Igor A. (Tel Aviv) (1) Bina, Craig R. (1) Boffa Ballaran, ... Yun-Yuan ; Jacobsen, Steven D. ; Bina, Craig R. ; Thomas, Sylvia-Monique ; Smyth, ...

  3. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Filter Results Filter by Author Safdi, Benjamin R. (1) Suerfu, Burkhant (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions for a way ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Kinzey, Bruce R. (1) Royer, Michael P. (1) Save Results Save this search to My Library Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions for a way ...

  5. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

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    SapuriButti, Annapoorna R. (1) Swanson, Basil I. (1) Yang, Calvin (1) Yee, Chanel Kitmon (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or ...

  6. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Lundeberg, Mark B. (1) Rossi, E. (1) Roy, Dibyendu (1) Winkler, R. (1) Woessner, Achim (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or ...

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    Schmidt, Randall G. (1) Shull, Kenneth R. (1) Yeh, C. Joshua (1) Save Results Save this search to My Library Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or ...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    McCorkle, Dennis L. (Knoxville, TN) (1) McNeany, Steve R (1) Simpson, John T (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions for ...

  9. BPA-2014-01924-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Harkonen, P.Eng. Consulting Specialist, Power Systems NORDMIN ENGINEERING LTD. 160 Logan Avenue Thunder Bay, ON, CANADA P7A 6R1 Phone: (807) 683-4858 Fax: (807) 344-0404 ww W...

  10. BPA-2014-01924-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nordmin Engineering Ltd. Attn: Harold Harkonen, P. Eng., Consulting Specialist 160 Logan Avenue Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada P7A6R1 Mr. Harkonen: We have received your request...

  11. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (1) Metz, Thomas O. (1) Mitchell, Hugh (1) Pomraning, Kyle R. (1) Sherman, Louis A (1) Smith, Richard D (1) Taylor, Ronald (1) Thimmapuram, Jyothi (1) Wei, Siwei (1) Welkie, David...

  12. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search SciTech Connect for author "Domier, C. W." Search SciTech Connect for ORCID "0000000280807773" Search orcid.org for ORCID "0000000280807773" ; Bell, R. 1 ; Smith, D. R. ...

  13. New natural shapes of non-Gaussianity from high-derivative interaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Behbahani, Siavosh R. 1 ; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad 2 ; Senatore, Leonardo 3 ; Smith, Kendrick M., E-mail: siavoshrezvan@gmail.com, E-mail: mehrdadm@ias.edu, E-mail: ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    CURRO, NICHOLAS J. (1) Graf, Matthias (1) Graf, Matthias J (1) Nicholas, Curro (1) Pines, David (1) URBANO, RICARDO R. (1) Urbano, Ricardo (1) YOUNG, BEN-LI (1) Yang, Yifeng (1) ...

  15. TITANIUM SHEET PRODUCTION FROM COMMERCIAL POWDERS (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Muth, Thomas R 1 ; Peter, William H 1 ; Yamamoto, Yukinori 1 ; Chen, Wei 1 ; Harper, David C 1 ; Harper, Kevin D 1 ; Cox, Gregory A 1 ; Lowe, Larry E 1 + Show...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    (1) Filter by Author Abell, Paul A. (1) Allison, Julius (1) Anderson, Scott F. (1) Andrew, John R. (1) Angel, J.Roger P. (1) Armus, Lee (1) Arnett, David (1)...

  17. Office of Enterprise Assessment Targeted Review of the Safety...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Procedures Update Training ARP-300 R1 CN1, OP-102 R5 B-1 Letter from Johnny Moore to Thomas Mason, 1172014, FY 2014 Contractor Formal Assessment Program Schedule for...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Dehoff, Ryan R ORNL (3) Peter, William H ORNL (2) Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh (1) Blue, Craig A ORNL (1) Chen, Wei ORNL (1) Cox, Gregory A ORNL (1) Dehoff, Ryan R (1) Dehoff, ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Lehmann, Alan R. (1) Ramn-Maiques, Santiago (1) Shin, David S. (1) Tainer, John A. (1) Yang, Wei (1) Zhao, Ye (1) Save Results Save this search to My Library Excel (limit 2000) ...

  20. Biomimetic Model Studies Reveal the Role of the Ca2+ Ion in Photosyste...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the intermediates. (left) one-electron oxidation. (right) one-electron reduction. The research was supported by KOSEFMEST of Korea through the CRI (NRF- 2012R1A3A2048842), GRL...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Filter Results Filter by Subject Filter by Author Bolstad, Paul V (1) Chen, Jiquan (1) Cook, Bruce D (1) Davis, Kenneth (1) Desai, Desai Ankur R. (1) Euskirchen, Eugenie S (1)...

  2. Gillard Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 12 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  3. Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  4. Fales Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  5. Sespe Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    120C393.15 K 248 F 707.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 11 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  6. Little Melozitna Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    88C361.15 K 190.4 F 650.07 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 4 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  7. Mt Signal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    135C408.15 K 275 F 734.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 3 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 15 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  8. Roystone Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90C363.15 K 194 F 653.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  9. Latty Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  10. Dyke Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  11. Spencer Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    95C368.15 K 203 F 662.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  12. Kwiniuk Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    75C348.15 K 167 F 626.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  13. Clear Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    300C573.15 K 572 F 1,031.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 29 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  14. The Needles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    120C393.15 K 248 F 707.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 3 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 17 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  15. Boulder Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  16. McGee Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  17. Newcastle Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 12 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  18. Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    85C358.15 K 185 F 644.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 2 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  19. Surprise Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    115C388.15 K 239 F 698.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 8 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  20. Wilbur Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    160C433.15 K 320 F 779.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 29 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  1. Melozi Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90C363.15 K 194 F 653.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  2. Calistoga Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    140C413.15 K 284 F 743.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 17 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  3. Dall Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    95C368.15 K 203 F 662.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3.5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  4. Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 9 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  5. Serpentine Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    145C418.15 K 293 F 752.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 17 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  6. Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 3 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 9 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  7. Makushin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    205C478.15 K 401 F 860.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 12 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 107 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  8. Indian Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    95C368.15 K 203 F 662.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  9. Lakeview Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    135C408.15 K 275 F 734.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 3 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 20 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  10. Worswick Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    105C378.15 K 221 F 680.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  11. Moana Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    95C368.15 K 203 F 662.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 4 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  12. Maple Grove Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    95C368.15 K 203 F 662.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 4 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  13. Crane Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    105C378.15 K 221 F 680.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  14. Sonoma Mission Inn Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  15. Breitenbush Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    150C423.15 K 302 F 761.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 8 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  16. Little Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    125C398.15 K 257 F 716.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 15 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  17. Mcdermitt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    95C368.15 K 203 F 662.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  18. Cherry Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 4.5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  19. Emigrant Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    165C438.15 K 329 F 788.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 40 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  20. Clear Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  1. Deer Creek Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    125C398.15 K 257 F 716.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 16 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  2. Huckleberry Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    120C393.15 K 248 F 707.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 39 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  3. Warfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  4. Vale Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    145C418.15 K 293 F 752.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 8 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 45 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  5. Geyser Bight Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    182C455.15 K 359.6 F 819.27 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 12 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 98 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  6. Routt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 8 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  7. Riverside Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    105C378.15 K 221 F 680.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 8 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  8. Idaho Bath Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    95C368.15 K 203 F 662.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  9. Hot Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    150C423.15 K 302 F 761.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 5 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 43 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  10. Circle Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    105C378.15 K 221 F 680.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  11. Fallon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    195C468.15 K 383 F 842.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 3 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 53 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  12. Kellog Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  13. Manley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90C363.15 K 194 F 653.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  14. Dunes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    145C418.15 K 293 F 752.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 19 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  15. Mickey Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    170C443.15 K 338 F 797.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 4 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 41 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  16. Brockway Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90C363.15 K 194 F 653.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 2 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  17. Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    120C393.15 K 248 F 707.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 10 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  18. Hot Spring On Umnak Island Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3.7 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  19. Lava Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  20. Medical Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    105C378.15 K 221 F 680.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  1. Randsburg Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    105C378.15 K 221 F 680.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 3 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 7 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  2. South Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    85C358.15 K 185 F 644.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 1.7 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  3. Neinmeyer Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  4. Black Warrior Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    135C408.15 K 275 F 734.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 17 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  5. Summer Lake Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 8 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  6. Grass Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    120C393.15 K 248 F 707.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 7 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  7. Weberg Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 4 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  8. Grovers Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90C363.15 K 194 F 653.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  9. Kilo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    75C348.15 K 167 F 626.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 2 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  10. Ophir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    85C358.15 K 185 F 644.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 2.3 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  11. Sharkey Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    115C388.15 K 239 F 698.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 10 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  12. East Basin Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    95C368.15 K 203 F 662.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 4 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  13. Jemez Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 9 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  14. Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    75C348.15 K 167 F 626.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 1.3 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  15. Paso Robles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    95C368.15 K 203 F 662.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  16. Radio Towers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90C363.15 K 194 F 653.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 4 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  17. Great Sitkin Island Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    130C403.15 K 266 F 725.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 3 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 15 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  18. Tolovana Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 15 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  19. Sierra Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 3.5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  20. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda5-20-11r1.pdf More Documents & Publications 2011 Cost Symposium Agenda 4-28-11 web draft.xls 2011 Cost Symposium Agenda for web (2)-OPAM...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Anderson, R. (1) Baroukh, J. (1) Barraclough, Bruce (1) Bell, J. (1) Bender, Steven C. (1) Berger, B. (1) Berger, G. (1) Blank, J. (1) Boynton, W. (1) Bridges, N. (1) Save Results ...

  2. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Available Full TextPublicly Available Full Text1 Citation Only0 Filtered Results Filter Results Filter by Author Anderson, Bill (1) De Haro, Leyma P. (1) Flynn, Edward R. (1) ...

  3. Natural Gas_v2 (9764 - Activated, Traditional).xps

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Amount used was: AActual EEstimated RRead by Customer (select one) A E R 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis ...

  4. RECS Electricity Usage Form_v2 (25418 - Activated, Traditional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AActual EEstimated RRead by Customer (select one) A E R 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar Amount including taxes Exclude late fees, merchandise, repairs, and service ...

  5. Transitioning SPIDERS JCT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... NIST NISTIR 7628 Revision 1, Guidelines for Smart Grid Cybersecurity (3 volumes) http:nvlpubs.nist.govnistpubsir2014NIST.IR.7628r1.pdf IEEE, IEEE Cyber Security Site - ...

  6. Elucidation of Combustion Associated With A Small Volume (4 Cc...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mark W 1 ; Kaul, Brian C 1 ; Edwards, Kevin Dean 1 ; Theiss, Timothy J 1 ; Love, Lonnie J 1 ; Dehoff, Ryan R 1 ; Thomas, John F 1 + Show Author Affiliations ORNL...

  7. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cavalier, David (1) Cotta, Michael A (1) Da Costa Sousa, Leonardo (1) Dale, Bruce E (1) ... Thompson, Stephanie R. (1) Xue, Saisi (1) da Costa Sousa, Leonardo (1) Save Results Excel ...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shea-Andersh, Maureen A. (1) Slininger, Patricia J. (1) Thompson, Stephanie R. (1) Uppugundla, Nirmal (1) da Costa Sousa, Leonardo (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit ...

  9. Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Authors: Harrison, R.J. ; Vzquez-Mayagoitia, A. ; Hammond, J.R. 1 ; Stony Brook University) 2 +...

  10. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ADDITIVELY MANUFACTURED INCONEL 718 ENGINE MOUNT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ADDITIVELY MANUFACTURED INCONEL 718 ENGINE MOUNT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ADDITIVELY MANUFACTURED INCONEL 718 ENGINE MOUNT Authors: Watkins, Thomas R [1] ; Cornwell, Paris A [1] ; Dehoff, Ryan R [1] ; Nangia, Vinod [2] ; Godfrey, Donald G. [2] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Honeywell Aerospace Services Publication Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1224750 DOE Contract Number:

  11. Shear Rolling of Magnesium Sheet for Automotive, Defense, and Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Applications (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Shear Rolling of Magnesium Sheet for Automotive, Defense, and Energy Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shear Rolling of Magnesium Sheet for Automotive, Defense, and Energy Applications Authors: Muralidharan, Govindarajan [1] ; Muth, Thomas R [1] ; Peter, William H [1] ; Watkins, Thomas R [1] ; Randman, David [2] ; Davis, Dr. Bruce [2] ; Alderman, Dr. Martyn [2] ; Romanoski, Chris [3] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL

  12. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. A preliminary report detailed some of the challenges associated with thick reinforced concrete sections and prioritized conceptual designs of specimens that could be fabricated to represent NPP concrete structures for using in NDE evaluation comparisons. This led to the construction of the concrete specimen presented in this report, which has sufficient reinforcement density and cross-sectional size to represent an NPP containment wall. Details on how a suitably thick concrete specimen was constructed are presented, including the construction materials, final nominal design schematic, as well as formwork and rigging required to safely meet the desired dimensions of the concrete structure. The report also details the type and methods of forming the concrete specimen as well as information on how the rebar and simulated defects were embedded. Details on how the resulting specimen was transported, safely anchored, and marked to allow access for systematic comparative NDE testing of defects in a representative NPP containment wall concrete specimen are also given. Data collection using the MIRA Ultrasonic NDE equipment and initial results are also presented along with a discussion of the preliminary findings. Comparative NDE of various defects in reinforced concrete specimens is a key component in identifying the most promising techniques and directing the research and development efforts needed to characterize concrete degradation in commercial NPPs. This requires access to the specimens for data collection using state-of-the-art technology. The construction of the specimen detailed in this report allows for an evaluation of how different NDE techniques may interact with the size and complexities of NPP concrete structures. These factors were taken into account when determining specimen size and features to ensure a realistic design. The lateral dimensions of the specimen were also chosen to mitigate unrealistic boundary effects that would not affect the results of field NPP concrete testing. Preliminary results show that, while the current methods are able to identify some of the deeper defects, improvements in data processing or hardware are necessary to be able to achieve the precision and reliability achieved in evaluating thinner and less heavily reinforced concrete structures.

  13. Moderate forest disturbance as a stringent test for gap and big-leaf models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Fisk, Justin P.; Holm, Jennifer; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher

    2015-01-27

    Disturbance-induced tree mortality is a key factor regulating the carbon balance of a forest, but tree mortality and its subsequent effects are poorly represented processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. It is thus unclear whether models can robustly simulate moderate (non-catastrophic) disturbances, which tend to increase biological and structural complexity and are increasingly common in aging US forests. We tested whether three forest ecosystem models – Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), a classic big-leaf model, and the ZELIG and ED (Ecosystem Demography) gap-oriented models – could reproduce the resilience to moderate disturbance observed in an experimentally manipulated forest (the Forest Accelerated Succession Experimentmore » in northern Michigan, USA, in which 38% of canopy dominants were stem girdled and compared to control plots). Each model was parameterized, spun up, and disturbed following similar protocols and run for 5 years post-disturbance. The models replicated observed declines in aboveground biomass well. Biome-BGC captured the timing and rebound of observed leaf area index (LAI), while ZELIG and ED correctly estimated the magnitude of LAI decline. None of the models fully captured the observed post-disturbance C fluxes, in particular gross primary production or net primary production (NPP). Biome-BGC NPP was correctly resilient but for the wrong reasons, and could not match the absolute observational values. ZELIG and ED, in contrast, exhibited large, unobserved drops in NPP and net ecosystem production. The biological mechanisms proposed to explain the observed rapid resilience of the C cycle are typically not incorporated by these or other models. It is thus an open question whether most ecosystem models will simulate correctly the gradual and less extensive tree mortality characteristic of moderate disturbances.« less

  14. An Empirical Study on Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Traci L.; Pardini, Allan F.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Prowant, Matthew S.; Mathews, Royce

    2012-09-01

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for inspecting nuclear power plant (NPP) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate UT techniques to assess their ability to detect, locate, size, and characterize fabrication flaws in typical NPP weldments. This particular study focused on the evaluation of four carbon steel pipe-to-pipe welds on specimens that ranged in thicknesses from 19.05 mm (0.75 in.) to 27.8 mm (1.094 in.) and were 355.6 mm (14.0 in.) or 406.4 mm (16.0 in.) in diameter. The pipe welds contained both implanted (intentional) fabrication flaws as well as bonus (unintentional) flaws throughout the entire thickness of the weld and the adjacent base material. The fabrication flaws were a combination of planar and volumetric flaw types, including incomplete fusion, incomplete penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array UT (PA UT) techniques applied primarily for detection and length sizing of the flaws. Radiographic examinations were also conducted on the specimens with RT detection and length sizing results being used to establish true state. This paper will discuss the comparison of UT and RT (true state) detection results conducted to date along with a discussion on the technical gaps that need to be addressed before these methods can be used interchangeably for repair and replacement activities for NPP components.

  15. Digital I and C system upgrade integration technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H. W.; Shih, C.; Wang, J. R.; Huang, K. C.

    2012-07-01

    This work developed an integration technique for digital I and C system upgrade, the utility can replace the I and C systems step by step systematically by this method. Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) developed a digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) replacement integration technique on the basis of requirement of the three existing nuclear power plants (NPPs), which are Chin-Shan (CS) NPP, Kuo-Sheng (KS) NPP, and Maanshan (MS) NPP, in Taiwan, and also developed the related Critical Digital Review (CDR) Procedure. The digital I and C replacement integration technique includes: (I) Establishment of Nuclear Power Plant Digital Replacement Integration Guideline, (2) Preliminary Investigation on I and C System Digitalization, (3) Evaluation on I and C System Digitalization, and (4) Establishment of I and C System Digitalization Architectures. These works can be a reference for performing I and C system digital replacement integration of the three existing NPPs of Taiwan Power Company (TPC). A CDR is the review for a critical system digital I and C replacement. The major reference of this procedure is EPRI TR- 1011710 (2005) 'Handbook for Evaluating Critical Digital Equipment and Systems' which was published by the Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI). With this document, INER developed a TPC-specific CDR procedure. Currently, CDR becomes one of the policies for digital I and C replacement in TPC. The contents of this CDR procedure include: Scope, Responsibility, Operation Procedure, Operation Flow Chart, CDR review items. The CDR review items include the comparison of the design change, Software Verification and Validation (SVandV), Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Evaluation of Diversity and Defense-in-depth (D3), Evaluation of Watchdog Timer, Evaluation of Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC), Evaluation of Grounding for System/Component, Seismic Evaluation, Witness and Inspection, Lessons Learnt from the Digital I and C Failure Events. A solid review can assure the quality of the digital I and C system replacement. (authors)

  16. Design and Validation of Control Room Upgrades Using a Research Simulator Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Jeffrey C. Joe; Julius J. Persensky

    2012-11-01

    Since 1981, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) [1] requires a plant- specific simulator facility for use in training at U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs). These training simulators are in near constant use for training and qualification of licensed NPP operators. In the early 1980s, the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLab) at the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) in Norway first built perhaps the most well known set of research simulators. The HRP offered a high- fidelity simulator facility in which the simulator is functionally linked to a specific plant but in which the human-machine interface (HMI) may differ from that found in the plant. As such, HAMMLab incorporated more advanced digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) than the plant, thereby giving it considerable interface flexibility that researchers took full advantage of when designing and validating different ways to upgrade NPP control rooms. Several U.S. partnersthe U.S. NRC, the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI), Sandia National Laboratories, and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as well as international members of the HRP, have been working with HRP to run control room simulator studies. These studies, which use crews from Scandinavian plants, are used to determine crew behavior in a variety of normal and off-normal plant operations. The findings have ultimately been used to guide safety considerations at plants and to inform advanced HMI designboth for the regulator and in industry. Given the desire to use U.S. crews of licensed operators on a simulator of a U.S. NPP, there is a clear need for a research simulator facility in the U.S. There is no general-purpose reconfigurable research oriented control room simulator facility in the U.S. that can be used for a variety of studies, including the design and validation of control room upgrades.

  17. Moderate forest disturbance as a stringent test for gap and big-leaf models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Fisk, Justin P.; Holm, Jennifer; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher

    2015-01-27

    Disturbance-induced tree mortality is a key factor regulating the carbon balance of a forest, but tree mortality and its subsequent effects are poorly represented processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. It is thus unclear whether models can robustly simulate moderate (non-catastrophic) disturbances, which tend to increase biological and structural complexity and are increasingly common in aging US forests. We tested whether three forest ecosystem models Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), a classic big-leaf model, and the ZELIG and ED (Ecosystem Demography) gap-oriented models could reproduce the resilience to moderate disturbance observed in an experimentally manipulated forest (the Forest Accelerated Succession Experiment in northern Michigan, USA, in which 38% of canopy dominants were stem girdled and compared to control plots). Each model was parameterized, spun up, and disturbed following similar protocols and run for 5 years post-disturbance. The models replicated observed declines in aboveground biomass well. Biome-BGC captured the timing and rebound of observed leaf area index (LAI), while ZELIG and ED correctly estimated the magnitude of LAI decline. None of the models fully captured the observed post-disturbance C fluxes, in particular gross primary production or net primary production (NPP). Biome-BGC NPP was correctly resilient but for the wrong reasons, and could not match the absolute observational values. ZELIG and ED, in contrast, exhibited large, unobserved drops in NPP and net ecosystem production. The biological mechanisms proposed to explain the observed rapid resilience of the C cycle are typically not incorporated by these or other models. It is thus an open question whether most ecosystem models will simulate correctly the gradual and less extensive tree mortality characteristic of moderate disturbances.

  18. Structural analysis of three global land models on carbon cycle simulations using a traceability framework

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rafique, R.; Xia, J.; Hararuk, O.; Luo, Y.

