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1

Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery as a Geothermal Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery as a Geothermal Exploration Tool Abstract In the Great Basin of the western United States, geothermal fluids are sometimes associated with surface crusts of borate evaporite minerals. These borates can therefore potentially serve as a geothermal exploration tool if they can be efficiently identified and mapped in the field. We demonstrate the effectiveness of using a field-portable ASD Fieldspec® spectroradiometer, and satellite-based Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and Emitted Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) imagery for mapping borate minerals

2

Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Remote_Detection_Of_Quaternary_Borate_Deposits_With_Aster_Satellite_Imagery_As_A_Geothermal_Exploration_Tool&oldid=389959

3

Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A close spatial relationship exists between Quaternary borate deposits and moderate to high temperature (>=150oC) geothermal systems in the western part of the Great Basin. Similarly, a strong correlation exists between high concentrations of boron in groundwater and geothermal activity in the Great Basin. These relationships hae special significance for geothermal exploraion becauase ina number of cases, Quaternary surface borates occur without associated springs, and thus the borates can, and

4

Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal systems. Using borates as an exploation guide, and with key assistance from remote sensing techniques, three new geothermal targets have been identified in...

5

Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through methyl borate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a methyl borate intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

Filby, Evan E. (Rigby, ID)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Passive safety injection system using borated water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive safety injection system relies on differences in water density to induce natural circulatory flow patterns which help maintain prescribed concentrations of boric acid in borated water, and prevents boron from accumulating in the reactor vessel and possibly preventing heat transfer.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Allegheny, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Westmoreland, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine: antibacterial activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine- (QA-PEI-) based nanoparticles were synthesized using two synthetic methods, reductive amination and N-alkylation. According to the first method, QA-PEI nanoparticles were synthesized by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde ...

Ira Yudovin-Farber; Jacob Golenser; Nurit Beyth; Ervin I. Weiss; Abraham J. Domb

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

Filby, Evan E. (Rigby, ID)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

CADMIUM-RARE EARTH BORATE GLASS AS REACTOR CONTROL MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor control rod fabricated from a cadmiumrare earth-borate glass is presented. The rare earth component of this glass is selected from among those rare earths having large neutron capture cross sections, such as samarium, gadolinium or europium. Partlcles of this glass are then dispersed in a metal matrix by standard powder metallurgy techniques.

Ploetz, G.L.; Ray, W.E.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Pulsed atomic layer epitaxy of quaternary AlInGaN layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this letter, we report on a material deposition scheme for quaternary Al{sub x}In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-x--y}N layers using a pulsed atomic layer epitaxy (PALE) technique. The PALE approach allows accurate control of the quaternary layer composition and thickness by simply changing the number of aluminum, indium, and gallium pulses in a unit cell and the number of unit cell repeats. Using PALE, AlInGaN layers with Al mole fractions in excess of 40% and strong room-temperature photoluminescence peaks at 280 nm can easily be grown even at temperatures lower than 800{sup o}C. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

Zhang, J.; Kuokstis, E.; Fareed, Q.; Wang, H.; Yang, J.; Simin, G.; Asif Khan, M.; Gaska, R.; Shur, M.

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

11

Impact of tripropyl borate on life and impedance of lithium-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tripropyl borate was investigated as a low cost anion receptor to improve the performance of lithium-ion cells. The impact of tripropyl borate was examined using lithium-ion cells comprising a negative electrode of mesocarbon microbeads, a positive electrode of Li{sub 1.1}[Mn{sub 1/3}Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}]{sub 0.9}O{sub 2} and an LiPF{sub 6}-based electrolyte. It was found that the performance of the cells was improved by adding a proper amount of tripropyl borate ({le} 0.1 wt%) to the LiPF{sub 6}-based electrolyte. However, a small amount of gas was observed from cells with high contents of tripropyl borate when cycled at 55 C, and as a result, the performance of the cells deteriorated.

Chen, Z.; Liu, J.; Amine, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

Nickel-Borate Oxygen-Evolving Catalyst that Functions under Benign Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin catalyst films with electrocatalytic water oxidation properties similar to those of a recently reported Co-based catalyst can be electrodeposited from dilute Ni2+ solutions in borate electrolyte at pH 9.2 (Bi). The ...

Nocera, Daniel G.

13

Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM'(BO.sub.3)F, where M, M' are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO.sub.3 F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator.

Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); DeLoach, Laura D. (Manteca, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Keszler, Douglas A. (Corvallis, OK)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...

15

Scientists Identify New Quaternary Materials for Solar Cell Absorbers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

insight for exploring use of Earth- abundant quaternary semiconductors for large-scale solar cell applications. For large-scale solar electricity generation, it is critical to...

16

Distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: Implications for extent...

17

Lithium borate cluster salts as novel redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redox shuttle is a promising mechanism for intrinsic overcharge protection in lithium-ion cells and batteries. Two lithium borate cluster salts are reported to function as both the main salt for a nonaqueous electrolyte and the redox shuttle for overcharge protection. Lithium borate cluster salts with a tunable redox potential are promising candidates for overcharge protection for most positive electrodes in state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells.

Chen, Z.; Liu, J.; Jansen, A. N.; Casteel, B.; Amine, K.; GirishKumar, G.; Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

19

Distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: Implications for extent of the geothermal anomaly Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Distribution of quaternary rhyolite dome of the Coso Range, California: Implications for extent of the geothermal anomaly Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thirty-eight separate domes and flows of phenocryst-poor, high-silica rhyolite of similar major element chemical composition were erupted over the past 1 m.y. from vents arranged in a crudely S-shaped array atop a granitic horst in the Coso Range, California. Most of the extrusions are probably less than about 0.3 m.y. old. The area is one of Quaternary basaltic volcanism and crustal extension. The central part of

20

Tetrakis(1-imidazolyl) borate (BIM4) based zwitterionic and related molecules used as electron injection layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tetrakis(1-imidazolyl)borate (BIm4) based zwitterionic and/or related molecules for the fabrication of PLEDs is provided. Device performances with these materials approaches that of devices with Ba/Al cathodes for which the cathode contact is ohmic. Methods of producing such materials, and electron injection layers and devices containing these materials are also provided.

Li, Huaping; Xu, Yunhua; Bazan, Guillermo C

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Timing of late Quaternary faulting in the 1954 Dixie Valley earthquake area, central Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1954 Dixie Valley earthquake (M 6.9) in central Nevada produced about 3 m of total vertical displacement distributed across two principal fault zones along the east flank of the Stillwater Range. Most of the 1954 displacement was along the range-front fault with minor amounts on the piedmont fault zone, in contrast to an earlier Holocene displacement that was restricted to the piedmont fault. Detailed chronostratigraphic, exploratory drilling, and trenching studies indicate that faulting events have migrated back and forth between the range-front and piedmont fault zones in the late Quaternary. Prior to the 1954 earthquake, the range-front fault last ruptured in the late Pleistocene, during a large-magnitude event here called the IXL event. The northern half of the piedmont fault zone last ruptured between 1.5 and 6.8 ka during a large-magnitude event here called the Bend event. On the basis of 6 m total slip since the deposition of shoreline gravels at {approximately} 12 ka, the estimated Holocene vertical-slip rate is 0.5 mm/yr for the Dixie Valley rupture zone. Overlapping and migratory patterns of late Quaternary faulting indicate that the Dixie Valley zone does not fit a simple segmentation model.

Bell, J.W. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno (USA)); Katzer, T. (Las Vegas Valley Water District, NV (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates: Catalysts for asymmetric olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research presented and discussed in this dissertation involves the synthesis of transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates, and their application in catalytic enantioselective olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation. Neutral oxazolinylboranes are excellent synthetic intermediates for preparing new borate ligands and also developing organometallic complexes. Achiral and optically active bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are synthesized by reaction of 2-lithio-2-oxazolide and 0.50 equiv of dichlorophenylborane. These bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are oligomeric species in solid state resulting from the coordination of an oxazoline to the boron center of another borane monomer. The treatment of chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes with sodium cyclopentadienide provide optically active cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates H[PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}] [Ox{sup R} = Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4R-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4S-tBu]}. These optically active proligands react with an equivalent of M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) to afford corresponding cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 complexes {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}}M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} in high yields. These group 4 compounds catalyze cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature or below, providing pyrrolidine, piperidine, and azepane with enantiomeric excesses up to 99%. Our mechanistic investigations suggest a non-insertive mechanism involving concerted C?N/C?H bond formation in the turnover limiting step of the catalytic cycle. Among cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 catalysts, the zirconium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}){sub 2}}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} ({S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}) displays highest activity and enantioselectivity. Interestingly, {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} also desymmetrizes olefin moieties of achiral non-conjugated aminodienes and aminodiynes during cyclization. The cyclization of aminodienes catalyzed by {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} affords diastereomeric mixture of cis and trans cylic amines with high diasteromeric ratios and excellent enantiomeric excesses. Similarly, the desymmetrization of alkyne moieties in {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-catalyzed cyclization of aminodiynes provides corresponding cyclic imines bearing quaternary stereocenters with enantiomeric excesses up to 93%. These stereoselective desymmetrization reactions are significantly affected by concentration of the substrate, temperature, and the presence of a noncyclizable primary amine. In addition, both the diastereomeric ratios and enantiomeric excesses of the products are markedly enhanced by N-deuteration of the substrates. Notably, the cationic zirconium-monoamide complex [{S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2})][B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] obtained from neutral {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} cyclizes primary aminopentenes providing pyrrolidines with S-configuration; whereas {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} provides R-configured pyrrolidines. The yttrium complex {S-2}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} also affords S-configured pyrrolidines by cyclization of aminopentenes, however the enantiomeric excesses of products are low. An alternative optically active yttrium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-tBu}){sub 2}}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} ({S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3}) is synthesized, which displays highly enantioselective in the cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature affording S-configured cyclic amines with enantiomeric excesses up to 96%. A noninsertive mechanism involving a six-membered transition state by a concerted C?N bond formation and N?H bond cleavage is proposed for {S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} system based on the kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical features. In the end, a series of bis- and tris(oxazolinyl)borato iridium and rhodium complexes are synthesized with bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborane [PhB(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 2}]{sub n}, tris(oxazolinyl)borane [B(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 3}]n, and tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate [To{sup M}]{sup ?}. All these new an

Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ternary and quaternary antimonide devices for thermophotovoltaic applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) devices have been fabricated using epitaxial ternary and quaternary layers grown on GaSb substrates. GaInSb ternary devices were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) with buffer layers to accommodate the lattice mismatch, and GaInAsSb lattice-matched quaternaries were grown by MOVPE and by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Improved devices are obtained when optical absorption occurs in the p-layer due to the longer minority carrier diffusion length. Thick emitter p/n devices are limited by surface recombination, with highest quantum efficiency and lowest dark current being achieved with epitaxially grown surface passivation layers on lattice-matched MOVPE quaternaries. Thin emitter/thick base n/p devices are very promising, but require improved shallow high-quality n-type ohmic contacts.

Hitchcock, C.W.; Gutmann, R.J.; Ehsani, H.; Bhat, I.B. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Center for Integrated Electronics and Electronics Manufacturing; Wang, C.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.; Freeman, M.J.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 3: Potash, Soda Ash, and Borates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potash, Potash, Soda Ash, and Borates 3 Potash, soda ash and borates are industrial minerals. They are used primary as feedstock for other industries. They are used to make fertilizers, glass, chemicals and other materials used throughout manufacturing industries. For example, the agricultural industry relies heavily on potash and borates as fertilizers. It is the dependence of these manufacturing industries that make industrial minerals so important. Forms of Potash Potash is used primarily as an agricultural fertilizer because it is a source for soluble potassium. Potash denotes a variety of mined and manufactured salts, all containing the element potassium in water-soluble form. Potash can be potassium chloride [KCL, or muriate of potash (MOP)], potassium sulfate [K

25

Experience with certifying borated stainless steel as a shipping cask basket material  

SciTech Connect

The original cask designs for a cask demonstration project featured fuel baskets constructed of borated stainless steel (bss) as a structural material. The project is intended to demonstrate casks that can be used for both shipping and storing spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The baskets were intended to maintain the fuel assemblies in a subcritical array for both normal and accident conditions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, however, judged bss to be unacceptable as a structural material. The cask designs were subsequently modified. The knowledge gained during this cask demonstration project may be applicable to development of bss as a basket material in future cask design. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Abbott, D.G. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Nickell, R.E. (Applied Science and Technology, Inc., Poway, CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Using a Borated Panel to Form a Dual Neutron-Gamma Detector  

SciTech Connect

A borated polyethylene plane placed between a neutron source and a gamma spectrometer is used to form a dual neutron-gamma detection system. The polyethylene thermalizes the source neutrons so that they are captured by {sup 10}B to produce a flux of 478 keV gamma-rays that radiate from the plane. This results in a buildup of count rate in the detector over that from a disk of the same diameter as the detector crystal (same thickness as the panel). Radiation portal systems are a potential application of this technique.

Scott Wilde; Raymond Keegan

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Synthesis and luminescence properties of the lithium-containing lanthanum-oxycarbonate-like borates  

SciTech Connect

The lithium-containing lanthanum-oxycarbonate-like borate, Li{sub 0.6}La{sub 2}O{sub 2.25}(BO{sub 3}){sub 0.7}, has been synthesized by solid-state reactions and was found to be isostructural with the type II lanthanum-oxycarbonate La{sub 2}O{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}). The new compound, lithium-containing lanthanum-oxycarbonate-like borate Li{sub 0.6}La{sub 2}O{sub 2.25}(BO{sub 3}){sub 0.7} has been synthesized and its structure characterized by the Rietveld method using powder X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in space group P6{sub 3}/mmc with lattice parameters of a=b=4.03396(3) A, c=16.5863(2) A, V=233.746(4) A{sup 3}. The mechanism of the lithium incorporation in the borate is that four Li{sup +} cations replace one (B{sub 2}O){sup 4+} group, i.e. Li{sub 0.6}La{sub 2}O{sub 2.25}(BO{sub 3}){sub 0.7} can be described as Li{sub 2x}La{sub 2}O{sub 1.5+2.5x}(BO{sub 3}){sub 1-x}, x=0.3 and the lithium incorporation stabilized the type II borate. The luminescent properties of Li{sub 0.6}La{sub 2}O{sub 2.25}(BO{sub 3}){sub 0.7} doped with Eu{sup 3+} were studied, indicating a potential application in white light emitting diodes (WLEDs). - Graphical abstract: The similar compounds of the new compound Li{sub 0.6}La{sub 2}O{sub 2.25}(BO{sub 3}){sub 0.7}. Projections along the b-axes of crystal structures for (a) La{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-II, (b) A-type La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (c) Li{sub 0.52}La{sub 2}O{sub 2.52}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.74}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new compound Li{sub 0.6}La{sub 2}O{sub 2.25}(BO{sub 3}){sub 0.7} has been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its structure is characterized by the Rietveld method using powder X-ray diffraction data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This compound crystallizes in space group P6{sub 3}/mmc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism of lithium incorporation in borate is that two Li{sup +} cations replace one (BO{sub 0.5}){sup 2+} group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Eu{sup 3+} doped samples have potential application in WLEDs.

Kang, Youjun; Liu, Chunmeng; Kuang, Xiaojun [KLGHEI of Environment and Energy Chemistry, MOE Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)] [KLGHEI of Environment and Energy Chemistry, MOE Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Mi, Jinxiao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Liang, Hongbin, E-mail: cesbin@mail.sysu.edu.cn [KLGHEI of Environment and Energy Chemistry, MOE Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)] [KLGHEI of Environment and Energy Chemistry, MOE Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Su, Qiang [KLGHEI of Environment and Energy Chemistry, MOE Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)] [KLGHEI of Environment and Energy Chemistry, MOE Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Breaker concentrations required to improve the permeability of proppant packs damaged by concentrated linear and borate-crosslinked fracturing fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the concentrations of an oxidative breaker required to reduce significantly the proppant-pack permeability damage caused by aqueous hydraulic fracturing fluids. Long-term, proppant-pack permeability testing was used to evaluate linear and borate-crosslinked gels. Results indicate that increasing the breaker concentration can reduce proppant-pack permeability damage very effectively.

Brannon, H. (BJ Services (United States)); Pulsinelli, R.J. (Dowell Schlumberger, Tulsa, OK (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Effect of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition on electrical and optical properties of lithium borate glasses  

SciTech Connect

The electrical and optical property of lithium borate glasses was investigated. It is observed that conductivity decreases while density and refractive index increases with the addition of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Radiation length of glasses was determined and it is observed that radiation length decreases with the addition of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

Gedam, R. S.; Ramteke, D. D. [Department of Applied physics, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, Nagpur-440 010 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Friction and Wear Behaviors of (quinazolin-4-ones)-3-methyl-butyl Borate as Additive in Liquid Paraffin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been growing concern for the use of mineral oils because of the worldwide interest in environmental issues. This has promoted the use of ash less additives as environmental friendly lubricants. A potential ash less additive containing N, B, ... Keywords: Synthesis, Quinazolin-4-ones, Borate, Additive, Friction and wear behaviors

Ouyang Ping; Zhang Xianming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Solution-mediated strategies for synthesizing metal oxides, borates and phosphides using nanocrystals as reactive precursors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of their high surface area (and hence, increased reactivity) nanocrystals can be used as reactive precursors in the low-temperature synthesis of solid state materials. When nanocrystals are used as reactants, the temperatures needed for diffusion between them can be significantly lower than for bulk-scale reactions—often at temperatures attainable using solution-based techniques. In the following work, two synthetic strategies are defined and developed for accessing metal oxides, borates and phosphides using nanocrystalline precursors and solution-mediated techniques. Broadly, the strategies involve either 1) the formation of a nano-sized precursor in solution which is post-annealed after isolation to form a target metal oxide or borate or 2) the solution-mediated diffusion of phosphorus into a nanocrystalline metal to form target metal phosphides. To form multi-metal oxides using the first strategy, metal oxide nanoparticle precursors are mixed in stoichiometric ratios in solution to form a nanocomposite. After isolation, the nanocomposite is annealed in air at 700-800 °C to form target ternary metal oxides, including Y2Ti2O7, Eu2Ti2O7, NiTiO3, Zn2SnO4 and CuInO2. As a variation of this method, rare earth borate nanoparticle precursors can be formed in solution by the reaction of RE3+ with NaBH4. After isolation, annealing in air at 700-800 °C crystallizes a range of REBO3 and Al3RE(BO3)4 powders. Using solution-based techniques, metal phosphides can be formed by the reaction of pre-formed metal nanocrystals with trioctylphosphine (TOP), which acts as a mild phosphorus-source, at 300-370 °C. A range of transition metal phosphide nanocrystals are accessible using this strategy, including the polyphosphides PdP2, AgP2 and Au2P3. Furthermore, shape and size of the metal phosphide product can be influenced by the shape and size of the metal precursor, allowing for the templated-design of nanostructured metal phosphides. The utility of this technique is not limited to the nano-regime. Bulk-scale metal powders, wires, foils, thin films and nanostructured metals can be converted to metal phosphides using analogous reactions with hot TOP. The two-fold purpose of this work is to extend these solution-mediated nanocrystal-based synthetic strategies to new classes of materials, and to compliment the existing library of low-temperature methods for making solid state materials.

Henkes, Amanda Erin

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Luminescence properties of Sm{sup 3+} impurities in strontium lithium bismuth borate glasses  

SciTech Connect

In the present work, different concentrations of Sm{sup 3+}-doped strontium lithium bismuth borate glasses (SLBiB) were prepared by melt quench technique. The amorphous nature of the prepared glass samples was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Using the J-O intensity parameters, emission and decay measurements various radiative properties are studied. The nature of decay curves of {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} level for different Sm{sup 3+} ion concentrations in SLBiB glasses has been analyzed. The intensities of observed emission peaks and measured lifetimes decrease with the increase of Sm{sup 3+} ion concentration which may be due to energy transfer between excited Sm{sup 3+} ions through cross-relaxations and resonant energy channels.

Rajesh, D.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.; Seshadri, M.; Balakrishna, A. [Department of Physics,Sri Venkateswara University,Tirupati-517502 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

33

Deposition Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pulsed Plasma Processing Pulsed Plasma Processing NEW: Downloadable: Invited Talk "Pulsed Metal Plasmas," presented at the 2006 AVS Meeting, San Francisco, California, November 15, 2006. (PDF, file size 8 MB). Plasma Sources for Window Coatings Deposition processes for low-emittance and solar control coatings can be improved through the use of advanced plasma technology developed at LBNL. A new type of constricted glow-discharge plasma source was selected for the 1997 R&D 100 Award. Invented by LBNL researchers Andre Anders, Mike Rubin, and Mike Dickinson, the source was designed to be compatible with industrial vacuum deposition equipment and practice. Construction is simple, rugged and inexpensive. It can operate indefinitely over a wide range of chamber pressure without any consumable parts such as filaments or grids. Several different gases including Argon, Oxygen and Nitrogen have been tested successfully.

34

Behavior of Late Quaternary and historical faults in the western Basin and Range province  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quaternary stratigraphic relations and exploratory trenching in zones of historical surface faulting in the western Basin and Range Province suggest that faults with historical surface ruptures have similar, and in some cases lower, long-term (late Quaternary) and short-term (Holocene) slip rates than other adjacent and regional non-historical Quaternary faults. In the 1954 Dixie Valley earthquake (M6.8) zone, the range-front and piedmont faults collectively record a late Quaternary (200 ka) slip rate on the order of 0.2 mm/yr and a Holocene (7--12 ka) slip rate of 0.5--0.8 mm/yr. The principal segment of the 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake (M7.2) zone has an estimated latest Quaternary (25--35 ka) slip rate of 0.2--0.7 mm/yr and a Holocene (6--13 ka) slip rate of 0.3--0.7 mm/yr. The 1954 Rainbow Mountain earthquakes (M6.6 and M6.8) and 1954 Fairview Peak earthquake (M7.1) zones have late Quaternary slip rates that are lower (=] 1 mm/yr. Based on a comparison of Holocene and late Quaternary rates, many, but not all, historical and non-historical zones show evidence of temporal clustering.

Bell, J.W. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Extratropical Influences on the El Niño–Southern Oscillation through the Late Quaternary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sequence of numerical simulations with a coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model configured for particular times during the late Quaternary shows that simulated El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events decrease in frequency from ...

Andrew B. G. Bush

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Metalorganic Vapor-Phase Epitaxial Growth and Characterization of Quaternary AlGaInN  

SciTech Connect

In this letter we report the growth (by MOVPE) and characterization of quaternary AlGaInN. A combination of PL, high-resolution XRD, and RBS characterizations enables us to explore and delineate the contours of equil-emission energy and lattice parameters as functions of the quaternary compositions. The observation of room temperature PL emission as short as 351nm (with 20% Al and 5% In) renders initial evidence that the quaternary could be used to provide confinement for GaInN (and possibly GaN). AlGaInN/GdnN MQW heterostructures have also been grown; both x-ray diffraction and PL measurement suggest the possibility of incorporating this quaternary into optoelectronic devices.

BANAS, MICHAEL ANTHONY; CRAWFORD, MARY H.; FIGIEL, JEFFREY J.; HAN, JUNG; LEE, STEPHEN R.; MYERS JR., SAMUEL M.; PETERSON, GARY D.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Comparison of Lithium Gadolinium Borate Crystal Shards in Scintillating and Nonscintillating Plastic Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method for detecting neutrons using scintillating lithium gadolinium borate crystal shards in a plastic matrix while maintaining high gamma rejection. We have procured two cylindrical detectors, 5"\\times5", containing 1% crystal by mass. Crystal shards have a typical dimension of 1 mm. One detector was made with scintillating plastic, and one with nonscintillating plastic. Pulse shape analysis was used to reject gamma ray backgrounds. The scintillating detector was measured to have an intrinsic fast fission neutron efficiency of 0.4% and a gamma sensitivity of less than 2.3 \\times 10-9, while the nonscintillating detector had a neutron efficiency of 0.7% and gamma sensitivity of (4.75\\pm3.94)\\times10-9. We determine that increasing the neutron detection efficiency by a factor of 2 will make the detector competitive with moderated 3He tubes, and we discuss several simple and straightforward methods for obtaining or surpassing such an improvement. We end with a discussion of possible applications, both for the scintillating-plastic and nonscintillating-plastic detectors.

Kareem Kazkaz; Nathaniel S. Bowden; Marisa Pedretti

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

Active Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Active Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In western North America, a number of geothermal systems derive their heat from magmas or cooling intrusions. The interior of the Great Basin however, is characterized by widespread amagmatic geothermal activity that owes its existence to high crustal heat flow and active extensional tectonics. Both the magmatically heated and extensional fluid types in the Great Basin have recently, or are currently, depositing gold. Quaternary to Pliocene-aged gold deposits with adjacent high-temperature (≤ 150°C)

39

Late Quaternary Histories of Lakes Huron and Michigan: A Stable Isotope Investigation of Sediment Cores and Modern Biogenic Carbonates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Late Quaternary histories are investigated here for sediment cores from Lakes Huron and Michigan, using the oxygen- and carbon-isotope compositions of biogenic carbonates and the… (more)

Macdonald, Rebecca A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Scientists Identify New Quaternary Materials for Solar Cell Absorbers (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research provides insight for exploring use of earth-abundant quaternary semiconductors for large-scale solar cell applications. For large-scale solar electricity generation, it is critical to find new material that is Earth abundant and easily manufactured. Previous experimental studies suggest that Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} could be a strong candidate absorber materials for large-scale thin-film solar cells due to its optimal bandgap, high adsorption coefficient, and ease of synthesis. However, due to the complicated nature of the quaternary compound, it is unclear whether other quaternary compounds have physical properties suitable for solar cell application. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Fudan University, and University College London have performed systematic searches of quaternary semiconductors using a sequential cation mutation method in which the material properties of the quaternary compounds can be derived and understood through the evolution from the binary, to ternary, and to quaternary compounds. The searches revealed that in addition to Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4}, Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} are also suitable quaternary materials for solar cell absorbers. Through the extensive study of defect and alloy properties of these materials, the researchers propose that to maximize solar cell performance, growth of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} under Cu-poor/Zn-rich conditions will be optimal and the formation of Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} alloy will be beneficial in improving solar cell performance.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available This data set, prepared by Elizabeth Holland and colleagues, contains data for wet and dry nitrogen-species deposition for the United States and...

42

Quaternary volcano-lacustrine patterns and palaeobotanical data in southern Armenia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caucasus has been strongly influenced by Plio-Quaternary volcanic and tectonic events and Pleistocene Caucasus were influenced by tectono-volcanic events, lake level changes and glacialeinterglacial of early prehistoric human occupation in Georgia (Dmanisi) around 1.81 Ma (Gabunia et al., * Corresponding

Utrecht, Universiteit

43

Structure and optical properties of a noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

A new noncentrosymmetric borate, RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (abbreviated as RSBO), has been grown from Rb{sub 2}O--B{sub 2}O{sub 3}--RbF flux and its crystal structure was determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in space group Ama2 with cell parameters of a=11.128(10) A, b=12.155(15) A, c=6.952(7) A, Z=4. The basic structural units are isolated planar BO{sub 3} groups. Second harmonic generation (SHG) test of the title compound by the Kurtz-Perry method shows that RSBO can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP). Finally, based on the anionic group approximation, the optical properties of the title compound are compared with those of the structure-related apatite-like compounds with the formula 'A{sub 5}(TO{sub n}){sub 3}X'. - Graphical abstract: RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} and some other borate NLO compounds, namely Ca{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}F RCa{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}O (R=Y or Gd) and Na{sub 3}La{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as the derivatives of apatite. They have similar formula composed of five cations and three anion groups (we call them 5/3 structures). The detailed SHG coefficients and optical properties of the apatite-like NLO crystals were compared and summarized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} was grown from flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as a derivative of the apatite-like structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure and its relationship to the optical properties of RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} are compared with other NLO crystals with apatite-like structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The basic structural units are the planar BO{sub 3} groups in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Second harmonic generation (SHG) test shows that RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}.

Xia, M.J. [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, R.K., E-mail: rkli@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

One-photon band gap engineering of borate glass doped with ZnO for photonics applications  

SciTech Connect

Lithium tungsten borate glass of the composition (0.56-x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0.4Li{sub 2}O-xZnO-0.04WO{sub 3} (0 {<=}x{<=} 0.1 mol. %) is prepared for photonics applications. The glass is doped with ZnO to tune the glass absorption characteristics in a wide spectrum range (200-2500 nm). Chemical bond approach, including chemical structure, electronegativity, bond ionicity, nearest-neighbor coordination, and other chemical bonding aspect, is used to analyze and to explain the obtained glass properties such as: transmittance, absorption, electronic structure parameters (bandgap, Fermi level, and Urbach exciton-phonon coupling), Wannier free excitons excitation (applying Elliott's model), and two-photon absorption coefficient as a result of replacement of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} by ZnO.

Abdel-Baki, Manal [Glass Department, National Research Centre, Dokki 12311 Giza (Egypt); Abdel-Wahab, Fathy A.; El-Diasty, Fouad [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbasia, 11566 Cairo (Egypt)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Application of quaternary phase diagrams to compound semiconductor processing. Progress report, April 1, 1988--December 31, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper considers the application of quaternary phase diagrams to understanding and predicting the behavior of II-VI thin film interfaces in photovoltaic devices under annealing conditions. Examples, listed in a table, include semiconductor/insulator/semiconductor (SIS) layered structures, II-VI/II-VI and III-V/II-VI epitaxial heterojunctions and oxidation of ternary compounds. Solid solubility is taken into account for quaternary phase diagrams of semiconductor systems. Using free energies of formation, a method to calculate the quaternary phase diagrams was developed. The Ga-As-II-VI and Cd-Te-Zn-O phase diagrams are reviewed as examples of quaternary phase diagrams without and with solid solubility.