    2014-06-27

    Modeled carbon (C) storage capacity is largely determined by the C residence time and net primary productivity (NPP). Extensive research has been done on NPP dynamics but the residence time and their relationships with C storage are much less studied. In this study, we implemented a traceability analysis to understand the modeled C storage and residence time in three land surface models: CSIRO's Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) with 9 C pools, Community Land Model (version 3.5) combined with Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CLM3.5-CASA) with 12 C pools and Community Land Model (version 4) (CLM4) with 26 C pools. The globally averagedmoreC storage and residence time was computed at both individual pool and total ecosystem levels. The spatial distribution of total ecosystem C storage and residence time differ greatly among the three models. The CABLE model showed a closer agreement with measured C storage and residence time in plant and soil pools than CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4. However, CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 were close to each other in modeled C storage but not with measured data. CABLE stores more C in root whereas CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 store more C in woody pools, partly due to differential NPP allocation in respective pools. The C residence time in individual C pools is greatly different among models, largely because of different transfer coefficient values among pools. CABLE had higher bulk residence time for soil C pools than the other two models. Overall, the traceability analysis used in this study can help fully characterizes the behavior of complex land models.less

  19. Multiple recycle of REMIX fuel based on reprocessed uranium and plutonium mixture in thermal reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Y.S.; Bibichev, B.A.; Zilberman, B.Y.; Baryshnikov, M.V.; Kryukov, O.V.; Khaperskaya, A.V.

    2013-07-01

    REMIX fuel consumption in WWER-1000 is considered. REMIX fuel is fabricated from non-separated mixture of uranium and plutonium obtained during NPP spent fuel reprocessing with further makeup by enriched natural uranium. It makes possible to recycle several times the total amount of uranium and plutonium obtained from spent fuel with 100% loading of the WWER-1000 core. The stored SNF could be also involved in REMIX fuel cycle by enrichment of regenerated uranium. The same approach could be applied to closing the fuel cycle of CANDU reactors. (authors)

  20. Principles of providing inherent self-protection and passive safety characteristics of the SVBR-75/100 type modular reactor installation for nuclear power plants of different capacity and purpose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Komlev, O.G.; Novikova, N.N.; Tormyshev, I.V.; Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N.; Dedoul, A.V.

    2007-07-01

    The report presents a brief description of the reactor installation SVBR-75/100, states a concept of providing the RI safety and presents the basic results of the analysis of the most dangerous pre-accidental situations and beyond the design basis accidents, which have been obtained in the process of validating the RI safety. It has been shown that the safety functions concerning the accidental shutdown of the reactor, total blacking out of the NPP and localization of the accidental situation relating to the postulated simultaneous rupture of several steam-generator tubes are not subject to influence of the human factor and are entirely realized in a passive way. (authors)

  1. Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-07-15

    The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: NPP Krsko revised decommissioning program, by Vladimir Lokner and Ivica Levanat, APO d.o.o., Croatia, and Nadja Zeleznik and Irena Mele, ARAO, Slovenia; Supporting the renaissance, by Marilyn C. Kray, Exelon Nuclear; Outage world an engineer's delight, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, NP Inc.; Optimizing refueling outages with R and D, by Ross Marcoot, GE Energy; and, A successful project, by Jim Lash, FirstEnergy.

  2. Migration and Retardation of Chemical Toxic Components from Radioactive Waste - Hydrochemical Aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jedinakova-Krizova, V.; Hanslik, E.

    2003-02-24

    A systematic analysis of nuclear power plant (NPP) operation and radioactive wastes disposal (near-surface disposal and geologic disposal) in underground repositories has provided the basis for a comparison between the radiotoxicity and chemotoxicity as part of an EIA (environmental impact assessment) procedure. This contribution summarizes the hydrochemical mechanisms of transport and retardation processes, chemistry and migration behavior of radionuclides and chemical toxics in natural sorbents, especially bentonites. The effect of solubility and dissolution reactions, diffusion and sorption/desorption, complexation and variations in the aqueous phase composition, pH-value and oxidation-reduction properties and other phenomena affecting distribution coefficients (Kd values) is discussed.

  3. The Development of a Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at Idaho National Laoboratory: Progress, Requirements and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David I Gertman; Katya L. LeBlanc; William phoenix; Alan R Mecham

    2010-11-01

    Next generation nuclear power plants and digital upgrades to the existing nuclear fleet introduce potential human performance issues in the control room. Safe application of new technologies calls for a thorough understanding of how those technologies affect human performance and in turn, plant safety. In support of advancing human factors for small modular reactors and light water reactor sustainability, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a reconfigurable simulation laboratory capable of testing human performance in multiple nuclear power plant (NPP) control room simulations. This paper discusses the laboratory infrastructure and capabilities, the laboratory s staffing requirements, lessons learned, and the researchers approach to measuring human performance in the simulation lab.

  4. NSR&D Program Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 Call for Proposals Mitigation of Seismic Risk at Nuclear Facilities using Seismic Isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Seismic isolation (SI) has the potential to drastically reduce seismic response of structures, systems, or components (SSCs) and therefore the risk associated with large seismic events (large seismic event could be defined as the design basis earthquake (DBE) and/or the beyond design basis earthquake (BDBE) depending on the site location). This would correspond to a potential increase in nuclear safety by minimizing the structural response and thus minimizing the risk of material release during large seismic events that have uncertainty associated with their magnitude and frequency. The national consensus standard America Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standard 4, Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures recently incorporated language and commentary for seismically isolating a large light water reactor or similar large nuclear structure. Some potential benefits of SI are: 1) substantially decoupling the SSC from the earthquake hazard thus decreasing risk of material release during large earthquakes, 2) cost savings for the facility and/or equipment, and 3) applicability to both nuclear (current and next generation) and high hazard non-nuclear facilities. Issue: To date no one has evaluated how the benefit of seismic risk reduction reduces cost to construct a nuclear facility. Objective: Use seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) to evaluate the reduction in seismic risk and estimate potential cost savings of seismic isolation of a generic nuclear facility. This project would leverage ongoing Idaho National Laboratory (INL) activities that are developing advanced (SPRA) methods using Nonlinear Soil-Structure Interaction (NLSSI) analysis. Technical Approach: The proposed study is intended to obtain an estimate on the reduction in seismic risk and construction cost that might be achieved by seismically isolating a nuclear facility. The nuclear facility is a representative pressurized water reactor building nuclear power plant (NPP) structure. Figure 1: Project activities The study will consider a representative NPP reinforced concrete reactor building and representative plant safety system. This study will leverage existing research and development (R&D) activities at INL. Figure 1 shows the proposed study steps with the steps in blue representing activities already funded at INL and the steps in purple the activities that would be funded under this proposal. The following results will be documented: 1) Comparison of seismic risk for the non-seismically isolated (non-SI) and seismically isolated (SI) NPP, and 2) an estimate of construction cost savings when implementing SI at the site of the generic NPP.

  5. Review of Quantitative Software Reliability Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Yue, M.; Martinez-Guridi, M.; Lehner, J.

    2010-09-17

    The current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process for digital systems rests on deterministic engineering criteria. In its 1995 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) policy statement, the Commission encouraged the use of PRA technology in all regulatory matters to the extent supported by the state-of-the-art in PRA methods and data. Although many activities have been completed in the area of risk-informed regulation, the risk-informed analysis process for digital systems has not yet been satisfactorily developed. Since digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems are expected to play an increasingly important role in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety, the NRC established a digital system research plan that defines a coherent set of research programs to support its regulatory needs. One of the research programs included in the NRC's digital system research plan addresses risk assessment methods and data for digital systems. Digital I&C systems have some unique characteristics, such as using software, and may have different failure causes and/or modes than analog I&C systems; hence, their incorporation into NPP PRAs entails special challenges. The objective of the NRC's digital system risk research is to identify and develop methods, analytical tools, and regulatory guidance for (1) including models of digital systems into NPP PRAs, and (2) using information on the risks of digital systems to support the NRC's risk-informed licensing and oversight activities. For several years, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has worked on NRC projects to investigate methods and tools for the probabilistic modeling of digital systems, as documented mainly in NUREG/CR-6962 and NUREG/CR-6997. However, the scope of this research principally focused on hardware failures, with limited reviews of software failure experience and software reliability methods. NRC also sponsored research at the Ohio State University investigating the modeling of digital systems using dynamic PRA methods. These efforts, documented in NUREG/CR-6901, NUREG/CR-6942, and NUREG/CR-6985, included a functional representation of the system's software but did not explicitly address failure modes caused by software defects or by inadequate design requirements. An important identified research need is to establish a commonly accepted basis for incorporating the behavior of software into digital I&C system reliability models for use in PRAs. To address this need, BNL is exploring the inclusion of software failures into the reliability models of digital I&C systems, such that their contribution to the risk of the associated NPP can be assessed.

  6. Study on the Accidental Rupture of Hot Leg or Surge Line in SBO Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kun Zhang; Xuewu Cao [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

    2006-07-01

    The postulated total station blackout accident (SBO) of PWR NPP with 600 MWe in China is analyzed as the base case using SCDAP/RELAP5 code. Then the hot leg or surge line are assumed to rupture before the lower head of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) ruptures, and the progressions are analyzed in detail comparing with the base case. The results show that the accidental rupture of hot leg or surge line will greatly influence the progression of accident. The probability of hot leg or surge line rupture in intentional depressurization is also studied in this paper, which provides a suggestion to the development of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG). (authors)

  7. Application of different nuclides in retrospective dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konheiser, J.; Mittag, S.; Viehrig, H.W.; Gleisberg, B.

    2011-07-01

    The activities of nuclides produced via the neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel are used to validate respective fluence calculations. Niobium, nickel, and technetium isotopes from RPV trepans of the decommissioned NPP Greifswald (VVER-440) have been analyzed. The activities were determined by TRAMO (Monte-Carlo) fluence calculations, newly applying 640 neutron-energy groups and ENDF/B7 data. Relative to earlier results, fluences up to 20% higher have been computed, leading to somewhat better agreement between measurement and calculation, particularly in the case of Tc-99. (authors)

  8. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weed, H.C.; Bazan, F.; Fontanilla, J.; Garrison, J.; Rego, J.; Winslow, A.M.

    1981-02-01

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of /sup 3/H, /sup 95m/Tc, and /sup 85/Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for /sup 85/Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for /sup 85/Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta.

  9. Completed Projects Table.xlsx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Completed Projects 2005-Present Approved Actual Soil and Water Remediation Soil and Water Remediation ANLE-0030 a 28 $ 30 $ 2007 2007 Yes Yes Yes Nuclear Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning ANLE-0040 18 $ 14 $ 2009 2010 Yes Yes Yes Nuclear Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Building 310 ANLE-0040.NEW.R1.1 13 $ 8 $ 2011 2011 Yes Yes Yes Nuclear Facility D & D Building 330 ANLE-0040.NEW.R1.2 34 $ 15 $ 2011 2011 Yes Yes Yes Ashtabula, OH Soil and Water Remediation Soil and Water

  10. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-012.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 SECTION A. Project Title: Water Security Test Bed (WSTB) SECTION B. Project Description: This project was extensively described in Environmental Checklists (ECs) Idaho National Laboratory (INL)-13-014 (Overarching [OA] 5) and INL-13-014 Revision (R) 1 (OA 5). Upon review, it was determined that additional planning and detail was required to fully describe the project and associated activities. Both INL-13-014 and R1 to that EC are canceled; this EC will replace them. Future revisions may

  11. Microsoft Word - FLYSHEET

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PAD-ARR-0011/R1 C-340 ARRA Lessons Learned Report September 2011 Final Lessons Learned Report C-340 Recovery Act Project U.S. Department of Energy Paducah, Kentucky, Site PAD-ARR-0011/R1 C-340 ARRA Lessons Learned Report September 2011 2 TITLE: Egress Routes and Emergency Exits LESSON ID: 2010Y-LL-LATA-0050 ORIGINATOR: LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC DATE: 11-30-2010 CONTACT: Kelly Ausbrooks, 270-441-5123 CLASSIFIER: Tony Hudson REVIEWER: N/A STATEMENT: Emergency egress routes

  12. I I I I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 * I ' ' r 'I i . i ) r 1 I I I I ' i \ _] r 1 r I I 1 i : ! ' ' ' GROUND w*.4 TER PROJECT -~ DOE/AL/62350-57 \ REV. 2 BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT THE URANIUM MILL T AIUNGS SITE NEAR GUNNISON, COLORADO June 1996 Prepared by the U.S. Departmentof Energy Albuquerque, New Mexico INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE Tl)is report l!as been reproduced from the best available copy. Available in paper copy and microfiche Number of pages .in this report: 160 DOE ;md DOE contractors

  13. FL J. Smith, Jr.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ct. B. Duillap (THPJJs L. Kassel) FL J. Smith, Jr. c c Kelley from R. 1. Cook, Kslley from R. 1. Cook, J J cit cit In accordawe with Secret memorandum dated October , 1951 ta IA. E. In accordawe with Secret rwmorandnn dated October , 1951 ta IA. E. Qapletad Uranium for HAA and ML," we are Ylepletad Uranium for HAA and ML," we are obligated to fill the following orders obligated to fill the following orders North American Aviation North American Aviation . . One Inch roes One Inch roes

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced RISMC toolkit that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  15. Methodology of Internal Assessment of Uncertainty and Extension to Neutron Kinetics/Thermal-Hydraulics Coupled Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F.; Giannotti, W.; Ivanov, K.

    2005-02-15

    The best-estimate calculation results from complex system codes are affected by approximations that are unpredictable without the use of computational tools that account for the various sources of uncertainty.The code with (the capability of) internal assessment of uncertainty (CIAU) has been previously proposed by the University of Pisa to realize the integration between a qualified system code and an uncertainty methodology and to supply proper uncertainty bands each time a nuclear power plant (NPP) transient scenario is calculated. The derivation of the methodology and the results achieved by the use of CIAU are discussed to demonstrate the main features and capabilities of the method.In a joint effort between the University of Pisa and The Pennsylvania State University, the CIAU method has been recently extended to evaluate the uncertainty of coupled three-dimensional neutronics/thermal-hydraulics calculations. The result is CIAU-TN. The feasibility of the approach has been demonstrated, and sample results related to the turbine trip transient in the Peach Bottom NPP are shown. Notwithstanding that the full implementation and use of the procedure requires a database of errors not available at the moment, the results give an idea of the errors expected from the present computational tools.

  16. Use of collaboration software to improve nuclear power plant outage management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, Shawn

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) refueling outages create some of the most challenging activities the utilities face in both tracking and coordinating thousands of activities in a short period of time. Other challenges, including nuclear safety concerns arising from atypical system configurations and resource allocation issues, can create delays and schedule overruns, driving up outage costs. Today the majority of the outage communication is done using processes that do not take advantage of advances in modern technologies that enable enhanced communication, collaboration and information sharing. Some of the common practices include: runners that deliver paper-based requests for approval, radios, telephones, desktop computers, daily schedule printouts, and static whiteboards that are used to display information. Many gains have been made to reduce the challenges facing outage coordinators; however; new opportunities can be realized by utilizing modern technological advancements in communication and information tools that can enhance the collective situational awareness of plant personnel leading to improved decision-making. Ongoing research as part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS) has been targeting NPP outage improvement. As part of this research, various applications of collaborative software have been demonstrated through pilot project utility partnerships. Collaboration software can be utilized as part of the larger concept of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Collaborative software can be used for emergent issue resolution, Outage Control Center (OCC) displays, and schedule monitoring. Use of collaboration software enables outage staff and subject matter experts (SMEs) to view and update critical outage information from any location on site or off.

  17. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    The Surtsey Test Facility is used to perform scaled experiments simulating High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). The experiments investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load. The results from Zion and Surry experiments can be extrapolated to other Westinghouse plants, but predicted containment loads cannot be generalized to all Combustion Engineering (CE) plants. Five CE plants have melt dispersal flow paths which circumvent the main mitigation of containment compartmentalization in most Westinghouse PWRs. Calvert Cliff-like plant geometries and the impact of codispersed water were addressed as part of the DCH issue resolution. Integral effects tests were performed with a scale model of the Calvert Cliffs NPP inside the Surtsey test vessel. The experiments investigated the effects of codispersal of water, steam, and molten core stimulant materials on DCH loads under prototypic accident conditions and plant configurations. The results indicated that large amounts of coejected water reduced the DCH load by a small amount. Large amounts of debris were dispersed from the cavity to the upper dome (via the annular gap). 22 refs., 84 figs., 30 tabs.

  18. Human-In-The-Loop Simulation in Support of Long-Term Sustainability of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce P

    2015-01-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration. The NPP owners and operators realize that this analog technology represents a significant challenge to sustaining the operation of the current fleet of NPPs. Beyond control systems, new technologies are needed to monitor and characterize the effects of aging and degradation in critical areas of key structures, systems, and components. The objective of the efforts sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy new digital technologies for II&C architectures and provide monitoring capabilities to ensure the continued safe, reliable, and economic operation of the nations NPPs.

  19. Synergistic Smart Fuel For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Ali; Steven L . Garrett

    2013-10-01

    In March 2011, an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale struck Japan with its epicenter on the northeast coast, near the Tohoku region. In addition to the immense physical destruction and casualties across the country, several nuclear power plants (NPP) were affected. It was the Fukushima Daiichi NPP that experienced the most severe and irreversible damage. The earthquake brought the reactors at Fukushima to an automatic shutdown and because the power transmission lines were damaged, emergency diesel generators (EDGs) were activated to ensure that there was continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was being successfully managed until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to the reactors.2 At this point, the situation became critical. There was a loss of the sensors and instrumentation within the reactor that could have provided valuable information to guide the operators to make informed decisions and avoid the unfortunate events that followed. In the light of these events, we have developed and tested a potential self-powered thermoacoustic system, which will have the ability to serve as a temperature sensor and can transmit data independently of electronic networks. Such a device is synergistic with the harsh environment of the nuclear reactor as it utilizes the heat from the nuclear fuel to provide the input power.

  20. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisner, R.; Melin, A.; Burress, T.; Fugate, D.; Holcomb, D.; Wilgen, J.; Miller, J.; Wilson, D.; Silva, P.; Whitlow, L.; Peretz, F.

    2012-09-15

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate improved reliability and increased performance made possible by deeply embedding instrumentation and controls (I&C) in nuclear power plant (NPP) components and systems. The project is employing a highly instrumented canned rotor, magnetic bearing, fluoride salt pump as its I&C technology demonstration platform. I&C is intimately part of the basic millisecond-by-millisecond functioning of the system; treating I&C as an integral part of the system design is innovative and will allow significant improvement in capabilities and performance. As systems become more complex and greater performance is required, traditional I&C design techniques become inadequate and more advanced I&C needs to be applied. New I&C techniques enable optimal and reliable performance and tolerance of noise and uncertainties in the system rather than merely monitoring quasistable performance. Traditionally, I&C has been incorporated in NPP components after the design is nearly complete; adequate performance was obtained through over-design. By incorporating I&C at the beginning of the design phase, the control system can provide superior performance and reliability and enable designs that are otherwise impossible. This report describes the progress and status of the project and provides a conceptual design overview for the platform to demonstrate the performance and reliability improvements enabled by advanced embedded I&C.

  1. Seismic Data Gathering and Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Three recent earthquakes in the last seven years have exceeded their design basis earthquake values (so it is implied that damage to SSCs should have occurred). These seismic events were recorded at North Anna (August 2011, detailed information provided in [Virginia Electric and Power Company Memo]), Fukushima Daichii and Daini (March 2011 [TEPCO 1]), and Kaswazaki-Kariwa (2007, [TEPCO 2]). However, seismic walk downs at some of these plants indicate that very little damage occurred to safety class systems and components due to the seismic motion. This report presents seismic data gathered for two of the three events mentioned above and recommends a path for using that data for two purposes. One purpose is to determine what margins exist in current industry standard seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) tools. The second purpose is the use the data to validated seismic site response tools and SSI tools. The gathered data represents free field soil and in-structure acceleration time histories data. Gathered data also includes elastic and dynamic soil properties and structural drawings. Gathering data and comparing with existing models has potential to identify areas of uncertainty that should be removed from current seismic analysis and SPRA approaches. Removing uncertainty (to the extent possible) from SPRAs will allow NPP owners to make decisions on where to reduce risk. Once a realistic understanding of seismic response is established for a nuclear power plant (NPP) then decisions on needed protective measures, such as SI, can be made.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-09-30

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  3. Progress and Status of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant's New Solid Waste Management and Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rausch, J.; Henderson, R.W.; Penkov, V.

    2008-07-01

    A considerable amount of dry radioactive waste from former NPP operation has accumulated up to date and is presently stored at the Ignalina NPP site, Lithuania. Current storage capacities are nearly exhausted and more waste is to come from future decommissioning of the two RMBKtype reactors. Additionally, the existing storage facilities does not comply to the state-of-the-art technology for handling and storage of radioactive waste. In 2005, INPP faced this situation of a need for waste processing and subsequent interim storage of these wastes by contracting NUKEM with the design, construction, installation and commissioning of new waste management and storage facilities. The subject of this paper is to describe the scope and the status of the new solid waste management and storage facilities at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. In summary: The turnkey contract for the design, supply and commission of the SWMSF was awarded in December 2005. The realisation of the project was initially planned within 48 month. The basic design was finished in August 2007 and the Technical Design Documentation and Preliminary Safety Analyses Report was provided to Authorities in October 2007. The construction license is expected in July 2008. The procurement phase was started in August 2007, start of onsite activities is expected in November 2007. The start of operation of the SWMSF is scheduled for end of 2009. (authors)

  4. Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

    2009-11-09

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  5. Human-In-The-Loop Simulation in Support of Long-Term Sustainability of Light Water Reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hallbert, Bruce P

    2015-01-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration. The NPP owners and operators realize that this analog technology represents a significant challenge to sustaining the operation of the current fleet of NPPs. Beyond control systems, new technologies are neededmore » to monitor and characterize the effects of aging and degradation in critical areas of key structures, systems, and components. The objective of the efforts sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy new digital technologies for II&C architectures and provide monitoring capabilities to ensure the continued safe, reliable, and economic operation of the nation’s NPPs.« less

  6. Westinghouse Waste Simulation and Optimization Software Tool - 13493

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mennicken, Kim [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Dudenstrasse 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Dudenstrasse 44, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Aign, Joerg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)] [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Global Waste Management, Tarpenring 6, D-22419 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste is produced during NPP operation and NPP D and D. Different kinds of waste with different volumes and properties have to be treated. Finding a technically and commercially optimized waste treatment concept is a difficult and time consuming process. The Westinghouse waste simulation and optimization software tool is an approach to study the total life cycle cost of any waste management facility. The tool enables the user of the simulation and optimization software to plan processes and storage buildings and to identify bottlenecks in the overall waste management design before starting detailed planning activities. Furthermore, application of the software enables the user to optimize the number of treatment systems, to determine the minimum design capacity for onsite storage facilities, to identify bottlenecks in the overall design and to identify the most cost-effective treatment paths by maintaining optimal waste treatment technologies. In combination with proven waste treatment equipment and integrated waste management solutions, the waste simulation and optimization software provides reliable qualitative results that lead to an effective planning and minimization of the total project planning risk of any waste management activity. (authors)

  7. Plant computer applications 'design and implementation tools' set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anikanov, S. S.; Stolyetniy, I. V.; Tregubov, M. I.; Guslyakov, O. L.; Gladkov, Y. I.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes functionality of the application programs' development tool, which is intended to support the full scope of the NPP plant computer applications' design process. The Application Development Tools' Set (ADTS), described in this paper, refers to a set of tools intended to capture functional requirements for applications and support design process from definition of design basis up to final testing of developed applications. There are several tools developed by Westinghouse that facilitate design of application software on different stages of design process. Those are: NAPDT - Nuclear Application Development Tool; SDODT - Simplified Display Object Development Tool; OPAL - Test case execution and documenting tool; The main idea of ADTS is to combine the aforementioned tools into one software environment with other Common out-of-shelf (COT) software to facilitate and expedite NPP plant computer applications. Combination of the software tools included into ADTS satisfies industry requirements for the application software intended for use in the Category B and C systems /2 - 4/. (authors)

  8. Human-In-The-Loop Simulation in Support of Long-Term Sustainability of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce P

    2015-01-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration. The NPP owners and operators realize that this analog technology represents a significant challenge to sustaining the operation of the current fleet of NPPs. Beyond control systems, new technologies are needed to monitor and characterize the effects of aging and degradation in critical areas of key structures, systems, and components. The objective of the efforts sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy new digital technologies for II&C architectures and provide monitoring capabilities to ensure the continued safe, reliable, and economic operation of the nation’s NPPs.

  9. Production of extremely low volatile organic compounds from biogenic emissions: Measured yields and atmospheric implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jokinen, Tuija; Berndt, Torsten; Makkonen, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Junninen, Heikki; Paasonen, Pauli; Stratmann, Frank; Herrmann, Hartmut; Guenther, Alex B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, M.; Ehn, Mikael K.; Sipila, Mikko

    2015-06-09

    Extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOC) are suggested to promote aerosol particle formation and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production in the atmosphere. We show that the capability of biogenic VOC (BVOC) to produce ELVOC depends strongly on their chemical structure and relative oxidant levels. BVOC with an endocyclic double bond, representative emissions from, e.g., boreal forests, efficiently produce ELVOC from ozonolysis. Compounds with exocyclic double bonds or acyclic compounds including isoprene, emission representative of the tropics, produce minor quantities of ELVOC, and the role of OH radical oxidation is relatively larger. Implementing these findings into a global modeling framework shows that detailed assessment of ELVOC production pathways is crucial for understanding biogenic secondary organic aerosol and atmospheric CCN formation.

  10. The plant cell wall decomposing machinery underlies the functional diversity of forest fungi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastwood, Daniel C.; Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Majcherczyk, Andrzej; Schneider, Patrick; Aerts, Andrea; Asiegbu, Fred O.; Baker, Scott E.; Barry, Kerrie; Bendiksby, Mika; Blumentritt, Melanie; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Cullen, Dan; Vries, Ronald P. de; Gathman, Allen; Goodell, Barry; Henrissat, Bernard; Ihrmark, Katarina; Kauserud, H; vard; Kohler, Annegret; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lavin, Jos; L.; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lindquist, Erika; Lilly, Walt; Lucas, Susan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Oguiza, Jos; A.; Park, Jongsun; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Riley, Robert; Rosling, Anna; Salamov, Asaf; Schmidt, Olaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Skrede, Inger; Stenlid, Jan; Wiebenga, Ad; Xie, Xinfeng; K; es, Ursula; Hibbett, David S.; Hoffmeister, Dirk; H; gberg, Nils; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Watkinson, Sarah C.

    2011-05-01

    Brown rot decay removes cellulose and hemicellulose from wood?residual lignin contributing up to 30percent of forest soil carbon?and is derived from an ancestral white rot saprotrophy in which both lignin and cellulose are decomposed. Comparative and functional genomics of the ?dry rot? fungus Serpula lacrymans, derived from forest ancestors, demonstrated that the evolution of both ectomycorrhizal biotrophy and brown rot saprotrophy were accompanied by reductions and losses in specific protein families, suggesting adaptation to an intercellular interaction with plant tissue. Transcriptome and proteome analysis also identified differences in wood decomposition in S. lacrymans relative to the brown rot Postia placenta. Furthermore, fungal nutritional mode diversification suggests that the boreal forest biome originated via genetic coevolution of above- and below-ground biota

  11. Science Plan Biogenic Aerosols – Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petäjä, T

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles impact human health in urban environments, while on regional and global scales they can affect climate patterns, the hydrological cycle, and the intensity of radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface. In spite of recent advances in the understanding of aerosol formation processes and the links between aerosol dynamics and biosphere-atmosphere-climate interactions, great challenges remain in the analysis of related processes on a global scale. Boreal forests, situated in a circumpolar belt in the northern latitudes throughout the United States, Canada, Russia and Scandinavia, are among the most active areas of atmospheric aerosol formation among all biomes. The formation of aerosol particles and their growth to the sizes of cloud condensation nuclei in these areas are associated with biogenic volatile organic emissions from vegetation and soil.

  12. ACBEDGF1DIH P Q2RSTDVU@DVW RYX1`bacSedVagf ShFiSpaqSTr1Hs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & WvD HkwdD r1H Spaqr1acUSpHa UWvrBEr1H rW HbDrwBvWvrH @jh B k l &22; m n dr1p UDo dr1wbUTDr pqq rWbDW D...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ishida, K. (1) Karim-Panahi, K. (1) Kennedy, R. (1) Lin, Chi Wen (1) Lin, Chi-Wen (1) Murray, R.C. (1) Suzuki, K. (1) Wang, C.Y (1) Wang, Chung Yi (1) Save Results Save this...

  14. Adsorption study for uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Rupert, M.C.; Harris, M.J.; Duran, A.

    1995-01-01

    Six adsorbents were studied to determine their effectiveness in removing uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater. The bench column and batch (Kd) tests showed that uranium can be removed (>99.9%) by four adsorbents. Bone Charcoal (R1O22); F-1 Alumina (granular activated alumina); BIOFIX (immobilized biological agent); SOPBPLUS (mixed metal oxide); Filtrasorb 300 (granular activated carbon); and Zeolite (clinoptilolite).

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    S A (1) Montagna, J (1) Panek, A F (1) Parker, K M (1) Podolski, W F (1) Shearer, J (1) Smith, G W (1) Smyk, E B (1) Snyder, R (1) Swift, W (1) Save Results Save this search to My...

  16. Electric current-producing device having sulfone-based electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Sun, Xiao-Guang (Tempe, AZ)

    2010-11-16

    Electrolytic solvents and applications of such solvents including electric current-producing devices. For example, a solvent can include a sulfone compound of R1--SO2--R2, with R1 being an alkyl group and R2 a partially oxygenated alkyl group, to exhibit high chemical and thermal stability and high oxidation resistance. For another example, a battery can include, between an anode and a cathode, an electrolyte which includes ionic electrolyte salts and a non-aqueous electrolyte solvent which includes a non-symmetrical, non-cyclic sulfone. The sulfone has a formula of R1--SO2--R2, wherein R1 is a linear or branched alkyl or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms, and R2 is a linear or branched or partially or fully fluorinated linear or branched oxygen containing alkyl group having 1 to 7 carbon atoms. The electrolyte can include an electrolyte co-solvent and an electrolyte additive for protective layer formation.

  17. Acquisition Guide

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Guide - - - -- - - - -- - - - -- - - -- -- - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - C h a p t e r 1.4 (September 2015) Source Evaluation Board (SEB) Secretariat and Knowledge Manager REFERENCES Guiding Principles ~ Establishment of a SEB Secretariat and Knowledge Management position will improve both the Department' s procurement system and its management of knowledge attained by the Department' s procurement personnel. Department of Energy (DOE) report on "Report on

  18. The sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere to climatic change: A simulation of the middle Holocene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, J.A.

    1994-12-01

    A process-based ecosystem model, DEMETER, is used to simulate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere to changes in climate. In this study, DEMETER is applied to the two following climatic regimes: (1) the modern observed climate and (2) a simulated mid-Holocene climate (6000 years before present). The mid-Holocene climate is simulated using the GENESIS global climate model, where shifts in the Earth`s orbital parameters result in warmer northern continents and enhanced monsoons in Asia, North Africa, and North America. DEMETER simulates large differences between modern and mid-Holocene vegetation cover: (1) mid-Holocene boreal forests extend farther poleward than present in much of Europe, Asia, and North America, and (2) mid-Holocene North African grasslands extend substantially farther north than present. The simulated patterns of mid-Holocene vegetation are consistent with many features of the paleobotanical record. Simulated mid-Holocene global net primary productivity is approximately 3% larger than present, largely due to the increase of boreal forest and tropical grasslands relative to tundra and desert. Global vegetation carbon is higher at 6 kyr B.P. compared to present by roughly the same amount (4%). Mid-Holocene global litter carbon is larger than present by 10%, while global soil carbon is approximately 1% less. Despite the regional changes in productivity and carbon storage the simulated total carbon storage potential of the terrestrial biosphere (not including changes in peat) does not change significantly between the two simulations. 53 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Comparison of Global Model Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) with Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Manipulation Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M; Randerson, Jim; Fung, Inez; Thornton, Peter E; Covey, Curtis; Bonan, Gordon; Running, Steven; Norby, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulation experiments have been carried out at a handful of sites to gauge the response of the biosphere to significant increases in atmospheric [CO{sub 2}]. Early synthesis results from four temperate forest sites suggest that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) is conserved across a broad range of productivity with a stimulation at the median of 23 {+-} 2% when the surrounding air [CO{sub 2}] was raised to 550{approx}ppm. As a part of the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), a community-based model-data comparison activity, the authors have performed a global FACE modeling experiment using two terrestrial biogeochemistry modules, CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN, coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The two models were forced with an improved NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set and reconstructed atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] and N deposition data through 1997. At the beginning of 1997 in the transient simulations, global atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] was abruptly raised to 550{approx}ppm, the target value used at the FACE sites. In the control runs, [CO{sub 2}] continued to rise following observations until 2004, after which it was held constant out to year 2100. In both simulations, the last 25 years of reanalysis forcing and a constant N deposition were applied after year 2004. Across all forest biomes, the NPP responses from both models are weaker than those reported for the four FACE sites. Moreover, model responses vary widely geographically with a decreasing trend of NPP increases from 40{sup o}N to 70{sup o}N. For CLM3-CASA, the largest responses occur in arid regions of western North America and central Asia, suggesting that responses are most strongly influenced by increased water use efficiency for this model. CLM3-CN exhibits consistently weaker responses than CLM3-CASA' with the strongest responses in central Asia, but significantly constrained by N limitation. C-LAMP is a sub-project of the Computational Climate Science End Station led by Dr. Warren Washington, using computing resources at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS).

  20. Comparative genomic insights into ecophysiology of neutrophilic, microaerophilic iron oxidizing bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Shingo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Powell, Deborah H.; Krepski, Sean T.; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Chan, Clara S.

    2015-11-13

    Neutrophilic microaerophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are thought to play a significant role in cycling of carbon, iron and associated elements in both freshwater and marine iron-rich environments. However, the roles of the neutrophilic microaerophilic FeOB are still poorly understood due largely to the difficulty of cultivation and lack of functional gene markers. Here, we analyze the genomes of two freshwater neutrophilic microaerophilic stalk-forming FeOB, Ferriphaselus amnicola OYT1 and Ferriphaselus strain R-1. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that these are distinct species within Betaproteobacteria; we describe strain R-1 and propose the name F. globulitus. We compare the genomes to those of two freshwater Betaproteobacterial and three marine Zetaproteobacterial FeOB isolates in order to look for mechanisms common to all FeOB, or just stalk-forming FeOB. The OYT1 and R-1 genomes both contain homologs to cyc2, which encodes a protein that has been shown to oxidize Fe in the acidophilic FeOB, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. This c-type cytochrome common to all seven microaerophilic FeOB isolates, strengthening the case for its common utility in the Fe oxidation pathway. In contrast, the OYT1 and R-1 genomes lack mto genes found in other freshwater FeOB. OYT1 and R-1 both have genes that suggest they can oxidize sulfur species. Both have the genes necessary to fix carbon by the Calvin–Benson– Basshom pathway, while only OYT1 has the genes necessary to fix nitrogen. The stalk-forming FeOB share xag genes that may help form the polysaccharide structure of stalks. Both OYT1 and R-1 make a novel biomineralization structure, short rod-shaped Fe oxyhydroxides much smaller than their stalks; these oxides are constantly shed, and may be a vector for C, P, and metal transport to downstream environments. Lastly, our results show that while different FeOB are adapted to particular niches, freshwater and marine FeOB likely share common mechanisms for Fe oxidation electron transport and biomineralization pathways.

  1. Comparative genomic insights into ecophysiology of neutrophilic, microaerophilic iron oxidizing bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kato, Shingo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Powell, Deborah H.; Krepski, Sean T.; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Chan, Clara S.

    2015-11-13

    Neutrophilic microaerophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are thought to play a significant role in cycling of carbon, iron and associated elements in both freshwater and marine iron-rich environments. However, the roles of the neutrophilic microaerophilic FeOB are still poorly understood due largely to the difficulty of cultivation and lack of functional gene markers. Here, we analyze the genomes of two freshwater neutrophilic microaerophilic stalk-forming FeOB, Ferriphaselus amnicola OYT1 and Ferriphaselus strain R-1. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that these are distinct species within Betaproteobacteria; we describe strain R-1 and propose the name F. globulitus. We compare the genomes to those of two freshwatermore » Betaproteobacterial and three marine Zetaproteobacterial FeOB isolates in order to look for mechanisms common to all FeOB, or just stalk-forming FeOB. The OYT1 and R-1 genomes both contain homologs to cyc2, which encodes a protein that has been shown to oxidize Fe in the acidophilic FeOB, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. This c-type cytochrome common to all seven microaerophilic FeOB isolates, strengthening the case for its common utility in the Fe oxidation pathway. In contrast, the OYT1 and R-1 genomes lack mto genes found in other freshwater FeOB. OYT1 and R-1 both have genes that suggest they can oxidize sulfur species. Both have the genes necessary to fix carbon by the Calvin–Benson– Basshom pathway, while only OYT1 has the genes necessary to fix nitrogen. The stalk-forming FeOB share xag genes that may help form the polysaccharide structure of stalks. Both OYT1 and R-1 make a novel biomineralization structure, short rod-shaped Fe oxyhydroxides much smaller than their stalks; these oxides are constantly shed, and may be a vector for C, P, and metal transport to downstream environments. Lastly, our results show that while different FeOB are adapted to particular niches, freshwater and marine FeOB likely share common mechanisms for Fe oxidation electron transport and biomineralization pathways.« less

  2. Handbook of human-reliability analysis with emphasis on nuclear power plant applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, A D; Guttmann, H E

    1983-08-01

    The primary purpose of the Handbook is to present methods, models, and estimated human error probabilities (HEPs) to enable qualified analysts to make quantitative or qualitative assessments of occurrences of human errors in nuclear power plants (NPPs) that affect the availability or operational reliability of engineered safety features and components. The Handbook is intended to provide much of the modeling and information necessary for the performance of human reliability analysis (HRA) as a part of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of NPPs. Although not a design guide, a second purpose of the Handbook is to enable the user to recognize error-likely equipment design, plant policies and practices, written procedures, and other human factors problems so that improvements can be considered. The Handbook provides the methodology to identify and quantify the potential for human error in NPP tasks.

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A; Barker, Alan M; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Albright, Austin P; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years [1]. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.

  4. A creep-damage model for mesoscale simulations of concrete expansion-degradation phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorla, Alain B; Le Pape, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Long-term performance of aging concrete in nuclear power plants (NPPs) requires a careful examination of the physical phenomena taking place in the material. Concrete under high neutron irradiation is subjected to large irreversible deformations as well as mechanical damage, caused by a swelling of the aggregates. However, these results, generally obtained in accelerated conditions in test reactors, cannot be directly applied to NPP irradiated structures, i.e., the biological shield, operating conditions due to difference in time scale and environmental conditions (temperature, humidity). Mesoscale numerical simulations are performed to separate the underlying mechanisms and their interactions. The cement paste creep-damage model accounts for the effect of the loading rate on the apparent damage properties of the material and uses an event-based approach to capture the competition between creep and damage. The model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the literature and shows a good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Technical Exchange on Improved Design and Performance of High Level Waste Melters - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SK Sundaram; ML Elliott; D Bickford

    1999-11-19

    SIA Radon is responsible for management of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Central Russia. In cooperation with Minatom organizations Radon carries out R and D programs on treatment of simulated high level waste (HLW) as well. Radon scientists deal with a study of materials for LILW, HLW, and Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) wastes immobilization, and development and testing of processes and technologies for waste treatment and disposal. Radon is mostly experienced in LILW vitrification. This experience can be carried over to HLW vitrification especially in field of melting systems. The melter chosen as a basic unit for the vitrification plant is a cold crucible. Later on Radon experience in LILW vitrification as well as our results on simulated HLW vitrification are briefly described.

  6. Activities in Support of Continuing the Service of Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The license renewal process in the U.S. is outlined and its current status provided. Operating experience related to performance of the concrete structures is presented. Basic components of a program to manage aging of the concrete structures are identified and described: (1) Degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; (2) Assessment and remediation: i.e., component selection, in- service inspection, non-destructive examinations, and remedial actions; and (3) Estimation of performance at present or some future point in time: i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk. Finally, areas are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

  7. Using Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Acceptance of Carbon Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Nove, Carol A.

    2014-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting studies for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for volumetric examination of nuclear power plant (NPP) components. This particular study focused on evaluating the use of UT on carbon steel plate welds. Welding fabrication flaws included a combination of planar and volumetric types, e.g., incomplete fusion, lack of penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array (PA) UT techniques applied primarily for detection and flaw type characterization. This paper will discuss the results of using UT in lieu of RT for detection and classification of fabrication flaws in carbon steel plate welds.

  8. Development of a new flux map processing code for moveable detector system in PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Lu, H.; Li, J.; Dang, Z.; Zhang, X.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an introduction to the development of the flux map processing code MAPLE developed by China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute (CNPPJ), China Guangdong Nuclear Power Group (CGN). The method to get the three-dimensional 'measured' power distribution according to measurement signal has also been described. Three methods, namely, Weight Coefficient Method (WCM), Polynomial Expand Method (PEM) and Thin Plane Spline (TPS) method, have been applied to fit the deviation between measured and predicted results for two-dimensional radial plane. The measured flux map data of the LINGAO nuclear power plant (NPP) is processed using MAPLE as a test case to compare the effectiveness of the three methods, combined with a 3D neutronics code COCO. Assembly power distribution results show that MAPLE results are reasonable and satisfied. More verification and validation of the MAPLE code will be carried out in future. (authors)

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION MONITORING IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - HISTORY AND RESULTS 25 YEARS AFTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    This article describes results of the radiation environmental monitoring performed in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ) during the period following the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. This article presents a brief overview of five comprehensive reports generated under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 (Washington Savannah River Company LLC, Subcontract No. AC55559N, SOW No. ON8778) and summarizes characteristics of the ChEZ and its post-accident status and the history of development of the radiation monitoring research in the ChEZ is described. This article addresses characteristics of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ, its major goals and objectives, and changes of these goals and objectives in the course of time, depending on the tasks associated with the phase of mitigation of the ChNPP accident consequences. The results of the radiation monitoring in the ChEZ during the last 25 years are also provided.

  10. Safety Assessment for a Surface Repository in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone - Methodology for Assessing Disposal under Intervention Conditions - 13476

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haverkamp, B.; Krone, J.; Shybetskyi, I.