Schwartzman, A.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Characterization and origins of high-amplitude reflection packets, HARPs, along the Gulf of Mexico depositional profile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High amplitude reflection packets (HARPs) refer to sheet-like sand deposits, showing high-amplitude seismic-reflection character, which are thought to be associated with constructional channel systems. Based on observations of Quaternary deposits from the Amazon Fan, HARPs are interpreted to be related to channel avulsion events. The depositional model from the Amazon Fan suggests when levees fail, sediment gravity flows move through the break into interchannel lows, where lack of confinement results in sheet like sand deposits. Based on 2D and 3D seismic data, HARPs from the Gulf of Mexico not only form from updip channel avulsions, but from additional geological processes. In salt withdrawal minibasins, sediment gravity flows encounter an underfilled depocenter, where lack of confinement results in sheet like deposits. After initial spill into an outboard basin and the development of a graded slope equilibrium profile, slope channel complexes develop as conduits for sediment transport. These depositional processes characterize the "fill and spill" model and can result in the creation of HARP-like deposits. At the toe-of-the Sigsbee Escarpment, turbidity currents flow through nickpoints at the seaward edge of the escarpment and become unconfined, resulting in HARP-like deposition on the abyssal floor. Seismically, these deposits are laterally continuous, have low relief, pinchout downdip, and have internal channelization. Erosive, low-relief, discontinuous channels and a low-relief, flat-bottomed trough cut into the TS-HARP deposits. On the outer fan, at the seaward limit of submarine channels, sediment gravity flows will also become unconfined and deposit HARPs. These HARPs typically consist of shingled sheet-like deposits that may form larger scale mounded features. These observations indicate that HARP-like deposits can form from a variety of depositional processes and in variable depositional settings along the Gulf of Mexico depositional profile.

Rains, David Brian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

direct_deposit_111609  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: DO NOT complete this form until you are ready to submit it to the Payroll Department. DIRECT DEPOSIT REQUEST Directions: 1. Provide required information neatly, legibly; 2. If Checking Account Direct Deposit, include a voided check. a. DO NOT submit a deposit slip! 3. If Savings Account Direct Deposit, include a copy of savings card. 4. Sign this form; 5. Inter-office mail it to Craft Payroll at "P238." DIRECT DEPOSITION AUTHORIZATION I hereby authorize Los Alamos National Laboratory, hereinafter called The Laboratory, to initiate credit entries and, if necessary, debit entries and adjustments for any credit entries in error to my account listed on this form. If deposit is for:

48

Radionuclide deposition control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA); McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Perspectives on Deposition Velocity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deposition Deposition Velocity ... Going down the rabbit hole to explain that sinking feeling Brian DiNunno, Ph.D. Project Enhancement Corporation June 6 th , 2012 Discussion Framework ï‚— Development of the HSS Deposition Velocity Safety Bulletin ï‚— Broader discussion of appropriate conservatism within dispersion modeling and DOE-STD-3009 DOE-STD-3009 Dose Comparison "General discussion is provided for source term calculation and dose estimation, as well as prescriptive guidance for the latter. The intent is that calculations be based on reasonably conservative estimates of the various input parameters." - DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A.3 DOE-STD-3009 Dispersion

50

Preparation and investigation of the quaternary alloy CuTaInSe{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycrystalline samples of the quaternary alloy CuTaInSe{sub 3} were prepared by the usual melt and anneal technique. The analysis of the diffraction pattern indicates a single phase which indexes as a tetragonal chalcopyrite-like structure with lattice parameters a = 5.7837 {+-} 0.0002 A; c = 11.6208 {+-} 0.0007 A and V = 389 {+-} 1 A{sup 3}. Differential thermal analysis shows that the melting transition of CuTaInSe{sub 3} is incongruent with large liquid + solids regions.

Grima-Gallardo, P. [Centro de Estudios en Semiconductores (CES), Dpto. Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela)], E-mail: peg@ula.ve; Munoz, M.; Duran, S. [Centro de Estudios en Semiconductores (CES), Dpto. Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela); Delgado, G.E. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia, Dpto. Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Quintero, M.; Ruiz, J. [Centro de Estudios en Semiconductores (CES), Dpto. Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

51

BWR Fuel Deposit Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With zinc injection to BWR feedwater for plant radiation dose reduction, fuel deposits often contain significant amounts of zinc and the inner layers of deposits become more adherent to the cladding. Fuel surveillance programs have revealed thick tenacious crud with surface spallation at several plants. This project determined the chemical composition and morphological features of crud flake samples from Duane Arnold Cycle 17 and Browns Ferry 2 Cycle 12 and compared the data with those obtained from othe...

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

EMSL: Capabilities: Deposition and Microfabrication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Additional Information Meet the Deposition and Microfabrication Experts Related EMSL User Projects Deposition and Microfabrication Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Deposition and Microfabrication brochure Designed to augment research important to a variety of disciplines, EMSL's Deposition and Microfabrication Capability tackles serious scientific challenges from a microscopic perspective. From deposition instruments that emphasize oxide films and interfaces to a state-of-the-art microfabrication suite, EMSL has equipment to tailor surfaces, as diverse as single-crystal thin films or nanostructures, or create the microenvironments needed for direct experimentation at micron scales. Users benefit from coupling deposition and microfabrication applications

53

High-pressure synthesis and crystal structure of the lithium borate HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new lithium borate HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 6 GPa and 1050 deg. C in a multianvil press with a Walker-type module. The compound crystallizes in the space group Pnma (no. 62) with the lattice parameters a=829.7(2), b=759.6(2), and c=1726.8(4) pm (Z=16). The high-pressure compound HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} is built up from a three-dimensional network of BO{sub 4} tetrahedra and BO{sub 3} groups, which incorporates Li{sup +} ions in channels along the b-axis. Band assignments of measured IR- and Raman spectra were done via quantum-mechanical calculations. Additionally, the thermal behavior of HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} was investigated. - Graphical abstract: The new high-pressure compound HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} is built up from a three-dimensional network of BO4 tetrahedra and BO{sub 3} groups, which incorporates Li{sup +} ions in channels along the b-axis. In this paper, the synthesis, the crystal structure, and the properties of HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} are described. Highlights: > Synthesis of a new lithium borate with the composition HP-LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5} at high pressure. > In contrast to the non-centrosymmetric phase LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5}, this high-pressure phase is centrosymmetric. > First example of ternary alkali borates exhibiting threefold bridging oxygen atoms.

Neumair, Stephanie C.; Vanicek, Stefan [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kaindl, Reinhard; Toebbens, Daniel M. [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Wurst, Klaus [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: Hubert.Huppertz@uibk.ac.at [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Zero-flux planes, flux reversals and diffusion paths in ternary and quaternary diffusion  

SciTech Connect

During isothermal multicomponent diffusion, interdiffusion fluxes of individual components can go to zero at zero-flux planes (ZFP) and exhibit flux reversals from one side to the other of such planes. Interdiffusion fluxes as well as the locations and compositions of ZFPs for components are determined directly from the concentration profiles of diffusion couples without the need for prior knowledge of interdiffusion coefficients. The development and identification of ZFPs is reviewed with the aid of single phase and two-phase diffusion couples investigated in the Cu-Ni-Zn system at 775/sup 0/C. ZFP locations in the diffusion zone nearly correspond to sections where the activity of a component is the same as its activity in either of the terminal alloys of a couple. Path slopes at ZFPs are uniquely dictated by the atomic mobility and thermodynamic data for the components. Discontinuous flux reversals for the components can also occur at interfaces in multiphase couples. Identification of ZFPs is also presented for diffusion in the Cu-Ni-Zn-Mn quaternary system. Analytical representation of diffusion paths for both ternary and quaternary diffusion couples is presented with the aid of characteristic path parameters.

Dayananda, M.A.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

Instrument Series: Deposition and Microfabrication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Sputter Deposition System Only available at EMSL, the Discovery ® Deposition System has been customized to be a fully automated multi-functional "hybrid" instrument with several modes for thin film processing, including multi-target sputtering, effusion cell deposition, electron beam deposition, and in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) materials characterization. Unlike most systems, the Discovery ® Deposition System's unique configuration offers operational flexibility, efficiency, and control, allowing a range of applications and materials to be processed simultaneously. Because it is software controlled, users can provide their own "recipes" and have a complete log of what happens throughout the

56

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition André Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 53, Berkeley, California 94720 aanders@lbl.gov Abstract Cathodic arc plasma deposition is one of oldest coatings technologies. Over the last two decades it has become the technology of choice for hard, wear resistant coatings on cutting and forming tools, corrosion resistant and decorative coatings on door knobs, shower heads, jewelry, and many other substrates. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions are reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. The

57

Oxygen-isotope geochemistry of quaternary rhyolite from the Mineral Mountains, Utah, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxygen isotope analyses were made of phenocryst and glass separates from four Quaternary rhyolite flows and domes in the Mineral Mountains, southwest Utah. With the exception of biotite in all samples and alkali feldspar in the rhyolite domes, all minerals appear to be in close oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium. The geothermometry equations proposed by Bottinga and Javoy (1973) and Javoy (1977) for quartz, alkali feldspar and magnetite produce the best agreement with temperature results fom two-feldspar and iron-titanium oxide geothermometry for these rhyolites. If the rhyolites were generated by partial melting in the crust, their whole-rock (glass) delta/sup 18/O values (6.3 to 6.9 permil) are consistent with generation from I-type (Chappell and White, 1974, O'Neil and Chappell, 1977; O'Neil et. al., 1977) sources.

Bowman, J.R.; Evans, S.H. Jr.; Nash, W.P.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy Deposition Using EGS4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are used to model the energy deposition in 0.4 r.l. Ti due to photons produced by the Tesla TRD undulator driven by the 250 GeV Tesla primary electron beam. 1 Energy Deposition...

59

Oil shale deposits of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Oil-shale deposits occur in several areas of Thailand. Perhaps the most important deposit occurs at Mae Sod in Tak Province, West Thailand. Other well-known deposits are Li in Lamphum Province, Ko Kha District, Lampang Province, and Krabi in the southern peninsular region. The geological age of all these deposits is late Tertiary, as demonstrated by the presence of the fossils from the oil shale of the Mae Sod series, e.g., fish of the Ostariophysian family Cyprinidae.

Chakrabarti, A.K.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thin Film Deposition and Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Applications: Tube 1 (T1), open for future upgrade. Silicon Nitride Deposition (Tube 2): Low Stress recipe. Stoichiometric recipe. ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Multi-chamber deposition system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Multi-chamber deposition system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

1989-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

63

Quaternary 1T-2MTJ Cell Circuit for a High-Density and a High-Throughput Nonvolatile Bit-Serial CAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact quaternary cell circuit using a single MOS transistor and two magnetic tunnel junction devices (1T-2MTJ) is proposed for a high-density nonvolatile bit-serial content-addressable memory (CAM). The use of quaternary CAM-cell structure makes ... Keywords: Low-Power, Compact, Spintronics, Magnetic Tunnel Junction, MTJ, MOS/MTJ-hybrid, Logic-in-Memory, Fine-Grain, Power Gating

Shoun Matsunaga; Takahiro Hanyu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effect of co-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles on photoluminescence of cu-doped potassium lithium borate glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SnO{sub 2} co-doped lithium potassium borate glasses doped with 0.05, 0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 mol% of Cu were synthesized by the melt quenching technique. The SnO{sub 2} co-dope was added to the compounds in the amounts of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 mol%. The photoluminescent spectrum for different concentrations of copper was studied. It was observed that the intensity of blue emission (450, 490 nm) varies with concentration mol%. In addition, with different concentration of SnO{sub 2} to 0.10 mol% Cu, the influence of the luminescence has been observed to enhance intensity and shifted to blue and red (490, 535 nm) emissions.

Namma, Haydar Aboud; Wagiran, H.; Hussin, R.; Ariwahjoedi, B. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Malaysia and Baghdad College of Economic Sciences University (Iraq); Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh (Malaysia)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

65

Critical experiments with 4. 31 wt % /sup 235/U-enriched UO/sub 2/ rods in highly borated water lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were performed with 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel rods immersed in water containing various concentrations of boron ranging up to 2.55 g/l. The boron was added in the form of boric acid (H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/). Critical experimental data were obtained for two different lattice pitches wherein the water-to-uranium oxide volume ratios were 1.59 and 1.09. The experiments provide benchmarks on heavily borated systems for use in validating calculational techniques employed in analyzing fuel shipping casks and spent fuel storage systems that may utilize boron for criticality control.

Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

P-odd, P-even, and T-odd asymmetries in true quaternary fission of nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coefficients of P-odd, P-even, and T -odd asymmetries for a third and a fourth prescission particle emitted in the true quaternary fission of nuclei that was induced by polarized cold neutrons were studied on the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory. By using non-evaporation (nonadiabatic) mechanisms of light-particle emission, these coefficients were compared with the analogous coefficients for prescission third particles emitted in the ternary fission of nuclei.

Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)] [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone  

SciTech Connect

Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may transition between asymmetric and symmetric dimers in response to changes in either biochemical modifications (e.g. proteolytic cleavage) or other biological cues. Such transitions may contribute to the broad range of protein-protein interactions and functions attributed to class II chaperones.

Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

69

Stable aqueous suspension of partial oxidation ash, slag and char containing polyethoxylated quaternary ammonium salt surfactant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a pumpable aqueous suspension of particulate matter with reduced viscosity and increased resistance to sedimentation. It has a particle size in the range of about 37-2000 microns as produced by quench cooling of scrubbing the hot raw effluent gas stream comprising H/sub 2/+CO at a temperature in the range of about 1700{sup 0}F - 3000{sup 0}F from the partial oxidation of solid carbonaceous fuel selected from the group consisting of anthracite, bituminous, sub-bituminous and lignite coal, coke from coal, petroleum coke, coal liquefaction solid residue, oil shale, tar sands, asphaltic bitumen, and mixtures thereof. Wherein the aqueous suspension comprises water, about 1.0-50.0 weight percent of the particulate matter consisting of a mixture of slag and char, and about 0.1-10.0 weight percent of a polyethoxylated quaternary ammonium salt surfactant of the formula: where R is an alkyl radical selected from the group consisting of coco, tallow, lauryl, oleyl, and octadecyl, and x+y has a value in the range of 2-15.

Najjar, M.S.; Yaghmaie, F.; Sorell, L.S.

1989-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

(Acidic deposition and the environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

1990-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

72

Particle Deposition in Granular Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

Tien, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Hydrothermal Deposition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Deposition Hydrothermal Deposition Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Deposition Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Deposition: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Quartz veins indicate ancient fluid flow, possibly the result of a hydrothermal system (reference: http://www.nvcc.edu/home/cbentley/dc_rocks/) Tufa mounds indicate the location of extinct hot springs. In this photo they show the ancient extent of the surface manifestations at Mono Lake, CA (reference: http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/climatechange/page.aspx?id=170704)(photo by Scott Stine) Hydrothermal water carries minerals as it travels through the crust. These minerals are often deposited as pressure decreases as the fluid approaches

74

TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two-Phase Studies, with a focus on heat transfer and paraffin deposition at various pipe inclinations, which will be used to enhance the paraffin deposition code for gas-liquid flow in pipes. (3) Deposition Physics and Water Impact Studies, which will address the aging process, improve our ability to characterize paraffin deposits and enhance our understanding of the role water plays in paraffin deposition in deepwater pipelines. As in the previous two studies, knowledge gained in this suite of studies will be integrated into a state-of-the-art three-phase paraffin deposition computer program.

Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

Sippola, Mark R.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Modeling particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS JA Siegel 1,3 * and WWof fin-and-tube heat exchangers by particle deposition leadsparticle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces. We present a

Siegel, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Seasonalepisodic control of acid deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report contains the climatological, technical and economic factors for episodic and seasonal control of emissions in existing power plants. Analyzing a large data set of acid deposition for the years 1982-85, we find ...

Fay, James A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Linked Deposit Loan Program (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Linked Deposit Program provides loan financing for small businesses of up to $100,000 for up to 7 years. The State Investment Commission invests funds from the state's Abandoned Property Cash...

79

BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River Bend Nuclear Power Station, a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant, experienced fuel defects during Cycle 11. The failed fuel pins were identified during the subsequent refueling outage. To assist analysis of the fuel failure root cause, crud flake deposit samples were collected for analyses. Results on the morphology and distribution of chemical elements in four tenacious crud flakes that are associated with the fuel failures are reported in EPRI report 1009733, BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation–Riv...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Vapor deposition of hardened niobium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

Blocher, Jr., John M. (Columbus, OH); Veigel, Neil D. (Columbus, OH); Landrigan, Richard B. (Columbus, OH)

1983-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Title Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2002 Authors Berdahl, Paul, Hashem...

84

Quick, Efficient Film Deposition for Nanomaterials - Energy ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; ... • Films can be deposited uniformly in a one-step deposition of nanoparticles with optimized drop distri ...

85

Rocky Mountain carbonate spring deposit development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Relict Holocene carbonate spring deposits containing diverse biotic and abiotic depositional textures are present at Fall Creek cold sulphur springs, Alberta, Fairmont Hot Springs, British… (more)

Rainey, Dustin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Radon Progeny Deposition Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

Guiseppe, V. E. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States); Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Westerdale, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

A radon progeny deposition model  

SciTech Connect

The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guiseppe, Vincent E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Westerdale, S. [MIT

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Mapped present-day borate evaporites in Teels and Rhodes Marsh with ASTER satellite imagery References C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin (2006) Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Rhodes_Marsh_Area_(Kratt,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=511014"

89

Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Mapped present-day borate evaporites in Teels and Rhodes Marsh with ASTER satellite imagery References C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin (2006) Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Teels_Marsh_Area_(Kratt,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=511018"

90

Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

Jervis, T.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

High-pressure synthesis, crystal structure, and structural relationship of the first ytterbium fluoride borate Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9}  

SciTech Connect

Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus at 7.5 GPa and 1100 deg. C, representing the first known ytterbium fluoride borate. The compound exhibits isolated BO{sub 3}-groups next to ytterbium cations and fluoride anions, showing a structure closely related to the other known rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}. Monoclinic Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} crystallizes in space group C2/c with the lattice parameters a=2028.2(4) pm, b=602.5(2) pm, c=820.4(2) pm, and beta=100.63(3){sup o} (Z=4). Three different ytterbium cations can be identified in the crystal structure, each coordinated by nine fluoride and oxygen anions. None of the five crystallographically independent fluoride ions is coordinated by boron atoms, solely by trigonally-planar arranged ytterbium cations. In close proximity to the above mentioned compounds RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}, Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} can be described via alternating layers with the formal compositions 'YbBO{sub 3}' and 'YbF{sub 3}' in the bc-plane. - Graphical abstract: High-pressure/high-temperature synthesis (multianvil technique) led to the first ytterbium fluoride borate Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9}, built up from isolated BO{sub 3}-groups. The compound shows structural relations to the known rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}.

Haberer, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

[Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

Wigand, P.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Quaternary Bismide Alloy ByGa1-yAs1-xBix Lattice Matched to GaAs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on the lattice matched quaternary alloy, B{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}As{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} grown by molecular beam epitaxy at conditions conducive to bismuth incorporation. Incorporating a smaller atom (boron) along with the larger atom (bismuth) allows for a reduction of the epi-layer strain and lattice matching to GaAs for compositions of Bi:B{approx_equal}1.3:1. The addition of boron flux does not significantly affect the bismuth incorporation and no change in the band gap energy is observed with increasing boron content. However, excess, non-substitutional boron is incorporated which leads to an increase in hole density, as well as an increase in the density of shallow in-gap states as observed by the loss of localization of photo-excited excitons.

Deaton, D. A.; Ptak, A. J.; Alberi, K.; Mascarenhas, A.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electrochemical comparison and deposition of lithium and potassium from phosphonium- and ammonium-tfsi ionic liquids .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated for use as battery electrolytes. The ILs were synthesized from quaternary ammonium and phosphonium salts and TFSI-.… (more)

Vega, Jose A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Evolution of Turbine Blade Deposits in an Accelerated Deposition Facility: Roughness and Thermal Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the operation of a gas turbine, ingested contaminants present in the air form deposits on the surfaces of the turbine blades. These deposits grow… (more)

Wammack, James Edward 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Deposition  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

as far 4 as nuclear power, the vast majority of those items that 5 are in a nuclear power plant that Commerce controls 6 have very limited licensing requirements. 7 Commerce also...

98

Chemical vapor depositing of metal fluorides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Purity BeF2 and BeF2–AlF3glasses have been deposited by the chemical vapor deposition technique using beryllium and aluminum 1

A. Sarhangi; J. M. Power

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a platform for deposition of polymer thin films that can be further tailored by chemical surface modification. First, we explore chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran films using ...

Olsson, Ylva Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

LOW PRESSURE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF POLYSILICON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THEORY The mass transport processes in low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) are similar to those occuring in catalytic reactors

Gieske, R.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Guidelines for Turbine Deposit Collection and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam impurities can deposit throughout the steam path, causing a variety of performance issues. Deposits can result in efficiency losses and component failures through stress corrosion cracking (SCC) or corrosion fatigue (CF) initiated by corrosive deposits. The potential for each of these mechanisms can be exacerbated by the reduced frequency of turbine overhauls or opportunities to conduct an inspection. Sampling and deposit analysis is an integral part of a steam path audit, as well as a reflection o...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Texture of atomic layer deposited ruthenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ruthenium films were grown by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si(100) and ALD TiN. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the as-deposited films on Si(100) were polycrystalline, on TiN they were (002) oriented. After annealing at 800^oC ... Keywords: Ammonia plasma, Atomic layer deposition, Ruthenium, Silicide, Texture

J. Musschoot; Q. Xie; D. Deduytsche; K. De Keyser; D. Longrie; J. Haemers; S. Van den Berghe; R. L. Van Meirhaeghe; J. D'Haen; C. Detavernier

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

DOE Workshop - Deposition Velocity Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delivering DOE's Vision for the Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Safely Delivering the Department of Energy's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission DOE Workshop Deposition Velocity Status Mike Hitchler, Manager Nuclear Facility Safety June 5, 2012 Safely Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Existing UCOR Analyses * UCOR facilities at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) use various plume models depending on when they were developed and by whom. - Some use MACCS or MACCS2 for dispersion evaluation. (~5 locations) - LLLW uses ingestion modeling (multiple locations)

105

Sequence stratigraphy of the late Pleistocene - Holocene deposits on the northwestern margin of the South Caspian Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpretation of 900 km of a closely spaced grid of high-resolution seismic profiles over the northwestern margin of South Caspian Basin (SCB) allows recognition and study of six late Pleistocene - Holocene depositional sequences. Sequence stratigraphy analysis of sedimentary strata from 117,000 years B.P. to present led to the identification of a highstand systems tract, two transgressive systems tracts and six lowstand systems tracts. Each systems tract is characterized by specific seismic facies. Diverse depositional processes on the northwestern margin of the SCB are suggested by the thirteen seismic facies patterns recognized in the study area. Two distinct progradational complexes were interpreted within Sequence III and Sequences IV and V in the northeastern and northwestern parts of the study area, respectively. Stratigraphic interpretation of the sequences provided important information on parameters that control depositional architectures, such as lake level fluctuations, tectonic dynamics, and sediment supply. High sedimentation rates combined with a series of high-frequency and high-amplitude lake-level fluctuations, abrupt changes at the shelf edge, abnormally high formation pressure, and high tectonic activity during Quaternary time resulted in the development of a variety of complex geologic drilling hazards. I distinguished three types of hazards as a result of this study: mud volcanoes, sediment instability, and shallow gas. The 2D high-resolution seismic dataset from the northwestern margin of the SCB allowed more detailed seismic sequence stratigraphic analysis in the study area than has previously been attempted. In particular, it has a clear application in deciphering sediment supply and relative lake level changes as well as tectonic relationship of the northwestern shelf margin of the SCB. Results of this work led us towards better understanding of recent depositional history, improved our knowledge of the nature of the basin tectonics, climate history and styles of and controls on sedimentation processes within a sequence stratigraphic framework during the late Pleistocene-Holocene time.

Rahmanov, Ogtay Rasim

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effect of trimerization motifs on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of a noncleavable HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein  

SciTech Connect

The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain, collectively known as gp140) contain all known viral neutralization epitopes. Various strategies have been used to create soluble trimers of the envelope to mimic the structure of the native viral protein, including mutation of the gp120-gp41 cleavage site, introduction of disulfide bonds, and fusion to heterologous trimerization motifs. We compared the effects on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of three such motifs: T4 fibritin, a GCN4 variant, and the Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase catalytic subunit. Fusion of each motif to the C-terminus of a noncleavable JRCSF gp140(-) envelope protein led to enhanced trimerization but had limited effects on the antigenic profile and CD4-binding ability of the trimers. Immunization of rabbits provided no evidence that the trimerized gp140(-) constructs induced significantly improved neutralizing antibodies to several HIV-1 pseudoviruses, compared to gp140 lacking a trimerization motif. However, modest differences in both binding specificity and neutralizing antibody responses were observed among the various immunogens.

Du, Sean X.; Idiart, Rebecca J.; Mariano, Ellaine B.; Chen, Helen [Maxygen, Inc., 515 Galveston Drive, Redwood City, CA 94063 (United States); Jiang Peifeng [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Xu Li; Ostrow, Kristin M. [Maxygen, Inc., 515 Galveston Drive, Redwood City, CA 94063 (United States); Wrin, Terri; Phung, Pham [Monogram Biosciences, Inc., San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Binley, James M. [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Petropoulos, Christos J. [Monogram Biosciences, Inc., San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Ballantyne, John A. [Aldevron LLC, Fargo, ND 58104 (United States); Whalen, Robert G., E-mail: robert.whalen@maxygen.co [Maxygen, Inc., 515 Galveston Drive, Redwood City, CA 94063 (United States)

2009-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

107

Probabilities for the emission of light particles and their energy and angular distributions for true quaternary nuclear fission  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory, the features of true quaternary nuclear fission are studied by treating this fission process as a sequence of three processes following one another in the course of time. The first two processes are the escape of the first and then the second of the two light particles emitted from the neck of a fissioning nucleus because of a nonadiabatic character of the collective deformation motion of this nucleus. Finally, the third process is the separation of the fissioning nucleus into two rather heavy fission fragments. The differences that arise in the emission probabilities and in the angular and energy distributions upon going over from the first emitted to the second emitted prescission third and fourth particles are analyzed by invoking experimental data on the spontaneous and thermalneutron-induced fission of nuclei, and it is shown that these differences are caused by the changes both in the geometric configuration of the fissioning nucleus and in the shell structure of its neck after the first prescission particle is emitted from it.

Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)] [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hydrothermal synthesis and the crystal structure of borate cancrinite (Na,Ca){sub 2}[Na{sub 6}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 6}](BO{sub 3}) . 2H{sub 2}O  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transparent prismatic single crystals of borate cancrinite (Na,Ca){sub 2}[Na{sub 6}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 6}](BO{sub 3}) . 2H{sub 2}O are prepared through hydrothermal crystallization. The parameters of the hexagonal unit cell and intensities of 10806 reflections are measured on an Enraf-Nonius CAD4 automated diffractometer. The compound crystallizes in the hexagonal crystal system with the unit cell parameters a = 12.745(4) A, c = 5.180(2) A, V = 728.6(4) A{sup 3}, and space group P6{sub 3}. The structure is determined by direct methods and refined using the full-matrix least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms. The refinement of the structure is performed to the final discrepancy factor R{sub 1} = 0.027 for 2889 unique reflections with I > 2 {sigma} (I). In the structure of the borate cancrinite, the AlO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra form a zeolite-like framework in which twelve-membered hexagonal channels are occupied by sodium atoms and BO{sub 3} groups, whereas six-membered channels are filled with sodium and calcium atoms and water molecules. The mean interatomic distances are found to be as follows: (Si-O){sub mean} = 1.614 A and (Al-O){sub mean} = 1.741 A in the AlO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, (Na-O){sub mean} = 2.542 A in the seven-vertex sodium polyhedra, and [(Na,Ca)-O]{sub mean} = 2.589 A in the ditrigonal bipyramids.