    2013-07-01

    The Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (RWDF) Buryakovka was constructed in 1986 as part of the intervention measures after the accident at Chernobyl NPP (ChNPP). Today, RWDF Buryakovka is still being operated but its maximum capacity is nearly reached. Plans for enlargement of the facility exist since more than 10 years but have not been implemented yet. In the framework of an European Commission Project DBE Technology GmbH prepared a safety analysis report of the facility in its current state (SAR) and a preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) based on the planned enlargement. Due to its history RWDF Buryakovka does not fully comply with today's best international practices and the latest Ukrainian regulations in this area. The most critical aspects are its inventory of long-lived radionuclides, and the non-existent multi-barrier waste confinement system. A significant part of the project was dedicated, therefore, to the development of a methodology for the safety assessment taking into consideration the facility's special situation and to reach an agreement with all stakeholders involved in the later review and approval procedure of the safety analysis reports. Main aspect of the agreed methodology was to analyze the safety, not strictly based on regulatory requirements but on the assessment of the actual situation of the facility including its location within the Exclusion Zone. For both safety analysis reports, SAR and PSAR, the assessment of the long-term safety led to results that were either within regulatory limits or within the limits allowing for a specific situational evaluation by the regulator. (authors)

  11. Accident tolerant fuel analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis; Chichester, Heather; Johns, Jesse; Teague, Melissa; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced ''RISMC toolkit'' that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional ''accident-tolerant'' (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

  12. Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced RISMC toolkit that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional accident-tolerant (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

  13. Lessons Learned from Raw Treatment in the Slovak Republic - Minimization for Final Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanusik, V.; Hladky, E.; Krajc, T.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M.; Urbanec, M. [Milan Zatkulak, VUJE, a.s., Trnava (Slovakia); Ehn, L.; Kover, M.; Remias, V.; Slezak, M. [JAVYS, a.s., Bohunice (Slovakia)

    2008-07-01

    This paper is referring about the utilization of technologies for the treatment and conditioning of low and intermediate level RAW from operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Slovakia. This experience represents more than 116 reactor years of NPP operation, mainly of NPPs equipped with VVER 440 reactors, 30 years of decommissioning activities, 27 years of development and operation of technologies for the treatment and conditioning of RAW and 7 years of LLW and ILW final repository operation. These technologies are located in two localities: Jaslovske Bohunice and Mochovce. The complex treatment and conditioning center (cementation, bituminization, incineration, vitrification, fragmentation and compacting) for almost all types of radioactive waste is located in Jaslovske Bohunice NPP site. The treatment and conditioning center for liquid radioactive waste (cementation and bituminization) and the surface type repository for LLW and ILW final disposal are located in Mochovce area. The treated waste forms are disposed to repository in cubical Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) containers. The experience from the phase of technology development and the phase of technology modifications for various types of RAW, the experience from long term operation of technologies and the experience from transportation of original and packed wastes are described in this paper. The method of optimally combined technology utilization in order to maximize the radionuclide inventory at the same time with respect of disposal safety limitations of repository is described, too. The significant RAW volume reduction for final disposal was achieved through mediation of the combination of treatment and conditioning technologies. The disposal of treated RAW in cubic FRC containers allowed the optimal utilization of volume and radiological capacity of LLW and ILW repository in Mochovce and the fulfillment of determined safety requirements at the same time. (authors)

  14. Periodic Verification of the Scaling Factor for Radwastes in Korean NPPs - 13294

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Yong Joon; Ahn, Hong Joo; Song, Byoung Chul; Song, Kyuseok

    2013-07-01

    According to the acceptance criteria for a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) listed in Notice No. 2012-53 of the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), specific concentrations of radionuclides inside a drum has to be identified and quantified. In 5 years of effort, scaling factors were derived through destructive radiochemical analysis, and the dry active waste, spent resin, concentration bottom, spent filter, and sludge drums generated during 2004 ? 2008 were evaluated to identify radionuclide inventories. Eventually, only dry active waste among LILWs generated from Korean NPPs were first shipped to a permanent disposal facility on December 2010. For the LILWs generated after 2009, the radionuclides are being radiochemically quantified because the Notice clarifies that the certifications of the scaling factors should be verified biennially. During the operation of NPP, the radionuclides designated in the Notice are formed by neutron activation of primary coolant, reactor structural materials, corrosion products, and fission products released into primary coolant through defects or failures in fuel cladding. Eventually, since the radionuclides released into primary coolant are transported into the numerous auxiliary and support systems connected to primary system, the LILWs can be contaminated, and the radionuclides can have various concentration distributions. Thus, radioactive wastes, such as spent resin and dry active waste generated at various Korean NPP sites, were sampled at each site, and the activities of the regulated radionuclides present in the sample were determined using radiochemical methods. The scaling factors were driven on the basis of the activity ratios between a or ?-emitting nuclides and ?-emitting nuclides. The resulting concentrations were directly compared with the established scaling factors' data using statistical methods. In conclusions, the established scaling factors were verified with a reliability of within 2?, and the scaling factors will be applied for newly analyzed LILWs to evaluate the radionuclide inventories. (authors)

  15. Approach for Czech regulatory body to LBB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tendera, P.

    1997-04-01

    At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWER model 213) and Temelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW-WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufactures. The objective for the Czech LBB programme is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of these NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety facilities, too. For both Dukovany and Temolin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASME, CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No. 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quotes} and consists of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

  16. Approach of Czech regulatory body to LBB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tendera, P.

    1997-04-01

    At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany, NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWBFL model 213) and Tomelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW - WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufacturers. The objective of the Czech LBB program is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of there NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety Facilities too. For both Dukovany and Tomelin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASMF CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quote} and consist of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

  17. Large scale distribution of ultra high energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with zenith angles up to 80°

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-30

    In this study, we present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in the right ascension and one in the azimuth angle distributions, that are sensitive to modulations in right ascension and declination, respectively. The largest departure from isotropy appears in themore » $$E\\gt 8$$ EeV energy bin, with an amplitude for the first harmonic in right ascension $$r_{1}^{\\alpha }=(4.4\\pm 1.0)\\times {{10}^{-2}}$$, that has a chance probability $$P(\\geqslant r_{1}^{\\alpha })=6.4\\times {{10}^{-5}}$$, reinforcing the hint previously reported with vertical events alone.« less

  18. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  19. A.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , ' ,' c...: ' ,;c ' ? / /- r;*,,1. ..$ r;?; -. . 1 ., ! \1_~ *+ri t,i;e? 7 -? :Lj_r'c ;~_<;:::I; >rg _ _, __ -- . I I .-, :-- _ ..' .." ,eTCPT.!.i'iC t KG jiT(Sc-1_2-1405 --__,.: . . ..---.I _ .-__ _-_-... -- .-.-- +- ,i~.aZb.ili~." cor:t,rr:ct. .-.w- -2 _ __u___eu,- u .,-- --..-..Z-. f&,X&A. ,:.f r-L'?ic ..-a 1-1 an .i ': 12 --II .,-.w --- -- A. 2 2. 4 :, c d 6 t 5. 9 xc Ii. G, A 0, File z-~-E~ nr-tmkhnvon S-6-53 Cont3.V~toF by hand 3-5-55 Belnore ~Snama 3-6-53 As&

  20. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R-1 APPENDIX R CUMULATIVE IMPACTS: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY This appendix describes the cumulative impacts methodology for the U.S. Department of Energy's Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The appendix is organized into sections on (1) regulations and guidance, (2) previous studies, (3) history of land use at the Hanford Site and in surrounding regions, (4) future land use at the Hanford Site, (5) future land use in

  1. Reliable appropriate topology design for multiple-processor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    A Shift and Replace Graph which is a very appropriate candidate for the topology of a multiple-processor system is a function of two positive integers r and m, and is denoted as SRF(r,m). Pradhan and Reddy proved that the node connectivity of SRG(r,m) is at least r and also give a routing algorithm which generally requires 2m jumps if the number of node failures is no larger than r - 1. Later, Esfahanian and Hakimi proved that SRG(r,m) has maximum node connectivity 2r - 2 and give routing algorithms which require: (1) at most m + 3 + log/sub r/m jumps if 3 + log/sub r/m does not exceed m and the number of node failures is at most r - 1; (2) at most m + 5 + log/sub r/m jumps if 4 + log/sub r/m less than or equal to m and the number of node failures if less than or equal to 2r - 3; (3) all the other situations require no more than 2m jumps. By modifying the SRG(r,m), it is first proved that node connectivity of SRG(r,m) can be increased to: (1) 2r - 1 when r = 2, m = 2, and (2) 2r when (r = 2, m > 2) or (r > 2, m greater than or equal to 2, m greater than or equal to 2). The routing algorithms are also given for the modified SRG (r,m), which require at most 2m + 3 jumps when the number of node failures is less than or equal to 2r - 1.

  2. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-009.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 SECTION A. Project Title: U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development Post Irradiation Examination SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: The purpose of the first revision to this environmental checklist (EC) (see Idaho National Laboratory [INL]-13-039 R1) was to capture the work activities and environmental aspects of additional Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) activities, specifically dissolution of aluminum cladding and bend testing in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility

  3. Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

  4. Final Progress Report Regional Projections...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    October 1, 2010 to September 30, 2013 DOE AWARD D E - S C 00 0 5 3 5 6 Fundi ng Period: O c t o b e r 1, 2 0 1 0 t o S e p t e m b e r 3 0, 2 0 1 3 R e c i p i e n t : J o s e p ...

  5. Microsoft Word - pfam5000_revised.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Manuscript Prot-00199-2004-R1 Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches. John-Marc Chandonia 1 and Steven E. Brenner 1,2 Address for correspondence: Steven E. Brenner Department of Plant and Microbial Biology 461A Koshland Hall University of California Berkeley, CA 94720-3102 email: brenner@compbio.berkeley.edu Affiliations: 1 - Berkeley Structural Genomics Center, Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National

  6. Multi-spectral Infrared Computed Tomography (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Multi-spectral Infrared Computed Tomography Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multi-spectral Infrared Computed Tomography Authors: Bingham, Philip R [1] ; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E [1] ; Datskos, Panos G [1] ; Graham, David E [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2016-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1240578 DOE Contract Number: AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Electronic Imaging, San Francisco, CA, USA, 20160214, 20160214

  7. Near equilibrium distributions for beams with space charge in linear and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nonlinear periodic focusing systems (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Near equilibrium distributions for beams with space charge in linear and nonlinear periodic focusing systems Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 29, 2016 Title: Near equilibrium distributions for beams with space charge in linear and nonlinear periodic focusing systems Authors: Sonnad, Kiran G. [1] ; Cary, John R. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Center for Integrated

  8. Photocurrent response of B12As2 crystals to blue light, and its

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature- dependent electrical characterizations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Photocurrent response of B12As2 crystals to blue light, and its temperature- dependent electrical characterizations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Photocurrent response of B12As2 crystals to blue light, and its temperature- dependent electrical characterizations Authors: Gul, R. [1] Search SciTech Connect for author "Gul, R." Search SciTech Connect for ORCID

  9. Graded-Refractive-Index Glass-based Antireflective Coatings:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Broadband/Omnidirectional Light Harvesting and Self-Cleaning Characteristics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Graded-Refractive-Index Glass-based Antireflective Coatings: Broadband/Omnidirectional Light Harvesting and Self-Cleaning Characteristics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graded-Refractive-Index Glass-based Antireflective Coatings: Broadband/Omnidirectional Light Harvesting and Self-Cleaning Characteristics Authors: Aytug, Tolga [1] ; Lupini, Andrew R [1] ; Jellison Jr,

  10. In Situ SAXS Studies of Structural Relaxation of an Ordered Block Copolymer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Melt Following Cessation of Uniaxial Extensional Flow (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect In Situ SAXS Studies of Structural Relaxation of an Ordered Block Copolymer Melt Following Cessation of Uniaxial Extensional Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In Situ SAXS Studies of Structural Relaxation of an Ordered Block Copolymer Melt Following Cessation of Uniaxial Extensional Flow Authors: McCready, Erica M. ; Burghardt, Wesley R. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (NWU) Publication

  11. Sea urchins have teeth? A review of their microstructure,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    biomineralization, development and mechanical properties (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Sea urchins have teeth? A review of their microstructure, biomineralization, development and mechanical properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sea urchins have teeth? A review of their microstructure, biomineralization, development and mechanical properties Authors: Stock, Stuart R. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (NWU) [NWU Publication Date: 2014-07-15 OSTI Identifier: 1132110 Resource

  12. Comparison of the Amanzi Model against Analytical Solutions and the FEHM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Model (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Comparison of the Amanzi Model against Analytical Solutions and the FEHM Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comparison of the Amanzi Model against Analytical Solutions and the FEHM Model Authors: Lu, Zhiming [1] ; Harp, Dylan R. [1] ; Birdsell, Kay H. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory [Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-02-13 OSTI Identifier: 1120679 Report Number(s):

  13. Detailed High-Resolution Three-Dimensional Simulations of OMEGA Separated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactants Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments (Conference) | SciTech Connect Detailed High-Resolution Three-Dimensional Simulations of OMEGA Separated Reactants Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detailed High-Resolution Three-Dimensional Simulations of OMEGA Separated Reactants Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments Authors: Haines, Brian Michael [1] ; Grim, Gary P. [1] ; Fincke, James R. [1] ; Shah, Rahul C. [1] ; Forrest, Chad [2] ;

  14. Discovery of bridgmanite, the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    meteorite (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Discovery of bridgmanite, the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteorite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery of bridgmanite, the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteorite Authors: Tschauner, Oliver ; Ma, Chi ; Beckett, John R. ; Prescher, Clemens ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. ; Rossman, George R. [1] ; UNLV) [2] ; CIT) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (UC) (

  15. Electric field induced texture in titania during experiments related to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    flash sintering (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electric field induced texture in titania during experiments related to flash sintering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electric field induced texture in titania during experiments related to flash sintering Authors: Jha, S.K. ; Lebrun, J.M. ; Seymour, K.C. ; Kriven, W.M. ; Raj, R. [1] ; UIUC) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Colorado) ( Publication Date: 2015-11-23 OSTI Identifier: 1225069 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource

  16. Structural response of a prealigned cylindrical block copolymer melt to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    extensional flow (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Structural response of a prealigned cylindrical block copolymer melt to extensional flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural response of a prealigned cylindrical block copolymer melt to extensional flow Authors: McCready, Erica M. ; Burghardt, Wesley R. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (NWU) Publication Date: 2015-08-24 OSTI Identifier: 1179492 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name:

  17. ind2000

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    R1 Indianapolis, IN-July 2000 Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) July 25-27, 2000 Indianapolis, Indiana Meeting Summary The Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) held its 17 th semi-annual meeting July 25- 27, 2000, in Indianapolis, Indiana. Over 110 participants representing State, Tribal and local governments, regional groups, industry and professional organizations, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other Federal agencies met to address a

  18. Tuning the Spectrum for Plant Growth

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    S E L A E R P O L Y T E C H N I C I N S T I T U T E 19 N o v e m b e r 1 7 , 2 0 1 5 CWF Lactuca sativa L. LED 1 LED 2 LED 3 Green lettuce R E N S S E L A E R P O L Y T E C H N I...

  19. DATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE-ID-ICP-16-001 R1 SECTION A. Project Title: INTEC - Macroencapsulation/Overpack Operations in CPP-659 and CPP-1617, Rev. 1 SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action will treat mixed low-level waste (MLLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The treatment process, macroencapsulation, will result in the waste stream meeting the treatment standards for debris and radioactive lead solids (RLS) for disposition at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The

  20. Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Residential Source Energy Consumption Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption Figure R1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) the number of U.S. households, 2) the average size of those housing units, 3) residential source energy consumption, 4) energy intensity, and 5) an overall structural component that represents "other explanatory factors." Activity: Since 1970, the number of household (occupied

  1. Response to Office of Science and Technology Policy Request for Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on Advanced Computing (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Response to Office of Science and Technology Policy Request for Information on Advanced Computing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Response to Office of Science and Technology Policy Request for Information on Advanced Computing Authors: Sarrao, John L. [1] ; Grider, Gary A. [1] ; Archer, Billy J. [1] ; Wampler, Cheryl L. [1] ; Lee, Stephen R. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory

  2. Shape memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | SciTech Connect R. [1] ; Maitland, Duncan J. [2] + Show Author Affiliations (New York, NY) (Pleasant Hill, CA) Publication Date: 2009-09-22 OSTI Identifier: 988699 Report Number(s): 7,591,834 US patent application 10/810,422 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Patent Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States) Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full

  3. Structural and functional analysis of FIP2 binding to the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    endosome-localised Rab25 GTPase (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Structural and functional analysis of FIP2 binding to the endosome-localised Rab25 GTPase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural and functional analysis of FIP2 binding to the endosome-localised Rab25 GTPase Authors: Lall, Patrick ; Horgan, Conor P. ; Oda, Shunichiro ; Franklin, Edward ; Sultana, Azmiri ; Hanscom, Sara R. ; McCaffrey, Mary W. ; Khan, Amir R. [1] ; Cork) [2] + Show Author

  4. TITANIUM SHEET PRODUCTION FROM COMMERCIAL POWDERS (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: TITANIUM SHEET PRODUCTION FROM COMMERCIAL POWDERS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TITANIUM SHEET PRODUCTION FROM COMMERCIAL POWDERS Authors: Muth, Thomas R [1] ; Peter, William H [1] ; Yamamoto, Yukinori [1] ; Chen, Wei [1] ; Harper, David C [1] ; Harper, Kevin D [1] ; Cox, Gregory A [1] ; Lowe, Larry E [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2013-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1072995 Report Number(s):

  5. The application of compressed sensing to long-term acoustic emission-based

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structural health monitoring (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: The application of compressed sensing to long-term acoustic emission-based structural health monitoring Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The application of compressed sensing to long-term acoustic emission-based structural health monitoring Authors: Park, Gyuhae [1] ; Farrar, Chuck R [1] ; Mascarenas, David L [1] ; Cattaneo, Alessandro [2] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory POLITEENICO DI

  6. Ultrashort pulse laser-triggering of long gap high voltage switches.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Ultrashort pulse laser-triggering of long gap high voltage switches. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrashort pulse laser-triggering of long gap high voltage switches. Authors: Rambo, Patrick K. ; Schwarz, Jens ; Kimmel, Mark W. ; Van Tassle, Aaron J. ; Urayama, Junji ; Welch, Dale Robert [1] ; Rose, David V. [1] ; Thoma, Carsten [1] ; Clark, Robert E. [1] ; Miller, Craig [1] ; Zimmerman, William R. [1] ; Pitts, Todd Alan ;

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  8. Microsoft Word - references.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    References May 2005 2004 Site Environmental Report R-1 References Facemire, D. F., S. I. Guttman, D. R. Osborne, and R. H. Sperger, 1990, "Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center," FMPC-SUB 018, prepared for Westinghouse Materials Co. of Ohio, Cincinnati, OH. GeoSyntec, 1996, "Impacted Material Placement Plan, On-site Disposal Facility," 20100-PL-007, Revision 3, PCN 2, Prepared for the Fernald Environmental Management Project,

  9. Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_FINAL1.DOC | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy FINAL1.DOC Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_FINAL1.DOC PDF icon Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_FINAL1.DOC More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_R1_Draft_3.DOC EA-1552: Final Environmental Assessment Probabilistic Modeling and Phase 2 Decision Making at the West Valley Demonstration Project and the Western New York Nuclear Service Center

  10. UNITED STATES GOVERNIMI~NT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .;. ,! r ?- 1; ,: ( ,T UNITED STATES GOVERNIMI~NT 7.;; ,:;$ _ a, -;::I-;. t, ,. :., .~, . ,.,,, : Thomas J. McCarvill, Chief, Physical Exploration Branch, Division of Baw : Reginald W. Bdmonds, Mining Engineer Division of Raw Naterials SUBJECT: MONAZITB DREDGING OPERATIONS AhD PLACER DEPOSITS CONTAINING TBOL~IIJM MINER&S SYXBOL: B&PM3 While at the Bureau of Mines office on June 2, 1955, Mr. Prank Lamb gave me the following information: The contract covering monazite production between

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Engaging_Williams

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Atlanta, Georgia Nuclear Transportation Management Services Training Shipper, Transportation Agent & Transport Crews trained to 49CFR 172.700 requirements Familiarization with TS-R-1, IMDG Code, & 49 CFR Ensures Safety & Compliance Transportation & Security Plans NRC Requires Project Specific TSP's for Each Shipment Safeguards Information DOE Guidelines Notifications Requirements set out in 10 CFR Federal, State & Tribal Armed Escort Requests Spent

  12. Date centerdTimes New Roman

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2008 DOE/IG-0802 September 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 S e p t e m b e r 1 7 , 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR THE CHAIRMAN, FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY FROM: COMMMISSION Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2008" BACKGROUND The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission depends on information technology to

  13. Approximation of functions of variable smoothness by Fourier-Legendre sums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharapudinov, I I

    2000-06-30

    Assume that 0<{mu}{<=}1, and let r{>=}1 be an integer. Let {delta}={l_brace}a{sub 1},...,a{sub l}{r_brace}, where the a{sub i} are points in the interval (-1,1). The classes S{sup r}H{sup {mu}}{sub {delta}} and S{sup r}H{sup {mu}}{sub {delta}}(B) are introduced. These consist of functions with absolutely continuous (r-1)th derivative on [-1,1] such that their rth and (r+1)th derivatives satisfy certain conditions outside the set {delta}. It is proved that for 0<{mu}<1 the Fourier-Legendre sums realize the best approximation in the classes S{sup r}H{sup {mu}}{sub {delta}}(B). Using the Fourier-Legendre expansions, polynomials Y{sub n+2r} of order n+2r are constructed that possess the following property: for 0<{mu}<1 the {nu}th derivative of the polynomial Y{sub n+2r} approximates f{sup ({nu})}(x) (f element of S{sup r}H{sup {mu}}{sub {delta}}) on [-1,1] to within O(n{sup {nu}}{sup +1-r-{mu}}), and the accuracy is of order O(n{sup {nu}}{sup -r-{mu}}) outside {delta}.

  14. Jet mass and substructure of inclusive jets in root s=7 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamezyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; et al.

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the potential of jet substructure techniques to identify the hadronic decays of boosted heavy particles. These studies all rely upon the assumption that the internal substructure of jets generated by QCD radiation is well understood. In this article, this assumption is tested on an inclusive sample of jets recorded with the ATLAS detector in 2010, which corresponds to 35 pb{sup -1} of pp collisions delivered by the LHC at {radical}s = 7 TeV. In a subsample of events with single pp collisions, measurements corrected for detector efficiency and resolution are presented with full systematic uncertainties. Jet invariant mass, k{sub t} splitting scales and N-subjettiness variables are presented for anti-k{sub t} R = 1.0 jets and Cambridge-Aachen R = 1.2 jets. Jet invariant-mass spectra for Cambridge-Aachen R = 1.2 jets after a splitting and filtering procedure are also presented. Leading-order parton-shower Monte Carlo predictions for these variables are found to be broadly in agreement with data. The dependence of mean jet mass on additional pp interactions is also explored.

  15. Consistent quantification of climate impacts due to biogenic carbon storage across a range of bio-product systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guest, Geoffrey Bright, Ryan M. Cherubini, Francesco Strmman, Anders H.

    2013-11-15

    Temporary and permanent carbon storage from biogenic sources is seen as a way to mitigate climate change. The aim of this work is to illustrate the need to harmonize the quantification of such mitigation across all possible storage pools in the bio- and anthroposphere. We investigate nine alternative storage cases and a wide array of bio-resource pools: from annual crops, short rotation woody crops, medium rotation temperate forests, and long rotation boreal forests. For each feedstock type and biogenic carbon storage pool, we quantify the carbon cycle climate impact due to the skewed time distribution between emission and sequestration fluxes in the bio- and anthroposphere. Additional consideration of the climate impact from albedo changes in forests is also illustrated for the boreal forest case. When characterizing climate impact with global warming potentials (GWP), we find a large variance in results which is attributed to different combinations of biomass storage and feedstock systems. The storage of biogenic carbon in any storage pool does not always confer climate benefits: even when biogenic carbon is stored long-term in durable product pools, the climate outcome may still be undesirable when the carbon is sourced from slow-growing biomass feedstock. For example, when biogenic carbon from Norway Spruce from Norway is stored in furniture with a mean life time of 43 years, a climate change impact of 0.08 kg CO{sub 2}eq per kg CO{sub 2} stored (100 year time horizon (TH)) would result. It was also found that when biogenic carbon is stored in a pool with negligible leakage to the atmosphere, the resulting GWP factor is not necessarily ? 1 CO{sub 2}eq per kg CO{sub 2} stored. As an example, when biogenic CO{sub 2} from Norway Spruce biomass is stored in geological reservoirs with no leakage, we estimate a GWP of ? 0.56 kg CO{sub 2}eq per kg CO{sub 2} stored (100 year TH) when albedo effects are also included. The large variance in GWPs across the range of resource and carbon storage options considered indicates that more accurate accounting will require case-specific factors derived following the methodological guidelines provided in this and recent manuscripts. -- Highlights: Climate impacts of stored biogenic carbon (bio-C) are consistently quantified. Temporary storage of bio-C does not always equate to a climate cooling impact. 1 unit of bio-C stored over a time horizon does not always equate to ? 1 unit CO{sub 2}eq. Discrepancies of climate change impact quantification in literature are clarified.

  16. Aberrant, ectopic expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in malignant colonic epithelial cells. Implications for these cells growth via an autocrine mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States)] [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Jones, Michael K. [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States) [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Szabo, Sandor [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States) [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Pathology, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Tarnawski, Andrzej S., E-mail: amrita.ahluwalia@va.gov [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: Malignant colonic epithelial cells express VEGF and its receptors. Cultured colon cancer cells secrete VEGF into the medium. Inhibition of VEGF receptor significantly decreases colon cancer cell proliferation. VEGF is critical for colon cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor A (referred to as VEGF) is implicated in colon cancer growth. Currently, the main accepted mechanism by which VEGF promotes colon cancer growth is via the stimulation of angiogenesis, which was originally postulated by late Judah Folkman. However, the cellular source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue; and, the expression of VEGF and its receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in colon cancer cells are not fully known and are subjects of controversy. Material and methods: We examined and quantified expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in three different human colonic tissue arrays containing sections of adenocarcinoma (n = 43) and normal mucosa (n = 41). In human colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 and normal colon cell lines NCM356 and NCM460, we examined expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 mRNA and protein, VEGF production and secretion into the culture medium; and, the effect of a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGF receptors, AL-993, on cell proliferation. Results: Human colorectal cancer specimens had strong expression of VEGF in cancer cells and also expressed VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2.In vitro studies showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and HT29, but not normal colonic cell lines, express VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 and secrete VEGF into the medium up to a concentration 2000 pg/ml within 48 h. Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of VEGF receptors using a specific VEGF-R inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation (by >50%) of cultured colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our findings support the contention that VEGF generated by colon cancer cells stimulates their growth directly through an autocrine mechanism that is independent of its primary function in the induction of angiogenesis.

  17. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Andrew J.; Zak, Donald R.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch photosynthesis increased with elevated CO2 and tended to decrease with elevated O3, compared to the control. In contrast to aspen and birch, maple photosynthesis was not enhanced by elevated CO2. Elevated O3 did not cause significant reductions in maximum photosynthesis in birch or maple. In addition, photosynthesis in ozone sensitive clones was affected to a much greater degree than that in ozone tolerant aspen clones. Treatment effects on photosynthesis contributed to CO2 stimulation of aboveground and belowground growth that was species and genotype dependent, with birch and aspen being most responsive and maple being least responsive. The positive effects of elevated CO2 on net primary productivity NPP were sustained through the end of the experiment, but negative effects of elevated O3 on NPP had dissipated during the final three years of treatments. The declining response to O3 over time resulted from the compensatory growth of O3-tolerant genotypes and species as the growth of O3-sensitive individuals declined over time. Cumulative NPP over the entire experiment was 39% greater under elevated CO2 and 10% lower under elevated O3. Enhanced NPP under elevated CO2 was sustained by greater root exploration of soil for growth-limiting N, as well as more rapid rates of litter decomposition and microbial N release during decay. Results from Aspen FACE clearly indicate that plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide, regardless of community type or ozone level, obtained significantly greater amounts of soil N. These results indicate that greater plant growth under elevated carbon dioxide has not led to “progressive N limitation”. If similar forests growing throughout northeastern North America respond in the same manner, then enhanced forest NPP under elevated CO2 may be sustained for a longer duration than previously thought, and the negative effect of elevated O3 may be diminished by compensatory growth of O3-tolerant plants as they begin to dominate forest communities. By the end of the experiment, elevated CO2 increased ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C content by 9%. Total ecosystem C content in the interaction treatment (elevated CO2 and O3) did not significantly differ from that of the control. Total ecosystem C content responded similarly to the treatments across the three forest communities. The treatment effects on ecosystem C content resulted from differences in tree biomass, particularly woody tissues (branches, stem, and coarse roots), and lower C content in the near-surface mineral soil. During its duration, the Aspen FACE project involved collaboration between scientists from 9 countries, and over the course of the experiment there were over 120 Aspen FACE scientific users. These scientists helped produce 75 publications during the most recent funding period (2008-2014) and 207 peer-reviewed publications (169 in refereed journals) since the beginning of the project.

  18. The northern wintertime divergence extrema at 200 hPa and surface cyclones as simulated in the AMIP integration of the ECMWF general circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    Divergence and convergence centers at 200 hPa and mean sea level pressure (MSLP) cyclones were located every 6 hr for a 10-yr general circulation model (GCM) simulation with the ECMWF (Cycle 36) for the boreal winters from 1980 to 1988. The simulation used the observed monthly mean sea surface temperature (SST) for the decade. Analysis of the frequency, location, and strength of these centers and cyclones gives insight into the dynamical response of the model to the varying SST. The results indicate that (1) the model produces reasonable climatologies of upper-level divergence and MSLP cyclones; (2) the model distribution of anomalies of divergence and convergence centers and MSLP cyclones is consistent with observations for the 1982-83 and 1986-87 El Nifio events; (3) the tropical Indian Ocean is the region of greatest divergence activity and interannual variability in the model; (4) the variability of the divergence centers is greater than that of the convergence centers; (5) strong divergence centers occur chiefly over the ocean in the midlatitudes but are more land-based in the tropics, except in the Indian Ocean; and (6) locations of divergence and convergence centers can be a useful tool for the intercomparison of global atmospheric simulations.

  19. Biogeophysical effects of CO2-fertilization on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C; Phillips, T J

    2006-04-26

    CO{sub 2}-fertilization affects plant growth, which modifies surface physical properties, altering the surface albedo, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. We investigate how such CO{sub 2}-fertilization effects on vegetation and surface properties would affect the climate system. Using a global three-dimensional climate-carbon model that simulates vegetation dynamics, we compare two multi-century simulations: a ''Control'' simulation with no emissions, and a ''Physiol-noGHG'' simulation where physiological changes occur as a result of prescribed CO{sub 2} emissions, but where CO{sub 2}-induced greenhouse warming is not included. In our simulations, CO{sub 2}-fertilization produces warming; we obtain an annual- and global-mean warming of about 0.65 K (and land-only warming of 1.4 K) after 430 years. This century-scale warming is mostly due to a decreased surface albedo associated with the expansion of the Northern Hemisphere boreal forests. On decadal time scales, the CO{sub 2} uptake by afforestation should produce a cooling effect that exceeds this albedo-based warming; but if the forests remain in place, the CO{sub 2}-enhanced-greenhouse effect would diminish as the ocean equilibrates with the atmosphere, whereas the albedo effect would persist. Thus, on century time scales, there is the prospect for net warming from CO{sub 2}-fertilization of the land biosphere. Further study is needed to confirm and better quantify our results.

  20. The upper Aptian-Albian succession of the Sergipe basin, Brazil: An integrated paleoenvironmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koutsoukos, E.A.M.; Mello, M.R.; de Azambuja Filho, N.C. ); Hart, M.B. ); Maxwell, J.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A combined micropaleontological, geochemical, and sedimentological study of the upper Aptian-Albian succession from the Sergipe basin, northeastern Brazil, has been undertaken. The paleoenvironmental evolution of the basin from the late Aptian to late Albian can be subdivided into three major depositional phases: (1) late Aptian, (2) early to middle Albian; (3) late Albian. A shallow carbonate compensation depth within upper mesopelagic depths (c. 300-500 m) is inferred for the late Aptian-Albian. Intermittent anoxic events, associated with salinity-stratified water masses, occurred in the basin during the late Aptian to Albian. An oxygen minimum (dysaerobic to anoxic conditions) occurred during the late Aptian to earliest Albian, in middle-outer neritic to upper bathyal settings. Waning dysaerobic to oxic conditions are apparent in the late Albian. The foraminiferal assemblages recovered from the upper Aptian marine deposits have a characteristic Tethyan affinity. The microfaunal evidence suggests that this area of the northern South Atlantic had at least some surface water exchange with low-latitude central North Atlantic-western Tethyan Provinces, even possible at intermediate (epipelagic to mesopelagic) water depths. Contribution of microfaunal elements coming from high-latitude northern (Boreal Realm) and/or southern (Austral) regions is also apparent, although of less significance.

  1. Observed Increase of TTL Temperature and Water Vapor in Polluted Couds over Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, J.; Read, William G.; Massie, Steven T.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Colarco, Peter; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.

    2011-06-01

    Aerosols can affect cloud particle size and lifetime, which impacts precipitation, radiation and climate. Previous studies1-4 suggested that reduced ice cloud particle size and fall speed due to the influence of aerosols may increase evaporation of ice crystals and/or cloud radiative heating in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), leading to higher water vapor abundance in air entering the stratosphere. Observational substantiation of such processes is still lacking. Here, we analyze new observations from multiple NASA satellites to show the imprint of pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. We focus our analysis on the highly-polluted South and East Asia region during boreal summer. We find that "polluted" ice clouds have smaller ice effective radius than "clean" clouds. In the TTL, the polluted clouds are associated with warmer temperature and higher specific humidity than the clean clouds. The water vapor difference between the polluted and clean clouds cannot be explained by other meteorological factors, such as updraft and detrainment strength. Therefore, the observed higher water vapor entry value into the stratosphere in the polluted clouds than in the clean clouds is likely a manifestation of aerosol pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. Given the radiative and chemical importance of stratospheric water vapor, the increasing emission of aerosols over Asia may have profound impacts on stratospheric chemistry and global energy balance and water cycle.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. The role of tropical forests on the world carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Lugo, A. E.; Liegel, B.

    1980-08-01

    Tropical forests constitute about half of the world's forest and are characterized by rapid rates of organic matter turnover and high storages of organic matter. Tropical forests are considered to be one of the most significant terrestrial elements in the equation that balances the carbon cycle of the world. As discussed in the paper by Tosi, tropical and subtropical latitudes are more complex in terms of climate and vegetation composition than temperate and boreal latitudes. The implications of the complexity of the tropics and the disregard of this complexity by many scientists is made evident in the paper by Brown and Lugo which shows that biomass estimates for tropical ecosystems have been overestimated by at least 100%. The paper by Brown shows that that rates of succession in the tropics are extremely rapid in terms of the ability of moist and wet forests to accumulate organic matter. Yet, in arid tropical Life Zones succession is slow. This leads to the idea that the question of whether tropical forests are sinks or sources of carbon must be analyzed in relation to Life Zones and to intensities of human activity in these Zones. The paper by Lugo presents conceptual models to illustrate this point and the paper by Tosi shows how land uses in the tropics also correspond to Life Zone characteristics. The ultimate significance of land use to the question of the carbon balance in a large region is addressed in the paper by Detwiler and Hall.

  3. HESFIRE: a global fire model to explore the role of anthropogenic and weather drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Morton, Douglas; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Pereira, Jose M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-02-13

    Vegetation fires are a major driver of ecosystem dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions. Anticipating potential changes in fire activity and their impacts relies first on a realistic model of fire activity (e.g., fire incidence and interannual variability) and second on a model accounting for fire impacts (e.g., mortality and emissions). In this paper, we focus on our understanding of fire activity and describe a new fire model, HESFIRE (HumanEarth System FIRE), which integrates the influence of weather, vegetation characteristics, and human activities on fires in a stand-alone framework. It was developed with a particular emphasis on allowing fires to spread over consecutive days given their major contribution to burned areas in many ecosystems. A subset of the model parameters was calibrated through an optimization procedure using observation data to enhance our knowledge of regional drivers of fire activity and improve the performance of the model on a global scale. Modeled fire activity showed reasonable agreement with observations of burned area, fire seasonality, and interannual variability in many regions, including for spatial and temporal domains not included in the optimization procedure. Significant discrepancies are investigated, most notably regarding fires in boreal regions and in xeric ecosystems and also fire size distribution. The sensitivity of fire activity to model parameters is analyzed to explore the dominance of specific drivers across regions and ecosystems. The characteristics of HESFIRE and the outcome of its evaluation provide insights into the influence of anthropogenic activities and weather, and their interactions, on fire activity.

  4. Are Greenhouse Gases Changing ENSO Precursors in the Western North Pacific?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S-Y; Heureux, Michelle L.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-09-01

    Using multiple observational and modeling datasets, we document a strengthening relationship between boreal winter sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) in the western North Pacific (WNP) and the development of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) one year later. The increased WNP-ENSO association emerged in the mid 20th century and has grown through the present, reaching correlation coefficients as high as ~0.70 in recent decades. Fully coupled climate experiments with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) replicate the WNP-ENSO association and indicate that greenhouse gases (GHG) are largely responsible for the observed increase. We speculate that shifts in the location and amplitudes of positive SST trends in the subtropical-tropical western Pacific impacts the low-level circulation so that WNP variability is increasingly influencing the development of ENSO one year later. A strengthened GHG-driven relationship between the WNP and ENSO provides an example of how anthropogenic climate change can potentially improve the skill of intraseasonal-to-interannual climate prediction.

  5. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Hydropower Reservoirs: FY2011 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Arthur J; Mosher, Jennifer J; Mulholland, Patrick J; Fortner, Allison M; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2012-05-01

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify the net emissions of key greenhouse gases (GHG) - notably, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} - from hydropower reservoirs in moist temperate areas within the U.S. The rationale for this objective is straightforward: if net emissions of GHG can be determined, it would be possible to directly compare hydropower to other power-producing methods on a carbon-emissions basis. Studies of GHG emissions from hydropower reservoirs elsewhere suggest that net emissions can be moderately high in tropical areas. In such areas, warm temperatures and relatively high supply rates of labile organic matter can encourage high rates of decomposition, which (depending upon local conditions) can result in elevated releases of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emissions also tend to be higher for younger reservoirs than for older reservoirs, because vegetation and labile soil organic matter that is inundated when a reservoir is created can continue to decompose for several years (Galy-Lacaux et al. 1997, Barros et al. 2011). Water bodies located in climatically cooler areas, such as in boreal forests, could be expected to have lower net emissions of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} because their organic carbon supplies tend to be relatively recalcitrant to microbial action and because cooler water temperatures are less conducive to decomposition.

  6. SPRUCE: Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    SPRUCE is an experiment to assess the response of northern peatland ecosystems to increases in temperature and exposures to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. It is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] - Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems.[copied from http://mnspruce.ornl.gov/] While some data files are restricted to access by project members only, others are available for public download now, even as research is being actively conducted.

  7. Microbes in thawing permafrost: the unknown variable in the climate change equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, David E; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Vishnivetskaya, T.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Onstott, T. C.; Whyte, Lyle; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Gilichinsky, David A; Elias, Dwayne A; Mackelprang, Rachel; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Wagner, Dirk; Wullschleger, Stan D; Jansson, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Considering that 25% of Earth s terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost (ground that has been continuously frozen for at least 2 years), our understanding of the diversity of microbial life in this extreme habitat is surprisingly limited. Taking into account the total mass of perennially frozen sediment (up to several hundred meters deep), permafrost contains a huge amount of buried, ancient organic carbon (Tarnocai et al., 2009). In addition, permafrost is warming rapidly in response to global climate change (Romanovsky et al., 2010), potentially leading to widespread thaw and a larger, seasonally thawed soil active layer. This concern has prompted the question: will permafrost thawing lead to the release of massive amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) into the atmosphere? This question can only be answered by understanding how the microbes residing in permafrost will respond to thaw, through processes such as respiration, fermentation, methanogenesis and CH4 oxidation (Schuur et al., 2009). Predicting future carbon fluxes is complicated by the diversity of permafrost environments, ranging from high mountains, southern boreal forests, frozen peatlands and Pleistocene ice complexes (yedoma) up to several hundred meters deep, which vary widely in soil composition, soil organic matter (SOM) quality, hydrology and thermal regimes (Figure 1). Permafrost degradation can occur in many forms: thaw can progress downward from seasonally-thawed active layer soils in warming climates or laterally because of changes in surface or groundwater flow paths (Grosse et al., 2011). Permafrost degradation can sometimes lead to dramatic changes in ecosystem structure and function

  8. Consequences of stand age and species functional trait changes on ecosystem water use of forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewers, Brent; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mackay, D. Scott

    2011-07-22

    We tested whether using stomatal conductance could capture the dynamic in transpiration with forest age. To do this we by answered the question If we chose a reference stomatal conductance from one stand age of the entire chronosequence to put into a model, would modeled transpiration be biased from the other ages? with a resounding yes. We found that obtaining the right stomatal conductance was crucial for accurate models in two different chronosequences. This strongly suggests that stomatal conductance is the appropriate integrator of inter- and intra-species change in tree transpiration with forest age. If we had tried to use a single reference canopy stomatal conductance, it would not have been able to capture the variability in transpiration with stand age despite the suggestion that hydraulic limitation was consistently acting on the trees; the situation is even more complex in many boreal systems, where a transition to nonstomatal bryophytes may occur over the course of succession. Because we used a biophysical approach, even if our and other researchers chronosequences do not fit the assumptions, the results are still useful. Further, our synthesis of sap flux based estimates of tree transpiration showing a large dynamic suggest that our approach to modeling is crucial in the face of anthropogenic changes to forest age structure. We have now provided the framework for a mechanistically rigorous yet simple approach based on simple tree hydraulics to measuring and modeling stand transpiration with changing forest age and/or species composition.