Shirinova, A. F. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)], E-mail: afashf@rambler.ru; Khrustalev, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds (Russian Federation); Samedov, H. R. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Chemical Problems (Azerbaijan); Chiragov, M. I. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Metal thin film growth on multimetallic surfaces: From quaternary metallic glass to binary crystal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work presented in this thesis mainly focuses on the nucleation and growth of metal thin films on multimetallic surfaces. First, we have investigated the Ag film growth on a bulk metallic glass surface. Next, we have examined the coarsening and decay of bilayer Ag islands on NiAl(110) surface. Third, we have investigated the Ag film growth on NiAl(110) surface using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). At last, we have reported our investigation on the epitaxial growth of Ni on NiAl(110) surface. Some general conclusions can be drawn as follows. First, Ag, a bulk-crystalline material, initially forms a disordered wetting layer up to 4-5 monolayers on Zr-Ni-Cu-Al metallic glass. Above this coverage, crystalline 3D clusters grow, in parallel with the flatter regions. The cluster density increases with decreasing temperature, indicating that the conditions of island nucleation are far-from-equilibrium. Within a simple model where clusters nucleate whenever two mobile Ag adatoms meet, the temperature-dependence of cluster density yields a (reasonable) upper limit for the value of the Ag diffusion barrier on top of the Ag wetting layer of 0.32 eV. Overall, this prototypical study suggests that it is possible to grow films of a bulk-crystalline metal that adopt the amorphous character of a glassy metal substrate, if film thickness is sufficiently low. Next, the first study of coarsening and decay of bilayer islands has been presented. The system was Ag on NiAl(110) in the temperature range from 185 K to 250 K. The coarsening behavior, has some similarities to that seen in the Ag(110) homoepitaxial system studied by Morgenstern and co-workers. At 185 K and 205 K, coarsening of Ag islands follows a Smoluchowski ripening pathway. At 205 K and 250 K, the terrace diffusion limited Ostwald ripening dominants. The experimental observed temperature for the transition from SR to OR is 205 K. The SR exhibits anisotropic island diffusion and the OR exhibits 1D decay of island length while keeping the corresponding island width constant. Third, LEED indicates that, up to about 6 BL (12 ML), the Ag film adopts the (110) structure on lattice matched NiAl(110) surface, supporting the previous assignment based upon island heights measured in STM. Starting at 4.5 to 6 BL, (111) diffraction pattern is detected. This is also in agreement with previous STM study. Careful examinations of the LEED patterns reveal the slight difference in lattice constants between bulk Ag and bulk NiAl. At last, we performed STM studies of Ni deposition on NiAl(110) in the temperature range from 200 K to 400 K. Ni forms 'dense' Ni(100)-like islands on NiAl(110) with a zig-zag shaped stripe feature which is probably due to strain relief. DFT analysis provides insights into the island growth shapes, which are rationalized by the thermodynamics and kinetics of the film growth process. For thick Ni films (coverage exceeding 6 ML), a Ni(111)-like structure developed. Traditional MF theory is applied to analyze island density at 200 K. Deviation from homogeneous nucleation behavior for island size distribution and island density reveals the presence of heterogeneous nucleation mediated by the Ni antisite point defects on NiAl(110) surface.

Jing, Dapeng

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

DETERMINATION OF DEPOSITION RATES FOR COOKING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... All calculations of deposition rates were made after ... the in- duct electrostatic precipitator increased the ... (1985) measured the performance of several ...

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Available Technologies: Super High Rate Sputter Deposition  

Andre’ Anders of Berkeley Lab has developed a very high deposition rate magnetron sputtering wherein the surface of a target and the race track zone area of the ...

112

Fundamentals of Electrochemical Deposition, Second Edition - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 25, 2007 ... Fundamentals of Electrochemical Deposition, 2nd Edition by Milan Paunovic and Mordechay Schlesinger provides a ... This is not a handbook.

113

Predicting particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas-side of finned tube heat- exchangers. Journal of Heatsurface interactions in heat exchanger fouling. Journal ofParticle Deposition on Heat Exchangers Epstein, N. , 1988.

Siegel, J A; Nazaroff, William W

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

"Invisible" Archaeological Deposits at Small Milling Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deposits at Small Milling Sites ROBERT E. PARR and MARK Q.architechire, bedrock milling features, soil colorlithic scatters or bedrock milling stations), it appears

Parr, Robert E.; Sutton, Mark Q.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-49339 MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS J.A. Siegel1,3 * and W.W. Nazaroff2 Department of Energy under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy. INDEX TERMS HVAC, Fouling

117

Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Particle Deposition in Granular Media. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

Tien, C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Focused helium ion beam milling and deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a helium ion microscope with an integrated gas injection system for nanofabrication is explored by demonstrating the milling of fine features into single layered graphene and the controlled deposition of tungsten and platinum wires from gaseous ... Keywords: Beam-induced deposition, Focused ion beam, Gas injection system, Graphene, Helium ion microscope

S. A. Boden; Z. Moktadir; D. M. Bagnall; H. Mizuta; H. N. Rutt

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on identifying ash deposit materials and mounting them to a heat transfer surface for further study. A group of synthetic slag of various compositions was also produced using a sodium silicate binder, Powder River Basin (PRB) bottom ash, and ash cenospheres for porosity to test the effects of pulse detonation techniques on the removal of ash deposits.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Plasma deposited rider rings for hot displacer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hot cylinder for a cryogenic refrigerator having two plasma spray deposited rider rings of a corrosion and abrasion resistant material provided in the rider ring grooves, wherein the rider rings are machined to the desired diameter and width after deposition. The rider rings have gas flow flats machined on their outer surface.

Kroebig, Helmut L. (Rolling Hills, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX  

SciTech Connect

Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} matched the mass of 13.5 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition.

C.H. Skinner; H. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore; J. Hogan; W.R. Wampler; the NSTX team

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

Quantification of particle deposition in asymmetrical tracheobronchial model geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to quantify the local inspiratory and expiratory aerosol deposition in a highly asymmetric five-generation tracheobronchial tree. User-enhanced commercial codes and self-developed software was used to compute the ... Keywords: Airflow, Central airways, Computational fluid and particle dynamics, Deposition efficiency, Deposition enhancement factor, Deposition fraction, Particle deposition patterns

Árpád Farkas; Imre Balásházy

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

Depletion effects of silicon deposition from methyltrichlorosilane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The deposition rate of SiC on carbon-coated Nicalon fibers from methyltrichlorosilane in hydrogen was measured as a function of temperature, pressure, total flow rate, and simulated reactant depletion. The results, which are included in this paper together with kinetic information on the stability of methyltrichlorosilane, led to two conclusions: two different mechanisms of deposition can occur depending on whether the methyltrichlorosilane has an opportunity to dissociate into separate silicon- and carbon-containing precursors, and the deposition rate is strongly reduced by the generation of byproduct HCl. The data were fitted to a simple etch model to obtain a kinetic expression that accounts for the significant effect of HCl.

Besmann, T.M.; Sheldon, B.W.; Moss, T.S. III; Kaster, M.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Chemical vapor deposition of antimicrobial polymer coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is large and growing interest in making a wide variety of materials and surfaces antimicrobial. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a solventless low-temperature process, is used to form thin films of polymers ...

Martin, Tyler Philip, 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thin Film Deposition Method for Sensor Manufacturing  

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed an innovative method for gas sensor manufacturing using a thin film deposition. The thin film requires very little material and can be applied in high throughput applications.

131

Small Business Linked Deposit Program (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Small Business Linked Deposit Program provides below-market interest rates for qualified small businesses and certified industrial parks through local financing sources. Loans are for a two...

132

Linked Deposit Loan Program (West Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Linked Deposit Loan Program is targeted at small, private firms with 50 or fewer employees and gross annual revenues of $5 million or less comes. This loan offered through the West Virginia...

133

Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) by Laser Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Laser metal deposition is a layered manufacturing process which ... using a computer simulated model and relate a few metallurgical systems as ... of Square Plate and Poisson's Ratio Measurement at Cryogenic Temperatures.

134

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of several boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but also lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

135

Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Deposits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under-deposit corrosion represents the second leading mechanism of chemistry-influenced heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures (HTFs) and third leading cause of major availability losses. This report was prepared, in recognition of the lack of information, to assemble the state of knowledge on deposition in HRSG high-pressure (HP) evaporator tubing and to identify the major deficiencies in that knowledge. Findings of this effort can be used to establish immediate remediation and correction of...

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of a number of boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

Rajh, Tijana (Naperville, IL); Meshkov, Natalia (Downers Grove, IL); Nedelijkovic, Jovan M. (Belgrade, YU); Skubal, Laura R. (West Brooklyn, IL); Tiede, David M. (Elmhurst, IL); Thurnauer, Marion (Downers Grove, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method of deposition by molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reproducibly controlling layer thickness and varying layer composition in an MBE deposition process. In particular, the present invention includes epitaxially depositing a plurality of layers of material on a substrate with a plurality of growth cycles whereby the average of the instantaneous growth rates for each growth cycle and from one growth cycle to the next remains substantially constant as a function of time.

Chalmers, Scott A. (Albuquerque, NM); Killeen, Kevin P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Chemical characteristics of some major uranium deposits in western USA  

SciTech Connect

Multi-element chemical analyses of several thousand samples were retrieved from the US Geological Survey's computerized Rock Analysis Storage System and used to estimate the average abundances of various elements in each of several types of uranium deposits, in altered rocks associated with some of these deposits, and in unmineralized parts of the various host rocks. Deposits for which results are presented include the tabular deposits in the Morrison Formation, Ambrosia Lake district, New Mexico; secondary deposits in the Ambrosia Lake district; tabular deposits in the Morrison Formation of the Henry Mountains, Utah; tabular deposits in the Chinle Formation in Utah and Colorado; roll-type deposits in Tertiary rocks from the Texas Gulf district; roll-type deposits in the Tertiary basins of Wyoming; tabular deposits in the Entrada Sandstone in Colorado; and a vein-type deposit in crystalline rocks of the Front Range of Colorado. Statistical treatment of the data identified elements that were notably more or less abundant in the deposits and altered rocks than in the unmineralized parts of the host rocks. Comparisons of the mean abundances of elements in the deposits show that the chemical composition of roll-type deposits varies greatly even among deposits in the same district. By contrast, the chemical characteristics of tabular deposits display little variation; the Ambrosia Lake tabular deposits and those of the Henry Mountains district are particularly similar. The data place some constraints on the geochemical aspects of genetic models and suggest certain elements as potential prospecting guides.

Spirakis, C.S.; Pierson, C.T.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Vacuum deposited polymer/silver reflector material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Weatherable, low cost, front surface, solar reflectors on flexible substrates would be highly desirable for lamination to solar concentrator panels. The method to be described in this paper may permit such reflector material to be fabricated for less than 50 cents per square foot. Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuum web coating operation on polyester substrates. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from .4 {mu}m to .8 {mu}m. It is hoped that a low cost substrate can be used with the substrate laminated to the concentrator and the weatherable acrylic polymer coating facing the sun. This technique should be capable of deposition line speeds approaching 1500 linear feet/minute. Central to this technique is a new vacuum deposition process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process - for Polymer Multi-Layer.

Affinito, J.; Martin, P.; Gross, M.; Bennett, W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Apparatus for laser assisted thin film deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed laser deposition apparatus uses fiber optics to deliver visible output beams. One or more optical fibers are coupled to one or more laser sources, and delivers visible output beams to a single chamber, to multiple targets in the chamber or to multiple chambers. The laser can run uninterrupted if one of the deposition chambers ceases to operate because other chambers can continue their laser deposition processes. The laser source can be positioned at a remote location relative to the deposition chamber. The use of fiber optics permits multi-plexing. A pulsed visible laser beam is directed at a generally non-perpendicular angle upon the target in the chamber, generating a plume of ions and energetic neutral species. A portion of the plume is deposited on a substrate as a thin film. A pulsed visible output beam with a high pulse repetition frequency is used. The high pulse repetition frequency is greater than 500 Hz, and more preferably, greater than about 1000 Hz. Diamond-like-carbon (DLC) is one of the thin films produced using the apparatus.

Warner, Bruce E. (Pleasanton, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten.

Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Frank (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, A. Wayne (Albuquerque, NM); Omstead, Thomas R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

AGING EFFECTS ON THE PROPERTIES OF IMIDAZOLIUM, QUATERNARY AMMONIUM, PYRIDINIUM AND PYRROLIDINIUM-BASED IONIC LIQUIDS USED IN FUEL AND ENERGY PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionic liquids are often cited for their excellent thermal stability, a key property for their use as solvents and in the chemical processing of biofuels. However, there has been little supporting data on the long term aging effect of temperature on these materials. Imizadolium, quaternary ammonium, pyridinium, and pyrrolidnium-based ionic liquids with the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide and bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide anions were aged for 2520 hours (15 weeks) at 200?C in air to determine the effects of an oxidizing environment on their chemical structure and thermal stability over time. It was found that the minor changes in the cation chemistry could greatly affect the properties of the ILs over time.

Fox, E.

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

144

The optical and vibrational properties of the quaternary chalcopyrite semiconductor alloy Ag{sub x}Cu{sub 1-x}GaS{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The absorption, emission and Raman spectra of the quaternary chalcopyrite alloys Ag{sub x}Cu{sub 1-x}GaS{sub 2} have been measured as a function of the Ag concentration. We find strong and highly nonlinear dependence on the alloy concentration in the optical band gap (a large bowing parameter). On the other hand, most of the Raman peaks exhibit either small energy shifts or large broadening with alloying. We conclude that the effect of substitution of the Ag cations by Cu in AgGaS{sub 2} on its band structure cannot be predicted by the simple virtual crystal potential approximation as a result of the large difference in electronegativity and bond length between Ag and Cu. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Choi, In-Hwan [Physics Department, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Sung-Hwan [Physics Department, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea (Korea, Republic of); Yu, P. Y. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2000-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Worldwide deposition of strontium-90 through 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strontium-90 results from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s (EML) Global Fallout Program (GFP) are presented for the years 1987 through 1990. Quarterly {sup 90}Sr deposition results for the 66 sampling locations of EML`s GFP were generally low, indicating that there was no significant release of fission products into the atmosphere during this period. The global {sup 90}Sr deposition during these 4 years was lower than it has been for any similar period since this program began in 1958. Since there was no major atmospheric source of {sup 90}Sr during this period, the global cumulative deposit of {sup 90}Sr continued to decrease by radioactive decay to a 27 year low of 311.4 Pbq.

Monetti, M.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Line-of-sight deposition method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A line-of-sight method of depositing a film having substantially 100% of theoretical density on a substrate. A pressure vessel contains a target source having a surface thereof capable of emitting particles therefrom and a substrate with the source surface and the substrate surface positioned such that the source surface is substantially parallel to the direction of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface, the distance between the most remote portion of the substrate surface receiving the particles and the source surface emitting the particles in a direction parallel to the substrate surface being relatively small. The pressure in the vessel is maintained less than about 5 microns to prevent scattering and permit line-of-sight deposition. By this method the angles of incidence of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface are in the range of from about 45/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/ even when the target surface area is greatly expanded to increase the deposition rate.

Patten, J.W.; McClanahan, E.D.; Bayne, M.A.

1980-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

Line-of-sight deposition method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A line-of-sight method of depositing a film having substantially 100% of theoretical density on a substrate. A pressure vessel contains a target source having a surface thereof capable of emitting particles therefrom and a substrate with the source surface and the substrate surface positioned such that the source surface is substantially parallel to the direction of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface, the distance between the most remote portion of the substrate surface receiving the particles and the source surface emitting the particles in a direction parallel to the substrate surface being relatively small. The pressure in the vessel is maintained less than about 5 microns to prevent scattering and permit line-of-sight deposition. By this method the angles of incidence of the particles impinging upon the substrate surface are in the range of from about 45.degree. to 90.degree. even when the target surface area is greatly expanded to increase the deposition rate.

Patten, James W. (Richland, WA); McClanahan, Edwin D. (Richland, WA); Bayne, Michael A. (West Richland, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Morphology effects on polydispersed aerosol deposition rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the analysis of severe nuclear accidents, accurate prediction of aerosol deposition is important since, among other things, this influences the distribution of radioactive decay heat within the primary system and containment compartments. The fact that the aerosol cloud is not comprised of dense isolated spherical particles of only one size inevitably complicates such calculations but must be taken into account. Some particle deposition mechanisms are more sensitive to particle size and morphology than others so that simplifying assumptions valid for one mechanism [such as particle thermophoresis (notoriously size and morphology insensitive)] may be seriously in error for others (e.g., convective Brownian diffusion or eddy impaction). This paper deals with aggregate aerosol deposition.

Rosner, D.E.; Tandon, P. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Khalil, Y.F. [Northeast Utilities Service Co., Berlin, CT (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Supplemental heating of deposition tooling shields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reducing particle generation from the thin coating deposited on the internal surfaces of a deposition chamber which undergoes temperature variation greater than 100.degree. C. comprising maintaining the temperature variation of the internal surfaces low enough during the process cycle to keep thermal expansion stresses between the coating and the surfaces under 500 MPa. For titanium nitride deposited on stainless steel, this means keeping temperature variations under approximately 70.degree. C. in a chamber that may be heated to over 350.degree. C. during a typical processing operation. Preferably, a supplemental heater is mounted behind the upper shield and controlled by a temperature sensitive element which provides feedback control based on the temperature of the upper shield.

Ohlhausen, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peebles, Diane E. (Albuquerque, NM); Hunter, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Eckelmeyer, Kenneth H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Apparatus and method for laser deposition of durable coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are method and apparatus for depositing durable coatings onto the surface of a substrate without heating the entire substrate to high temperatures by using lasers to heat the substrate and dissociate a deposition gas. The apparatus comprises a deposition chamber for enclosing the substrate upon which a coating is to be deposited, gas delivery means for directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate, a first laser for heating the substrate, and a second laser for irradiating the deposition gas to dissociate the gas. The method includes placing a substrate within a vacuum deposition chamber and directing a flow of deposition gas on the substrate. Then the substrate is heated with a first laser while the deposition gas is irradiated with a second laser to dissociate the deposition gas.

Veligdan, J.T.; Vanier, P.; Barletta, R.E.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 1: Feasibility Study (1004931), published in 2004; Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization (1012207) published in 2007; and Boiler Water Deposition ...

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

153

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the following Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports: 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004; 1012207, Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization, published in 2007; 1014128, Boiler Water Deposition Model fo...

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Method of blasting a subterranean deposit  

SciTech Connect

A blasting method is described for mining of a subterranean oil-shale deposit. A raise is driven upward into a designated block of a subterranean oil-shale deposit from the roof of an undercutting cavity. A number of blasting holes are driven horizontally into the block from the raise in a fan-shaped pattern at each of a number of vertically spaced levels and are at least partially loaded with explosives. The charges are detonated sequentially in an upward progression to effect fragmentation and expansion of the overlaying block into the undercutting cavity. (11 claims)

Janssen, A.T.

1975-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

155

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

156

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

157

Treating paraffin deposits in producing oil wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paraffin deposition has been a problem for operators in many areas since the beginning of petroleum production from wells. An extensive literature search on paraffin problems and methods of control has been carried out, and contact was made with companies which provide chemicals to aid in the treatment of paraffin problems. A discussion of the nature of paraffins and the mechanisms of this deposition is presented. The methods of prevention and treatment of paraffin problems are summarized. Suggested procedures for handling paraffin problems are provided. Suggestions for areas of further research testing are given.

Noll, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Selective Area ALD Deposition with Nanolithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well-defined nano-patterned surfaces after metal-oxide deposition will be ... Effect of Initial Microstructure on the Processing of Titanium Using Equal ... of Ferroelectric Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride-Trifluoroethylene) Copolymer Films ... Sonochemistry as a Tool for Synthesis of Ion-Substituted Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles.

159

Exploration for uranium deposits, Grants mineral belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, occur in fluvial sandstones in the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). Uranium mineralization is concentrated by a dark-gray to black substance that has been identified as humate, which is derived from decaying vegetation. Black ore is truncated by overlying sandstone in at least three ore deposits, documenting an early age for mineralization. Ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt vary greatly in size and shape, tend to occur in clusters, and often present difficult drill targets. Current exploration is largely a matter of drilling in stages to distinguish favorable from unfavorable ground on a wide spacing, to seek mineralization in favorable ground, and to conduct close-spaced drilling in mineralized areas. Criteria for favorability differ among exploration groups but generally include 1) presence of a host sandstone, 2) anomalous mineralization, 3) color of the host rock, 4) presence of carbonaceous matter, and 5) position of the area relative to mineralized trends. A description of the drilling sequence, from ore discovery to the development of a mine at the Johnny M deposit (in the east part of the Ambrosia Lake district), exemplifies the problem of predicting where orebodies may occur. A study of the drill data at the Johnny M indicates the uranium ore is not related to specific geologic features other than humate, which is commonly associated with coalified plant fragments in mudstone-rich parts of the host sandstone.

Fitch, D.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Deposition Diagnostics for Next-step Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scale-up of deposition in next-step devices such as ITER will pose new diagnostic challenges. Codeposition of hydrogen with carbon needs to be characterized and understood in the initial hydrogen phase in order to mitigate tritium retention and qualify carbon plasma facing components for DT operations. Plasma facing diagnostic mirrors will experience deposition that is expected to rapidly degrade their reflectivity, posing a new challenge to diagnostic design. Some eroded particles will collect as dust on interior surfaces and the quantity of dust will be strictly regulated for safety reasons - however diagnostics of in-vessel dust are lacking. We report results from two diagnostics that relate to these issues. Measurements of deposition on NSTX with 4 Hz time resolution have been made using a quartz microbalance in a configuration that mimics that of a typical diagnostic mirror. Often deposition was observed immediately following the discharge suggesting that diagnostic shutters should be closed as soon as possible after the time period of interest. Material loss was observed following a few discharges. A novel diagnostic to detect surface particles on remote surfaces was commissioned on NSTX.

C.H. Skinner; A.L. Roquemore; the NSTX team; A. Bader; W.R. Wampler

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

State-of-Knowledge on Deposition, Part 2: Assessment of Deposition Activity in Fossil Plant Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 20 years, substantial advances have been made in the understanding and control of fossil plant cycle chemistry. In spite of these advances, deposition activity, most notably in boilers and steam turbines, remains an issue of concern to many organizations that operate fossil units. The underlying science of deposition in fossil unit components has not, with the exception of steam turbines, been studied extensively under the EPRI Boiler and Turbine Steam and Cycle Chemistry Program. This repo...

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

162

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

163

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar-reflective roofs remain cooler than absorptive roofs and thus conserve electricity otherwise needed for air conditioning. A currently controversial aspect of solar-reflective cool roofing is the extent to which an initially high solar reflectance decreases with time. We present experimental data on the spectral absorption of deposits that accumulate on roofs, and we attribute most of the absorption to carbon soot originally produced by combustion. The deposits absorb more at short wavelengths (e.g., in the blue) than in the red and infrared, imparting a slightly yellow tinge to formerly white surfaces. The initial rate of reflectance reduction by soot accumulation is consistent with known emission rates that are due to combustion. The long-term reflectance change appears to be determined by the ability of the soot to adhere to the roof, resisting washout by rain.

Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Rose, Leanna S.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.

Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Apparatus and method for photochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical vapor deposition apparatus includes a reactor housing having a window in one wall above a reaction chamber in the housing. A transparent curtain divides the reaction chamber into a reaction zone and a flush zone. At least one substrate is mounted in the reaction zone in light communication with the window so that ultraviolet radiation may penetrate through the window into the reaction zone. The window is kept clear by a gas flowing through the flush zone.

Jackson, Scott C. (Wilmington, DE); Rocheleau, Richard E. (Wilmington, DE)

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Electrostatic force assisted deposition of graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An embodiment of a method of depositing graphene includes bringing a stamp into contact with a substrate over a contact area. The stamp has at least a few layers of the graphene covering the contact area. An electric field is developed over the contact area. The stamp is removed from the vicinity of the substrate which leaves at least a layer of the graphene substantially covering the contact area.

Liang, Xiaogan (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of nano-composite...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plasma chemical vapor deposition of nano-composite CPt thin-films Title Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of nano-composite CPt thin-films Publication Type Journal...

168

Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and joint-type leaks Title Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and joint-type leaks Publication Type...

169

A molecular view of vapor deposited glasses  

SciTech Connect

Recently, novel organic glassy materials that exhibit remarkable stability have been prepared by vapor deposition. The thermophysical properties of these new ''stable'' glasses are equivalent to those that common glasses would exhibit after aging over periods lasting thousands of years. The origin of such enhanced stability has been elusive; in the absence of detailed models, past studies have discussed the formation of new polyamorphs or that of nanocrystals to explain the observed behavior. In this work, an atomistic molecular model of trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose, is used to examine the properties of vapor-deposited stable glasses. Consistent with experiment, the model predicts the formation of stable glasses having a higher density, a lower enthalpy, and higher onset temperatures than those of the corresponding ''ordinary'' glass formed by quenching the bulk liquid. Simulations reveal that newly formed layers of the growing vapor-deposited film exhibit greater mobility than the remainder of the material, thereby enabling a reorganization of the film as it is grown. They also reveal that ''stable'' glasses exhibit a distinct layered structure in the direction normal to the substrate that is responsible for their unusual properties.

Singh, Sadanand; Pablo, Juan J. de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

170

Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

Sievers, Robert E. (Boulder, CO); Hansen, Brian N. (Boulder, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

Mullendore, Arthur W. (Sandia Park, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-water cycles. Deposition in drum boilers has been identified as the area of broadest concern to the industry; therefore, an improved understanding of deposition in drum boilers is expected to represent the greatest source of benefits and value to end users. The overall objective of the modeling described here is to develop a comprehensive, integrated model for deposition process...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Electrochemical deposition of high purity silicon from molten fluoride ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Electrochemical deposition of high purity ...

174

Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National ...

175

Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings ...  

... Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings - Energy Innovation Portal on Delicious ...

176

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of modeling the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in EPRI report 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004. This report presents findings of follow-up activities directed toward the ultimate goal of developing an aggregate model that is applicable to the important deposition phenomena in fossil drum-type boilers.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 162°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Rhodes_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=387552"

178

Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 192°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Teels_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=388168

179

CHLORIDE DEPOSITION FROM STEAM ONTO SUPERHEATER FUEL CLAD MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

Experimemts using Cl/sup 36/ in a steam test loop were conducted to study the deposition behavior of chlorides on BONUS superheater fuel assembly materials. The moisture content of the steam was varied between 0 and 0.5 wt%, and superheat was added up to 15 deg F before the steam passed over the test cartridge heater. The effects of vaiiables on the chloride deposition on the heater were studied in detail. Chloride deposition from moist steam was found to result in heavy, adherent deposits which are conducive to severe chloride stress corrosion of austenitic steels, while removal of all moisture from the incoming steam reduces the chloride deposition and minimizes the chloride stress corrosion. The heater surface condition was found to be a very important variable; deposition is increased by surface defects and pits. Neither the temperature of steam or heater nor the amount of superheat had an appreciable effect on the deposition, when no moisture existed in the steam. However, low steam velocities and spacer protoberances increase the deposition. Different clad materials (Inconel and Type 304 and 347 stainless steel) with similar surface conditions did not affect the deposition, although subsequent corrosion effects do modify the deposition behavior. Recommendations are given for the control of chloride deposition in nuclear superheater reactor systems. (D.L.C.)

Bevilacqua, F.; Brown, G.M.

1963-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Dynamics of nucleation in chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the evolution of layer morphology during the early stages of metal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto Si(100) via pyrolysis of Fe(CO){sub 5} below 250{degrees}C. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) shows that nuclei formation is limited by precursor dissociation which occurs on terraces, not at step sites. Also, the average size of clusters formed during CVD is larger than for Fe growth by evaporation (a random deposition process). Based on STM data and Monte Carlo simulations, we conclude that the CVD-growth morphology is affected by preferential dissociation of Fe(CO){sub 5} molecules at existing Fe clusters -- an autocatalytic effect. We demonstrate that nucleation kinetics can be used to control formation of metal nanostructures on chemically tailored surfaces. Reactive sites on Si (001) are first passivated by hydrogen. H atoms are locally removed by electron stimulated desorption using electrons emitted from the STM tip. Subsequent pyrolysis of Fe(CO){sub 5} leads to selective nucleation and growth of Fe films in the areas where H has been removed.

Mayer, T.M.; Adams, D.P.; Swartzentruber, B.S.; Chason, E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

APPARATUS FOR VACUUM DEPOSITION OF METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and a method are described for continuous vacuum deposition of metals for metallic coatings, for ultra-high vacuum work, for purification of metals, for maintaining high-density electron currents, and for other uses. The apparatus comprises an externally cooled feeder tube extending into a container and adapted to feed metal wire or strip so that it emerges in a generally vertical position therein. The tube also provides shielding from the heat produced by an electron beam therein focused to impinge from a vertical direction upon the tip of the emerging wire. By proper control of the wire feed, coolant feed, and electron beam intensity, a molten ball of metal forms upon the emerging tip and remains self-supported thereon by the interaction of various forces. The metal is vaporized and travels in a line of sight direction, while additional wire is fed from the tube, so that the size of the molten ball remains constant. In the preferred embodiments, the wire is selected from a number of gettering metals and is degassed by electrical resistance in an adjacent chamber which is also partially evacuated. The wire is then fed through the feed tube into the electron beam and vaporizes and adsorbs gases to provide pumping action while being continuously deposited upon surfaces within the chamber. Ion pump electrodes may also be provided within line of sight of the vaporizing metal source to enhance the pumping action. (AEC)

Milleron, N.