  9. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petäjä, Tuukka; Moisseev, Dmitri; Sinclair, Victoria; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Manninen, Antti J.; Levula, Janne; Väänänen, Riikka; Heikkinen, Liine; Äijälä, Mikko; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana

    2015-11-01

    “Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  10. EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2011-10-01

    Radioecology is the study of the fate and transport and potential effects of radionuclides and associated contaminants in the environment. In short, it is the science that describes the fundamental connection between environmental health and human health risks. As such, radioecology can and has provided the credible, consistent and defensible basis for the successful and cost-effective environmental cleanup and closure of nuclear production and waste sites. In addition, radioecology also provides the technical basis for making timely and reliable decisions on cleanup in the aftermath of nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima. The 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident resulted in catastrophic health, social, and economic consequences in many countries, predominantly, Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. The extent of radioactive contamination, levels and forms of contamination, and diversity of the ecosystems affected by the accident did not have any precedent and provided unique opportunities for environmental scientists around the world. Following the natural course of their development, populations of species and their communities found themselves in conditions of chronic radiation exposure that exceeded the natural background by factors of hundreds and thousands. Anything similar would have been extremely difficult if not impossible to recreate in a scientific laboratory. Consequently, since the first few years after the accident, many teams of scientists have visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). The knowledge gained by studying the consequences of this accident has tremendous importance. The concept of an international research and technical center to address the problems involving nuclear and radiological accidents became a reality with the establishment of the International Chernobyl Center (ICC). In May 1995, the US and Ukraine signed a Protocol of Intent on establishment of the ICC, and the government of Ukraine appealed to the international scientific community to support ICC and join its activities (Chernobyl Center 2006). In December 1995, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on the ChNPP closure was signed by the government of Ukraine, all of the G7 governments, and the European Commission. The ICC foundation was considered critical to ensure the safe decommissioning of the ChNPP reactor units and improvement of the safety of the Chernobyl Containment Shelter. On the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident (26 April 1996), Mr. Viktor Yushchenko, the President of Ukraine, issued a decree to establish the Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology (Chernobyl Center). On the same day, a MOU involving the US participation in Chernobyl Center activities was signed by the US and Ukraine (Chernobyl Center 2006). In July 1998, the US and Ukraine signed an agreement to establish the International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) as part of the Chernobyl Center. The creation of IRL was a logical continuation of previous programs to conduct scientific research in radioecology and provide Ukraine and the rest of the world with the necessary infrastructure and scientific basis to conduct research in radioecology, radiobiology, dosimetry, and environmental protection in the ChEZ (Chernobyl Center 2006). A recent collaborative effort with IRL has been implemented through a project titled 'Long-term impacts from radiation/contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone' (Farfan et al. 2008; Gerdes et al. 2009; Marra et al. 2010). This collaboration had the following objectives: (1) Assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure within the ChEZ; (2) Provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories based on the results of long-term field monitoring, analytical measurements, and numerical modeling of soils and groundwater radioactive contamination; and (3) Recommend the development and testing of effective cleanup technologies to reduce environmental and health risks. Based on this work, a large amount of data are now available for publication, some of which are presented in this Special Issue of the Health Physics Journal.

  11. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 20002008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  12. Emergency Diesel Generation System Surveillance Test Policy Optimization Through Genetic Algorithms Using Non-Periodic Intervention Frequencies and Seasonal Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapa, Celso M.F.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [CNEN, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rua General Severiano 90, Rio de Janeiro, RJ-22-294-900 (Brazil); Frutuoso e Melo, P.F. [COPPE/UFRJ, Cidade Universitaria, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco G, sala 101, Ilha do Fundao, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    Nuclear standby safety systems must frequently, be submitted to periodic surveillance tests. The main reason is to detect, as soon as possible, the occurrence of unrevealed failure states. Such interventions may, however, affect the overall system availability due to component outages. Besides, as the components are demanded, deterioration by aging may occur, penalizing again the system performance. By these reasons, planning a good surveillance test policy implies in a trade-off between gains and overheads due to the surveillance test interventions. In order maximize the systems average availability during a given period of time, it has recently been developed a non-periodic surveillance test optimization methodology based on genetic algorithms (GA). The fact of allowing non-periodic tests turns the solution space much more flexible and schedules can be better adjusted, providing gains in the overall system average availability, when compared to those obtained by an optimized periodic tests scheme. The optimization problem becomes, however, more complex. Hence, the use of a powerful optimization technique, such as GAs, is required. Some particular features of certain systems can turn it advisable to introduce other specific constraints in the optimization problem. The Emergency Diesel Generation System (EDGS) of a Nuclear Power Plant (N-PP) is a good example for demonstrating the introduction of seasonal constraints in the optimization problem. This system is responsible for power supply during an external blackout. Therefore, it is desirable during periods of high blackout probability to maintain the system availability as high as possible. Previous applications have demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of the methodology. However, no seasonal constraints have ever been imposed. This work aims at investigating the application of such methodology in the Angra-II Brazilian NPP EDGS surveillance test policy optimization, considering the blackout probability growth during summer, due to the electrical power demand increase. Here, the model used penalizes test interventions by a continuous modulating function, which depends on the instantaneous blackout probability. Results have demonstrated the ability of the method in adapting the surveillance tests policy to seasonal behaviors. The knowledge acquired by the GA during the searching process has lead to test schedules that drastically minimize the test interventions at periods of high blackout probability. It is compensated by more frequent tests redistributed through the periods of low blackout probability, in order to provide improvement on the overall average availability at the system level. (authors)

  13. GUIDELINES FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF AN ADVANCED OUTAGE CONTROL CENTER TO IMPROVE OUTAGE COORDINATION, PROBLEM RESOLUTION, AND OUTAGE RISK MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, Shawn St; Farris, Ronald; Whaley, April M; Medema, Heather; Gertman, David

    2014-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Managing NPP outages is a complex and difficult task due to the large number of maintenance and repair activities that are accomplished in a short period of time. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information, and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status, and periodic briefings in the OCC. It is a difficult task to maintain current the information related to outage progress and discovered conditions. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across, and out of the OCC. The use of these technologies will allow information to be shared electronically, providing greater amounts of real-time information to the decision makers and allowing OCC coordinators to meet with supporting staff remotely. Passively monitoring status electronically through advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer-based procedures, and automated work packages will reduce the current reliance on manually reporting progress. The use of these technologies will also improve the knowledge capture and management capabilities of the organization. The purpose of this research is to improve management of NPP outages through the development of an advanced outage control center (AOCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This technical report for industry implementation outlines methods and considerations for the establishment of an AOCC. This report provides a process for implementation of a change management plan, evaluation of current outage processes, the selection of technology, and guidance for the implementation of the selected technology. Methods are presented for both adoption of technologies within an existing OCC and for a complete OCC replacement, including human factors considerations for OCC design and setup.

  14. Foundation Capital

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Foundation Capital EiR1 at ORNL Presentation to EERE May 2010 Narrow EiR IP filter employed  Find a technology that  Promises a 5-10x improvement over status quo - Not incremental  Is covered by unique, defensible, broad IP portfolio - No license patchwork  Addresses a $B market opportunity  Has platform characteristics - Once core product developed, should be leverageable into several applications with small additional R&D resources  Fit for private funding within 12

  15. United States Patent: 7896053

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patent: 7896053 http://patft.uspto.gov/...p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=7,896,053.PN.&OS=PN/7,896,053&RS=PN[6/20/2011 12:30:03 PM] ( 1 of 1 ) United States Patent 7,896,053 Simandl , et al. March 1, 2011 Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy Abstract A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component.

  16. 1.TIF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -one unit, therefore, it has been broken down into sections. EDMC#: r1i 11i 1 SECTION: 5 OF 11 DOCUMENT #: DOE/EIS-0113 TITLE: Final EIS Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes C^^3 DOEIEIS-0113 VOLUME VOLUME 3of5 APPENDICES M-V FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT DISPOSAL OF HANFORD DEFENSE HIGH-LEVEL, TRANSURANIC AND TANK WASTES Hanford Si te Richland, Washington DECEMBER 1987. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PLEASE RETURN TO: ENVIRONMENTAL DIVISION RESOURCE CENTER This

  17. A F O S R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F O S R / 1 9 4 8 Department of Physics, Columbia University, Xdew York, Bkw York and S. Weinberg Department of Pkiysics, University of California, Berkeley, California i - * This work wa8 supported in part by the United States Air Force under contract Eo. AF 49(638)-327 monitored by the M r Force Office of Scientific Research of the A i r &search and Development Command, 'by the Office of Naval Research under contract No. r-222(60)@RO 41-22f), and DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an

  18. A permanent breast seed implant as partial breast radiation therapy for early-stage patients: A comparison of palladium-103 and iodine-125 isotopes based on radiation safety considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Brian; Sankreacha, Raxa; Rakovitch, Eileen; O'Brien, Peter; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) technique has been developed as a new form of partial adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This study compares iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) and palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) isotopes by examining the exposure and effective dose (ED) to a patient's partner.Methods and Materials: A low-energy survey meter was used to measure exposure rates as a function of bolus thickness placed over {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I seeds. A general mathematical expression for the initial exposure rate at 1 m (x{sub o,1m}) from the skin surface as a function of the implant size, R, and the distance between the skin surface and the implant, d, was derived. Also, a second general equation is proposed to calculate the ED to the patient's partner.Results: The initial exposure rate at 1 meter and the ED are calculated as follows: x{sub o,1m} = (3{alpha})/2R{sup 3}{center_dot}{beta}{sup 3} [e{sup -{beta}}{sup (2R+d)}({beta}R + 1) + e{sup -{beta}}{sup {center_dot}}{sup d}({beta}R - 1)], and ED = aR{sup b} {center_dot} [e{sup -c(2R+d)} {center_dot} (cR + 1) + e{sup -cd} -bar (cR - 1)]. For {sup 125}I, the parameters are: {alpha} = 0.154409, {beta} = 0.388460, a = 197, b = -0.95, and c = 0.38846. For {sup 103}Pd, they are: {alpha} = 0.06877, {beta} = 0.421098, a = 18.6, b -0.78, and c = 0.421098. For implant diameters varying from 2 to 6 cm and skin-to-implant distances varying from 0.7 to 4 cm, the ED is consistently below 2.6 mSv using the {sup 103}Pd isotope, but more than 5 mSv in many instances and possibly up to 20 mSv using {sup 125}I.Conclusions: PBSI using {sup 103}Pd seeds appears safe because the patient's partner ED is consistently below 5 mSv. The{sup 125}I isotope is not recommended for PBSI.

  19. Feynman integral treatment of the Bargmann potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaf, A.; Chouchaoui, A. . E-mail: akchouchaoui@yahoo.fr; Lombard, R.J.

    2005-06-01

    A method based on path integral formulation is given for obtaining exact solution of the s states for the Bargmann potentialV(r)=1ka{sup 2}{beta}({beta}-1)e{sup -2r/a}1-e{sup -r/a2}-Ae{sup -r/a}1-e{sup -r=} /{sup a},where {beta} and k are parameters. The exact energy spectrum and the normalised s-state eigenfunctions are obtained from the poles of the Green function and their residues, respectively. The results are compared with their of Schrodinger formalism, special cases are also discussed.

  20. 1.TIF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -one unit, therefore, it has been broken down into sections. EDMC#: r1i 11i 1 SECTION: 5 OF 11 DOCUMENT #: DOE/EIS-0113 TITLE: Final EIS Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes C^^3 DOEIEIS-0113 VOLUME VOLUME 3of5 APPENDICES M-V FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT DISPOSAL OF HANFORD DEFENSE HIGH-LEVEL, TRANSURANIC AND TANK WASTES Hanford Si te Richland, Washington DECEMBER 1987. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PLEASE RETURN TO: ENVIRONMENTAL DIVISION RESOURCE CENTER This

  1. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 California - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,580 1,308 1,423 R 1,335 1,118 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  2. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,979 5,732 1,669 R 1,967 1,645 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas

  3. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2010-2014 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 230 210 212 R 1,089 1,024 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,144

  4. Acute toxicity of selected metals and phenols on RTG-2 and CHSE-214 fish cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castano, A. |; Vega, M.M.; Tarazona, J.V.

    1995-08-01

    In vitro toxicity tests with fish cell lines appear as an alternative to single species bioassays and have been used successfully in different applications, both for single chemicals and for environmental samples, including Toxicity Identification Evaluation procedures. Different fish cell lines, such as BF-2, RTG-2, FHM and R1 have been employed in these toxicological studies. The aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of two salmonid fish cell lines, RTG-2 and CHSE-214, in evaluating toxicity of seven compounds (three metals and four phenolic chemicals), by measuring three endpoints: cellular mass, cell viability and intracellular ATP content of the cells. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Multi-Moment ADER-Taylor Methods for Systems of Conservation Laws With

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Source Terms in One Dimension (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Multi-Moment ADER-Taylor Methods for Systems of Conservation Laws With Source Terms in One Dimension Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multi-Moment ADER-Taylor Methods for Systems of Conservation Laws With Source Terms in One Dimension Authors: Finkel, H. ; Norman, M.R. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (LCF) [LCF Publication Date: 2012-08-15 OSTI Identifier: 1115873 Report Number(s): ANL/LCF/JA-71879

  6. Real-time condition assessment of RAPTOR telescope systems (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Real-time condition assessment of RAPTOR telescope systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Real-time condition assessment of RAPTOR telescope systems Authors: Stull, Christopher J [1] ; Taylor, Stuart G [1] ; Wren, James [1] ; Mascarenas, David L [1] ; Farrar, Charles R [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2011-05-12 OSTI Identifier: 1067412 Report Number(s): LA-UR-11-02858; LA-UR-11-2858 DOE Contract Number:

  7. Real-time condition assessment of RAPTOR telescope systems (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Real-time condition assessment of RAPTOR telescope systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Real-time condition assessment of RAPTOR telescope systems Authors: Stull, Christopher J [1] ; Taylor, Stuart G [1] ; Wren, James [1] ; Mascarenas, David L [1] ; Farrar, Charles R [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2011-09-08 OSTI Identifier: 1095860 Report Number(s): LA-UR-11-05218; LA-UR-11-5218 DOE

  8. I Unlimited Release UC-70

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Unlimited Release UC-70 Proceedings of the Fifth Annual NEA-Seabed Working Group Meeting Bristol, England March 3 - 5, 1980 D. Richard Anderson, Editor *md by $wrdia W - I Labcratmks, A l b u q w - New Mmka '71@s - a d L - Cal&mla SrFSBDfm tfm Unitad S l w m D - 1 ird E W @ ~ : ya& CpFaJS Q & d - 7 - ~~&rS&emhw I B ~ D -a,J - . r , ~ : :>5:, ~ ~ 5 - r 1 - e . - - Q Sandia National Laboratories L - I . DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by

  9. Table 1.15 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels, 1980-2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels, 1980-2011 Year Petroleum Products Natural Gas 4 Coal Total Percent of Total Energy Consumption Asphalt and Road Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1 Lubricants Petro- chemical Feedstocks 2 Petroleum Coke Special Naphthas Other 3 Total Physical Units 5<//td> 1980 145 230 58 253 14 [R] 37 58 795 [R] 639 2.4 [ – –] [ – –] 1981 125 229 56 216 15 [R] 27 54 722 [R] 518 [R] 2.1 [ – –] [ – –] 1982 125 256 51 157 15 [R] 25 48 678 [R] 448 [R] 1.4 [ – –] [

  10. Fusion Peptides Promote Formation of Bilayer Cubic Phases in Lipid

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dispersions. An X-Ray Diffraction Study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Fusion Peptides Promote Formation of Bilayer Cubic Phases in Lipid Dispersions. An X-Ray Diffraction Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fusion Peptides Promote Formation of Bilayer Cubic Phases in Lipid Dispersions. An X-Ray Diffraction Study Authors: Tenchov, Boris G. ; MacDonald, Robert C. ; Lentz, Barry R. [1] ; UNC) [2] ; Sofia-MED) [2] + Show Author

  11. Microsoft Word - DE-FE0004285-final report-ys.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production Final Report For the period October 1, 2010 -M arch 30, 2014 WORK PERFORMED UNDER AGREEMENT DE-FE0004285 SUBMITTED BY Yixin Shao McGill University 817 Sherbrooke Street W est M ontreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 June 26, 2014 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR Yixin Shao 514-398-6674 Email: yixin.shao@mcgill.ca Subcontractor: 3H Company 1500 Bull Lea Road, Suite R1 Lexington, KY 40511 SUBMITTED TO U.S. Departm ent of Energy National Energy Technology

  12. ALCC Allocation Final Report: HPC Colony II (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect ALCC Allocation Final Report: HPC Colony II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ALCC Allocation Final Report: HPC Colony II The report describes those activities of the HPC Colony II Project as they relate to their FY2013 ALCC Award. Authors: Jones, Terry R [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2013-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1105949 Report Number(s): ORNL/TM-2013/553 KJ0402000; ERKJT17 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Technical Report Research

  13. Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test reactor Authors: Fredrickson, E. D. [1] ; Bell, M. G. [1] ; Budny, R. V. [1] ; Darrow, D. S. [1] ; White, R. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA Publication Date: 2015-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1228558 Grant/Contract

  14. ALCC Allocation Final Report: HPC Colony II (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect ALCC Allocation Final Report: HPC Colony II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ALCC Allocation Final Report: HPC Colony II The report describes those activities of the HPC Colony II Project as they relate to their FY2013 ALCC Award. Authors: Jones, Terry R [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2013-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1105949 Report Number(s): ORNL/TM-2013/553 KJ0402000; ERKJT17 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Technical Report Research

  15. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R1.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 I July 23,2010 Certified Mail Mr. Tom Reynolds TDR Consulting 195 Adair Road Burbank, Washington 99323 Dear Mr. Reynolds: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2010-01751) You requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), a list of names and contact information for the members ofthe U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Labor Standards Board (LSB), including the name and contact information of the Chairman and the schedule of the LSB

  16. No: P311

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    '-) , LosAlamos NATIONAL LABORATORY EST.1 943 Responsible Office: Safety Basis Technical Services R. D. Selvaqe Name M. E. Pansov-Hielvik Name Responsible Manager: Safety Basis Division Leader J. H. Miller Jr. Name lssuing Authority: Associate Director of Nuclear and High Hazard Operations W. T. Bivens Name lssued Date: Effective Date: //- 7-Jo/3 //- /â-zo/.3 Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) Process sBP-112-3-R1.1 Safety Basis Procedure 4-Ç- ¡2, Q-e-13 Date Approved by DOE Correspondence: So

  17. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Monthly Meeting W W W

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    N N N o o o v v v e e e m m m b b b e e e r r r 1 1 1 3 3 3 , , , 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 3 3 6 p.m., DOE Information Center 1 Science.gov Way Oak Ridge, Tennessee The mission of the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) is to provide informed advice and recommendations concerning site specific issues related to the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Oak Ridge Reservation. In order to provide unbiased evaluation and recommendations on the cleanup

  18. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Monthly Meeting W W W

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    O O O c c c t t t o o o b b b e e e r r r 1 1 1 4 4 4 , , , 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 5 5 5 6 p.m., DOE Information Center 1 Science.gov Way Oak Ridge, Tennessee The mission of the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) is to provide informed advice and recommendations concerning site specific issues related to the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Oak Ridge Reservation. In order to provide unbiased evaluation and recommendations on the cleanup efforts

  19. I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    i'lnai 'I'echnical ^^2^ lSoa/e:t\ I r » "Superacid Catalyzed Depolymerization and Conversion of Coals D O E : / E R / 1 0 3 4 0 - 1 DE83 013036 We were interested in applying superacid catalyzed cleavage-depolymerization and ionic hydrogenation for significantly improved low temperature conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbon, as well as obtaining information about involved reactions and the structure of intermediates of the coal-liquefaction process. In order to show the feasibility of

  20. Environmental Review Form for Argonne National Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    J?)Pwiect/Activitv Title: Generic Categorical Exclusion: Miscellaneous Installations and Maintenance Activities (?)AS0 NEPA track in^ No. ASO-CX-262 ( ) T v D e n ~ : ? NA B&R Code /?)Identifvine number: ERF-0973R1 WFO proposal # CRADA proposal # (?IProiect Manager: Philip C. Rash Signature: (?WEPA Owner: Phili~ C. Rash - ANL NEPA Reviewer: Y A. Kamiva s i g n a h & ? ' 3:- I. [?IDescri~tion of Proposed Action: SCOPE: GENERAL: This Categorical Exclusion covers action of a general and

  1. FHA PowerSaver

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FHA PowerSaver 203(k) Approved Lenders, Locations & Contact Information 1 | P a g e A s o f 1 8 - M a r - 1 4 Lender State Licensed In Contact Information AmeriFirst Financial Corporation 616 W. Centre Ave. Portage, MI 49024 ME, KY MN, WI, IL, MI, IN, OH, KY, TN, NC, FL Sandra Cartwright (269) 324-4240 scartwright@amerifirst.com Website: AmeriFirst Home Mortgage Neighbors Financial Corporation 2831 G Street Suite 200 Sacramento, CA 95816 CA Melissa Hillis (916) 732-2340 ext. 251

  2. Anti-cancer agents based on 4-(hetero)Ary1-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl Amino derivatives and a method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A.; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-29

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. ##STR00001## In particular, the invention relates N-substituted derivatives of 4-(hetero)aryl-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl amines having the structural Formula (I) and (II), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. Meaning of R1 and R2 in the Formula (I) and (II) are defined in claim 1. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  3. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search DOE PAGES Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Dai, Yang" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Total Results3 Pub. Available Full TextPublicly Available Full Text3 Citation Only0 Filtered Results Filter Results Filter by Author Dai, Yang (3) Larsen, Peter E. (2) Blanchard, Jeffrey L. (1) Cai, Sendan (1) Collart, Frank R. (1) Wen, Wen

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "/Hawaii U./ETH, Zurich" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything1 Electronic Full Text1 Citations0 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject astro, grqc (1) Filter by Author Alexander, D.M. (1) Ballantyne, D.R. (1) Balokovic, M. (1) Bauer, F.E. (1)

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Lukhanin, Alexander" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything1 Electronic Full Text0 Citations1 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject particle identification (1) sane (1) threshold gas cerenkov detector (1) Filter by Author Armstrong, Whitney R. (1)