1962-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of deposition conditions on the properties of pyrolytic carbon deposited in a fluidized bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-density, isotropic pyrolytic carbon layer beneath the silicon carbide (IPyC) plays a key role in the irradiation performance of coated particle fuel. The IPyC layer protects the kernel from reactions with chlorine during deposition of the SiC layer, provides structural support for the SiC layer, and protects the SiC from fission products and carbon monoxide. The process conditions used by the Germans to deposit the IPyC coating produced a highly isotropic, but somewhat permeable IPyC coating. The permeability of the IPyC coating was acceptable for use with the dense German UO{sub 2} kernels, but may not be suitable when coating UCO kernels. The UCO kernels are typically more porous and thus have a larger surface area than UO{sub 2} kernels. The lower density and the higher surface area of UCO kernels could make them more susceptible to attack by HCl gas during the silicon carbide (SiC) coating process, which could result in heavy metal dispersion into the buffer and IPyC coatings and a higher level of as-manufactured SiC defects. The relationship between IPyC deposition conditions, permeability, and anisotropy must be understood and the appropriate combination of anisotropy and permeability for particle fuel containing UCO kernels selected. A reference set of processing conditions have been determined from review of historical information and results of earlier coating experiments employing 350 and 500 {micro}m UO{sub 2} kernels. It was decided that a limited study would be conducted, in which only coating gas fraction (CGF) and temperature would be varied. Coatings would be deposited at different rates and with a range of microstructures. Thickness, density, porosity and anisotropy would be measured and permeability evaluated using a chlorine leach test. The results would be used to select the best IPyC coating conditions for use with the available natural enrichment uranium carbide/uranium oxide (NUCO) kernels. The response plots from the investigation of the deposition of pyrolytic carbon in a fluidized bed graphically depict the relationships between processing parameters and coating properties. The additional figures present optical, scanning electron microscopy, and other images to highlight microstructural details. For the study, only two parameters (factors), coating gas fraction and deposition temperature, were varied. The plots reveal obvious trends and links between factors and responses. The dominant relationships determined by this study for this range of coating conditions are: (1) rate is dependent upon coating gas fraction or in other terms, reactant concentration; (2) density is controlled by deposition temperature; (3) efficiency is influenced by both CGF and temperature; (4) anisotropy is affect by CGF and temperature, however, the relationship is more complex than for other properties; (5) permeability is dependent upon deposition temperature (thus density); and (6) open porosity is affect by CGF thus is influenced by coating rate. The response plots can be used as 'maps' for the deposition process and are thus valuable for selecting coating conditions necessary to produce desired combinations of properties. The information is useful in predicting the effects of changes to processing on properties and is beneficial in optimizing the process and product properties. Although the study was limited to only two parameters, the information provides a foundation from which other aspects of the coating process can be more easily investigated.

Lowden, Richard Andrew [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Nunn, Stephen D [ORNL; Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Price, Jeffery R [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Jackpile-Paguate deposit: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium mineralization occurs in the Jackpile sandstone, the uppermost unit in the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic), north of Laguna, New Mexico. Mineralization ranges from discontinuous, spotty disseminations to lenses up to 30 ft (10 m) thick and 100 ft (30 m) long. The lenses are elongate subparallel to the northeast trend of the Jackpile sandstone. Since 1952, observations during mining have indicated that varied forms of mineralization occur within lenses, such as rodlike features, irregular and diffused masses, and discontinuous seams or wisps crosscutting channel boundaries. The positive correlation between uranium content and organic carbon for samples greater than 0.04 percent U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ suggests that organic carbonaceous material is a major large-scale controlling factor for the deposition of uranium. No other significant geochemical control on mineralization can be postulated from the limited data presented.

Beck, R.G.; Cherrywell, C.H.; Earnest, D.F.; Feirn, W.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities  

SciTech Connect

We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: 1) evidence from point contact tunneling showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, 2) experimental results showing the production sharp niobium/oxide interfaces from a high temperature bake of ALD coated Al2O3 on niobium surfaces, 3) results from ALD coated structures.

Norem, J; Pellin, M J; Antoine, C Z; Ciovati, G; Kneisel, P; Reece, C E; Rimmer, R A; Cooley, L; Gurevich, A V; Ha, Y; Proslier, Th

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the commercial steam and power generation industry, deposits on heat transfer surfaces of the steam-water cycle equipment in fossil plant units have been a challenge. Deposits form at nearly all locations within the steam-water cycle, particularly in boiler tubes where failures can have substantial negative impacts on unit availability and reliability. Accumulation of internal deposits can adversely affect the performance and availability of boilers and turbines in fossil steam-wat...

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

186

Modeling PWR Fuel Corrosion Product Deposition and Growth Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) drove industry to conduct crud scrape campaigns at a number of units to characterize and better understand the material being deposited on the fuel clad surface. This report describes the first phase of a program to develop models that describe the crud deposition and growth process, including the many phenomena that influence not only the deposit mass, but the composition. The models will be benchmarked against published crud...

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

187

Boiler Water Deposition Model, Part 1: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many sources of availability and performance losses in fossil units involve deposition on water- and steam-touched surfaces, with the most acute effects occurring in boilers and turbines. Earlier deposition state-of-knowledge assessments sponsored by EPRI established three broad classifications of deposition phenomena (EPRI reports 1004194 and 1004930). However, within these classifications are many processes and influencing factors that need to be considered in order to make meaningful improvements in d...

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

188

REPORT: Direct Laser Powder Deposition – “State of the Art”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2007 ... This report describes the Direct Laser Powder Deposition (DLPD) process known by various names, including Directed Light Fabrication ...

189

Anisotropic Finite Element Modeling of the Fused Deposition ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit · Direct Precipitation of Sr-doped LaP3O9 Thin Film Electrolytes for ...

190

Study of Electroless-Deposited Nano-Silver on Medical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the sodium hypophosphite, dextrose and potassium sodium tartrate were selected as reducers for electroless-deposited nano-silver. The influences ...

191

Concept for lightweight spaced-based deposition technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based deposition technology for solar power and astronomicalmirrors and space solar power reflectors. In addition, thelow voltage bus of a solar panel power system of a satellite

Fulton, Michael; Anders, Andre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Geochemistry of the Yutangba Se deposit in western Hubei, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Se ores and abandoned stone coal pile at the Yutangba Se deposit there ... of Se minerals due to secondary enrichment of selenium in the stone coal ...

193

Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate Based Bio-ceramic Coatings ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate Based Bio-ceramic Coatings on ... of Nano Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride and Titanium Ions.

194

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation-The Ohio State University Background When coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) is used in place of natural...

195

USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition with Carbide Filaments ...  

Many of the current industry cells in production have come through NREL, ... One deposition technology utilized at NREL deals with hot wire chemical ...

197

Application of Vacuum Deposition Methods to Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of vacuum deposition techniques to the fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell materials and structures are reviewed, focusing on magnetron sputtering, vacuum plasma methods, laser ablation, and electrochemical vapor deposition. A description of each method and examples of use to produce electrolyte, electrode, and/or electrical interconnects are given. Generally high equipment costs and relatively low deposition rates have limited the use of vacuum deposition methods in solid oxide fuel cell manufacture, with a few notable exceptions. Vacuum methods are particularly promising in the fabrication of micro fuel cells, where thin films of high quality and unusual configuration are desired.

Pederson, Larry R.; Singh, Prabhakar; Zhou, Xiao Dong

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Heteroepitaxial Si Thin Films Deposited on Flexible Copper ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Heteroepitaxial Si Thin Films Deposited on Flexible Copper Substrates for Solar Photovoltaics. Author(s), Daniela Florentina Bogorin, Lee ...

199

Dense Deposition of Nanocomposites by a Compact YAG Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2002 ... Dense Deposition of Nanocomposites by a Compact YAG Laser by M. Senna and K. Hamada. Publisher: TMS. Product Format: PDF. Pages ...

200

Formation and Quantification of Corrosion Deposits in the Power Industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The presence of deposits on the secondary side of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator systems is one of the main contributors to the high… (more)

Namduri, Haritha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Plasma implantation and deposition for advanced materials surface modification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research work described in this thesis focuses on the physics of plasma implantation and deposition as well as the application of the technology to… (more)

Fu, King Yu (???)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Characteristics of Polymer Films Deposited via Microwave Plasma ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thin films were deposited on both Al and glass substrates at RT by MPECVD using benzene as precursor. Surface and physical properties of ...

203

REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF DEPOSITS FROM COAL GASIFICATION ...  

A method is provided for on-line removal and recovery of deposits from fossil fuel gasification systems to improve plant performance and recover a valuable metalloid.

204

Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits - Energy ...  

Researchers at ORNL developed a down-well heating apparatus that efficiently heats subterranean geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract ...

205

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous semiconductor films. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from higher order silanes has been studied for fabricating amorphous hydrogenated silicon thin-film solar cells. Intrinsic and doped a-Si:H films were deposited in a reduced-pressure, tubular-flow reactor, using disilane feed-gas. Conditions for depositing intrinsic films at growth rates up to 10 A/s were identified. Electrical and optical properties, including dark conductivity, photoconductivity, activation energy, optical absorption, band-gap and sub-band-gap absorption properties of CVD intrinsic material were characterized. Parameter space for depositing intrinsic and doped films, suitable for device analysis, was identified.

Rocheleau, R.E.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Aerosol Jet® Material Deposition for High Resolution Printed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Aerosol Jet printing, is finding wide use in a number of ... The Aerosol Jet systems deposit a wide variety of functional materials onto a wide ...

207

Health Effects for Boron and Borates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron occurs in varying concentrations in coal fly ash and is typically found in fly ash leachates. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is in the process of performing a risk assessment to determine safe levels of boron for human ingestion. This report describes existing information on the health effects of boron and how that information is being used to calculate a reference dose (RfD) and acceptable concentration in drinking water.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

Minimization of Pressurized Water Reactor Radiation Fields through Fuel Deposit Engineering: Deposit Property Evaluation and Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide an initial assessment of the options for modification of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary side corrosion product deposits (crud) to minimize the incorporation of activated crud into out-of-core surfaces, thus reducing the intensity of out-of-core radiation fields. This report summarizes the current knowledge of PWR fuel crud characteristics, including crystallographic structure (crystal habits), and buildup mechanisms. The report also reviews the ...

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

Crystal structure of new synthetic Ca,Na carbonate-borate Ca{sub 2}Na(Na{sub x}Ca{sub 0.5-x})[B{sub 3}{sup t}B{sub 2}{sup {delta}}O{sub 8}(OH)(O{sub 1-x}OH{sub x})](CO{sub 3})  

SciTech Connect

New Ca,Na carbonate-borate Ca{sub 2}Na(Na{sub x}Ca{sub 0.5-x}) [B{sub 3}{sup t}B{sub 2}{sup {Delta}}O{sub 8}(OH)(O{sub 1-x}OH{sub x})](CO{sub 3}) crystals (x {approx} 0.4) have been synthesized by the hydrothermal method in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-NaCl-system at t = 250 Degree-Sign C and P = 70-80 atm; the structure parameters are found to be a = 11.1848(3) Angstrom-Sign , b = 6.4727(2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 25.8181(7) Angstrom-Sign , {beta} = 96.364(3) Degree-Sign , V = 1857.60(9) Angstrom-Sign {sup 3}, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 8, and {rho}{sub calcd} = 2.801 g/cm{sup 3} (Xcalibur S autodiffractometer (CCD), 2663 reflections with I > 2{sigma} (I), direct solution, refinement by the least-squares method in the anisotropic approximation of thermal atomic vibrations, hydrogen localization, R{sub 1} = 0.0387). The structure is based on boron-oxygen layers of pentaborate radicals 5(2{Delta} + 3T). Ca and Na polyhedra and CO{sub 3} triangles are located between the layers. A crystallochemical analysis of the new Ca,Na carbonate-borate has established its similarity to natural Na,Ca pentaborates (heidornite and tuzlaite) and synthetic Na,Ba-decaborate.

Yamnova, N. A., E-mail: natalia-yamnova@yandex.ru; Borovikova, E. Yu.; Gurbanova, O. A.; Dimitrova, O. V.; Zubkova, N. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide.

Lowden, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sputter deposition for multi-component thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion beam sputter-induced deposition using a single ion beam and a multicomponent target is capable of reproducibly producing thin films of arbitrary composition, including those which are close to stoichiometry. Using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and a computer controlled, well-focused ion beam, this sputter-deposition approach is capable of producing metal oxide superconductors and semiconductors of the superlattice type such as GaAs-AlGaAs as well as layered metal/oxide/semiconductor/superconductor structures. By programming the dwell time for each target according to the known sputtering yield and desired layer thickness for each material, it is possible to deposit composite films from a well-controlled sub-monolayer up to thicknesses determined only by the available deposition time. In one embodiment, an ion beam is sequentially directed via a set of X-Y electrostatic deflection plates onto three or more different element or compound targets which are constituents of the desired film. In another embodiment, the ion beam is directed through an aperture in the deposition plate and is displaced under computer control to provide a high degree of control over the deposited layer. In yet another embodiment, a single fixed ion beam is directed onto a plurality of sputter targets in a sequential manner where the targets are each moved in alignment with the beam under computer control in forming a multilayer thin film. This controlled sputter-deposition approach may also be used with laser and electron beams.

Krauss, Alan R. (Plainfield, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Cary, NC)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Moore, Keith

213

Electroplating method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits for nuclear reactor dosimetry is described, including the steps of holding a radioactive parent until the radioactive parent reaches secular equilibrium with a daughter isotope, chemically separating the daughter from the parent, electroplating the daughter on a suitable substrate, and holding the electroplated daughter until the daughter decays to the fissionable deposit.

Ruddy, Francis H. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information ORNL DAAC Data Set Change Information Data Set: Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe Effective Date of Revision: May 2, 2005 Data Set Citation: Holland, E. A., B. H. Braswell, J. M. Sulzman, and J. -F. Lamarque. 2005. Nitrogen Deposition onto the United States and Western Europe. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Revision Summary: The investigator advised us that data in two of the deposition files were a factor of 100 too large and the order of the records was reversed from the description in the documentation. NADP_wet_deposition_no3_0.5x0.5_grid_annual.txt NADP_wet_deposition_nh4_0.5x0.5_grid_annual.txt Data File Changes:

215

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 Radiography Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 Radiography Abstract Iridium-192 radiography has been successfully tested as a technique for externally monitoring geothermal scale deposits in piping at the Brawley, CA geothermal field. This technique is applied to piping that handles flowing brine to provide in situ scale deposition observations without the disadvantage of dismantling piping for visual scale inspection. Exposure times and film orientations have been optimized to yield excellent agreement between radiographically detected scale thicknesses and actual

216

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated. 5 figs.

Mansure, A.J.; Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Method of and apparatus for determining deposition-point temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition for monitoring deposition-point temperature. The apparatus includes at least one acoustic-wave device such as SAW, QCM, FPM, TSM or APM type devices in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the surface temperature at which deposition occurs and/or rate of deposition as a function of temperature by sensing an accompanying change in frequency, phase shift, damping voltage or damping current of an electrical oscillator to a known calibrated condition. The acoustic wave device is actively cooled to monitor the deposition of constituents such as paraffins by determining the point at which solids from the liquid composition begin to form on the acoustic wave device. The acoustic wave device can be heated to melt or boil off the deposits to reset the monitor and the process can be repeated.

Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM); Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

ENERGY AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM DEPOSITION DURING COMMON ENVELOPE EVOLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I consider three processes which enhance mass loss rate from a common envelope of a giant star with a main sequence or a white dwarf companion spiraling-in inside its envelope. I consider deposition of orbital energy and orbital angular momentum to the giant’s envelope, and in more detail the formation of jets by an accreting companion and their propagation in the envelope. I find that in many cases the deposition of orbital angular momentum to the envelope may be more important to the mass loss process than the deposition of orbital energy. Jets blown by an accreting companion, in particular a white dwarf, orbiting inside the outer regions of the giant’s envelope may also dominate over orbital energy deposition at early stage of the common envelope evolution. These imply that studies which ignore the deposition of angular momentum to the envelope and the effects of the accreting companion may reach wrong conclusions.

Noam Soker

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Validation of Geant4 simulation of electron energy deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geant4-based simulations of the energy deposited by electrons in various materials are quantitatively compared to high precision calorimetric measurements taken at Sandia Laboratories. The experimental data concern electron beams of energy between a few tens of keV and 1 MeV at various incidence angles. Two experimental scenarios are evaluated: the longitudinal energy deposition pattern in a finely segmented detector, and the total energy deposited in a larger size calorimeter. The simulations are produced with Geant4 versions from 9.1 to 9.6; they involve models of electron-photon interactions in the standard and low energy electromagnetic packages, and various implementations of electron multiple scattering. Significant differences in compatibility with experimental data are observed in the longitudinal energy deposition patterns produced by the examined Geant4 versions, while the total deposited energy exhibits smaller variations across the various Geant4 versions, with the exception Geant4 9.4. The valida...

Batic, Matej; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Metal oxide morphology in argon-assisted glancing angle deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) is a thin film deposition technique capable of fabricating columnar architectures such as posts, helices, and chevrons with control over nanoscale film features. Argon bombardment during deposition modifies the GLAD process, producing films with new morphologies which have shown promise for sensing and photonic devices. The authors report modification of column tilt angle, film density, and specific surface area for 12 different metal oxide and fluoride film materials deposited using Ar-assisted GLAD. For the vapor flux/ion beam geometry and materials studied here, with increasing argon flux, the column tilt increases, film density increases, and specific surface area decreases. With a better understanding of the nature of property modification and the mechanisms responsible, the Ar-assisted deposition process can be more effectively targeted towards specific applications, including birefringent thin films or photonic crystal square spirals.

Sorge, J. B.; Taschuk, M. T.; Wakefield, N. G.; Sit, J. C.; Brett, M. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4 (Canada) and NRC National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M9 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ancillary effects of selected acid deposition control policies  

SciTech Connect

NAPAP is examining a number of potential ways to reduce the precursors (sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) to acid deposition. However, the policies to reduce acid deposition will have other physical, biological and economic effects unrelated to acid deposition. For example, control policies that reduce sulfur dioxide emissions may also increase visibility. The effects of an acid deposition policy that are unrelated to acid deposition are referred to as ''ancillary'' effects. This reserch identifies and characterizes the principle physical and economic ancillary effects associated with acid deposition control and mitigation policies. In this study the ancillary benefits associated with four specific acid deposition policy options were investigated. The four policy options investigated are: (1) flue gas desulfurization, (2) coal blending or switching, (3) reductions in automobile emissions of NO/sub x/, and (4) lake liming. Potential ancillary benefits of each option were identified and characterized. Particular attention was paid to the literature on economic valuation of potential ancillary effects.

Moe, R.J.; Lyke, A.J.; Nesse, R.J.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are presented. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a DC electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

1989-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

224

In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Rapid tooling by electron-beam vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) of tooling metal, onto a shaped substrate to produce a replica of the substrate surface, offers the potential for significant cost savings over present methods of injection mold manufacturing. These savings are realized by the high deposition rate and the corresponding short manufacturing times provided by the EBPVD process. However, on route to realizing these gains, there are process technical issues which need to be resolved. Mold surfaces typically contain relatively high aspect ratio details that must be replicated to dimensional tolerances within +/- 2 mils. The deposited mold material must also provide high surface hardness and high fracture toughness. Good quality grain structure can be obtained in deposited Al 10-wt% Cu mold material when the substrate and corresponding deposit are at high process temperature. However, the resulting mold is subject to distortion during cooldown due to differential temperatures and shrinkage rates. Thermally controlled cooldown and the use of crushable substrate materials reduce these distortions, but not to the required levels of tolerance. Deposition of the Al-Cu at lower temperature produces columnar, poorly joined grains which result in a brittle and weakened mold material. When Al 10-wt% Cu metal vapor is deposited across high aspect ratio step features on the substrate surface, a grain growth defect can form in the step-shadowed regions of the deposited material, alongside the step feature. The step coverage defect consists of entrained voids which persist at intermediate deposition temperatures and produce a weakened mold. This final 1997 LDRD report investigates causes of this step coverage defect and offers methods for their control and elimination.

Meier, T. C., LLNL

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

226

A Permeability-Porosity Relationship for Surface Deposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The changes to porosity and permeability resulting from surface deposition and early dissolution in an initial rhombohedral array of uniform spheres are calculated. Very rapid decreases of permeability result from early deposition, with 48% reduction predicted in permeability from 8% reduction in porosity. After deposition has caused about a 1% increase in the radii of the spherical array, relative permeability reductions vary approximately as the square of relative changes in porosity. These theoretical results are matched with experimental data of Ioti et al. and shown to be satisfactory in some cases, but for others, a more complex model of the porous medium is needed.

Weir, G.J.; White, S.P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Physical vapor deposition and patterning of calcium fluoride films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical vapor deposition of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) thin films was performed via electron beam evaporation, resistive/thermal evaporation, and nonreactive radio frequency sputtering. Patterning of the resultant ''usable'' thin films was then also attempted in several ways, including by shadow mask deposition, liftoff, and direct chemical etching. Resistive evaporation produced the most stable films, having polycrystalline morphology with a moderately strong preference to the 331 orientation. The cleanest patterning results were obtained via a polymer/metal liftoff. The results and implications of each of the various deposition and patterning techniques are discussed.

Pinol, L.; Rebello, K.; Caruso, K.; Francomacaro, A. S.; Coles, G. L. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland 20723 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Davis-Besse Cycle 16 Fuel Deposit Analysis and Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel deposit samples were collected from Davis-Besse Unit 1 during the EOC16 outage. The impetus behind collecting crud samples came from the observation of unusual deposits on fuel during EOC15, as well as measured crud-induced power shape (CIPS) during Cycle 16. The purpose of EOC16 sample campaign therefore was to determine the nature of the fuel deposits. Samples were collected from two fuel assemblies, one after one cycle of exposure and the other after two cycles of exposure. Samples were collected...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

229

Method for depositing high-quality microcrystalline semiconductor materials  

SciTech Connect

A process for the plasma deposition of a layer of a microcrystalline semiconductor material is carried out by energizing a process gas which includes a precursor of the semiconductor material and a diluent with electromagnetic energy so as to create a plasma therefrom. The plasma deposits a layer of the microcrystalline semiconductor material onto the substrate. The concentration of the diluent in the process gas is varied as a function of the thickness of the layer of microcrystalline semiconductor material which has been deposited. Also disclosed is the use of the process for the preparation of an N-I-P type photovoltaic device.

Guha, Subhendu (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Yang, Chi C. (Troy, MI); Yan, Baojie (Rochester Hills, MI)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

is complicated by quaternary deposits (including glacial and fluvial deposits), we use DC electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential mapping to identify preferential...

231

Initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymeric thin films : mechanism and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a novel technique for depositing polymeric thin films. It is able to deposit thin films of application-specific polymers in one step without using any solvents. Its uniqueness ...

Chan, Kelvin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Evaluation of the Accuracy with Which Dry Deposition Can Be Measured with Current Micrometeorological Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By reviewing the physics of the processes leading to dry deposition in the atmospheric surface layer, a number of corrections and possible errors in the determination of the dry deposition fluxes are identified. The concept of deposition velocity ...

J. A. Businger

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Chemical vapor deposition thin films as biopassivation coatings and directly patternable dielectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organosilicon thin films deposited by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PPECVD) and hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) were investigated as potential biopassivation coatings for neural probes. ...

Pryce Lewis, Hilton G. (Hilton Gavin), 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

235

Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and the Airborne Visible/IR Image Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were used to characterize hot spring deposits in the Lower, Midway, and Upper Geyser Basins of Yellowstone National Park from the visible/near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths. Field observations of these basins provided the critical ground-truth for comparison with the

236

Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Experience with Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues Douglas Clark Analyst B&W Technical Services Y-12 May 9, 2012 Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues Y-12 Specific Issues Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues Windspeed - Calm Wind Conditions at Y-12 Site Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues Windspeed - Stability Class Determinations * NRC RG 1.23 ΔT-only method * EPA-454/R-99-005 solar- radiation-delta-temperature (SRDT) method * Hybrid SR - DT method * wind direction standard deviation [sigma-theta (σ θ )] * elevation angle standard deviation [sigma-phi (σ φ )] * vertical wind speed standard deviation [sigma-omega (σ ω )], * wind-speed ratio method (u R ) * All evaluated using data from west

237

Automatic Monitoring of the Amount of Deposited Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic device for measurement of the amount (weight) of deposited precipitation developed at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, is described. Examples of measurements of various types of ...

J. Fišák; J. Chum; J. Vojta; K. Bart??ková

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Deposition of Particles Liberated in Gusts of Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretically, the aerial transport and deposition of fungal spores near to their source dependon the way in which they become airborne. Spores of some fungi are injected into the air, independentof wind speed, whereas others are blown from the ...

DONALD E. AYLOR; H. A. MCCARTNEY; A. BAINBRIOGE

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of nanocrystalline film deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A full diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm is used to model nanocrystalline film deposition, and study the mechanisms of grain nucleation and microstructure formation in such films. The major finding of this work is ...

Ruan, Shiyun

240

Atomic layer deposition for the conformal coating of nanoporous materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is ideal for applying precise and conformal coatings over nanoporous materials. We have recently used ALD to coat two nanoporous solids: anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) and silica aerogels. AAO possesses hexagonally ordered ...

Jeffrey W. Elam; Guang Xiong; Catherine Y. Han; H. Hau Wang; James P. Birrell; Ulrich Welp; John N. Hryn; Michael J. Pellin; Theodore F. Baumann; John F. Poco; Joe H. Satcher, Jr.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Deposition and surface treatment with intense pulsed ion beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense pulsed ion beams (500 keV, 30 kA, 0.5 {mu}s) are being investigated for materials processing. Demonstrated and potential applications include film deposition, glazing and joining, alloying and mixing, cleaning and polishing, corrosion improvement, polymer surface treatments, and nanophase powder synthesis. Initial experiments at Los Alamos have emphasized thin-film formation by depositing beam ablated target material on substrates. We have deposited films with complex stoichiometry such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, and formed diamond-like-carbon films. Instantaneous deposition rates of 1 mm/sec have been achieved because of the short ion range (typically 1{mu}m), excellent target coupling, and the inherently high energy of these beams. Currently the beams are produced in single shot uncomplicated diodes with good electrical efficiency. High-voltage modulator technology and diodes capable of repetitive firing, needed for commercial application, are being developed.

Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stinnett, R.W.; McIntyre, D.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Modeling the dynamics and depositional patterns of sandy rivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis seeks to advance our understanding of the dynamic nature, spatial organization and depositional record of topography in sand-bedded rivers. I examine patterns and processes over a wide range of scales, on Earth ...

Jerolmack, Douglas J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Source apportionment of wet sulfate deposition in eastern North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model of long distance transport of air pollutants (Fay and Rosenzweig, 1980) has been adapted for the estimation of long term (e.g. annual) wet sulfate deposition in eastern N. America. The model parameters ...

Fay, James A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Preparing for a Deposition in a Patent Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preparing for a Deposition in a Patent Case. Arnold B. Silverman. Patent litigation in the United States is tried before a federal district court, with or without a jury.

245

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Brian, Riley (Willimantic, CT); Szreders, Bernard E. (Oakdale, CT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

247

Chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon and sacrificial polymer thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) produced films for a wide array of applications from a variety of organosilicon and organic precursors. The structure and properties of thin films were controlled by varying processing ...

Casserly, Thomas Bryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Glow discharge deposition at high rates using disilane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research program reported makes use of the fact that amorphous silicon films can be grown faster from disilane in a glow discharge than from the traditional silane. The goal is to find a method to grow films at a high rate and with sufficiently high quality to be used in an efficient solar cell. It must also be demonstrated that the appropriate device structure can be successfully fabricated under conditions which give high deposition rates. High quality intrinsic films have been deposited at 20 A/s. Efficiency of 5.6% on steel substrates and 5.3% on glass substrates were achieved using disilane i-layers deposited at 15 A/s in a basic structure, without wide-gap doped layers or light trapping. Wide gap p-layers were deposited using disilane. Results were compared with those obtained at Vactronic using high power discharges of silane-hydrogen mixtures. (LEW)

Rajeswaran, G.; Corderman, R.R.; Kampas, F.J.; Vanier, P.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Initiated chemical vapor deposition of functional polyacrylic thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was explored as a novel method for synthesis of functional polyacrylic thin films. The process introduces a peroxide initiator, which can be decomposed at low temperatures (<200?C) ...

Mao, Yu, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

On Estimating Dry Deposition Rates in Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In complex terrain, horizontal advection and filtration through a canopy can add substantially to the vertical diffusion component assumed to be the dominant transfer mechanism in conventional deposition velocity formulations. To illustrate this, ...

Bruce B. Hicks

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Properties of vacuum arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous hard carbon films formed by vacuum arc deposition are hydrogen-free, dense, and very hard. The properties of amorphous hard carbon films depend strongly on the energy of the incident ions. A technique which is called Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation can be applied to vacuum arc deposition of amorphous hard carbon films to influence the ion energy. The authors have studied the influence of the ion energy on the elastic modulus determined by an ultrasonic method, and have measured the optical gap for films with the highest sp{sup 3} content they have obtained so far with this deposition technique. The results show an elastic modulus close to that of diamond, and an optical gap of 2.1 eV which is much greater than for amorphous hard carbon films deposited by other techniques.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Raoux, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Computational Intelligence for Deepwater Reservoir Depositional Environments Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting oil recovery efficiency of a deepwater reservoir is a challenging task. One approach to characterize a deepwater reservoir and to predict its producibility is by analyzing its depositional information. This research proposes a deposition-based stratigraphic interpretation framework for deepwater reservoir characterization. In this framework, one critical task is the identification and labeling of the stratigraphic components in the reservoir, according to their depositional environments. This interpretation process is labor intensive and can produce different results depending on the stratigrapher who performs the analysis. To relieve stratigrapher's workload and to produce more consistent results, we have developed a novel methodology to automate this process using various computational intelligence techniques. Using a well log data set, we demonstrate that the developed methodology and the designed workflow can produce finite state transducer models that interpret deepwater reservoir depositional...