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Goyal, Neeraj" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything1 Electronic Full Text0 Citations1 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject Filter by Author Dhar, S. K. (1) Goyal, Neeraj (1) Kulkarni, R. (1) Manfrinetti, P. (1) Paudyal, D. (1) Provino, A. (1)

  7. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    XCL-2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 Authors: Scott, Kathleen M [1] ; Sievert, Stefan M [2] ; Abril, Fereniki N [1] ; Ball, Lois A [1] ; Barrett, Chantell J [1] ; Blake, Rodrigo A [1] ; Boller, Amanda J [1] ; Chain, Patrick S [3] ; Clark, Justin A [1] ; Davis, Carisa R [1] ; Detter, J C [4] ; Do, Kimberly F [1] ; Dobrinski, Kimberly P

  8. The LANL urban consequences project (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The LANL urban consequences project Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The LANL urban consequences project Authors: Bos, Randall J [1] ; Brown, Michael J [1] ; Goorley, John T [1] ; Grinstein, Fernando [1] ; Heger, Arlen S [1] ; Linn, Rodman R [1] ; Zhang, Duan Z [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2010-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1172860 Report Number(s): LA-UR-10-06665; LA-UR-10-6665 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference

  9. Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | DOE PAGES Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system Title: Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system Authors: Dhar, S. K. [1] ; Provino, A. [2] ; Manfrinetti, P. [2] ; Kulkarni, R. [1] ; Goyal, Neeraj [1] ; Paudyal, D. [3] + Show Author Affiliations Department of Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, T.I.F.R., Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai, 400005, India Department of Chemistry, University of Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146

  10. BC TIPS - Hot-Humid Climate: New Orleans | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BC TIPS - Hot-Humid Climate: New Orleans BC TIPS - Hot-Humid Climate: New Orleans Homes that provide substantial reductions in energy use and home-owner utility bills and recognizes the best practices for quality, comfort, health, and safety in the market. PDF icon btp_hh_norleans_dec08v2_r1.pdf More Documents & Publications BC TIPS - Hot-Humid Climate: New Orleans High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY - Building America Top Innovation Unvented Crawlspace Code

  11. ORNL/RASA-85/1 RESULTS OF THE II4OBILE GAMMA SCANNING ACTIVITIES IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEvl YORK AREA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Nf7 n-q gz75 tLtY r 1 irl,r:'a :.a l: i , l : i l ',:lr.:'. itl:t i .,,::l ' i , t . . ORNL/RASA-85/1 RESULTS OF THE II4OBILE GAMMA SCANNING ACTIVITIES IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEvl YORK AREA Access to the information in this report is limited to thoss indicated on the distribution list and io Department ol Energy ancl Depsrtment of Energy Contractors This report was prepared as an account ol work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the U nited StatesGovernment nor any

  12. Rulison Open

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Control number -R-57 has been assigned t o t h i s report i n the Rulison Open his repon has been r e p i r d d d e c d y from the best mil.blc mpy. Available from the Sixvice; U. S. Department o f Commerce, Price: Papa m . 0 0 g . 9 . . Microfic DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. r- r? I I ; i 1 1 j j I, L.-, j TABLE O F CONTENTS ',--.> r\ '-1 I >.\, i Subject 1 1 Page No. I L

  13. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 111II1111111111111111111111111 GSB WW06 Floodplains and Wetlands Survey Results for the Gasbuggy and Gnome-Coach Sites, New Mexico December 1993 y :<I 2:. r k :'I : J *' r 1 ! J Environmental Restoration 1 A:, p. J : J Floodplains and Wetlands Survey Results for the Gasbuggy and Gnome-Coach Sites, New Mexico December 1993 Environmental Restoration U-~i~epartrnent of Energy Nevada Operations Office Floodplains and Wetlands Survey Results for the Gasbuggy and Gnome-Coach Sites, New Mexico

  14. Special Report: IG-0777

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Special Report Loan Guarantees for Innovative Energy Technologies DOE/IG-0777 September 2007 Department of Energy vvast~lngton, U L L U 3 d 3 S e p t e m b e r 1 9 , 2007 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Inspector General SUBSEC'T: INFORMATION: Special Repol-t on "Loan Guarantees for Iilnovative Energy 'Technologies" BACKGROUND 'Title XVlI of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorized the Departinent of Energy to provide loan guarantees for projects that "avoid, reduce, or

  15. Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1 Issue 4 - October 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 , I S S U E 4 O C T O B E R 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE Deploys Staff in Support of Hurricane Isaac Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director Infrastructure Reliability ISER Stewart Cedres Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness Hurricane Isaac, the fourth hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, made

  16. . UrZed States Government DePartment of Enerq DATE: REPLY TO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    YVE r 1Lcla (8.8gJ EFG (07.90) (3f1 , q q - z . UrZed States Government DePartment of Enerq DATE: REPLY TO A?TN OF: SUBJECT: TO: =.--. AUG12 1991 EM-421 (J. Wagoner, 3-8147) Elimination of the Processes Research, Inc. Site The File I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the Processes Research, Inc. Site in Cincinnati, Ohio. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at this site. Based on the above, the Processes Research,

  17. The Honorable Sebastian J'. Garafalb.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Departnient .of Energy _ ' > Wa$hingtoh. DC 20585 _, .<- The Honorable Sebastian J'. Garafalb. P.O., Box 1300,' M iddletown,. Connecti,cut dS457 ' r \ 1 Dear Mayor Garafalo: Secretary of 'Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a new approach to openness in the Department of Energy,(DDE) and its communications with the public. In, support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed information related to the former Pratt and W h itney Corp:.in your,j,urisd.iction that. :

  18. Ufl

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D*E(;;~8 \3s. 8 -\ . EFG (07.9:Q - lJ hit&d States Government - I_ memorandum Ufl Department of Energy ------ r ( \' * ;1;1.-' ,p "I (-pQ ( +;y, ---- [ 2 \ \ ! DATE: REPLY TO ATTN OF: AUG 12 1991 SUBJECT: EM-421 (J. Wagoner, 3-8147) Elimination of the Metcut Research Site TO: The File I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the Metcut Research Site. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at this site. Based on

  19. ft. n. Both, Ohtef, RarourQb DWrion,Oak Ridgo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    _ ,' .' ft. n. Both, Ohtef, RarourQb DWrion,Oak Ridgo hwt 2% w9 s. P. Morgan, Aar' t, Pimotor; Produotlon Dirirloa, i BY00 sniwm! OP Zr T~BIDm 1 . It ir axpeat tbt 4alivery of @air wteri8.l will be maa on orbaforo leptcmwrl, lg4g. Idantifioatioii my&ml "2416" haa been wr@md to thlr ahip nent and all related dauuuentr, aat ma&or Watlr Br n&R 1 ::_,, : ; .,. . . . ,~,-,.", :;> .

  20. I I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Header Sheet .Doc ID # 7 e) AW-h a""- - 'IN r 1,9- / q 1-1- 31 0 )c // C) SC CCN: FUSRAP COMMUNICATIONS DISTRIBUTION FSRD= COMM. TYPELL-1-1 FORMER SITES RESTORATION DIVISION (EW-93) SAIC SENSITIVE DATE PROCESSED BY PDCC APR 0 3 1997 COMM REF ADMIN RCD SUBJECT .1 lrhnu rn t FROM To r P, COMM DATE ADDR CODE I I CLOSES CNN Wes I - RESPONSE TRACKING INFORMATION AC TION DESCRIPTION: 01: Ioi: OWEOTO- OWED BY: (ORG) I (ORG) TARGETDAT9.A IcLosiNr cco..coaoip. DATE CLOSING REF- 02: 1 02'. OWED

  1. MACHINE AND FOUNDRY COMPANY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MACHINE AND FOUNDRY COMPANY kt '- : :'~ ENGINEERING DIVISIOJ ---. Cl FIELD iRIP ,REP@?T ,' ~ i;~:z;~zy~ MEETING REPORT : .I.-.-' ~Y ::,:I :. &, .I7 ENGINEERING REPORT- : $T, ~ suBJ:m~i-c n-..*~~.~n~ 9r.1 _ P,Y.~.I~ ADDRESS: :'~.'"I .- .._ c. Plans for - ,:, ..-; .:.j s ,PERSON CONTACTED . . .' ., I : /LV cliq 22: PLPCZS w: - American Machine & Fouudq Co., i3ue Termlual. Office ;s& $' PRI?sI?,NT: S. P~:Chartland - DuPont D. B. Craxford - AW ..x.i "7.7, J. J* Crata - LHF 1, .

  2. Mr. Andrew Wallo The Aerospace Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1% - : Mr. Andrew Wallo The Aerospace Corporation cr,6 Suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 OH-3 Dear Andy: of-l:33 The comments and authority decision from the following sites are set out TL.f I below. No additional coffments are included; therefore, a careful editorialIL,/Z. review of these documents should be made when the documents are finalized. IL. 5 \r 1. Watertown Arsenal, Watertown, MA // ,/ I* a+: /Jeti ' C ?A*-= pA-3 ?A-\* Although building 421

  3. Mr. Wayne Klassing Klassing Handbrake Company

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , '? 4,"?+s64!!m .a j ,; 1 -T ' a j II. 7 . iII4.J OCT 2 O 19199 . - Mr. Wayne Klassing Klassing Handbrake Company P.O. Box 860 Joliet, Illinois 60434 o a & E D @- r 1 /I i' .' .; rJ - -- -.--. -.- ' % \I! ,yG9 I .._M -' ?J -2 F K 1 - - /89 Dear Hr. Edmonds: Enclosed is a copy of the final survey report for your facility in Joliet, Illinois, which is the-site of the former W. E. Pratt Nanufacturing Company. This survey report documents the fact that the radiological condition of your

  4. Spencer Chetnical Ccmpny

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -146 I . . :, ~70-340 : .;, _. Spencer Chetnical Ccmpny &Q&t Building .:. /.: : Xensas City, Hiosouri .,i Attention: &.N~,~-l~ ~.I_ .z ,%;,.::.r .~'..; ,,., ,. : 1~. wt1-*: :,..: .,..' ..,,/ : f ,.,,. :;Lil~~.+ A,;; ;.,,I ~'~&:,.,3~ :;~ .: Thts refers to thr'iampactieo ckoducted.~~May 2 - 5, 1961, of activitiias at your~hawk~orlc8, Pfttsburg,~a;ansas, lic8msed under Source HaSerial Lieeme.Ho.C-4352 and Special Nuclear Material LiCans8 x011. 5xX-154 and a-329. ;. ; ., .,., :_:

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: survey of models for concrete degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Benjamin W; Huang, Hai

    2014-08-01

    Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of two primary properties: its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. Concrete structures have been known to last for hundreds of years, but they are also known to deteriorate in very short periods of time under adverse conditions. The use of concrete in nuclear facilities for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. The goal of this report is to review and document the main aging mechanisms of concern for concrete structures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the models used in simulations of concrete aging and structural response of degraded concrete structures. This is in preparation for future work to develop and apply models for aging processes and response of aged NPP concrete structures in the Grizzly code. To that end, this report also provides recommendations for developing more robust predictive models for aging effects of performance of concrete.

  6. Multi-Applications Small Light Water Reactor - NERI Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Michale Modro; James E. Fisher; Kevan D. Weaver; Jose N. Reyes, Jr.; John T. Groome; Pierre Babka; Thomas M. Carlson

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle.

  7. Science-based HRA: experimental comparison of operator performance to IDAC (Information-Decision-Action Crew) simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley, Rachel; Smidts, Carol; Boring, Ronald; Li, Yuandan; Mosleh, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Information-Decision-Action Crew (IDAC) operator model simulations of a Steam Generator Tube Rupture are compared to student operator performance in studies conducted in the Ohio State Universitys Nuclear Power Plant Simulator Facility. This study is presented as a prototype for conducting simulator studies to validate key aspects of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) methods. Seven student operator crews are compared to simulation results for crews designed to demonstrate three different decision-making strategies. The IDAC model used in the simulations is modified slightly to capture novice behavior rather that expert operators. Operator actions and scenario pacing are compared. A preliminary review of available performance shaping factors (PSFs) is presented. After the scenario in the NPP Simulator Facility, student operators review a video of the scenario and evaluate six PSFs at pre-determined points in the scenario. This provides a dynamic record of the PSFs experienced by the OSU student operators. In this preliminary analysis, Time Constraint Load (TCL) calculated in the IDAC simulations is compared to TCL reported by student operators. We identify potential modifications to the IDAC model to develop an IDAC Student Operator Model. This analysis provides insights into how similar experiments could be conducted using expert operators to improve the fidelity of IDAC simulations.

  8. Challenges in leveraging existing human performance data for quantifying the IDHEAS HRA method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Huafei N.; Groth, Katrina; Stevens-Adams, Susan

    2015-07-29

    Our article documents an exploratory study for collecting and using human performance data to inform human error probability (HEP) estimates for a new human reliability analysis (HRA) method, the IntegrateD Human Event Analysis System (IDHEAS). The method was based on cognitive models and mechanisms underlying human behaviour and employs a framework of 14 crew failure modes (CFMs) to represent human failures typical for human performance in nuclear power plant (NPP) internal, at-power events [1]. A decision tree (DT) was constructed for each CFM to assess the probability of the CFM occurring in different contexts. Data needs for IDHEAS quantification are discussed. Then, the data collection framework and process is described and how the collected data were used to inform HEP estimation is illustrated with two examples. Next, five major technical challenges are identified for leveraging human performance data for IDHEAS quantification. Furthermore, these challenges reflect the data needs specific to IDHEAS. More importantly, they also represent the general issues with current human performance data and can provide insight for a path forward to support HRA data collection, use, and exchange for HRA method development, implementation, and validation.

  9. A method to select human-system interfaces for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugo, Jacques Victor; Gertman, David Ira

    2015-10-19

    The new generation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will likely make use of state-of-the-art technologies in many areas of the plant. The analysis, design, and selection of advanced humansystem interfaces (HSIs) constitute an important part of power plant engineering. Designers need to consider the new capabilities afforded by these technologies in the context of current regulations and new operational concepts, which is why they need a more rigorous method by which to plan the introduction of advanced HSIs in NPP work areas. Much of current human factors research stops at the user interface and fails to provide a definitive process for integration of end user devices with instrumentation and control (I&C) and operational concepts. The current lack of a clear definition of HSI technology, including the process for integration, makes characterization and implementation of new and advanced HSIs difficult. This paper describes how new design concepts in the nuclear industry can be analyzed and how HSI technologies associated with new industrial processes might be considered. Furthermore, it also describes a basis for an understanding of human as well as technology characteristics that could be incorporated into a prioritization scheme for technology selection and deployment plans.

  10. A method to select human-system interfaces for nuclear power plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hugo, Jacques Victor; Gertman, David Ira

    2015-10-19

    The new generation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) will likely make use of state-of-the-art technologies in many areas of the plant. The analysis, design, and selection of advanced human–system interfaces (HSIs) constitute an important part of power plant engineering. Designers need to consider the new capabilities afforded by these technologies in the context of current regulations and new operational concepts, which is why they need a more rigorous method by which to plan the introduction of advanced HSIs in NPP work areas. Much of current human factors research stops at the user interface and fails to provide a definitive processmore » for integration of end user devices with instrumentation and control (I&C) and operational concepts. The current lack of a clear definition of HSI technology, including the process for integration, makes characterization and implementation of new and advanced HSIs difficult. This paper describes how new design concepts in the nuclear industry can be analyzed and how HSI technologies associated with new industrial processes might be considered. Furthermore, it also describes a basis for an understanding of human as well as technology characteristics that could be incorporated into a prioritization scheme for technology selection and deployment plans.« less

  11. A NOVEL APPROACH TO SPENT FUEL POOL DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Demmer

    2011-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been at the forefront of developing methods to reduce the cost and schedule of deactivating spent fuel pools (SFP). Several pools have been deactivated at the INL using an underwater approach with divers. These projects provided a basis for the INL cooperation with the Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 SFP (Exelon Generation Company) deactivation. It represents the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating process. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and allowing safer, more cost effective deactivation. The INL pioneered underwater coating process was used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by INL and Exelon to decommission SFPs using the underwater coating process. The rationale used to select the underwater coating process and the advantages and disadvantages are described. Special circumstances are also discussed, such as the use of a remotely-operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible. A larger project, the INTEC-603 SFP in-situ (grouting) deactivation, is reviewed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are discussed and a Lessons Learned evaluation is included.

  12. Identification of limiting case between DBA and SBDBA (CL break area sensitivity): A new model for the boron injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and (e.g., oblique Control Rods, Positive Void coefficient) required a developed and validated complex three dimensional (3D) neutron kinetics (NK) coupled thermal hydraulic (TH) model. Reactor shut-down is obtained by oblique CRs and, during accidental conditions, by an emergency shut-down system (JDJ) injecting a highly concentrated boron solution (boron clouds) in the moderator tank, the boron clouds reconstruction is obtained using a CFD (CFX) code calculation. A complete LBLOCA calculation implies the application of the RELAP5-3D{sup C} system code. Within the framework of the third Agreement 'NA-SA - Univ. of Pisa' a new RELAP5-3D control system for the boron injection system was developed and implemented in the validated coupled RELAP5-3D/NESTLE model of the Atucha 2 NPP. The aim of this activity is to find out the limiting case (maximum break area size) for the Peak Cladding Temperature for LOCAs under fixed boundary conditions. (authors)

  13. Correlation between Asian Dust and Specific Radioactivities of Fission Products Included in Airborne Samples in Tokushima, Shikoku Island, Japan, Due to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakama, M.; Nagano, Y.; Kitade, T.; Shikino, O.; Nakayama, S.

    2014-06-15

    Radioactive fission product {sup 131}I released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (FD-NPP) was first detected on March 23, 2011 in an airborne aerosol sample collected at Tokushima, Shikoku Island, located in western Japan. Two other radioactive fission products, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs were also observed in a sample collected from April 2 to 4, 2011. The maximum specific radioactivities observed in this work were about 2.5 to 3.5 mBq×m{sup -3} in a airborne aerosol sample collected on April 6. During the course of the continuous monitoring, we also made our first observation of seasonal Asian Dust and those fission products associated with the FDNPP accident concurrently from May 2 to 5, 2011. We found that the specific radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs decreased drastically only during the period of Asian Dust. And also, it was found that this trend was very similar to the atmospheric elemental concentration (ng×m{sup -3}) variation of stable cesium ({sup 133}Cs) quantified by elemental analyses using our developed ICP-DRC-MS instrument.

  14. Application of Standard Maintenance Windows in PHWR Outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuming Jiang [Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company, Ltd. (China)

    2006-07-01

    The concept of Standard Maintenance Windows has been widely used in the planned outage of light water reactor in the world. However, due to the specific feature of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), it has not come to a consensus for the PHWR owners to adopt Standard Maintenance Windows for planned outage aiming at the optimization of outage duration. Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company (TQNPC), with their experience gained in the previous outages and with reference to other PHWR power plants, has identified a set of Standard Maintenance Windows for planned outage. It can be applied to similar PHWR plants and with a few windows that are specific to Qinshan Phase III NPP. The use of these Standard Maintenance Windows in planned outage has been proved to be effective in control shutdown nuclear safety, minimize the unavailability of safety system, improve the efficient utilization of outage duration, and improved the flexibility of outage schedule in the case of emergency issue, which forced the revision of outage schedule. It has also formed a solid foundation for benchmarking. The identification of Standard Maintenance Windows and its application will be discussed with relevant cases for the common improvement of outage duration. (author)

  15. Johnson Noise Thermometry for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton, C.L.,Jr.; Roberts, M.; Bull, N.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Wood, R.T.

    2012-09-15

    Temperature is a key process variable at any nuclear power plant (NPP). The harsh reactor environment causes all sensor properties to drift over time. At the higher temperatures of advanced NPPs the drift occurs more rapidly. The allowable reactor operating temperature must be reduced by the amount of the potential measurement error to assure adequate margin to material damage. Johnson noise is a fundamental expression of temperature and as such is immune to drift in a sensor’s physical condition. In and near the core, only Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) and radiation pyrometry offer the possibility for long-term, high-accuracy temperature measurement due to their fundamental natures. Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) place a higher value on long-term stability in their temperature measurements in that they produce less power per reactor core and thus cannot afford as much instrument recalibration labor as their larger brethren. The purpose of the current ORNL-led project, conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced SMR Research and Development (R&D) program, is to develop and demonstrate a drift free Johnson noise-based thermometer suitable for deployment near core in advanced SMR plants.

  16. Johnson Noise Thermometry for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton Jr, Charles L; Roberts, Michael; Bull, Nora D; Holcomb, David Eugene; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Temperature is a key process variable at any nuclear power plant (NPP). The harsh reactor environment causes all sensor properties to drift over time. At the higher temperatures of advanced NPPs the drift occurs more rapidly. The allowable reactor operating temperature must be reduced by the amount of the potential measurement error to assure adequate margin to material damage. Johnson noise is a fundamental expression of temperature and as such is immune to drift in a sensor s physical condition. In and near core, only Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) and radiation pyrometry offer the possibility for long-term, high-accuracy temperature measurement due to their fundamental natures. Small, Modular Reactors (SMRs) place a higher value on long-term stability in their temperature measurements in that they produce less power per reactor core and thus cannot afford as much instrument recalibration labor as their larger brethren. The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate a drift free Johnson noise-based thermometer suitable for deployment near core in advanced SMR plants.