Yu, Tina; Clark, Julian; Sullivan, Morgan; 10.1016/j.jngse.2011.07.014

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

U.S. Mercury Deposition Under Alternative Regulatory Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Clean Air Mercury Rule regulates electric utility mercury emissions while permitting individual states to enact stricter rules at their discretion. Computer modeling has shown how mercury deposition patterns will change if all regulated utility power plants follow the Federal rule, vs. alternative state rules. These patterns of deposition can be compared to the limiting case: what if all U.S. utility mercury emissions were zeroed out? The findings show that regulations stricter than the Feder...

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

Lowden, R.A.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

Muruska, H. Paul (East Windsor, NJ); Sansregret, Joseph L. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Young, Archie R. (Montclair, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Photosensitivity of Pulsed Laser Deposited Amorphous (GeSe2)100 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photosensitivity of deposited layers in as-deposited as well as relaxed state was ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

257

Low Temperature Direct Growth of Graphene Films on Transparent Substrates by Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Few- Layer Graphene by Chemical Vapor Deposition",Liu, W. , et al. (2010). "Chemical vapor deposition of large5 1.3.3. Chemical Vapor

Antoine, Geoffrey Sandosh Jeffy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

ZnO Nanowires Grown on ZnO Thin Film Deposited by Atomic Layer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was used to deposit the seeding ... 3D Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) for Li-Ion Battery Anode.

259

Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico, in Uranium Deposits in Volcanic Rocks, International Atomic EnergyMéxico, in Uranium Deposits in Volcanic Rocks, International Atomic Energy

Dobson, P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Natural mercury isotope variation in coal deposits and organic soils  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to distinguish among sources of Hg to the atmosphere in order to more fully understand global Hg pollution. In this study we investigate whether coal deposits within the United States, China, and Russia-Kazakhstan, which are three of the five greatest coal-producing regions, have diagnostic Hg isotopic fingerprints that can be used to discriminate among Hg sources. We also investigate the Hg isotopic composition of modern organic soil horizons developed in areas distant from point sources of Hg in North America. Mercury stored in coal deposits displays a wide range of both mass dependent fractionation and mass independent fractionation. {delta}{sup 202}Hg varies in coals by 3{per_thousand} and {Delta}{sup 201}Hg varies by 0.9{per_thousand}. Combining these two Hg isotope signals results in what may be a unique isotopic 'fingerprint' for many coal deposits. Mass independent fractionation of mercury has been demonstrated to occur during photochemical reactions of mercury. This suggests that Hg found in most coal deposits was subjected to photochemical reduction near the Earth's surface prior to deposition. The similarity in MDF and MIF of modern organic soils and coals from North America suggests that Hg deposition from coal may have imprinted an isotopic signature on soils. This research offers a new tool for characterizing mercury inputs from natural and anthropogenic sources to the atmosphere and provides new insights into the geochemistry of mercury in coal and soils. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Abir, Biswas; Joel D. Blum; Bridget A. Bergquist; Gerald J. Keeler; Zhouqing Xie [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Geological Sciences

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Application of throughfall methods to estimate dry deposition of mercury  

SciTech Connect

Several dry deposition methods for Mercury (Hg) are being developed and tested in our laboratory. These include big-leaf and multilayer resistance models, micrometeorological methods such as Bowen ratio gradient approaches, laboratory controlled plant chambers, and throughfall. We have previously described our initial results using modeling and gradient methods. Throughfall may be used to estimate Hg dry deposition if some simplifying assumptions are met. We describe here the application and initial results of throughfull studies at the Walker Branch Watershed forest, and discuss the influence of certain assumptions on interpretation of the data. Throughfall appears useful in that it can place a lower bound to dry deposition under field conditions. Our preliminary throughfall data indicate net dry deposition rates to a pine canopy which increase significantly from winter to summer, as previously predicted by our resistance model. Atmospheric data suggest that rainfall washoff of fine aerosol dry deposition at this site is not sufficient to account for all of the Hg in net throughfall. Potential additional sources include dry deposited gas-phase compounds, soil-derived coarse aerosols, and oxidation reactions at the leaf surface.

Lindberg, S.E.; Owens, J.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stratton, W. [Earlham Coll., Richmond, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Film deposition and surface modification using intense pulsed ion beams  

SciTech Connect

High-power pulsed ion beams have been used to ablate material for ultrahigh-rate film deposition and to treat the surfaces of alloys. Pulsed ion beams were provided by the high-power-density Gamble II facility at the Naval Research Laboratory [high voltage ({similar_to}900 keV), short pulse (60 ns)] and the lower-power-density Anaconda facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory [lower voltage ({similar_to}300 keV), longer pulse (400 ns)]. Peak film deposition rates after target ablation reached 1 mm/s. Films of pure Al, pure Ta, YBCO, and Ni--Zn ferrite were deposited on glass and single-crystal substrates, in some cases heated. The film deposition process was studied with framing photography, a bolometer, and other diagnostics to gain an understanding of the ablation, transport, and deposition steps. Stoichiometric deposition of multicomponent targets has been demonstrated. Film morphology remains poor, but has steadily improved, and our present understanding points the way to further improvement. Lower fluences ({similar_to}5 J/cm{sup 2}) were used to investigate rapid thermal processing of metal surfaces for the enhancement of corrosion resistance. The results in this area have been negative, but here again the knowledge gained through these experiments allows us to propose directions for improvement. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

Meli, C.A.; Grabowski, K.S.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Stephanakis, S.J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

1986 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1986 and spatial patterns for 1986. The report provides statistical distribution summaries of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. The data in the report are from the Acid Depositing System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data. Isopleth maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1986 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 30 sites over an 8-year (1979-1986) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 5-year (1982-1986) period. The 8-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data unavailable that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. 19 refs., 105 figs., 29 tabs.

Olsen, A.R.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Deposit information in gasoline engines: Part I. Base oil effects in sequence VE deposits  

SciTech Connect

Base oil effects on sludge and deposit formation in the ASTM Sequence VE were studied with blends made using the same American Petroleum Institute (API) SG performance package and the same viscosity improver. One percent of the dispersant was removed from the formulation to accentuate base oil effects. Nine tests on six different 100N base oils were run. Sequence VE test lubricant drain analyses show differences in insolubles, viscosity, and particle size with base stock variations. The most significant base oil factors which can be used to predict Sequence VE sludge ratings are the base oil saturate content, polar content, and volatility. While all oils studied passed the Sequence VE API SG engine varnish and piston varnish requirements, higher levels of poly-nuclear aromatics (PNA`s) are shown to increase the severity of these ratings.

Supp, J.A.; Kornbrekke, R.E.; Roby, S.H. [Lubrizol Corporation, Wickliffe, OH (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Method and apparatus for removing and preventing window deposition during photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Unwanted build-up of the film deposited on the transparent light-transmitting window of a photochemical vacuum deposition (photo-CVD) chamber is eliminated by flowing an etchant into the part of the photolysis region in the chamber immediately adjacent the window and remote from the substrate and from the process gas inlet. The respective flows of the etchant and the process gas are balanced to confine the etchant reaction to the part of the photolysis region proximate to the window and remote from the substrate. The etchant is preferably one that etches film deposit on the window, does not etch or affect the window itself, and does not produce reaction by-products that are deleterious to either the desired film deposited on the substrate or to the photolysis reaction adjacent the substrate.

Tsuo, Simon (Lakewood, CO); Langford, Alison A. (Boulder, CO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Method and apparatus for removing and preventing window deposition during photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Unwanted build-up of the film deposited on the transparent light-transmitting window of a photochemical vacuum deposition (photo-CVD) chamber is eliminated by flowing an etchant into the part of the photolysis region in the chamber immediately adjacent the window and remote from the substrate and from the process gas inlet. The respective flows of the etchant and the process gas are balanced to confine the etchant reaction to the part of the photolysis region proximate to the window and remote from the substrate. The etchant is preferably one that etches film deposit on the window, does not etch or affect the window itself, and does not produce reaction by-products that are deleterious to either the desired film deposited on the substrate or to the photolysis reaction adjacent the substrate. 3 figs.

Tsuo, S.; Langford, A.A.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Interfacial reactions of Gd- and Nb-oxide based high-k layers deposited by aqueous chemical solution deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, ultrathin layers of GdOx, NbOx and GdNbOx, deposited with ACSD have been investigated. Because of the high temperature anneals utilized in the process flow of electronic devices, interactions of the deposited high-k materials and the substrate ... Keywords: ACSD, Ellipsometry, GATR-FTIR, GdNbOx, GdOx, HT-XRD, High temperature anneal, High-k, Interlayer formation, NbOx, Thickness variation

D. Dewulf; N. Peys; S. Van Elshocht; G. Rampelberg; C. Detavernier; S. De Gendt; A. Hardy; M. K. Van Bael

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fluid mixing during deposition of bedded-replacement (BR) deposits in the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois-Kentucky(IK) district is unusual by comparison to other Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) districts in the central US in that it contains fluorspar mineralization primarily, with subordinate quantities of base metals. This mineralization occurs as vein, BR, and breccia-hosted deposits. A clearly discernible paragenetic sequence of color banded fluorite sulfides, carbonates, and sulfates is present in BR deposits in three sub-districts: Cave-in-Rock, Harris Creek, and Carrsville. Homogenization temperatures (T[sub b]) and salinities of fluids in fluorite show that BR deposits formed from at least three fluids, a lower temperature-higher salinity connate fluid (F1) and a higher temperature-lower salinity connate fluid (F2) that mixed at the site of deposition. These fluids were followed by a lower temperature-lower salinity meteoric dominated fluid (F3). The involvement of two distinct regional fluids: a lower temperature, more-saline fluid, and a warmer, less-saline fluid, during mineralization of MVT deposits has previously been recognized for Pb-Zn deposits in southeast Missouri (Shelton et al., 1992), and east Tennessee (Zimmerman and Kesler, 1981; Taylor et al. 1983).

Spry, P.G.; Fuhrmann, G.D. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Geological Atmospheric Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ash Deposit Formation and Deposit Properties. A Comprehensive Summary of Research Conducted at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work performed at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility over the past eight years on the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion. This work has been done under four broad categories: coal characterization, fly ash formation, ash deposition, and deposit property development. The objective was to provide sufficient understanding of these four areas to be able to predict coal behavior in current and advanced conversion systems. This work has led to new characterization techniques for fuels that provide, for the first time, systematic and species specific information regarding the inorganic material. The transformations of inorganic material during combustion can be described in terms of the net effects of the transformations of these individual species. Deposit formation mechanisms provide a framework for predicting deposition rates for abroad range of particle sizes. Predictions based on these rates many times are quite accurate although there are important exceptions. A rigorous framework for evaluating deposit has been established. Substantial data have been obtained with which to exercise this framework, but this portion of the work is less mature than is any other. Accurate prediction of deposit properties as functions of fuel properties, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions represents the single most critical area where additional research is needed.

Larry L. Baxter

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

In-situ deposition of high-k dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductor in MOCVD system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ deposition of high-k materials to passivate the GaAs in metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system was well demonstrated. Both atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods ...

Cheng, Cheng-Wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of material that may be treated. The deposition of DLC at atmospheric pressure has been demonstrated by several researchers. Izake, et al [53] and Novikov and Dymont [54] have demonstrated an electrochemical process that is carried out with organic compounds such as methanol and acetylene dissolved in ammonia. This process requires that the substrates be immersed in the liquid [53-54]. The atmospheric pressure deposition of DLC was also demonstrated by Kulik, et al. utilizing a plasma torch. However, this process requires operating temperatures in excess of 800 oC [55]. In this report, we investigate the deposition of diamond-like carbon films using a low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The films were characterized by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) and found to have a ratio of sp2 to sp3 carbon of 43 to 57%. The films were also tested for adhesion, coefficient of friction, and dielectric strength.

Ladwig, Angela

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

272

Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research 'Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen`s median trend estimate and Kendall`s seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen's median trend estimate and Kendall's seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Photovoltaic cells fabricated by electrophoretic deposition of CdSe nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photovoltaic cells fabricated by electrophoretic deposition of CdSe nanocrystals Nathanael J. Smith Electrophoretic deposition was used to deposit CdSe nanocrystals on TiO2 for use in photovoltaic cells formed. A solar cell constructed using electrophoretic deposition exhibited a photovoltaic response from

Smith, Nathanael J.

276

Low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon oxide films using disilane and nitrous oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: disilane, low temperature, nitrous oxide, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, silicon oxide

Juho Song; G. S. Lee; P. K. Ajmera

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Chrome Deposit Corporation and the University of Delaware IAC: Another  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chrome Deposit Corporation and the University of Delaware IAC: Chrome Deposit Corporation and the University of Delaware IAC: Another Energy Efficiency Success Story Chrome Deposit Corporation and the University of Delaware IAC: Another Energy Efficiency Success Story November 2, 2011 - 2:11pm Addthis Pictured left to right: University of Delaware students Joseph Camp and Nicole Suto; Keith Goossen, director of the Industrial Assessment Center; and Cesar Duarte, University of Delaware grad student. | Image courtesy of UD. Pictured left to right: University of Delaware students Joseph Camp and Nicole Suto; Keith Goossen, director of the Industrial Assessment Center; and Cesar Duarte, University of Delaware grad student. | Image courtesy of UD. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs

278

Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Application to low-pressure deposition of tungsten  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a mode for the simultaneous reaction kinetics and transport processes in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors extended to treat deposition of materials that have a broad range of surface characteristics, e.g. sites with multiple dangling bonds and adsorbates with multiple bonding configurations. The model uses the nature of the surface to determine the elementary processes that can take place during growth. Rate constants for these processes are calculated from first principles using statistical thermodynamics, transition state theory, and bond dissociation enthalpies. In this way, deposition rates are determined without either assuming the reaction mechanism or arbitrarily choosing any kinetic parameter values. The utility of the approach is illustrated by modeling low-pressure CVD of tungsten from tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen. The treatment considers 14 species and eight reactions in the gas together with 21 species and 65 processes at the surface.

Arora, R.; Pollard, R. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX (US))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop The Department of Energy's Chief of Nuclear Safety hosted a MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop on June 5-6, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. Approximately 70 participants attended. The purpose of the workshop was to: Discuss MACCS2 and atmospheric dispersion models as applied to DOE consequence analysis. Discuss implementation of HSS Safety Bulletin 2011-2, Accident Analysis Parameter Update, at field sites. Develop a consistent Department-wide approach for responding to the HSS Safety Bulletin. Identify areas for improved DOE guidance for ensuring defensible consequence analyses. June Workshop Agenda- Final.docx Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses; GENII

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Why sequence freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium freshwater manganese depositing β-proteobacterium (Siderocapsaceae)? Stream biofilms are key component of stream food webs and contain bacteria that contribute to the carbon and nitrogen cycles. A slow-growing bacterium isolated from a freshwater stream biofilm has potential bioenergy and bioremediation applications. JOSHI_001 is part of a class of bacteria that deposit iron and manganese precipitates externally to the colony early in its life cycle and could be used for fuel cells and to help clean up manganese contaminated water. Members of the Siderocapsaceae family to which JOSHI_001 belongs have been observed in biofilms for the past century, but have never before been isolated and cultivated in a laboratory environment. As a result, researchers have not been able to learn about the

282

Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Modeling PWR Fuel Corrosion Product Deposition and Growth Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes further developments to the crud chemistry model developed in 2003. This model calculates the thermal and chemical conditions within fuel crud deposits. The model was developed to understand fuel crud scrape observations and help alleviate AOA in plants suffering this problem. The model predicts the main form of boron in thick crud (30µm) is precipitated LiBO2. This precipitates because Li and boric acid concentrate in the bottom of the deposit due to evaporation. The rise in temper...

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Particle Velocity and Deposition Efficiency in the Cold Spray Process  

SciTech Connect

Copper powder was sprayed by the cold-gas dynamic method. In-flight particle velocities were measured with a laser-two-focus system as a function of process parameters such as gas temperature, gas pressure, and powder feed rate. Particle velocities were uniform in a relatively large volume within the plume and agreed with theoretical predictions. The presence of the substrate was found to have no significant effect on particle velocities. Cold-spray deposition efficiencies were measured on aluminum substrates as a function of particle velocity and incident angle of the plume. Deposition efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved. The critical velocity for deposition was determined to be about 640 meters per second. This work investigates both the in-flight characteristics of copper particles in a supersonic cold-spray plume and the build-up of the subsequent coating on aluminum substrates. Velocities were found to be relatively constant within a large volume of the plume. Particle counts dropped off sharply away from the central axis. The presence of a substrate was found to have no effect on the velocity of the particles. A substantial mass-loading effect on the particle velocity was observed; particle velocities begin to drop as the mass ratio of powder to gas flow rates exceeds 3%. The measured variation of velocity with gas pressure and pre-heat temperature was in fairly good agreement with theoretical predictions. Helium may be used as the driving gas instead of air in order to achieve higher particle velocities for a given temperature and pressure. Coating deposition efficiencies were found to increase with particle velocity and decrease with gun- substrate angle. There did not appear to be any dependence of the deposition efficiency on coating thickness. A critical velocity for deposition of about 640 mk appears to fit the data well. The cold-spray technique shows promise as a method for the deposition of materials which are thermally sensitive or may experience rapid oxidation under typical thermal spray conditions. High deposition efficiencies are achievable for certain coating-substrate conditions. Work remains to determine the material and microstructural properties which govern the coating process.

Dykhuizen, R.C.; Gilmore, D.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.; Smith, M.F.

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Characterization of deposits and effect of deposits on corrosion of materials for MHD balance-of-plant applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Candidate heat exchanger materials tested in the Low Mass Flow Train at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at Tullahoma, TN, were analyzed to evaluate their corrosion performances. Tube specimens obtained at each foot of the 14-ft-long U-bend tubes were analyzed for corrosion-scale morphologies, scale thicknesses, and internal penetration depths. Results developed on 1,500- and 2,000-h exposed specimens were correlated with exposure temperature. In addition, deposit materials collected at several locations in the CFFF were analyzed in detail to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the deposits and their influence on corrosion performance of tube materials.

Natesan, K.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-47669 Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Iain Walker of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey A. Siegel Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. ASHRAE Student Member that are found in commercial and residential HVAC systems of 1 - 6 m/s (200 - 1200 ft/min), particle diameters

288

Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figures.

Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

1991-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Tritium labeling of organic compounds deposited on porous structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for labeling organic compounds with tritium is carried out by depositing the selected compound on the extensive surface of a porous structure such as a membrane filter and exposing the membrane containing the compound to tritium gas activated by the microwave discharge technique. The labeled compound is then recovered from the porous structure.

Ehrenkaufer, Richard L. E. (Speonk, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY); Hembree, Wylie C. (Woodcliff Lake, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Atmospheric Deposition of Tritium at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium source terms at nuclear power plants consist of several sources that include plant vents and cooling impoundments, cooling towers, and treatment ponds. Cooling lakes and reservoirs can be sources of airborne tritium. Methods are presented for estimating these source terms and predicting resulting deposition of tritium using metrological models and for estimating infiltration of tritium using hydrogeological models.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Topography-sensitive copper deposition in supercritical solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topography-sensitive deposition, a preferential growth mode in a narrow concave feature, of copper in supercritical solutions is reported. Experiments were carried out in supercritical carbon dioxide at 13MPa with a maximum temperature of 230^oC, using ... Keywords: Capillary condensation, Copper, Nanorod, Supercritical fluid

E. Kondoh; K. Nagano; C. Yamamoto; J. Yamanaka

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method of depositing wide bandgap amorphous semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of depositing wide bandgap p type amorphous semiconductor materials on a substrate without photosensitization by the decomposition of one or more higher order gaseous silanes in the presence of a p-type catalytic dopant at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. and a pressure in the range from about 1-50 Torr.

Ellis, Jr., Frank B. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Delahoy, Alan E. (Rocky Hill, NJ)

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

293

Sputter deposition of semiconductor superlattices for thermoelectric applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Theoretical dramatic improvement of the thermoelectric properties of materials by using quantum confinement in novel semiconductor nanostructures has lead to considerable interest in the thermoelectric community. Therefore, we are exploring the critical materials issues for fabrication of quantum confined structures by magnetron sputtering in the lead telluride and bismuth telluride families of materials. We have synthesized modulated structures from thermoelectric materials with bilayer periods of as little as 3.2 nm and shown that they are stable at deposition temperatures high enough to grow quality films. Issues critical to high quality film growth have been investigated such as nucleation and growth conditions and their effect on crystal orientation and growth morphology. These investigations show that nucleating the film at a temperature below the growth temperature of optimum electronic properties produces high quality films. Our work with sputter deposition, which is inherently a high rate deposition process, builds the technological base necessary to develop economical production of these advanced materials. High deposition rate is critical since, even if efficiencies comparable with CFC based refrigeration systems can be achieved, large quantities of quantum confined materials will be necessary for cost-competitive uses.

Wagner, A.V.; Foreman, R.J.; Farmer, J.C.; Barbee, T.W.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Kinetics of silica deposition from simulated geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supersaturated brines were passed through columns packed with several forms of silica (crystalline ..cap alpha.. quartz, polycrystalline ..cap alpha.. quartz, and porous Vycor). Also, silica deposition on ThO/sub 2/ microspheres and titanium powder was studied under controlled conditions of supersaturation, pH, temperature, and salinity. The residence time was varied by adjustments of flow rate and column length. The silica contents of the input and effluent solutions were determined colorimetrically by a molybdate method which does not include polymers without special pretreatment. Essentially identical deposition behavior was observed once the substrate was thoroughly coated with amorphous silica and the BET surface area of the coated particles was taken into account. The reaction rate is not diffusion limited in the columns. The silica deposition is a function of the monomeric Si(OH)/sub 4/ concentration in the brine. The deposition on all surfaces examined was spontaneously nucleated. The dependence on the supersaturation concentration, hydroxide ion concentration, surface area, temperature and salinity were examined. Fluoride was shown to have no effect at pH 5.94 and low salinity. The empirical rate law which describes the data in 1 m NaCl in the pH range 5-7 and temperatures from 60 to 120/sup 0/C is given.

Bohlmann, E.G.; Mesmer, R.E.; Berlinski, P.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Atmospheric Mercury Deposition during the Last 270 Years: A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that were placed in an oven at 50 °C overnight to ensure complete oxidation of all mercury species. Analysis requiring pollutant scrubbers that also likely remove a fraction of the Hg in flue gases. If so, the resultsAtmospheric Mercury Deposition during the Last 270 Years: A Glacial Ice Core Record of Natural

296

Deposition of DLC via intense ion beam ablation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diamond-like carbon films were prepared by high intensity pulsed ion beam ablation of graphite targets. A 350 key, 35 kA, 400 ns pulse width beam, consisting primarily of carbon ions and protons, was focused onto a graphite target at a fluence of 15-45J/cm{sup 2}. Films were deposited onto substrates positioned i.n q n angular array from normal to the target to 90{degrees} off normal. Deposition rates up to 30 nm per pulse, corresponding to an instantaneous deposition rate greater than I mn/sec, have been observed. Electrical resistivities between 1 and 1000 ohm-cm were measured for these films. XRD scans showed that no crystalline structure developed in the films. SEM revealed that the bulk of the films contain material with feature sizes on the order of 100 nm, but micron size particles were deposited as well. Both Raman and electron energy loss spectroscopy indicated significant amounts of sp{sup 3} bonded carbon present in most of the films.

Johnston, G.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Tiwari, P.; Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Waganaar, W.J.; Muenchausen, R.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tallant, D.; Simpson, R.L. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, D.B. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Qui, X. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept of Chemical Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modeling CaCO{sub 3} deposition in geothermal wellbores  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The capacity of a geothermal liquid to carry calcium varies mainly with the concentrations of CO{sub 2} and HCO{sub 3}, temperature and ionic strength, of which the CO{sub 2} concentration (pressure) changes most in the wellbore. Wellbore models that carry accurate computations for CO{sub 2} and other gas pressures might be adapted to compute profile thicknesses of CaCO{sub 3} scale. A general model for carbonate scale deposition in a wellbore must make a simultaneous accounting for pressures of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and two or three other gases plus salt effects on those pressures. In addition, the elevation of flash initiation must be accurately identified and combined with profiles of temperature, etc., in the 2-phase zone. Such a model has been developed and its principle features are described here, including calibration of some factors with measured scale deposits. The model provides insight about the scale deposition processes through parametric studies. Tactics and strategies for confronting the effects of CaCO{sub 3} deposition in wells and wellfields can be explored with the model. Modeling of specific wellbores/wellfluids can help quantify risks and benefits concerning scale inhibition, wellfluid monitoring, timing of consequences relating to failure of scale inhibiting apparatus, urgency of remedial actions, and other aspects.

Michels, Donald E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Low energy ion beam assisted deposition of a spin valve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spin dependent electron transport in giant magnetoresistive (GMR) multilayers is significantly affected by the atomic scale structure of their interfaces. Devices with atomically flat and chemically sharp interfaces are preferred for magnetic sensor and memory applications. Recent atomic simulations of the atom-by-atom assembly of these devices indicate that near optimal interfacial structures can be created using low energy, ion assisted vapor deposition techniques with ion energies in the 5-10 eV range. A recently developed biased target ion beam deposition system has been used to experimentally test this hypothesis. Prototypical Ta/NiFe/Co/Cu/Co/FeMn/Cu spin valve structures were first grown using (simultaneous) argon ion assistance during deposition of the Co/Cu/Co trilayer part of the spin valve multilayer. Assisting ion energies of around 10 eV resulted in structures with a 30% higher magnetoresistance ratio and significantly reduced coupling field compared to samples grown with no ion assistance or with ion energies above 15 eV. These results are consistent with the atomistic simulation predictions. Other promising ion assistance schemes identified by the simulations were then used to deposit the Ta, NiFe, FeMn, and the top copper layer. A near optimal strategy was identified that resulted in the further improvement of the GMR ratio.

Quan, J. J.; Wolf, S. A.; Wadley, H. N. G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice`s interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figs.

Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

Flynn, Paul L. (Fairview, PA); Giammarise, Anthony W. (Erie, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance toerosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

Flynn, Paul L. (5139 Fox Park Dr., Fairview, PA 16415); Giammarise, Anthony W. (527 Lincoln Ave., Erie, PA 16505)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

R&D ERL: Photocathode Deposition and Transport System  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the photocathode deposition and transport system is to (1) produce a robust, high yield multialkali photocathode and (2) have a method of transporting the multialkali photocathode for insertion into a super conducting RF electron gun. This process is only successful if a sufficient quantum efficiency lifetime of the cathode, which is inserted in the SRF electron gun, is maintained. One important element in producing a multialkali photocathode is the strict vacuum requirements of 10{sup -11} torr to assure success in the production of longlived photocathodes that will not have their QE or lifetime depleted due to residual gas poisoning in a poor vacuum. A cutaway view of our third generation deposition system is shown in figure 1. There are certain design criteria and principles required. One must be able to install, remove, rejuvenate and replace a cathode without exposing the source or cathode to atmosphere. The system must allow one to deposit Cs, K, and Sb on a cathode tip surface at pressures in the 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -9} torr range. The cathode needs to be heated to as high as 850 C for cleaning and maintained at 130 C to 150 C during deposition. There should also be the capability for in-situ QE measurements. In addition the preparation of dispenser photocathodes must be accounted for, thus requiring an ion source for cathode cleaning. Finally the transport cart must be mobile and be able to negotiate the ERL facility labyrinth.

Pate, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, R.; Todd, R.; Smedley, J.; Holmes, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Prevention of deleterious deposits in a coal liquefaction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preventing the formation of deleterious coke deposits on the walls of coal liquefaction reactor vessels involves passing hydrogen and a feed slurry comprising feed coal and recycle liquid solvent to a coal liquefaction reaction zone while imparting a critical mixing energy of at least 3500 ergs per cubic centimeter of reaction zone volume per second to the reacting slurry.

Carr, Norman L. (Allison Park, PA); Prudich, Michael E. (Pittsburgh, PA); King, Jr., William E. (Gibsonia, PA); Moon, William G. (Cheswick, PA)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

304

High-rate deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status of high-rate deposition technologies associated with amorphous silicon thin films for photovoltaic applications. The report lists (1) deposition rates for a-Si:H films according to source and method and (2) efficiencies and other parameters of a-Si:H solar cells. Two main deposition source materials, silane and disilane, are discussed, as well as effects of boron doping. The effects of various deposition parameters on film characteristics and on deposition rate are presented, as well as the effects of annealing on high-deposition-rate films. Light-induced effects are also discussed. Finally, progress and problems in this field of study are summarized.

Luft, W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Finding a Link between Microbes and Mineral Deposits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Finding a Link between Microbes and Mineral Deposits Finding a Link between Microbes and Mineral Deposits Contamination around mining sites is a significant problem worldwide. Acid mine drainage, for example, is a threat to surface and groundwater near mines. It occurs when metal-sulfide ores are exposed to air and water and the sulfide is transformed to sulfuric acid. Moreover, metals such as zinc are toxic and can leach into groundwater and contaminate wells and other drinking water supplies. Results of EDX (bottom left) and x-ray microprobe fluorescence (top right) analysis of specific biomineralized zinc sulfide precipitates. The sensitivity of the x-ray microprobe enables identification of arsenic and selenium constituents in the zinc sulfide precipitate. Above: Results of EDX (bottom left) and x-ray microprobe fluorescence (top

306

A filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus are described for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

Krauss, Alan R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Apparatus and process for deposition of hard carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and an apparatus for depositing thin, amorphous carbon films having extreme hardness on a substrate is described. An enclosed chamber maintained at less than atmospheric pressure houses the substrate and plasma producing elements. A first electrode is comprised of a cavity enclosed within an RF coil which excites the plasma. A substrate located on a second electrode is excited by radio frequency power applied to the substrate. A magnetic field confines the plasma produced by the first electrode to the area away from the walls of the chamber and focuses the plasma onto the substrate thereby yielding film deposits having higher purity and having more rapid buildup than other methods of the prior art.

Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Menlo Park, CA); Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

CORROSION PRODUCT TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION UNDER IONIZING RADIATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was made of corrosion product transport and deposition on Zircaloy-2 and AISI 304 stainless steel in the presence and absence of ionizing radiation. Three 100-hour irradiation tests, using 2-Mev electrons from a Van de Graaff accelerator, and four 100-hour nonradiation tests were performed in 6O0 deg F pressurized water. Data from the seven runs and an additional exploratory run are presented. In addition, complete experimental procedures and descriptions of the apparatus are included. Control of pH was obtained by using H and OH form ion exchange resias for pH 7 and Li and OH form ion exchange resins for pH 10. The major conclusion to be drawn from the present work is that the deposition on Zircaloy-2 at pH 10 and 600 deg F is higher than on AISI 304 stainless steel at the same conditions. (auth)

Thomas, C.C. Jr.; Lacock, H.W.; Cadoff, H.Y. ed.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF URANIUM DEPOSITS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for recovering uranium values from UCl/sub 4/ deposits formed on calutrons. Such deposits are removed from the calutron parts by an aqueous wash solution which then contains the uranium values in addition to the following impurities: Ni, Cu, Fe, and Cr. This impurity bearing wash solution is treated with an oxidizing agent, and the oxidized solution is then treated with ammonia in order to precipitate the uranium as ammonium diuranate. The metal impurities of iron and chromium, which form insoluble hydroxides, are precipitated along with the uranium values. The precipitate is separated from the solution, dissolved in acid, and the solution again treated with ammonia and ammonium carbonate, which results in the precipitation of the metal impurities as hydroxides while the uranium values remain in solution.

Carter, J.M.; Kamen, M.D.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modeling study of deposition locations in the 291-Z plenum  

SciTech Connect

The TEMPEST (Trent and Eyler 1991) and PART5 computer codes were used to predict the probable locations of particle deposition in the suction-side plenum of the 291-Z building in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site, the exhaust fan building for the 234-5Z, 236-Z, and 232-Z buildings in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site. The Tempest code provided velocity fields for the airflow through the plenum. These velocity fields were then used with TEMPEST to provide modeling of near-floor particle concentrations without particle sticking (100% resuspension). The same velocity fields were also used with PART5 to provide modeling of particle deposition with sticking (0% resuspension). Some of the parameters whose importance was tested were particle size, point of injection and exhaust fan configuration.

Mahoney, L.A.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from disilane  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited at growth rates of 1 to 30 A/s by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane source gas at 24 torr total pressure in a tubular reactor. The effects of substrate temperature and gas holding time (flow rate) on film growth rate and effluent gas composition were measured at temperatures ranging from 360{sup 0} to 485{sup 0}C and gas holding times from 3 to 62s. Effluent gases determined by gas chromatography included silane, disilane and other higher order silanes. A chemical reaction engineering model, based on a silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion gas phase reaction network and film growth from both SiH/sub 2/ and high molecular weight silicon species, Si/sub n/H/sub 2n/, was developed. The model predictions were in good agreement with experimentally determined growth rates and effluent gas compositions.

Bogaert, R.J.; Russell, T.W.F.; Klein, M.T. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rocheleau, R.E.; Baron, B.N. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (USA). Inst. of Energy Conversion)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Heat treatment of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous hard carbon films of varying sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} fractions have been deposited on Si using filtered cathodic are deposition with pulsed biasing. The films were heat treated in air up to 550 C. Raman investigation and nanoindentation were performed to study the modification of the films caused by the heat treatment. It was found that films containing a high sp{sup 3} fraction sustain their hardness for temperatures at least up to 400 C, their structure for temperatures up to 500 C, and show a low thickness loss during heat treatment. Films containing at low sp{sup 3} fraction graphitize during the heat treatment, show changes in structure and hardness, and a considerable thickness loss.

Anders, S.; Ager, J.W. III; Brown, I.G. [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Experimental thin film deposition and surface analysis techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An attempt has been made to present some of the thin-film deposition and surface analysis techniques which may be useful in growing superionic conducting materials. Emphasis is made on the importance of being careful in selecting process parameters and materials in order to produce films with properties outlined in this article. Also, special care should be given to proper consideration of grain boundary effects.

Collins, W.E.; Rambabu, B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Application of Strain Gage Technology for Slag Deposition Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detecting furnace deposits in large power generation boilers has always been problematic. The current requirements of fuel flexibility, high furnace availability, and reduced staffing worsen the predicament. Fuel flexibility requires furnaces to handle off-design fuels routinely, and reduced staffing provides fewer sets of eyes to observe furnace sections. In addition, the expanding use of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems has led to the firing of higher sulfur coals that, in turn, increases the pot...

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

315

Chemical vapor deposition growth. Quarterly report No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities of the first quarter of the contract, which began December 29, 1975, are described. An existing laboratory-type CVD reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber has been used for growth of the Si films studied to date. Extensive modifications of this system, involving mass flow controllers and automatic timing of reactant gas flows by means of solenoid-activated air-operated bellows valves, will be completed early in the second quarter. (WDM)

Ruth, R.P.; Manasevit, H.M.; Kenty, J.L.; Moudy, L.A.; Simpson, W.I.; Yang, J.J.

1976-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Freeze drying for gas chromatography stationary phase deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to methods for deposition of gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases into chromatography columns, for example gas chromatography columns. A chromatographic medium is dissolved or suspended in a solvent to form a composition. The composition may be inserted into a chromatographic column. Alternatively, portions of the chromatographic column may be exposed or filled with the composition. The composition is permitted to solidify, and at least a portion of the solvent is removed by vacuum sublimation.

Sylwester, Alan P. (Livermore, CA)

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

317

MODELING TRITIUM TRANSPORT, DEPOSITION AND RE-EMISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric release of tritium oxide (HTO) potentially impacts human health, typically through inhalation or absorption. Due to HTO's similarity to water, vegetation will absorb HTO by solution in the leaf water and then re-emit it, creating a number of secondary sources of HTO. Currently, models used for emergency response at Savannah River Site incorporate the transport and deposition of HTO but do not provide estimates for its potential re-emission from vegetation or soil surface though re-emission could result in prolonged exposure and greater than predicted dose for an individual downwind. A simple model of HTO transport, deposition and re-emission has been developed to examine the potential increase in exposure and dose. The model simulates an initial release of HTO that moves with a mean wind and expands through diffusion as a Gaussian puff. Deposition is modeled using previous estimates of deposition velocity for HTO and re-emission is modeled using a time constant that describes how quickly HTO is transferred between the surface and atmosphere. Additional puffs are created to simulate re-emission of HTO as well as horizontal diffusion across model grid cells. An evaluation of field data indicates that the use of a re-emission module tends to improve model predictions through improved prediction of peak concentration magnitude and location. When considering dose, nearly all of the released material is included in the dose calculation when re-emission is included. Although exposure to HTO through re-emission occurs over a few hours, the incremental increase in dose is relatively small because the atmospheric concentration of re-emitted HTO is much lower than the initial release.

Viner, B.

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

318

Substrates suitable for deposition of superconducting thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting system for the lossless transmission of electrical current comprising a thin film of superconducting material Y.sub.1 Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x epitaxially deposited upon a KTaO.sub.3 substrate. The KTaO.sub.3 is an improved substrate over those of the prior art since the it exhibits small lattice constant mismatch and does not chemically react with the superconducting film.

Feenstra, Roeland (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Matrix-assisted pulsed laser thin film deposition by using Nd: YAG laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) is a deposition technique, developed from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) especially well suited for producing organic/polymeric thin films, which can take advantage from using Nd:YAG laser. Depending on ...

Francesco Bloisi; Mario Barra; Antonio Cassinese; Luciano Rosario Maria Vicari

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of conductive polymers for use in novel photovoltaic device architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), (PEDOT), deposited via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) has been investigated for use in organic electronic devices. The oCVD process as well as the ...

Howden, Rachel M. (Rachel Mary)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 7 Development of Soy Composites by Direct Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 7 Development of Soy Composites by Direct Deposition Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Development of Soy Composites by Direct Deposition

322

Deposition of micron liquid droplets on wall in impinging turbulent air jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluid mechanics of the deposition of micron liquid (olive oil) droplets on a glass wall in an impinging turbulent air jet is studied experimentally. The spatial patterns of droplets deposited on a wall are measured by ...

Liu, Tianshu

323

Investigation of electrophoretic deposition as a fabrication technique for high performance composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a colloidal processing method for the deposition of materials from charged nanoparticles suspended in solution with the application of an external electric field. It is an increasingly ...

Palmer, Timothy R. (Timothy Richard)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Prediction of plasma enhanced deposition process using GA-Optimized GRNN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A genetic algorithm (GA)-based optimization of generalized regression neural network (GRNN) was presented and evaluated with statistically characterized plasma deposition data. The film characteristics to model were deposition rate and positive charge ...

Byungwhan Kim; Dukwoo Lee; Seung Soo Han

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Semianalytical Solution to a Diffusion–Deposition–Resuspension Model of Local Contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes a semianalytical solution to a diffusion–deposition–resuspension model. Calculations of the fate of a point contaminant show that the model performs well in representing the individual effects of advection, deposition, and ...

Yahui Zhuang

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Meteorological Modeling of Very High-Resolution Wind Fields and Snow Deposition for Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inhomogeneous snow distribution found in alpine terrain is the result of wind and precipitation interacting with the snow surface. During major snowfall events, preferential deposition of snow and transport of previously deposited snow often ...

Rebecca Mott; Michael Lehning

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

Norton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Non-analog Monte Carlo estimators for radiation momentum deposition  

SciTech Connect

The standard method for calculating radiation momentum deposition in Monte Carlo simulations is the analog estimator, which tallies the change in a particle's momentum at each interaction with the matter. Unfortunately, the analog estimator can suffer from large amounts of statistical error. In this paper, we present three new non-analog techniques for estimating momentum deposition. Specifically, we use absorption, collision, and track-length estimators to evaluate a simple integral expression for momentum deposition that does not contain terms that can cause large amounts of statistical error in the analog scheme. We compare our new non-analog estimators to the analog estimator with a set of test problems that encompass a wide range of material properties and both isotropic and anisotropic scattering. In nearly all cases, the new non-analog estimators outperform the analog estimator. The track-length estimator consistently yields the highest performance gains, improving upon the analog-estimator figure of merit by factors of up to two orders of magnitude.

Densmore, Jeffery D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hykes, Joshua M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Supercritical fluid molecular spray film deposition and powder formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. Upon expansion and supersonic interaction with background gases in the low pressure region, any clusters of solvent are broken up and the solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solute concentration in the solution is varied primarily by varying solution pressure to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solvent clustering and solute nucleation are controlled by manipulating the rate of expansion of the solution and the pressure of the lower pressure region. Solution and low pressure region temperatures are also controlled.

Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nuclear criticality safety modeling of an LEU deposit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (now known as the K-25 Site) began during World War H and eventually consisted of five major process buildings: K-25, K-27, K-29, K-31, and K-33. The plant took natural (0.711% {sup 231}U) uranium as feed and processed it into both low-enriched uranium (LEU) and high-enriched uranium (HEU) with concentrations up to {approximately}93% {sup 231}U. The K-25 and K-27 buildings were shut down in 1964, but the rest of the plant produced LEU until 1985. During operation, inleakage of humid air into process piping and equipment caused reactions with gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that produced nonvolatile uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposits. As part of shutdown, most of the uranium was evacuated as volatile UF{sub 6}. The UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits remained. The U.S. Department of Energy has mitiated a program to unprove nuclear criticality safety by removing the larger enriched uranium deposits.

Haire, M.J.; Elam, K.R.; Jordan, W.C.; Dahl, T.L.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays  

SciTech Connect

To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Method for materials deposition by ablation transfer processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method in which a thin layer of semiconducting, insulating, or metallic material is transferred by ablation from a source substrate, coated uniformly with a thin layer of said material, to a target substrate, where said material is desired, with a pulsed, high intensity, patternable beam of energy. The use of a patternable beam allows area-selective ablation from the source substrate resulting in additive deposition of the material onto the target substrate which may require a very low percentage of the area to be covered. Since material is placed only where it is required, material waste can be minimized by reusing the source substrate for depositions on multiple target substrates. Due to the use of a pulsed, high intensity energy source the target substrate remains at low temperature during the process, and thus low-temperature, low cost transparent glass or plastic can be used as the target substrate. The method can be carried out atmospheric pressures and at room temperatures, thus eliminating vacuum systems normally required in materials deposition processes. This invention has particular application in the flat panel display industry, as well as minimizing materials waste and associated costs. 1 fig.

Weiner, K.H.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

Method for materials deposition by ablation transfer processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method in which a thin layer of semiconducting, insulating, or metallic material is transferred by ablation from a source substrate, coated uniformly with a thin layer of said material, to a target substrate, where said material is desired, with a pulsed, high intensity, patternable beam of energy. The use of a patternable beam allows area-selective ablation from the source substrate resulting in additive deposition of the material onto the target substrate which may require a very low percentage of the area to be covered. Since material is placed only where it is required, material waste can be minimized by reusing the source substrate for depositions on multiple target substrates. Due to the use of a pulsed, high intensity energy source the target substrate remains at low temperature during the process, and thus low-temperature, low cost transparent glass or plastic can be used as the target substrate. The method can be carried out atmospheric pressures and at room temperatures, thus eliminating vacuum systems normally required in materials deposition processes. This invention has particular application in the flat panel display industry, as well as minimizing materials waste and associated costs.

Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Solution Deposition of Amorphous IZO Films By Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates atmospheric-pressure solution deposition routes as an alternative to these traditional high-vacuum techniques.

Pasquarelli, R.; van Hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Curtis, C.; Perkins, J.; Berry, J.; O'Hayre, R.; Ginley, D.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Solution Deposition of Amorphous IZO Films by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates atmospheric-pressure solution deposition routes as an alternative to these traditional high-vacuum techniques.

Pasquarelli, R.; van Hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Curtis, C.; Perkins, J.; Berry, J.; O'Hayre, R.; Ginley, D.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Maskless deposition technique for the physical vapor deposition of thin film and multilayer coatings with subnanometer precision and accuracy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method for the production of axially symmetric, graded and ungraded thickness thin film and multilayer coatings that avoids the use of apertures or masks to tailor the deposition profile. A motional averaging scheme permits the deposition of uniform thickness coatings independent of the substrate radius. Coating uniformity results from an exact cancellation of substrate radius dependent terms, which occurs when the substrate moves at constant velocity. If the substrate is allowed to accelerate over the source, arbitrary coating profiles can be generated through appropriate selection and control of the substrate center of mass equation of motion. The radial symmetry of the coating profile is an artifact produced by orbiting the substrate about its center of mass; other distributions are obtained by selecting another rotation axis. Consequently there is a direct mapping between the coating thickness and substrate equation of motion which can be used to tailor the coating profile without the use of masks and apertures.

Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Apparatus and method for selective area deposition of thin films on electrically biased substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam deposition process for selective area deposition on a polarized substrate uses a potential applied to the substrate which allows the ionized particles to reach into selected areas for film deposition. Areas of the substrate to be left uncoated are held at a potential that repells the ionized particles.

Zuhr, Raymond A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Tony E. (Knoxville, TN); Golanski, Andrzej (Le Cheylas, FR)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Apparatus and method for selective area deposition of thin films on electrically biased substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam deposition process for selective area deposition on a polarized substrate uses a potential applied to the substrate which allows the ionized particles to reach into selected areas for film deposition. Areas of the substrate to be left uncoated are held at a potential that repells the ionized particles.

Zuhr, Raymond A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Tony E. (Knoxville, TN); Golanski, Andrzej (Cheylas, FR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Legal deposit of digital publications: a review of research and development activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a global trend towards extending legal deposit to include dig ital publications in order to maintain comprehensive national archives. However, including digital publications in legal deposit regulation is not enough to ensure the long-term preservation ... Keywords: digital preservation, digital publications, legal deposit

Adrienne Muir

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Modeling the Dry Deposition Velocity of Sulfur Dioxide and Sulfate in Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dry deposition model was created to estimate SO2 and sulfate dry deposition velocities over nine land use types in Asia. The study domain is 20°S–50°N, 39°–154°E. Monthly averaged 1° × 1° dry deposition velocities are estimated for four ...

Yiwen Xu; Gregory R. Carmichael

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy deposition of 24 GeV/c protons in gravity affected  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy deposition of 24 GeV/c protons in gravity affected mercury jet Sergei Striganov Fermilab +- 15 degree 75 +- 15 degree #12;Energy deposition density in round gravity affected jet at 5 Tesla, r=8.1 degree 84.2 +- 5.8 degree 330.9 +- 29.1 degree #12;Energy deposition density in elliptic gravity affected

McDonald, Kirk

344

All-Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) nip solar cells have been fabricated with all doped and undoped a-Si:H layers deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total deposition time of all layers, except the top ITO-contact, is less than 4 minutes.

Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.; Branz, H. M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a triple cell showing 10.7% stable efficiency. Figure 4-1 Schematic diagram of the Hot Wire CVD deposition. Task 7: High-rate deposition of a-Si based solar cells We have conducted extensive research using a hot1 High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells PHASE I Annual

Deng, Xunming

346

Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits of sedimentary basins hosting unconformity-type uranium deposits. In addition, these techniques have great potential as a guide for exploration of uranium and other types of deposits in basins of any age. Isotope

Hiatt, Eric E.

347

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

348

The Role of Research Measurement Networks as Contributions to Federal Assessments of Acid Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three demands for wet-deposition data and dry-deposition data are particularly important at the present time: 1) the analysis of long-term trends to evaluate the consequences of emission changes, 2) the measurement of deposition loadings to ...

J. M. Hales; B. B. Hicks; J. M. Miller

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures.

Schmitt, III, Jerome J. (New Haven, CT); Halpern, Bret L. (Bethany, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Improved process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

Lackey, W.J. Jr.; Caputo, A.J.

1984-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development of an ash particle deposition model considering build-up and removal mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

Slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in power boilers fired with fossil fuels and fuel mixtures has a significant influence on boiler efficiency and availability. Mathematical modelling has long been considered a suitable method to assist boiler operators to determine optimized operating conditions for an existing furnace. The ultimate goal in ash deposition prediction is hereby the determination of the total amount of material deposited and hence the determination of the total reduction in efficiency. Depending on the fuels fired the total deposited mass is a combination of ash particle deposition and ash particle erosion due to non-sticky particles. The novel ash particle deposition model presented in this work considers deposition of sticky ash particles, cleansing of deposit by non-sticky sand particles and sticking of sand due to contact with sticky ash. The steady-state modelling results for the total amount of ash deposited on the deposition probe of an entrained flow reactor presented in this work agree well with the experimental data. Only at very high fractions of sand added as non-sticky material, a significant influence of the sand on the overall mass deposited was found. Since the model considers sticking of non-sticking sand due to contact with sticky ash, the fraction of sand deposited on the probe was especially studied. Using a correction factor to consider the influence of operating time on the steady-state simulations led to good agreement between simulations and experimental data. 12 refs., 10 figs.

Kjell Strandstroem; Christian Muellera; Mikko Hupa [Abo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Abo (Finland)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Title The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of pm2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Thatcher, Tracy L., Melissa M. Lunden, Richard G. Sextro, Susanne V. Hering, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 1 Pagination 846-851 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation

353

Holocene deposition in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas: a geochemical approach  

SciTech Connect

The origins and depositional history of Holocene sediment in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas (NWPC) have been determined using geochemical measurements coupled with textural data, petrographic examination, and scanning electron microscopy. Most of the channel is 200 to 2000 m deep, and nearly 100% of the sediment is calcium carbonate. Shallow water platform sources contribute 75-90% of the Holocene sediment in NWPC. Bank derived sand is most abundant near the platforms (nearly 100%) and is concentrically distributed around a central area of abundant non-platform sand. Bank-derived mud (<62 ..mu..m) accounts for more than 80% of the mud fraction in NWPC. The coarse silt (62-16 ..mu..m), fine silt (16-4 ..mu..m) and clay (< 4 ..mu..m) fractions from LLB (Bight of Abaco) are geochemically distinct from the mud fractions of Great Bahama Bank (GBB). Their distributions in NWPC demonstrate that both platforms are significant sediment contributors to NWPC. The observed sediment distribution clearly indicates that significant off bank transport occurs. With regard to sediment transport, no windward or leeward effects are observed in Holocene sediment deposition. Gravity flow processes are not significant to Holocene deposition. 80% of the present sedimentation rate results from the banktop flooding and confirms that 75%-90% of the Holocene sediment is derived from platform sources. The C-14 dated Holocene sediment layer is approximately 50 cm thick, and its transition with the Pleistocene occurs over a vertical interval of less than 20 cm as a result of mixing by benthonic organisms. This Holocene sediment layer should remain intact to permanently record this banktop episode, and should have a different diagenetic future from the underlying stable (calcite-rich) sediment.

Boardman, M.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

SORPTION OF GASES BY VAPOR-DEPOSITED TITANIUM FILMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are summarized for an investigation of the sorption rates of gases on vapor-deposited titanium films. The usefulness of such films for ultrahigh speed vacuum pumping is appraised. The sorption of hydrogen, deuterium, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water vapor, helium, argon, and methane onto titanium films was measured for a variety of circumstances using techniques and apparatus developed for this specific purpose. The information obtained and techniques evolved in this study have shown that large-scale getter pumping is feasible and can be a very effective means of pumping many gases. Sticking fractions larger than 0.8 were obtained for hydrogen, deuterium, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The experiments have shown that the sticking fraction for gases on vapor-deposited films is a function of the deposition conditions. There is strong evidence to support the supposition that conditions which favor the formation of a porous, fine-grained film structure with a large surface-to-volume ratio produce films with the highest sorption rates. The technique for measuring sticking fractions is new and in many respects unique. It utilizes a very large sorption surface, thus minimizing the perturbing effect of the instrumentation and evaporation apparatus and reducing the hazard of film contamination due to small leaks in the system or outgassing of system components. The method gives especially good accuracy for measurements of sticking fractions approaching unity. The quantity of gas adsorbed, the gas flux onto the getter surface, and the gas flux leaving the getter surface are measured directly. Any two of these three independent measurements can be used to determine the sticking fraction, thereby providing a means of checking the data. The evaporation techniques, substrate surface, and substrate area were chosen to very nearly duplicate the conditions likely to be encountered in the practical application of large-scale getter pumping. (auth)

Clausing, R.E.

1964-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Spectroscopic research on infrared emittance of coal ash deposits  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a pulverized coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant. Normal emittance spectra in the near to medium infrared (2.5-25 {mu}m) region and total normal emittances were measured on four kinds of ground ash deposits. Measurements were conducted in the 570-1460 K temperature range which is common for boiler furnaces, by both heating and cooling the ash samples, with the aim to study the effect of their thermal history. Dependence of emittance on wavelength, temperature and chemical composition was studied, too. Samples were tested for transparency (opacity) to verify the accuracy of results. It was determined that the thicknesses used for the ash powders are opaque for infrared radiation for thicknesses in the order of a millimeter. Tests have shown that spectral emittance increases with an increase of wavelength with a characteristic pattern common for all samples. Spectral normal emittance increases strongly with temperature at shorter wavelengths and remains high and unchanged at longer ones. Emittance spectra are not very sensitive to chemical composition of ashes especially beyond {lambda} {approx} 5 {mu}m. With an increase of temperature, total emittance of the powdered sample decreases to a minimum value around 1200 K. Further temperature rise induces an increase of total emittance due to sintering in the ash. On cooling, the emittance increases monotonically following the hysteresis. Quantitative directions for evaluating thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits for the merits of the safety design of boiler furnaces were proposed. That comprises correlating the experimentally obtained emittance spectra with curves of simple analytical form, i.e., a continuous function of minimum emittance vs. wavelength. The proposed method can be extended to other specimens from the same furnace and used to determine correlations for thermal calculation of old and design of new furnaces - with similar geometry and combusting similar coal. The method is potentially applicable to completely different boiler furnaces combusting different coal, and the authors recommend running the tests with new deposit samples. The data will then be applicable to the thermal design of a whole new class of furnaces, having similar geometry and combusting similar coal. This is expected to greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of thermal calculation as well as the efficiency of thermal design of steam boilers. (author)

Saljnikov, Aleksandar; Komatina, Mirko; Gojak, Milan [Department of Thermomechanics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS); Vucicevic, Biljana [Laboratory for Thermal Engineering, Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (RS); Goricanec, Darko [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Smetanova 17, Maribor 2000 (Slovenia); Stevanovic, Zoran [Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Dusina 7, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Method of depositing a catalyst on a fuel cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel cell electrodes comprising a minimal load of catalyst having maximum catalytic activity and a method of forming such fuel cell electrodes. The method comprises vaporizing a catalyst, preferably platinum, in a vacuum to form a catalyst vapor. A catalytically effective amount of the catalyst vapor is deposited onto a carbon catalyst support on the fuel cell electrode. The electrode preferably is carbon cloth. The method reduces the amount of catalyst needed for a high performance fuel cell electrode to about 0.3 mg/cm.sup.2 or less.

Dearnaley, Geoffrey (San Antonio, TX); Arps, James H. (San Antonio, TX)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Characterization of the TEXTOR plasma edge using deposition probe techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon and single crystal silicon passive deposition probes were used to measure the characteristics of the plasma edge region of the TEXTOR tokamak. Analysis of the probes was done by Rutherford backscattering for impurities and nuclear reaction analysis and elastic recoil detection for hydrogen isotopes. Plasma fluxes and energies in the edge were measured using these techniques. The principal impurities in the plasma edge were determined and their behavior as a function of time and position was measured. Measurements were also made of in situ erosion rates. The results are compared with independent measurements of other plasma parameters to study possible impurity introduction mechanisms.

Zuhr, R.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Pulsed laser deposition of ITO thin films and their characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films are grown on quartz glass substrates by the pulsed laser deposition method. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of ITO films are studied as a function of the substrate temperature, the oxygen pressure in the vacuum chamber, and the Sn concentration in the target. The transmittance of grown ITO films in the visible spectral region exceeds 85%. The minimum value of resistivity 1.79 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} {Omega} cm has been achieved in the ITO films with content of Sn 5 at %.

Zuev, D. A., E-mail: zuewda@yandex.ru; Lotin, A. A.; Novodvorsky, O. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Khramova, O. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Petuhov, I. A.; Putilin, Ph. N.; Shatohin, A. N.; Rumyanzeva, M. N.; Gaskov, A. M. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition  

SciTech Connect

We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

Proslier, Th. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zasadzinski, J. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Elam, J. W. [ANL; Norem, J. [ANL; Pellin, M. J. [ANL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Chemical surface deposition of ultra-thin semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical surface deposition process for forming an ultra-thin semiconducting film of Group IIB-VIA compounds onto a substrate. This process eliminates particulates formed by homogeneous reactions in bath, dramatically increases the utilization of Group IIB species, and results in the formation of a dense, adherent film for thin film solar cells. The process involves applying a pre-mixed liquid coating composition containing Group IIB and Group VIA ionic species onto a preheated substrate. Heat from the substrate causes a heterogeneous reaction between the Group IIB and VIA ionic species of the liquid coating composition, thus forming a solid reaction product film on the substrate surface.

McCandless, Brian E. (243 W. Main St., Elkton, MD 21921); Shafarman, William N. (1905 N. Van Buren St., Wilmington, DE 19802)

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effect of deposition temperature on the crystalline structure and surface morphology of ZnO films deposited on p-Si  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc oxide (ZnO) films were deposited on p-Si substrates by sol-gel spin coating method. Zinc acetate dihydrate (ZnAc), 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine (MEA) were used as a starting material, solvent and stabilizer, respectively. The films were ... Keywords: FESEM, ZnO, crystalline structure, deposition temperature, reflectance, sol-gel

Seval Aksoy; Yasemin Caglar; Saliha Ilican; Mujdat Caglar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

In-situ post-deposition thermal annealing of co-evaporated Cu(InGa)Se2 thin films deposited at low temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

equivalent to devices made from films grown at 550°C. Films originally deposited at 300°C yielded devices after post-deposition annealing with VOC close to that of devices made from films grown at 550°C, despite smaller grain size.

Wilson, James D.; McCandless, Brian E.; Birkmire, Robert W.; Shafarman, William N.

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Silicon nucleation and film evolution on silicon dioxide using disilane: Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of very smooth silicon at high deposition rates  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and H{sub 2} for rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) of silicon on SiO{sub 2} has been performed at temperatures ranging from 590 to 900 C and pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 Torr. Deposition at 590 C yields amorphous silicon films with the corresponding ultrasmooth surface with a deposition rate of 68 nm/min. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of a sample deposited at 625 C and 1 Torr reveals a bilayer structure which is amorphous at the growth surface and crystallized at the oxide interface. Higher temperatures yield polycrystalline films where the surface roughness depends strongly on both deposition pressure and temperature. Silane-based amorphous silicon deposition in conventional systems yields the expected ultrasmooth surfaces, but at greatly reduced deposition rates unsuitable for single-wafer processing. However, disilane, over the process window considered here, yields growth rates high enough to be appropriate for single-wafer manufacturing, thus providing a viable means for deposition of very smooth silicon films on SiO{sub 2} in a single-wafer environment.

Violette, K.E.; Oeztuerk, M.C.; Christensen, K.N.; Maher, D.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Gaseous dry deposition of atmospheric mercury: A comparison of two surface resistance models for deposition to semiarid vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition, from regional and international sources, is the largest contributor to increased Hg concentrations in bodies of water leading to bioaccumulation of methyl mercury in fish. In this work, modeled dry deposition velocities (vd) for gaseous Hg are calculated using two surface resistance parameterizations found in the literature. The flux is then estimated as the product of the species concentration and modeled vd. The calculations utilize speciated atmospheric mercury concentrations measured during an annual monitoring campaign in southern Idaho. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were monitored with Tekran models 2537A and 1130, respectively. Two anemometers collected meteorological data, including one fast-response three-dimensional sonic anemometer to measure turbulence parameters. For the flux calculation, three resistances are required to model the mechanisms that transport gaseous Hg from the atmosphere to the surface, with the surface resistance being the largest source of error. Results from two surface resistance models are presented. In particular, the downward flux is sensitive to the choice of model and input parameters such as seasonal category and mesophyll resistance. A comparison of annual GEM and RGM fluxes calculated using the two models shows good agreement for RGM (3.2% difference for annual deposition); however, for the low-solubility species of GEM, the models show a 64% difference in annual fluxes, with a range of 32% to 200% in seasonal fluxes. Results indicate the importance of understanding the diurnal variation of the physical processes modeled in the surface resistance parameterization for vd.

Heather A. Holmes; Eric R. Pardyjak; Kevin D. Perry; Michael L. Abbott

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Formation of film superconductors by metallo-organic deposition  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for producing thin film superconductor materials. It comprises forming a solution from the neodecanoates of yttrium, barium, and copper metals; depositing a film of the solution onto a substrate. The substrate selected from the group consisting of strontium titanate, barium titanate, and sapphire; pyrolyzing the film in an oxygen-containing environment at a first temperature of about 500{degrees}C. for about 5 minutes, so as to decompose the neodecanoates of yttrium, barium, and copper into a film containing oxides of yttrium, barium, and copper, the pyrolyzing occurring substantially immediately after the depositing step; and heating the metal oxide film to a second temperature of about 850{degrees}C. for a duration of approximately no more than 2 minutes and allowing the metal oxide film to cool to room temperature, then heating the metal oxide film to a third temperature of about 920{degrees}C. for a duration of approximately no more than 1 minute.

Micheli, A.L.; Dungan, D.F.; Hamdi, A.H.; Mantese, J.V.; Laugal, R.C.O.

1990-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Particle deposition in human and canine tracheobronchial casts  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work is to measure deposition patterns and efficiencies of aerosol particles within realistic, single-pathway physical models of the tracheobronchial airways of humans and experimental animals over a range of particle sizes for a variety of respiratory modes and rates. This will provide data needed to assess the dose to the bronchial epithelium from inhaled radon progeny. In the current year theoretical studies based on a developing flow model were extended. We concluded that although the developing flow model is better predictor of the data than assumption of parabolic flow, the predicated deposition is significantly lower than that predicted by our best fit equation. The mass size dispersion of particles classified according to their electrical mobilities was also studies. For the conditions tested, doubly charged particles constituted 9--13% of the total particle number concentration and 24--48% of the total mass concentration. We demonstrated that the multiply charged particles are effectively removed, and nearly monodisperse particles produced, if an impactor is placed in the aerosol generation system. A condensation aerosol generator was constructed and tested for the production of high concentrations of radioactively tagged aerosol particles with diameters from 0.2 to 10{mu}m. 9 refs.

Cohen, B.S.

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

Anders, Andre

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

368

Substrate heating measurements in pulsed ion beam film deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films have been deposited at Los Alamos National Laboratory by pulsed ion beam ablation of graphite targets. The targets were illuminated by an intense beam of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen ions at a fluence of 15-45 J/cm{sup 2}. Ion energies were on the order of 350 keV, with beam current rising to 35 kA over a 400 ns ion current pulse. Raman spectra of the deposited films indicate an increasing ratio of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding as the substrate is moved further away from the target and further off the target normal. Using a thin film platinum resistor at varying positions, we have measured the heating of the substrate surface due to the kinetic energy and heat of condensation of the ablated material. This information is used to determine if substrate heating is responsible for the lack of DLC in positions close to the target and near the target normal. Latest data and analysis will be presented.

Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tallant, D.R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Dept.; Thompson, M.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon films from disilane  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous silicon films for fabrication of solar cells have been deposited by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) using a tubular flow reactor. A mathematical description for the CVD reactor was developed and solved by a numerical procedure. The proposed chemical reaction network for the model is based on silylene (SiH/sub 2/) insertion in the gas phase and film growth from SiH/sub 2/ and silicon polymers (Si/sub n/N/sub 2n/, n approx. 10). Estimates of the rate constants have been obtained for trisilane decomposition, silicon polymer formation, and polymer dehydrogenation. The silane unimolecular decomposition rate constants were corrected for pressure effects. The model behavior is compared to the experimental results over the range of conditions: reactor temperature (360 to 485/sup 0/C), pressures (2 to 48 torr), and gas holding time (1 to 70 s). Within the above range of conditions, film growth rate varies from 0.01 to 30 A/s. Results indicate that silicon polymers are the main film precursors for gas holding times greater than 3 s. Film growth by silylene only becomes important at short holding times, large inert gas dilution, and positions near the beginning of the reactor hot zone.

Bogaert, R.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Calculations of turbidite deposits and tsunamis from submarine landslides  

SciTech Connect

Great underwater landslides like Storegga off the Norwegian coast leave massive deposits on the seafloor and must produce enormous tsunamis. Such events have occurred on continental slopes worldwide, and continue to do so. Triggers for such slides include earthquakes, gas hydrate releases, and underwater volcanos. We have petformed a numerical study of such landslides using the multi-material compressible hydrocode Sage in order to understand the relationship between the rheology of the slide material, the configuration of the resulting deposits on the seafloor, and the tsunami that is produced. Instabilities in the fluid-fluid mixing between slide material and seawater produce vortices and swirls with sizes that depend on the rheology of the slide material. These dynamical features of the flow may be preserved as ridges when the sliding material finally stops. Thus studying the configuration of the ridges in prehistoric slides may give us measures of the circumstances under which the slide was initiated. As part of this study, we have also done a convergence test showing that the slide velocity is sensitive to the resolution adopted in the simulation, but that extrapolation to infinite resolution is possible, and can yield good velocities. We will present two-dimensional simulations of schematic underwater slides for our study of rheology, and a three-dimensional simulation in bathymetric conditions that resemble the pre-Storegga Norwegian margin.

Gisler, Galen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gittings, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Si deposition rates in a two-dimensional CVD (chemical vapor deposition) reactor and comparisons with model calculations  

SciTech Connect

Deposition rates are presented for silicon from silane in a helium carrier gas using a tubular CVD reactor with a two-dimensional flow geometry. Measured surface-temperature profiles, inlet gas velocities, total pressures, and silane/helium concentrations are reported, providing exact boundary conditions that can be used in a two-dimensional numerical CVD model. Comparisons are made between this data and two variations of a model by Coltrin, Kee, and Miller in which different empirical expressions for the silane and disilane reactive sticking coefficient are used.

Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

late Quaternary. An investigation of the nature of deposition and alteration of the methane hydrate in cores from the Umnak Plateau in the southeastern Bering Sea was conducted...

374

Subsurface Site Characterization  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and limestone. The Green River Formation is the primary formation of interest for oil shale development in the region. Quaternary-age deposits of alluvium, mudflows, talus...

375

Superheater Tube Corrosion in Wood Gasifier Ash Deposits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The upper operating temperature of tubes in heat exchangers/steam generators is strongly influenced by the degradation that can occur because of the reaction of the exchanger/generator tubing with the deposits that accumulate on the surface of the tubes. In fact, severe corrosion has been observed in some biomass fired systems, particularly with elevated potassium and chlorine concentrations in the deposits. Wood gasifiers have recently been and are currently being constructed at several sites in North America. In these systems, the syngas is burned to produce steam and the performance of the heat exchanger tubes under ash deposits is of great concern. As temperatures of the heat exchangers are increased in an effort to increase their operating efficiency, the performance of the tubes is of greater interest. The corrosion behavior of alloy steel tubes as a function of temperature has been investigated by exposing samples of selected alloys to ash collected from the steam generator fired by syngas produced in wood gasifiers. This study compares corrosion rates from laboratory exposures of synthesis gas and ash at 500 C and 600 C. This study investigated the material performance of four ferritic steels and one austenitic steel exposed to conditions expected on the fireside of a wood gasifier. The purpose of this study was to identify an effective method for determining material performance for samples exposed to both the process gas and the fly ash that is typically observed within the steam generator for times up to 1000 hours. Mass changes were measured for all of the samples, but this information can be misleading concerning material performance due to the difficulty in sufficiently cleaning the samples after exposure in the ash. Therefore, small cross sections of the samples were collected and imaged using optical microscopy. Oxide thicknesses were measured along with metal losses. The metal loss information provides a clear indication of material performance. The metal loss rates for the ferritic steels at 500 C were almost half of those observed at 600 C and the rates decreased with increasing exposure time. It was also reported that the metal loss rates generally decrease with increasing chromium concentration.

Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates with increased stability using the hot wire filament technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method or producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate, comprising the steps of: positioning the substrate in a deposition chamber at a distance of about 0.5 to 3.0 cm from a heatable filament in the deposition chamber; maintaining a pressure in said deposition chamber in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr and pressure times substrate-filament spacing in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr-cm, heating the filament to a temperature in the range of about 1,500 to 2,000.degree. C., and heating the substrate to a surface temperature in the range of about 280 to 475.degree. C.; and flowing silicohydride gas into the deposition chamber with said heated filament, decomposing said silicohydride gas into silicon and hydrogen atomic species and allowing products of gas reactions between said atomic species and the silicohydride gas to migrate to and deposit on said substrate while adjusting and maintaining said pressure times substrate-filament spacing in said deposition chamber at a value in said 10 to 100 millitorr range to produce statistically about 3 to 50 atomic collisions between the silicon and hydrogen atomic species migrating to said substrate and undecomposed molecules of the silane or other silicohydride gas in the deposition chamber.

Molenbroek, Edith C. (Utrecht, NL); Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO)

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

377

Photoemission Studies of Metallic Photocathodes Prepared by Pulsed Laser Ablation Deposition Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of our investigation on metallic films as suitable photocathodes for the production of intense electron beams in RF photoinjector guns. Pulsed laser ablation deposition technique was used for growing Mg and Y thin films onto Si and Cu substrates in high vacuum and at room temperature.Different diagnostic methods were used to characterize the thin films deposited on Si with the aim to optimize the deposition process. Photoelectron performances were investigated on samples deposited on Cu substrate in an ultra high vacuum photodiode chamber at 10{sup -7} Pa. Relatively high quantum efficiencies have been obtained for the deposited films, comparable to those of corresponding bulks. Samples could stay for several months in humid open air before being tested in a photodiode cell. The deposition process and the role of the photocathode surface contamination and its influence on the photoelectron performances are presented and discussed.

Fasano, V.; Lorusso, A.; Perrone, A. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Physics Department, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100-Lecce (Italy); De Rosa, H. [Laboratorio de Metalografia, Dpto. Ingenieria Mecanica y Naval, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cultrera, L. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Laboratories, Frascati (Italy)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer. 1 fig.

Donaghy, R.E.; Sherman, A.H.

1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

379

Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer.

Donaghy, Robert E. (Wilmington, NC); Sherman, Anna H. (Wilmington, NC)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Electrochemical Deposition of Iron Nanoneedles on Titanium Oxide Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iron as a catalyst has wide applications for hydrogen generation from ammonia, photodecomposition of organics, and carbon nanotube growth. Tuning the size and shape of iron is meaningful for improving the catalysis efficiency. It is the objective of this work to prepare nanostructured iron with high surface area via electrochemical deposition. Iron nanoneedles were successfully electrodeposited on Ti supported TiO2 nanotube arrays in a chlorine-based electrolyte containing 0.15 M FeCl2 {center_dot} 4H2O and 2.0 M HCl. Transmission electron microscopic analysis reveals that the average length of the nanoneedles is about 200 nm and the thickness is about 10 nm. It has been found that a high overpotential at the cathode made of Ti/TiO2 nanotube arrays is necessary for the formation of the nanoneedles. Cyclic voltammetry test indicates that the electrodeposition of iron nanoneedles is a concentration-limited process.

Gan Y. X.; Zhang L.; Gan B.J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

Miller, Joel S. (Salt Lake City, UT); Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I. (Salt Lake City, UT)

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

382

Purification and deposition of silicon by an iodide disproportionation reaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

Wang, Tihu (Littleton, CO); Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Synthesis and characterization of GaN thin films deposited on different substrates using a low-cost electrochemical deposition technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gallium nitride GaN thin films were deposited on three different substrates; Si (111), Si (100) and ITO coated glass using electrochemical deposition technique at 20 Degree-Sign C. A mixture of gallium nitrate, ammonium nitrate was used as electrolyte. The deposited films were investigated at room temperature by a series of material characterization techniques, namely; scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM images and EDX results indicated that the growth of GaN films varies according to the substrates. XRD analyses showed the presence of hexagonal wurtzite and cubic zinc blende GaN phases with the crystallite size around 18-29 nm.

Al-Heuseen, K.; Hashim, M. R. [Al-Balqa Applied University, Ajloun University College (Jordan); School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800-Penang (Malaysia)

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Steam Generator Management Program: Assessment of the Effect of Deposit Removal Frequency on Sludge Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a PWR steam generator, the buildup of deposits on the tubes near the tubesheet can increase the risk of tube degradation. To ensure the integrity of the tubes which are part of the primary-to-secondary side pressure boundary, various repair and/or mitigation techniques are available which have attendant benefits, risks, and costs. To mitigate deposit buildup, utilities employ a variety of deposit removal techniques, such as sludge lancing and chemical cleaning. This report addresses the effect of ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

385

Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures. 5 figures.

Schmitt, J.J. III; Halpern, B.L.

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

Recommended Tritium Oxide Deposition Velocity For Use In Savannah River Site Safety Analyses  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of examining the deposition velocity of water to forests, the residence time of HTO in forests, and the relation between deposition velocity and residence time with specific consideration given to the topography and experimental work performed at SRS. A simple mechanistic model is used to obtain plausible deposition velocity and residence time values where experimental data are not available and recommendations are made for practical application in a safety analysis model.

Lee, P. L.; Murphy, C. E.; Viner, B. J.; Hunter, C. H.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

RECOMMENDED TRITIUM OXIDE DEPOSITION VELOCITY FOR USE IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SAFETY ANALYSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of examining the deposition velocity of water to forests, the residence time of HTO in forests, and the relation between deposition velocity and residence time with specific consideration given to the topography and experimental work performed at SRS. A simple mechanistic model is used to obtain plausible deposition velocity and residence time values where experimental data are not available and recommendations are made for practical application in a safety analysis model.

Lee, P.; Murphy, C.; Viner, B.; Jannik, T.; Hunter, C.; Moore, M.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Index of /files/ftp/NDB/coordinates/na-deposited  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

deposited deposited Parent Directory adh012.ent.gz adh013.ent.gz adh016.ent.gz adh029.ent.gz adh030.ent.gz adh031.ent.gz adh034.ent.gz adh098.ent.gz arb002.ent.gz arb003.ent.gz arb004.ent.gz arb005.ent.gz bdbp23.ent.gz bdj061.ent.gz bdl018.ent.gz bdl021.ent.gz ddb004.ent.gz ddb005.ent.gz ddb008.ent.gz ddb009.ent.gz ddb011.ent.gz ddb012.ent.gz ddb033.ent.gz ddb034.ent.gz dddb06.ent.gz ddf007.ent.gz ddf031.ent.gz ddf032.ent.gz drb002.ent.gz drb003.ent.gz drb005.ent.gz drb006.ent.gz drb007.ent.gz drb008.ent.gz drb018.ent.gz drbb01.ent.gz drbb09.ent.gz drbb11.ent.gz drbb12.ent.gz drbb13.ent.gz drbb14.ent.gz drbb15.ent.gz drbb16.ent.gz drbb17.ent.gz drbb19.ent.gz drd004.ent.gz gdl001.ent.gz pdb100d.ent.gz pdb101d.ent.gz pdb102d.ent.gz pdb109d.ent.gz pdb10mh.ent.gz pdb110d.ent.gz pdb111d.ent.gz pdb112d.ent.gz pdb113d.ent.gz

389

Chemical vapor deposition growth. Quarterly report No. 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The contract activities during the quarter were concentrated in the following areas: (1) preparation of polished substrates of three new experimental glasses received in raw billet form from the manufacturer; (2) exploratory Si CVD growth on two experimental glazes (on aluminas), at temperatures below and above the softening points; (3) evaluation of several different surface cleaning procedures for glass substrates, with a procedure involving an acid-cleaning step being adopted as standard; (4) determination of Si film crystallographic properties on glasses (and sapphire) as a function of deposition temperature and thickness in three different thickness ranges; (5) determination of the effect of HCl additions to SiH/sub 4/ on the net growth rates and the properties of Si films grown by a two-step process at two different deposition temperatures; (6) investigation of the reproducibility of Si film growth rates when the SiH/sub 4/ flow rate is controlled by a) the mass-flow controller and b) the conventional rotameter; (7) determination of further carrier density vs added dopant concentration data for B-doped Si films grown in He at low temperatures (approximately 850/sup 0/C); (8) preparation of p-type B-doped Si films in a range of carrier densities on substrates of single-crystal Si, sapphire, and several glasses for fabrication of experimental solar cell structures; (9) preparation of p/p/sup +/ films on substrates of sapphire and single-crystal Si for solar cell fabrication; (10) evaluation of the electrical properties of the various films prepared; and (11) fabrication and characterization of experimental cells made by P diffusion into the p-type and the p/p/sup +/ CVD layers.

Ruth, R.P.; Manasevit, H.M.; Campbell, A.G.; Johnson, R.E.; Moudy, L.A.; Shaw, G.L.; Simpson, W.I.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

Padture, Nitin

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

Nitin Padture

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high rate, low temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be 5 performed at less than 100C, including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 at% fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of 10 refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within 15% of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

Stafford, B.L.; Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Nelson, A.J.

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

394

Soil Degradation and Global Change: Role of Soil Erosion and Deposition in Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M.  York.  1999.  Carbon  Sequestration Research and of soil movement on  carbon sequestration in agricultural and deposition in  carbon sequestration  Asmeret  Asefaw 

Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Harden, Jennifer W.; Harte, John; Torn, Margaret S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

Stafford, Byron L. (Arvada, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Nelson, Arthur J. (Longmont, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Impacts of increasing anthropogenic soluble iron and nitrogen deposition on ocean biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sulfur deposition on ocean acidification and thethe tropical North Atlantic Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 105,and iron inputs to the ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 19,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Biodiesel Deposits Formed on a Hot Metal Surface.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis aims to investigate the formation of deposits from thermally degraded biodiesel on a hot metal surface under the influence of sodium or… (more)

Westberg, Emilie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

(Ti,Mg)N Thin Film Coatings Produced Via Physical Vapor Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnesium (Mg) doped TiN was prepared via physical vapor deposition to ... Axial Compression of a Hollow Cylinder Filled with a Foam: A Porcupine Quill ...

400

Modeling transport and deposition of level 1 substances to the great lakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Persistence and Long-Range Transport Potential amongassessment of potential for transport and deposition to theE. "Assessing Long-Range Transport Potential of Persistent

MacLeod, Matthew; Riley, William J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

B7: Synthesis and Deposition of CeO2 Nanocrystals via Aqueous ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, B7: Synthesis and Deposition of CeO2 Nanocrystals via ... Abstract Scope, Morphological control of nanocrystals (NCs) has been one of the  ...

402

U-17: Selective Area Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) with E-Beam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, U-17: Selective Area Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) with E- Beam ... 3D Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) for Li-Ion Battery Anode.

403

High-rate deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and devices  

SciTech Connect

In high-rate deposition of a-Si:H films, the effect of deposition parameters on material properties are examined when silane and disilane are the feed gases. The emphasis is on RF glow discharge, but other deposition methods are also covered. The problems of gas-phase polymerization and power formation at high rates have been overcome by modified reactor designs. Deposition rates of 1-3 nm/s are adequate for economically fabricating the intrinsic layer. Laboratory-size a-Si:H cells with greater than 10% efficiency have been achieved with both silane and disilane at rates in the 1- to 2-nm/s range.

Luft, W.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films produced by chemical vapor deposition: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a technologically important semiconductor, well-suited for solar photovoltaic energy conversion and thin film device applications. While the glow discharge technique is widely used for the deposition of a-Si:H films, this work is focused on the use of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique, i.e., the thermal decomposition of disilane and higher silanes, for the deposition of a-Si:H films. A simple technique for the preparation of disilane and higher silanes by using an electric discharge in monosilane under atmospheric pressure has been developed, and the discharge product can be used directly for the deposition process. The important parameters of the CVD process including the substrate temperature, the composition and flow rate of the reaction mixture, and the nature of the diluent gas for disilane, have also been investigated. The deposition rate of a-Si:H films in a helium atmosphere is considerably higher than that in a hydrogen atmosphere, and the CVD process in a helium atmosphere is well-suited for the deposition of thick a-Si:H films. The a-Si:H films deposited under various conditions have been characterized by the photoconductivity, dissolution rate, optical absorption, mechanical stress, gap state density, minority carrier diffusion length, and stability measurements. On the basis of these measurements, a-Si:H films deposited by the thermal decomposition of disilane in a helium atmosphere exhibit better structural and electronic properties than those deposited in a hydrogen atmosphere.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Deposition Rates of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Physics and Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007). R. Chistyakov, “High deposition rate sputtering,” USD. M. Mihut, and S. L. Rohde, Rate enhancement in high powerand often reduced normalized rates, it will find application

Anders, Andre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

An Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, An Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond Coats for Advanced Syngas/Hydrogen Turbine Applications. Author(s), Ying ...

407

Dielectric properties of chemically vapour-deposited Si 3 N 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

measured by using a transformer bridge (Ando; TR-. 10C). ..... TABLE I Deposition conditions and some properties of CVD-Si3N 4. Specimen. Tdep*. P,

408

In situ removal of the ``hockey stick`` fissile material deposit at the East Tennessee Technology Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to shutdown of the gaseous diffusion process at the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant (now East Tennessee Technology Park), leakage of humid air into the process piping and equipment caused reactions with UF{sub 6}, which produced nonvolatile uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposition and other solid uranium fluoride compounds. During the period 1988--1991, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems performed nondestructive analysis (NDA) radiological surveys of the K-25 Site process facilities that previously had contained or processed uranium. These surveys were made to estimate the mass and {sup 235}U assay of localized uranium deposits remaining within the process piping and equipment. Three deposits were identified that had sufficient mass to achieve criticality. Two of these, the horizontal pipe and the T pipe deposits, required the addition of a moderator before a criticality accident could occur. The third was a very large uranium deposit determined by NDA to be distributed annularly in the process piping. Because of the shape of the system, it came to be called the hockey stick deposit. Because of the foregoing concerns with the hockey stick deposit, it was decided to gain experience by removing the less hazardous smaller deposits with their less complicated geometries first. Thus, the horizontal pipe deposit, the simplest and least reactive case, was handled first, in June 1997. Next, the T pipe, which was an intersection of large-diameter pipes and which posed additional problems because of a more complex geometry, was handled in August 1997. From this experience, the deposit removal techniques and procedures were refined. In December 1997, this large deposit was removed, and the contents were placed in a safe array configuration.

Lewis, K.D.; Tollefson, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of the enclosure overspray examined by AFM also demonstrated the presence of agglomerates for the Au QDs. The AFM system was not able to resolve individual QDs as was the STEM. Chemical fingerprinting of the QDs with STEM/EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) was performed for the Cd-Se surface deposition, but not the aerosol. Both STEM and AFM background characterization by morphology and chemical fingerprinting were performed throughout the laboratory for a period of about one year. Outdoor sources were primarily biological, combustion fume, salt and other crustal particles. Indoor sources were primarily paper/clothing fibers, spray-on insulation fragments, fiber glass, and human skin cells.

Jankovic, John Timothy [ORNL; Hollenbeck, Scott M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Steam Turbine Efficiency and Corrosion: Effects of Surface Finish, Deposits, and Moisture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The causes of steam turbine losses have been recognized for over 50 years. In practice, deposits and surface finish account for major losses during turbine blade path audits. This report presents new experimental information on the effects of surface finish, moisture removal, and deposits.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Facile synthesis of porous-structured nickel oxide thin film by pulsed laser deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porous-structured nickel oxide (PsNiO) was obtained through the oxidization of a nickel thin film. The nickel thin film was deposited using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method on a nickel foil as a substrate. The results show uniform PsNiO after ...

Siamak Pilban Jahromi; Nay Ming Huang; Ahmad Kamalianfar; Hong Ngee Lim; Muhamad Rasat Muhamad; Ramin Yousefi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Lithium phosphorous oxynitride films synthesized by a plasma-assisted directed vapor deposition approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium phosphorous oxynitride films synthesized by a plasma-assisted directed vapor deposition vapor deposition approach has been explored for the synthesis of lithium phosphorous oxynitride Lipon the ionic transport properties of these films. This enabled the synthesis of electrolyte films with lithium

Wadley, Haydn

413

The Application of Paraffin Deposition Model of Wellbore for Condensate Gas Well  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safety hazard caused by paraffin precipitation to normal oil and gas production cannot be ignored. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the paraffin precipitation, deposition mechanism, and variation discipline of phase state, prediction technology ... Keywords: deposition mechanism, paraffin precipitation, condensate gas reservoir

Xi-an Wang; Min Yang

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium depositCo Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit is the most efficient analytical method to detect these anomalies. Athabasca Basin Figure 1: Denison Mine

415

Demonstration of spatially programmable chemical vapor deposition: Model-based uniformity/nonuniformity control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demonstration of spatially programmable chemical vapor deposition: Model-based uniformity of deposition experiments to develop a model relating precursor concentration to film thickness in each segment region. As a demonstration of spatial programmability, the system was reprogramed using this model

Rubloff, Gary W.

416

Synthesis of high-quality monolayer and bilayer graphene on copper using chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/IG of the Raman spectra (red line in Fig. 6a) taken from the graphene grown on high purity Cu (99.999%) is above 3Synthesis of high-quality monolayer and bilayer graphene on copper using chemical vapor deposition determining the growth of high-quality monolayer and bilayer graphene on Cu using chemical vapor deposition

417

Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF.sub.6, either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W--Si--N or W--B--N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth Lynn (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Paul M. (Albuquerque, NM); Custer, Jonathan S. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Ronald V. (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolet, Marc-A. (Pasadena, CA); Madar, Roland (Eybens, FR); Bernard, Claude (Brie et Angonnes, FR)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Stable nitrogen isotope ratios in wet and dry nitrate deposition collected with an artificial tree  

SciTech Connect

Amounts of dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition and N isotope ratios in wet and dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition have been simultaneously determined by examining differences between precipitation collected by open funnels and throughfall collected beneath an artificial Christmas tree. Samples were collected in a forest clearing on Walker Branch Watershed, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. From mid-summer to early autumn, NO{sub 3}-N fluxes beneath the artificial tree were always greater than those measured in precipitation indicating the tree's effectiveness as a passive collector of dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition. Dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition averaged 60 {+-} 9% of total (wet and dry) deposition. The mean ({+-} SD) calculated {delta}{sup 15}N value for NO{sub 3}-N in dry deposition was + 5.6 {+-} 2.1{per_thousand} (n = 6 sampling periods ranging from 4 to 15 days). On average, this was {approx} 6{per_thousand} heavier than measured {delta}{sup 15}N values for NO{sub 3}-N in precipitation. The calculated {delta}{sup 15}N value for NO{sub 3}-N in dry deposition was consistent with that expected if NO{sub x} precursors to HNO{sub 3} vapor (the major constituent of dry deposition at this site) originated principally from coal combustion.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Spent Nuclear Fuel project photon heat deposition calculation for hygrogen generation within MCO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three types of water conditions are analyzed for nuclear heat deposition in a MCO: fully flooded, thick film, and thin film. These heat deposition rates within water can be used to determine gas generation during the different phases of Spent Fuel removal and processing for storage.

Lan, J.S.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Mineral paragenesis and textures associated with sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, NW China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral paragenesis and textures associated with sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, NW, People's Republic of China c Northwest Institute of Uranium Geology, China National Nuclear Corporation, Wuyiyi and Shihongtan sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwest China. The mineralization

Fayek, Mostafa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern Available online 25 January 2005 Abstract We show evidence that the primary uranium minerals, uraninite-front uranium deposits, Xinjiang, northwestern China were biogenically precipitated and psuedomorphically

Fayek, Mostafa

422

CO2 Snow Deposition in Antarctica to Curtail Anthropogenic Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scientific plan is presented that proposes the construction of carbon dioxide (CO2) deposition plants in the Antarctic for removing CO2 gas from Earth’s atmosphere. The Antarctic continent offers the best environment on Earth for CO2 deposition ...