  17. Challenges in leveraging existing human performance data for quantifying the IDHEAS HRA method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liao, Huafei N.; Groth, Katrina; Stevens-Adams, Susan

    2015-07-29

    Our article documents an exploratory study for collecting and using human performance data to inform human error probability (HEP) estimates for a new human reliability analysis (HRA) method, the IntegrateD Human Event Analysis System (IDHEAS). The method was based on cognitive models and mechanisms underlying human behaviour and employs a framework of 14 crew failure modes (CFMs) to represent human failures typical for human performance in nuclear power plant (NPP) internal, at-power events [1]. A decision tree (DT) was constructed for each CFM to assess the probability of the CFM occurring in different contexts. Data needs for IDHEAS quantification aremore » discussed. Then, the data collection framework and process is described and how the collected data were used to inform HEP estimation is illustrated with two examples. Next, five major technical challenges are identified for leveraging human performance data for IDHEAS quantification. Furthermore, these challenges reflect the data needs specific to IDHEAS. More importantly, they also represent the general issues with current human performance data and can provide insight for a path forward to support HRA data collection, use, and exchange for HRA method development, implementation, and validation.« less

  18. Proceedings of the Chornobyl phytoremediation and biomass energy conversion workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, J.; Tokarevsky, V.

    1998-06-01

    Many concepts, systems, technical approaches, technologies, ideas, agreements, and disagreements were vigorously discussed during the course of the 2-day workshop. The workshop was successful in generating intensive discussions on the merits of the proposed concept that includes removal of radionuclides by plants and trees (phytoremediation) to clean up soil in the Chornobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ), use of the resultant biomass (plants and trees) to generate electrical power, and incorporation of ash in concrete casks to be used as storage containers in a licensed repository for low-level waste. Twelve years after the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Unit 4 accident, which occurred on April 26, 1986, the primary 4radioactive contamination of concern is from radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium ({sup 90}Sr). The {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr were widely distributed throughout the CEZ. The attendees from Ukraine, Russia, Belarus, Denmark and the US provided information, discussed and debated the following issues considerably: distribution and characteristics of radionuclides in CEZ; efficacy of using trees and plants to extract radioactive cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from contaminated soil; selection of energy conversion systems and technologies; necessary infrastructure for biomass harvesting, handling, transportation, and energy conversion; radioactive ash and emission management; occupational health and safety concerns for the personnel involved in this work; and economics. The attendees concluded that the overall concept has technical and possibly economic merits. However, many issues (technical, economic, risk) remain to be resolved before a viable commercial-scale implementation could take place.

  19. Effects of an Advanced Reactors Design, Use of Automation, and Mission on Human Operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Johanna H. Oxstrand

    2014-06-01

    The roles, functions, and tasks of the human operator in existing light water nuclear power plants (NPPs) are based on sound nuclear and human factors engineering (HFE) principles, are well defined by the plants conduct of operations, and have been validated by years of operating experience. However, advanced NPPs whose engineering designs differ from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) will impose changes on the roles, functions, and tasks of the human operators. The plans to increase the use of automation, reduce staffing levels, and add to the mission of these advanced NPPs will also affect the operators roles, functions, and tasks. We assert that these factors, which do not appear to have received a lot of attention by the design engineers of advanced NPPs relative to the attention given to conceptual design of these reactors, can have significant risk implications for the operators and overall plant safety if not mitigated appropriately. This paper presents a high-level analysis of a specific advanced NPP and how its engineered design, its plan to use greater levels of automation, and its expanded mission have risk significant implications on operator performance and overall plant safety.

  20. Demonstrating Structural Adequacy of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures for Beyond Design-Basis Pressure Loadings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braverman, J.I.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    ABSTRACT Demonstrating the structural integrity of U.S. nuclear power plant (NPP) containment structures, for beyond design-basis internal pressure loadings, is necessary to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements and performance goals. This paper discusses methods for demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment for beyond design-basis pressure loadings. Three distinct evaluations are addressed: (1) estimating the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment structure (10 CFR 50 and US NRC Standard Review Plan, Section 3.8) ; (2) demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment subjected to pressure loadings associated with combustible gas generation (10 CFR 52 and 10 CFR 50); and (3) demonstrating the containment structural integrity for severe accidents (10 CFR 52 as well as SECY 90-016, SECY 93-087, and related NRC staff requirements memoranda (SRMs)). The paper describes the technical basis for specific aspects of the methods presented. It also presents examples of past issues identified in licensing activities related to these evaluations.

  1. Control Board Digital Interface Input Devices Touchscreen, Trackpad, or Mouse?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Ronald L. Boring; Roger Lew

    2015-08-01

    The authors collaborated with a power utility to evaluate input devices for use in the human system interface (HSI) for a new digital Turbine Control System (TCS) at a nuclear power plant (NPP) undergoing a TCS upgrade. A standalone dynamic software simulation of the new digital TCS and a mobile kiosk were developed to conduct an input device study to evaluate operator preference and input device effectiveness. The TCS software presented the anticipated HSI for the TCS and mimicked (i.e., simulated) the turbine systems responses to operator commands. Twenty-four licensed operators from the two nuclear power units participated in the study. Three input devices were tested: a trackpad, mouse, and touchscreen. The subjective feedback from the survey indicates the operators preferred the touchscreen interface. The operators subjectively rated the touchscreen as the fastest and most comfortable input device given the range of tasks they performed during the study, but also noted a lack of accuracy for selecting small targets. The empirical data suggest the mouse input device provides the most consistent performance for screen navigation and manipulating on screen controls. The trackpad input device was both empirically and subjectively found to be the least effective and least desired input device.

  2. Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

  3. Baseline Evaluations to Support Control Room Modernization at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald L.; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2015-02-01

    For any major control room modernization activity at a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) in the U.S., a utility should carefully follow the four phases prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG-0711, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model. These four phases include Planning and Analysis, Design, Verification and Validation, and Implementation and Operation. While NUREG-0711 is a useful guideline, it is written primarily from the perspective of regulatory review, and it therefore does not provide a nuanced account of many of the steps the utility might undertake as part of control room modernization. The guideline is largely summative—intended to catalog final products—rather than formative—intended to guide the overall modernization process. In this paper, we highlight two crucial formative sub-elements of the Planning and Analysis phase specific to control room modernization that are not covered in NUREG-0711. These two sub-elements are the usability and ergonomics baseline evaluations. A baseline evaluation entails evaluating the system as-built and currently in use. The usability baseline evaluation provides key insights into operator performance using the control system currently in place. The ergonomics baseline evaluation identifies possible deficiencies in the physical configuration of the control system. Both baseline evaluations feed into the design of the replacement system and subsequent summative benchmarking activities that help ensure that control room modernization represents a successful evolution of the control system.

  4. Current status of the radioactive waste management programme in Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang-Lenton Leon, Jorge; Garcia Neri, Emilio

    2007-07-01

    Since 1984, ENRESA is responsible of the radioactive waste management and the decommissioning of nuclear installations in Spain. The major recent challenge has been the approval of the Sixth General Radioactive Waste Plan (GRWP) as 'master plan' of the activities to be performed by ENRESA. Regarding the LILW programme, the El Cabril LILW disposal facility will be described highlighting the most relevant events especially focused on optimizing the existing capacity and the start-up of a purpose -built disposal area for VLLW. Concerning the HLW programme, two aspects may be distinguished in the direct management of spent fuel: temporary storage and long-term management. In this regards, a major challenge has been the decision adopted by the Spanish Government to set up a Inter-ministerial Committee for the establishment of the criteria that must be met by the site of the Centralized Intermediate Storage (CTS) facility as the first and necessary step for the process. Also the developments of the long-term management programme will be presented in the frame of the ENRESA's R and D programme. Finally, in the field of decommissioning they will be presented the PIMIC project at the CIEMAT centre and the activities in course for the decommissioning of Jose Cabrera NPP. (authors)

  5. Modeling and Quantification of Team Performance in Human Reliability Analysis for Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. JOe; Ronald L. Boring

    2014-06-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) are important technical contributors to the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC) risk-informed and performance based approach to regulating U.S. commercial nuclear activities. Furthermore, all currently operating commercial NPPs in the U.S. are required by federal regulation to be staffed with crews of operators. Yet, aspects of team performance are underspecified in most HRA methods that are widely used in the nuclear industry. There are a variety of "emergent" team cognition and teamwork errors (e.g., communication errors) that are 1) distinct from individual human errors, and 2) important to understand from a PRA perspective. The lack of robust models or quantification of team performance is an issue that affects the accuracy and validity of HRA methods and models, leading to significant uncertainty in estimating HEPs. This paper describes research that has the objective to model and quantify team dynamics and teamwork within NPP control room crews for risk informed applications, thereby improving the technical basis of HRA, which improves the risk-informed approach the NRC uses to regulate the U.S. commercial nuclear industry.

  6. Digital I&C systems in nuclear power plants. Risk-screening of environmental stressors and a comparison of hardware unavailability with an existing analog system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, M.; Vesely, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we present a screening study to identify environmental stressors for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP) which can be potentially risk-significant, and compare the hardware unavailability of such a system with that of its existing analog counterpart. The stressors evaluated are temperature, humidity, vibration, radiation, electro-magnetic interference (EMI), and smoke. The results of risk-screening for an example plant, subject to some bounding assumptions and based on relative changes in plant risk (core damage frequency impacts of the stressors), indicate that humidity, EMI from lightning, and smoke can be potentially risk-significant. Risk from other sources of EMI could not be evaluated for a lack of data. Risk from temperature appears to be insignificant as that from the assumed levels of vibrations. A comparison of the hardware unavailability of the existing analog Safety Injection Actuation System (SIAS) in the example plant with that of an assumed digital upgrade of the system indicates that system unavailability may be more sensitive to the level of redundancy in elements of the digital system than to the environmental and operational variations involved. The findings of this study can be used to focus activities relating to the regulatory basis for digital I&C upgrades in NPPs, including identification of dominant stressors, data-gathering, equipment qualification, and requirements to limit the effects of environmental stressors. 30 refs., 8 figs., 26 tabs.

  7. Strategy for Migration of Traditional to Hybrid Control Boards in a Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids; Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Ulrich, Thomas Anthony

    2014-07-01

    This strategy document describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of new digital control room elements in a legacy analog main control room (MCR). Information from previous planning and analysis work serves as the foundation for creating a human-machine interface (HMI) specification for distributed control systems (DCSs) to be implemented as part of nuclear power plant (NPP) modernization. This document reviews ways to take the HMSI specification and use it when migrating legacy displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then an integrated system validation (ISV) in the full-scope control room training simulator. Following successful demonstration of operator performance using the systems during the ISV, the new DCS is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the MCR. This document concludes with a sample project plan, including a 15-month timeline from DCS design through implementation. Included is a discussion of how the U.S. Department of Energys Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) can be used to support design and V&V activities. This report completes a Level 4 (M4) milestone under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program.

  8. Predictive based monitoring of nuclear plant component degradation using support vector regression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Alamaniotis, Miltiadis; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) are large installations comprised of many active and passive assets. Degradation monitoring of all these assets is expensive (labor cost) and highly demanding task. In this paper a framework based on Support Vector Regression (SVR) for online surveillance of critical parameter degradation of NPP components is proposed. In this case, on time replacement or maintenance of components will prevent potential plant malfunctions, and reduce the overall operational cost. In the current work, we apply SVR equipped with a Gaussian kernel function to monitor components. Monitoring includes the one-step-ahead prediction of the components respective operational quantity using the SVR model, while the SVR model is trained using a set of previous recorded degradation histories of similar components. Predictive capability of the model is evaluated upon arrival of a sensor measurement, which is compared to the component failure threshold. A maintenance decision is based on a fuzzy inference system that utilizes three parameters: (i) prediction evaluation in the previous steps, (ii) predicted value of the current step, (iii) and difference of current predicted value with components failure thresholds. The proposed framework will be tested on turbine blade degradation data.

  9. Safety Assessment for the Kozloduy National Disposal Facility in Bulgaria - 13507

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biurrun, E.; Haverkamp, B.; Lazaro, A.; Miralles, A.; Stefanova, I.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the early decommissioning of four Water-Water Energy Reactors (WWER) 440-V230 reactors at the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) near the city of Kozloduy in Bulgaria, large amounts of low and intermediate radioactive waste will arise much earlier than initially scheduled. In or-der to manage the radioactive waste from the early decommissioning, Bulgaria has intensified its efforts to provide a near surface disposal facility at Radiana with the required capacity. To this end, a project was launched and assigned in international competition to a German-Spanish consortium to provide the complete technical planning including the preparation of the Intermediate Safety Assessment Report. Preliminary results of operational and long-term safety show compliance with the Bulgarian regulatory requirements. The long-term calculations carried out for the Radiana site are also a good example of how analysis of safety assessment results can be used for iterative improvements of the assessment by pointing out uncertainties and areas of future investigations to reduce such uncertainties in regard to the potential radiological impact. The computer model used to estimate the long-term evolution of the future repository at Radiana predicted a maximum total annual dose for members of the critical group, which is carried to approximately 80 % by C-14 for a specific ingestion pathway. Based on this result and the outcome of the sensitivity analysis, existing uncertainties were evaluated and areas for reasonable future investigations to reduce these uncertainties were identified. (authors)

  10. Briefing Products - Tools for Communicating Technical Issues to a Non-Technical Audience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Harvey Clark, Kevin T. Foster

    2011-06-09

    Briefing Products are a new NARAC/IMAAC product line designed to communicate the consequences of a radiological, nuclear, chemical or biological agent incident to non-technical decision makers and key leaders. Each Briefing Product addresses a single decision or issue focused on potential actions that should be considered when responding to a hazard, while avoiding the use of technical or regulatory jargon. Briefing Products do not make protective action recommendations, although they do concretely assist decision-makers with development of their own protective actions by quoting or paraphrasing the published guidance relevant to the decision at hand. Briefing Products are produced in sets tailored to specific types of incident which together depict the key decisions and characteristics of the incident. Each Briefing Product in the set consists of three elements: (1) Primary Effects, (2) Key Points and (3) Presenter Notes. Both the Primary Effects and Key Points are ready for direct presentation, while the Presenter Notes are designed to provide background information to the presenter and are not for direct presentation to the audience. The Briefing Products themselves are alternative presentations of results from the customary standard NARAC/IMAAC technical products. Currently, Briefing Products are available for detonation of both RDDs (Radiological Dispersal Devices) and INDs (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A new set of products tailored to nuclear power plant (NPP) accidents is currently under development. This paper describes the scope, structure and content of the Briefing Product sets. Examples from the two sets of Briefing Products now available are presented.

  11. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Jain, Jinesh; Russo, Richard E.; McIntyre, Dustin; Mao, Xianglei

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented:empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5–476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrumyielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies

  12. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  13. Microsoft Word - table_05.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 5. Number of producing gas wells by state and the Gulf of Mexico, December 31, 2010-2014 Alabama 7,026 7,063 6,327 R 6,165 6,118 Alaska 269 277 185 R 159 170 Arizona 5 5 5 5 5 Arkansas 7,397 8,388 8,538 R 9,843 10,150 California 1,580 1,308 1,423 R 1,335 1,118 Colorado 28,813 30,101 32,000 R 32,468 38,346 Gulf of Mexico 1,852 1,559 1,474 R 1,146 1,400 Illinois 50 40 40 R 34 36 Indiana 620 914 819 R 921 895 Kansas 22,145 25,758 24,697 R 23,792 24,354 Kentucky 17,670 14,632 17,936 R 19,494

  14. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    99 Table 7.1 Coal Overview, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Production 1 Waste Coal Supplied 2 Trade Stock Change 4,5 Losses and Unaccounted for 6 Consumption Imports Exports Net Imports 3 1949 480.6 NA 0.3 32.8 -32.5 7 ( ) 7 -35.1 483.2 1950 560.4 NA .4 29.4 -29.0 R 27.8 R 9.5 494.1 1955 490.8 NA .3 54.4 -54.1 R -4.0 R -6.3 447.0 1960 434.3 NA .3 38.0 -37.7 R -3.2 R 1.7 398.1 1965 527.0 NA .2 51.0 -50.8 R 1.9 R 2.2 472.0 1970 612.7 NA (s) 71.7 -71.7 R 11.1 R 6.6 523.2 1975

  15. Measurement of the ratio B(t to Wb)/B(t to Wq) in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2014-09-01

    The ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t to Wb)/B(t to Wq), where the denominator includes the sum over all down-type quarks (q = b, s, d), is measured in the t t-bar dilepton final state with proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s)=8 TeV from an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, collected with the CMS detector. In order to quantify the purity of the signal sample, the cross section is measured by fitting the observed jet multiplicity, thereby constraining the signal and background contributions. By counting the number of b jets per event, an unconstrained value of R=1.014 +/- 0.003 (stat.) +/- 0.032 (syst.) is measured, in good agreement with the standard model prediction. A lower limit R > 0.955 at the 95% confidence level is obtained after requiring R <;=1, and a lower limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element abs(V[tb]) > 0.975 is set at 95% confidence level. The result is combined with a previous CMS measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark cross section to determine the top-quark total decay width, Gamma[t]=1.36 +/- 0.02 (stat.) +0.14/-0.11 (syst.) GeV.

  16. Radiative forcing and temperature response to changes in urban albedos and associated CO2 offsets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-02-12

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and land surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe by 0.1. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the change in the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation and land surface temperature to a 0.1 increase in urban albedos for all global land areas. The global average increase in the total outgoing radiation was 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, and temperature decreased by {approx}0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in surface albedo. These averages represent all global land areas where data were available from the land surface model used and are for the boreal summer (June-July-August). For the continental U.S. the total outgoing radiation increased by 2.3 Wm{sup -2}, and land surface temperature decreased by {approx}0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in surface albedo. Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO{sub 2} offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be {approx} 57 Gt CO{sub 2}. A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on global climate and the expected CO{sub 2} offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  17. Sensitivity of MJO to the CAPE lapse time in the NCAR CAM3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LIU, P.; Wang, B.; Meehl, Gerald, A.

    2007-09-05

    Weak and irregular boreal winter MJO in the NCAR CAM3 corresponds to very low CAPE background, which is caused by easy-to-occur and over-dominant deep convection indicating the deep convective scheme uses either too low CAPE threshold as triggering function or too large consumption rate of CAPE to close the scheme. Raising the CAPE threshold from default 70 J/kg to ten times large only enhances the CAPE background while fails to noticeably improve the wind mean state and the MJO. However, lengthening the CAPE lapse time from one to eight hours significantly improved the background in CAPE and winds, and salient features of the MJO. Variances, dominant periods and zonal wave numbers, power spectra and coherent propagating structure in winds and convection associated with MJO are ameliorated and comparable to the observations. Lengthening the CAPE lapse time to eight hours reduces dramatically the cloud base mass flux, which prevents effectively the deep convection from occurring prematurely. In this case, partitioning of deep to shallow convection in MJO active area is about 5:4.5 compared to over 9:0.5 in the control run. Latent heat is significantly enhanced below 600 hPa over the central Indian Ocean and the western Pacific. Such partitioning of deep and shallow convection is argued necessary for simulating realistic MJO features. Although the universal eight hours lies in the upper limit of that required by the quasi-equilibrium theory, a local CAPE lapse time for the parameterized cumulus convection will be more realistic.

  18. HESFIRE: a global fire model to explore the role of anthropogenic and weather drivers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Morton, Douglas; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Pereira, Jose M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-02-13

    Vegetation fires are a major driver of ecosystem dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions. Anticipating potential changes in fire activity and their impacts relies first on a realistic model of fire activity (e.g., fire incidence and interannual variability) and second on a model accounting for fire impacts (e.g., mortality and emissions). In this paper, we focus on our understanding of fire activity and describe a new fire model, HESFIRE (Human–Earth System FIRE), which integrates the influence of weather, vegetation characteristics, and human activities on fires in a stand-alone framework. It was developed with a particular emphasis on allowing fires to spreadmore » over consecutive days given their major contribution to burned areas in many ecosystems. A subset of the model parameters was calibrated through an optimization procedure using observation data to enhance our knowledge of regional drivers of fire activity and improve the performance of the model on a global scale. Modeled fire activity showed reasonable agreement with observations of burned area, fire seasonality, and interannual variability in many regions, including for spatial and temporal domains not included in the optimization procedure. Significant discrepancies are investigated, most notably regarding fires in boreal regions and in xeric ecosystems and also fire size distribution. The sensitivity of fire activity to model parameters is analyzed to explore the dominance of specific drivers across regions and ecosystems. The characteristics of HESFIRE and the outcome of its evaluation provide insights into the influence of anthropogenic activities and weather, and their interactions, on fire activity.« less

  19. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W.; Hayes, Daniel J; Mcclelland, James W; Peterson, Bruce; Mcguire, David; Melillo, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  20. A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindell, D T; Chin, M; Dentener, F; Doherty, R M; Faluvegi, G; Fiore, A M; Hess, P; Koch, D M; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Schultz, M G; Schulz, M; Stevenson, D S; Teich, H; Textor, C; Wild, O; Bergmann, D J; Bey, I; Bian, H; Cuvelier, C; Duncan, B N; Folberth, G; Horowitz, L W; Jonson, J; Kaminski, J W; Marmer, E; Park, R; Pringle, K J; Schroeder, S; Szopa, S; Takemura, T; Zeng, G; Keating, T J; Zuber, A

    2008-03-13

    We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission) vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC) onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute {approx}40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with {approx}20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal). Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O{sub 3}, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for European and North American sources. At higher levels, model-to-model variations in transport and oxidation are most important. Differences in photochemistry appear to play the largest role in the intermodel variations in Arctic ozone sensitivity, though transport also contributes substantially in the mid-troposphere.