Ernest Agee; Andrea Orton; John Rogers

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Airflow structures and nano-particle deposition in a human upper airway model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering a human upper airway model, or equivalently complex internal flow conduits, the transport and deposition of nano-particles in the 1-150 nm diameter range are simulated and analyzed for cyclic and steady flow conditions. Specifically, using ... Keywords: computational fluid-particle dynamics simulation, human airways, inspiratory flow, nano-size particle deposition

Z. Zhang; C. Kleinstreuer

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermal deposition and electron beam patterning techniques for biopolymer thin films: dna complex and proteins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties and effects of deposition and patterning of bio-organic materials have been studied in this work. Thermal deposition of DNA:CTMA, DNA:CTMA/PEDOT, DNA:Eu complexes, bacteriorhodipsin, and Bombix mori silk thin films from ...

Robert Andrew Jones / Andrew J. Steckl

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Chemical vapor deposition of ZrC in small bore carbon-composite tubes  

SciTech Connect

Process conditions are described for the chemical vapor deposition of ZrC from ZrCl/sub 4/--CH/sub 4/--HCl--H/sub 2/--Ar vapor over the temperature range 1320 to 1775 deg K. From an analysis of the process conditions (initial composition of coating gas, axial temperature profile along the tubes, total pressure, and length of deposition time), the subsequent ZrC coat thickness profiles and thermodynamic data, an equation expressing the variation of the axial rate of ZrC deposition is derived. This expression can be used for the estimation of process conditions required to yield a specified ZrC coat profile. Variations of the chlorine and oxygen contents, lattice pararmeter, microstructure of the ZrC deposit and thermal expansion coefficient as a function of deposition temperature are described. (11 figures, 3 tables) (auth)

Wallace, T.C.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Pulsed-Laser Deposition of Electronic Oxides: Superconductor and Semiconductor Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) has proven to be one of the most versatile and effective methods for obtaining high-quality electronic oxide thin-film materials. Much of this success can be attributed to its initial use in depositing high temperature superconducting materials. However, pulsed-laser deposition is now a leading research tool in the development of various electronic oxide thin-film technologies, In this paper, recent progress in the deposition of oxide materials on dissimilar materials for both superconductor and semiconductor applications is discussed. Recent developments in the synthesis of superconducting wires via epitaxial growth of superconducting oxides on biaxially textured metal tapes is described. In addition, efforts to integrate high-k dielectric oxides on semiconductor surfaces using pulsed-laser deposition are highlighted.

Norton, D.P.; Park, C.; Lee, Y.E.; Budai, J.D.; Chisholm, M.F.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Christen, D.K.; Kroeger, D.M.

2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

427

Engineering properties of superhard films with ion energy and post-deposition processing  

SciTech Connect

Recent developments in plasma synthesis of hard materials using energetic ions are described. Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (MePIIID) has been used to prepare several hard films: from diamondlike carbon (DLC) to carbides, from nitrides to oxides. The energy of the depositing species is controlled to maximize adhesion as well as to change the physical and chemical properties of the films. Adhesion is promoted by the creation of a graded interface between the film and the substrate. The energy of the depositing ions is also used to modify and control the intrinsic stresses and the microstructure of the films. The deposition is carried out at room temperature, which is important for temperature sensitive substrates. A correlation between intrinsic stresses and the energetics of the deposition is presented for the case of DLC films, and means to reduce stress levels are discussed.

Monteiro, Othon R.; Delplancke-Ogletree, Mari-Paule

2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chemical vapor deposition growth. Quarterly report No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the contract is to explore the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials. The work is carried out at the Rockwell Electronics Research Division in Anaheim, and also involves some experimental solar cell fabrication and evaluation by the Photo-electronics Group of Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. (OCLI), in City of Industry, California. The contract program is composed of six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures (by OCLI), using standard and near-standard processing techniques. The progress achieved during the fourth quarter is described by task, followed by a summary of conclusions and recommendations and an outline of the work planned for the next three months. The manpower and funding expenditures to date are summarized in Appendix A, and the Updated Technical Program Plan is included as Appendix B.

Ruth, R.P.; Manasevit, H.M.; Johnson, R.D.; Moudy, L.A..; Simpson, W.I.; Yang, J.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate, and as having a crystalline orientation defined as predominantly C-axis oriented by x-ray diffraction is disclosed.

Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

430

Optical Spectroscopy of Borate Glasses Doped with Trivalent Rare ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Luminescence properties of rare-earth ions are well-known, but quantum efficiencies ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

431

Conversion of Rare Earth Doped Borate Glass to Rare Earth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A History of the Theories of Glass Structure: Can We Really Believe What is ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass ... Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in ...

432

BIologIcal statIon laBoratorIes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(kbtu/yr) Reduction Energy Demand Daylighting, Insulation, Efficient Energy Systems, etc. Area Reduction from Shared in the summer and 75 in the winter. Project budgets are intended to reflect advanced energy efficiency: · active photovoltaics and hot water heating for building projects · Passive solar heating · Daylight

Amin, S. Massoud

433

Development of Lithium Lanthanide Borate Scintillator for Neutron Scattering Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have completed the design and testing of neutron scattering instrument detectors for powder diffractometers and single crystal diffractometers. These detectors meet the performance requirements for these types of instruments at the Department of Energy Spallation Neutron Source facility.

Czirr, J.B.; McKnight, T.; Merrill, D.

2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and. 4) development of dry deposition formulations applicable to urban areas. Also to improve dry deposition modeling capabilities, atmospheric dispersion models in which the dry deposition formulations are imbedded need better source-term plume initialization and improved in-plume treatment of particle growth processes. Dry deposition formulations used in current models are largely inapplicable to the complex urban environment. An improved capability is urgently needed to provide surface-specific information to assess local exposure hazard levels in both urban and non-urban areas on roads, buildings, crops, rivers, etc. A model improvement plan is developed with a near-term and far-term component. Despite some conceptual limitations, the current formulations for particle deposition based on a resistance approach have proven to provide reasonable dry deposition simulations. For many models with inadequate dry deposition formulations, adding or improving a resistance approach will be the desirable near-term update. Resistance models however are inapplicable aerodynamically very rough surfaces such as urban areas. In the longer term an improved parameterization of dry deposition needs to be developed that will be applicable to all surfaces, and in particular urban surfaces.

Droppo, James G.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Quaternary faulting of Deschutes County, Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sixty-one normal faults were identified in a 53-kilometer long by 21-kilometer wide northwest-trending zone in central and northern Deschutes County, Oregon. The faults are within… (more)

Wellik, John M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

DEPOSITION VELOCITY ESTIMATION WITH THE GENII V2 SOFTWARE  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) Chief of Nuclear Safety and Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), with the support of industry experts in atmospheric sciences and accident dose consequences analysis, performed detailed analyses of the basis for the dry deposition velocity (DV) values used in the MACCS2 computer code. As a result of these analyses, DOE concluded that the historically used default DV values of 1 centimeter/second (cm/s) for unfiltered/unmitigated releases and 0.1 cm/s for filtered/mitigated releases may not be reasonably conservative for all DOE sites and accident scenarios. HSS recently issued Safety Bulletin 2011-02, Accident Analysis Parameter Update, recommending the use of the newly developed default DV, 0.1 cm/s for an unmitigated/unfiltered release. Alternatively site specific DV values can be developed using GENII version 2 (GENII v2) computer code. Key input parameters for calculating DV values include surface roughness, maximum wind speed for calm, particle size, particle density and meteorological data (wind speed and stability class). This paper will include reasonably conservative inputs, and a truncated parametric study. In lieu of the highly-conservative recommended DV value (0.1cm/s) for unmitigated/unfiltered release, GENII v2 has been used to justify estimated 95th percentile DV values. Also presented here are atmospheric dilution factors ({chi}/Q values) calculated with the MACCS2 code using the DV values form GENII v2, {chi}/Q values calculated directly with GENII v2, and a discussion of these results compare with one another. This paper will give an overview of the process of calculating DV with GENII v2 including a discussion of the sensitivity of input parameters.

Hutchins, H.

2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

437

The effect of roughness on aerosol deposition in tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental measurements of simulated roughness within tubes and the subsequent aerosol penetration performance through these tubes were conducted for a aerosol particle size range of 5 nm to 20 nm and a flow rate range of 28 L/min to 169.9 L/min. The relative roughness for each of the tubes tested are as follows: clean aluminum pipe and clean copper tube, F,/D = 10-4; fine sandpaper pipe, F,/D = 0.017-12 helical ridges per linear centimeter copper tube, F,/D = 0.046; coarse sandpaper pipe, F,/D = 0.065. Non-dimensional quantities were used to produce an empirical model relating roughness to aerosol penetration. The dependent variable, aerosol penetration, was encompassed in the non-dimensional deposition velocity (v,) and modeled as a function of the dependent variables, non-dimensional particle relaxation time (,c,) and relative roughness (&/D). In addition, a method was developed for estimating when to remove the sampling transport lines for cleaning due to the roughness within the transport line. The empirical correlation fits the data over the range of 0. I 6 to 112 L/min. For these conditions, the model deviated from the experimental data by less than 10% with one outlier which deviated by 20% for the coarse sandpaper pipe at a flow rate of 1 12 L/min. The correlation was used to show that the transport lines should be removed for cleaning or replacement once the pressure drop has exceeded 7.5 mm Hg. The experimental data has shown that the aerosol penetration decreases below 85% for an internal roughness comparable to this pressure drop limit. The correlation for aerosol penetration in transport lines with internal roughness presented should be a beneficial engineering tool for predicting the aerosol losses in sampling systems where roughness is a concern. The correlation should be a useful sub-model for aerosol penetration prediction computational tools as well.

Chavez, Mario Cesar

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Method For Plasma Source Ion Implantation And Deposition For Cylindrical Surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uniform ion implantation and deposition onto cylindrical surfaces is achieved by placing a cylindrical electrode in coaxial and conformal relation to the target surface. For implantation and deposition of an inner bore surface the electrode is placed inside the target. For implantation and deposition on an outer cylindrical surface the electrode is placed around the outside of the target. A plasma is generated between the electrode and the target cylindrical surface. Applying a pulse of high voltage to the target causes ions from the plasma to be driven onto the cylindrical target surface. The plasma contained in the space between the target and the electrode is uniform, resulting in a uniform implantation or deposition of the target surface. Since the plasma is largely contained in the space between the target and the electrode, contamination of the vacuum chamber enclosing the target and electrodes by inadvertent ion deposition is reduced. The coaxial alignment of the target and the electrode may be employed for the ion assisted deposition of sputtered metals onto the target, resulting in a uniform coating of the cylindrical target surface by the sputtered material. The independently generated and contained plasmas associated with each cylindrical target/electrode pair allows for effective batch processing of multiple cylindrical targets within a single vacuum chamber, resulting in both uniform implantation or deposition, and reduced contamination of one target by adjacent target/electrode pairs.

Fetherston, Robert P. (Madison, WI), Shamim, Muhammad M. (Madison, WI), Conrad, John R. (Madison, WI)

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

439

Direct Measurement of EGR Cooler Deposit Thermal Properties for Improved Understanding of Cooler Fouling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler fouling has become a significant issue for compliance with NOX emissions standards. This paper reports results of a study of fundamental aspects of EGR cooler fouling. An apparatus and procedure were developed to allow surrogate EGR cooler tubes to be exposed to diesel engine exhaust under controlled conditions. The resulting fouled tubes were removed and analyzed. Volatile and non-volatile deposit mass was measured for each tube. Thermal diffusivity of the deposited soot cake was measured by milling a window into the tube and using the Xenon flash lamp method. The heat capacity of the deposit was measured at temperatures up to 430 C and was slightly higher than graphite, presumably due to the presence of hydrocarbons. These measurements were combined to allow calculation of the deposit thermal conductivity, which was determined to be 0.041 W/mK, only ~1.5 times that of air and much lower than the 304 stainless steel tube (14.7 W/mK). The main determinant of the deposit thermal conductivity is density, which was measured to be just 2% that of the density of the primary soot particles (or 98% porous). The deposit layer thermal resistance was calculated and compared with estimates of the thermal resistance calculated from gas temperature data during the experiment. The deposit properties were also used to further analyze the temperature data collected during the experiment.

Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Geology and recognition criteria for uraniferous humate deposits, Grants Uranium Region, New Mexico. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geology of the uraniferous humate uranium deposits of the Grants Uranium Region, northwestern New Mexico, is summarized. The most important conclusions of this study are enumerated. Although the geologic characteristics of the uraniferous humate deposits of the Grants Uranium Region are obviously not common in the world, neither are they bizarre or coincidental. The source of the uranium in the deposits of the Grants Uranium Region is not known with certainty. The depositional environment of the host sediments was apparently the mid and distal portions of a wet alluvial fan system. The influence of structural control on the location and accumulation of the host sediments is now supported by considerable data. The host sediments possess numerous important characteristics which influenced the formation of uraniferous humate deposits. Ilmenite-magnetite distribution within potential host sandstones is believed to be the simplest and most useful regional alteration pattern related to this type of uranium deposit. A method is presented for organizing geologic observations into what is referred to as recognition criteria. The potential of the United States for new districts similar to the Grants Uranium Region is judged to be low based upon presently available geologic information. Continuing studies on uraniferous humate deposits are desirable in three particular areas.

Adams, S.S.; Saucier, A.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Fouling in Diesel Applications: Fundamental Studies Deposit Properties and Microstructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the results of experimental efforts aimed at improving the understanding of the mechanisms and conditions at play in the fouling of EGR coolers. An experimental apparatus was constructed to utilize simplified surrogate heat exchanger tubes in lieu of full-size heat exchangers. The use of these surrogate tubes allowed removal of the tubes after exposure to engine exhaust for study of the deposit layer and its properties. The exhaust used for fouling the surrogate tubes was produced using a modern medium-duty diesel engine fueled with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and biodiesel blends. At long exposure times, no significant difference in the fouling rate was observed between fuel types and HC levels. Surface coatings for the tubes were also evaluated to determine their impact on deposit growth. No surface treatment or coating produced a reduction in the fouling rate or any evidence of deposit removal. In addition, microstructural analysis of the fouling layers was performed using optical and electron microscopy in order to better understand the deposition mechanism. The experimental results are consistent with thermophoretic deposition for deposit formation, and van der Waals attraction between the deposit surface and exhaust-borne particulate.

Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Styles, Dan [Ford Motor Company; Simko, Steve [Ford Motor Company

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Chemical Weathering of New Pyroclastic Deposits from Mt. Merapi (Java), Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Java Island, Indonesia with abundant amount of pyroclastic deposits is located in the very active and dynamic Pacific Ring of Fires. Studying the geochemical weathering indices of these pyroclastic deposits is important to get a clear picture about weathering profiles on deposits resulting from the eruption of Mt. Merapi. Immediately after the first phase of the eruption (March to June 2006), moist and leached pyroclastic deposits were collected. These pyroclastic deposits were found to be composed of volcanic glass, plagioclase feldspar in various proportions, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, olivine, amphibole, and titanomagnetite. Total elemental composition of the bulk samples (including trace elements and heavy metals) were determined by wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses. Weathering of the pyroclastic deposits was studied using various weathering indices. The Ruxton ratio, weathering index of Parker, Vought resudual index and chemical index of weathering of moist pyroclastic are lower than the leached sample but the alteration indices (chemical and plagioclase) are slightly higher in the moist compared to the leached pyroclastic deposits.

Fiantis, Dian; Nelson, Malik; Van Ranst, Eric; Shamshudin, Josup; Qafoku, Nikolla

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Thermal Response of Tritiated Co-deposits from JET and TFTR to Transient Heat Pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High heat flux interactions with plasma-facing components have been studied at microscopic scales. The beam from a continuous wave neodymium laser was scanned at high speed over the surface of graphite and carbon fiber composite tiles that had been retrieved from TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) after D-T plasma operations. The tiles have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was co-deposited during plasma operations, and laser scanning has released more than 80% of the co-deposited tritium. The temperature rise of the co-deposit was much higher than that of the manufactured material and showed an extended time history. The peak temperature varied dramatically (e.g., 1,436 C compared to >2,300 C), indicating strong variations in the thermal conductivity to the substrate. A digital microscope imaged the co-deposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed 100-micron scale hot spots during the interaction. Heat pulse durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, whilst a duration of =10 ms showed minimal changes to the co-deposit. These results show that reliable predictions for the response of deposition areas to off-normal events such as ELMs (edge-localized modes) and disruptions in next-step devices need to be based on experiments with tokamak generated co-deposits.

C.H. Skinner; N. Bekrisl; J.P. Coad; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein; R. Reiswig; S. Willms

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se-Based Solar Cells prepared from Electrodeposited and Electroless-Deposited Precursors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three devices were fabricated from electrodeposited (ED) and electroless-deposited (EL) precursors. Compositions were adjusted with additional In and Ga by physical vapor deposition (PVD) for an ED and an EL device.

Batchelor, W. K.; Bhattacharya, R. N.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Large-scale pulsed laser deposition Nini Pryds, AFM, Jrgen Schou, OPL, Finn Saxild, AFM and Sren Linderoth,AFM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; OPL, Department of Optics and Plasma Research) e-mail: j.schou@risoe.dk Pulsed laser deposition (PLD

446

Effect of gas feeding methods on optical properties of GaN grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: Ga vacancies, GaN growth, gas feeding method, optical property, rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD), yellow luminescence

Sun Jung Kim; Young Hun Seo; Kee Suk Nahm; Yun Bong Hahn; Hyun Wook Shim; Eun-Kyung Suh; Kee Young Lim; Hyung Jae Lee

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Calculation of the dose rate and air ionisation from radioactive fallout deposited at Chilton, Oxon (1951 to 1977)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculation of the dose rate and air ionisation from radioactive fallout deposited at Chilton, Oxon (1951 to 1977)

Gibson, J A B

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

Janecky, D.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

X-Ray Studies of GaN Film Grown on Si Using Electrochemical Deposition Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the X-ray studies of GaN thin films deposited on Si (111) substrate at different current density using electrochemical deposition technique. The structural properties of GaN films were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD analysis showed that hexagonal wurtzite and cubic zinc blende GaN phases were both deposited on Si (111). The lattice constants, the average size of h-GaN crystals and the in-plane (along a-axis) and out of plane (along c-axis) strains were calculated from XRD analysis.

Al-Heuseen, K.; Hashim, M. R. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), 11800 Minden, Penang (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Some concepts of favorability for world-class-type uranium deposits in the northeastern United States  

SciTech Connect

An account is given of concepts of favorability of geologic environments in the eastern United States for uranium deposits of several major types existing elsewhere in the world. The purpose is to convey some initial ideas about the interrelationships of the geology of the eastern United States and the geologic settings of certain of these world-class deposits. The study and report include consideration of uranium deposits other than those generally manifesting the geologic, geochemical and genetic characteristics associated with the conventional sandstone-type ores of the western United States.

Adler, H.H.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Formation of thin-film high T/sub c/ superconductors by metalorganic deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metalorganic deposition (MOD) is a nonvacuum method of thin-film deposition which allows easy alteration of chemical components and is compatible with thin-film processing. We report the preparation of thin-film superconductors by MOD. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was used to determine film compositions and thicknesses. Films, approximately 500 nm thick, of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 4/O/sub z/ (z undetermined) were deposited on single-crystal SrTiO/sub 3/. A superconducting onset temperature of 90 K was measured with 37 K the zero resistance temperature. Scanning electron microscopy revealed grain sizes approximately 250 nm in diameter.

Hamdi, A.H.; Mantese, J.V.; Micheli, A.L.; Laugal, R.C.O.; Dungan, D.F.; Zhang, Z.H.; Padmanabhan, K.R.

1987-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

A Geomorphological Assessment of Armored Deposits Along the Southern Flanks of Grand Mesa, CO, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of deposits, located along the southern flanks of Grand Mesa, Colorado, and extending to the south, are problematic, and the processes related to emplacement are not understood. The overall area is dominated by two landform systems, Grand Mesa, which supported a Pleistocene ice cap, and the North Fork Gunnison River drainage. Thus, one has to ask: Are these deposits the result of the melting of the ice cap or are they fluvial terraces associated with the evolution of the ancestral Gunnison River? The goal of this research was to map the areal extent of the deposits and to interpret the formation and climatic significance in understanding the evolution of the Pleistocene landscape in the region. An extensive exposure, parallel to State Highway 65 near Cory Grade, was used for detailed description and sampling. Three additional exposures, ~10 to 20 km (~6 to 12 mi) were used to extend the areal extent of sampling. The study area was mapped using aerial photography and traditional field mapping aided by GPS. From the field work, a detailed stratigraphic column, including lithology and erodability, was constructed. Vertical exposures of the deposits were described, mapped, and recorded in the field and using detailed photo mosaics. Samples were collected from each stratum of the deposits for grain-size, shape, and sorting analyses. Five distinct depositional facies were identified. Sieve analysis on collected samples shows that four distinct grain-sizes occur in the outcrops; coarse sand, very-coarse sand, granule, and pebble and boulder. Mean grain-sizes range from 0.0722 to 0.9617, -0.0948 to -0.9456, -1.0566 to -1.9053, and -2.0050 to -3.4643, respectively. Glacio-fluvial depositional environments were identified and supported with observations of sedimentary structures and clast composition. Two major environments of deposition are recorded in the deposits; fluvial deposits from glacial outburst floods, and debris flow deposits. Imbrication of clasts in the strata suggests the flow came from the direction of Grand Mesa to the north. Facies and subsequent sequences were constructed to portray evidence that supports the glacio-fluvial mode of deposition.

Brunk, Timothy J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Analysis of Combustion Chamber Deposits by ESI-TOF-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion chamber deposits (CCDs) in internal combustion engines have been studied by various techniques to understand the relationship of performance degradation with deposit quantity and structure. XPS, XAS, NMR, and elemental analysis have offered insight into the bulk structure of C, H, N, O and metal components [1]. MS has offered some information about compound structure, but results are limited due to the insolubility and complexity of the materials. Recent advances in MS have opened new possibilities for analysis of CCDs. Here we report initial findings on the carbon structure of these deposits determined by ESI-TOF-MS and MADLI-TOF-MS.

Reynolds, J G; Shields, S J; Roos, J W

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

454

CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER AND STEAM ATOMIZED SCRUBBER DEPOSIT SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results from the characterization of deposits from the inlets of the primary off-gas Quencher and Steam Atomized Scrubber (SAS) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), as requested by a technical assistance request. DWPF requested elemental analysis and compound identification to help determine the potential causes for the substance formation. This information will be fed into Savannah River National Laboratory modeling programs to determine if there is a way to decrease the formation of the deposits. The general approach to the characterization of these samples included x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) The deposits are not high level waste glass from the DWPF melt pool based on comparison of the compositions of deposits to the composition of a sample of glass taken from the pour stream of the melter during processing of Sludge Batch 3. (2) Chemical composition results suggest that the deposits are probably a combination of sludge and frit particles entrained in the off-gas. (3) Gamma emitters, such as Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-154, Am-241, and Am-243 were detected in both the Quencher and SAS samples with Cs-137 having the highest concentration of the gamma emitters. (4) No evidence existed for accumulation of fissile material (U-233, U-235, and Pu-239) relative to Fe in either deposit. (5) XRD results indicated both samples were primarily amorphorous and contained some crystals of the iron oxides, hematite and magnetite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4})), along with sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}). The other main crystalline compound in the SAS deposit was mercurous chloride. The main crystalline compound in the Quencher deposit was a uranium oxide compound. These are all sludge components. (6) SEM analysis of the Quencher deposit revealed crystalline uranium compounds within the sample. SEM analysis of the SAS sample could not be performed due to the presence of a significant concentration of Hg in the sample. (7) Essentially all the Na and the S in the off-gas samples were soluble in water. (8) The main soluble anion was NO{sub 3}{sup -} with SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} being second. (9) In contrast to the results for the off-gas deposits analyzed in 2003, soluble compounds of fluoride and chloride were detected; however, their concentrations in the Quencher and SAS deposits were less than one weight percent. (10) The results suggest that the S is primarily in the deposits as the sulfate anion.

Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Experimental Study on the Wax-Deposit Law in High-Pour-Point Crude Oi1 Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High pour point properties of crude oil are generally due to the high wax content, so the study of the laws and the characteristics of wax deposition are significant for taking steps to save energy and transport safely. For the wax deposition of high ... Keywords: pipeline transportation, high-pour-point waxy crude, wax deposition law, DSC, experimental study

Wang Zhihua; Si Minglin; Wang Jinxiu; Li Jungang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Effect of fuel type and deposition surface temperature on the growth and structure of an ash deposit collected during co-firing of coal with sewage sludge and sawdust  

SciTech Connect

Blends of a South African bituminous 'Middleburg' coal, a municipal sewage sludge, and a sawdust have been fired in the slagging reactor to examine the effect of the added fuel on the slagging propensity of the mixtures. Uncooled ceramic probes and air-cooled metal probes were used to examine the influence of the deposition surface temperature on the growth and structureof the deposits. The initial stages of slagging were in a high-temperature range of 1100-1300{sup o}C and a low-temperature range of 550-700{sup o}C. Laboratory ash, ash sampled on the deposition probes, and ash collected in the cyclone have been analyzed using the X-ray fluorescence technique. The electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of the embedded resin deposit probes have been performed to determine the thickness, structure, porosity, and chemical composition in different layers of the deposit. Distinct differences in structures of the deposits collected using the uncooled ceramic probes and air-cooled steal probes were observed. Glassy, easily molten deposits collected on uncooled ceramic deposition probes are characteristic for co-firing of municipal sewage sludge with coal. Porous, sintered, but easily removable deposits of the same fuel blend have been collected on the air-cooled metal deposition probes. The addition of sawdust does not negatively influence the deposition behavior. Loose, easy removable deposits have been sampled on air-cooled metal deposition probes during co-firing of coal-sawdust blends. The mass of the deposit sampled at lower deposition surface temperatures (550-700{sup o}C) was always larger than the mass sampled at higher surface temperatures (1100-1300{sup o}C). 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Tomasz Kupka; Krzysztof Zajac; Roman Weber [Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Institute of Energy Process Engineering and Fuel Technology

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Formation In The Volcano Of Milos, Aegean Arc, Greece Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Formation In The Volcano Of Milos, Aegean Arc, Greece Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The viability of boiling as a mechanism for meso- to epithermal ore formation has been tested in the Milos volcano, Aegean Island Arc, by investigating rates of deposition and composition of scale, and by drawing an analogy between the results and actual field occurrences on the island. Milos offers ideal conditions for such testing: it consists of predominantly felsic volcanic rocks with numerous late-stage hydrovolcanic

458

Single- and few-layer graphene by ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition on nickel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process is used to fabricate graphene based films consisting of one to several graphene layers across their area. Polycrystalline Ni thin films are used and the graphene ...

Reina Ceeco, Alfonso

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Age And Nature Of Deposits On The Submarine Flanks Of Piton De La Fournaise  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Age And Nature Of Deposits On The Submarine Flanks Of Piton De La Fournaise Age And Nature Of Deposits On The Submarine Flanks Of Piton De La Fournaise (Reunion Island) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Age And Nature Of Deposits On The Submarine Flanks Of Piton De La Fournaise (Reunion Island) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Debris-avalanche deposits are by far the most extensive and voluminous formations in the submarine domain around Reunion Island. 21 sites sampled offshore of Piton de la Fournaise were studied. All the dredged rocks have a volcanic origin and often consist of blocks buried in a finer-grained matrix. Both massive and vesiculated samples were found, but only rare fragments of pillow lavas were encountered. All the lavas are basalts with variable amounts of olivine. A few plagioclase-bearing basalts

460

Laboratory illustrations of the transformations and deposition of inorganic material in biomass boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boilers fired with certain woody biomass fuels have proven to be a viable, reliable means of generating electrical power. The behavior of the inorganic material in the fuels is one of the greatest challenges to burning the large variety of fuels available to biomass combustors. Unmanageable ash deposits and interactions between ash and bed material cause loss in boiler availability and significant increase in maintenance costs. The problems related to the behavior of inorganic material now exceed all other combustion-related challenges in biomass-fired boilers. This paper reviews the mechanisms of ash deposit formation, the relationship between fuel properties and ash deposit properties, and a series of laboratory tests in Sandia`s Multifuel Combustor designed to illustrate how fuel type, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions impact ash deposit properties.

Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological and Argicultural Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quaternary borate deposits" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Synthesis of Nano-Structured Metal-Oxides and Deposition via Ink ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to synthesize numerous metal oxide nano- structures including TiO2, Nb-doped TiO2, and SnO2 and deposit these materials on ...

462

Characterization of LiNi?.?Mn?.?O? Thin Film Cathode Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LiNi?.?Mn?.?O? thin films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on stainless steel (SS) substrates. The crystallinity and structure of thin films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Microstructure and ...

Xia, Hui

463

Microbial activities in forest soils exposed to chronic depositions from a lignite power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

around a coal-burning power plant: a case study in the Czechdepositions from a lignite power plant Susanne Klose 1* ,DEPOSITIONS FROM A LIGNITE POWER PLANT Susanne Klose 1* ,

Klose, Susanne; Wernecke, K D; Makeschin, F

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Agreement for Minority Financial Institutions Participation in the Bank Deposit Financial Assistance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As  a condition of  participation in the Bank Deposit Financial Assistance Program (BDFAP), the Minority Financial lnstitution fully agrees to comply with the intent of  the program, the...

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