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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. Third quarter 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the 1997 third quarter short term energy projections. Information is presented for fossil fuels and renewable energy.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

Not Available

1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

Not Available

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

4

Short-Term Energy Outlook: Quarterly projections. Fourth quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the third quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications.

Not Available

1993-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, second quarter 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the first quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the second quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). 34 figs., 19 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term' Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

7

DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2QH 2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Tern Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

8

QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) 1991 1 QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION February 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the

9

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections November 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .lort lort lort lort <.ort ort Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Nrm ,iergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short-

10

DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short Short

11

DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short- Short Short- Short- Short Short Short Short Short Short

12

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(83/3Q) (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

13

DOE/EIA-0202(87/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1987 aergy i . Energy ' Energy Energy Energy i Energy i . Energy . Energy Energy Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy i Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy . Energy "nergy ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-T'- Ent. Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energv Ene1" F- Ou Out, Outlc Outloc.

14

DOE/EIA-0202(88/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1988 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy . oi Lor L- . ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term Ent, Energ,, Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Ene r F- Ou Out, Outlc Outloc Outloo. Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlool Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlool

15

DOE/EIA-0202(88/2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1988 aergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy E nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy '? nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook '"""look Short-Terni Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

16

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chart Gallery for February 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 Jan...

17

DOE/EIA-0202(87/2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1987 . m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term iort-Term ion-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term Tt-Term ".-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

18

DOE/EIA-0202(88/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8/1Q) 8/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1988 .m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term ion-Term ion-Term tort-Term jort-Term ion-Term ort-Term ore-Term rt-Term 't-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook ~">Mook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

19

Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

NONE

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook amm Quarterly Projections April 1985 Published: May 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort iort iort lort '.ort ort .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Crude oil prices fell sharply at the onset of war in Iraq, but the initial declines probably overshot levels that we consider to be generally consistent with fundamental factors in the world oil market. Thus, while near-term price averages are likely to be below our previous projections, the baseline outlook for crude oil prices (while generally lower) is not drastically different and includes an average for spot West Texas Intermediate (WTI) that is close to $30 per barrel in 2003 (Figure 1). The mix of uncertainties related to key oil production areas has changed since last month, as Venezuelan production has accelerated beyond previous estimates while Nigerian output has been reduced due to internal conflict.

22

DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4Q) 4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook ""'tlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

23

Short Term Energy Outlook ,November 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 2002 November 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: During the past 3-4 months, OPEC 10 production has risen more quickly than projected, thus reducing upward pressure on prices. More specifically, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $28.84 in October, about $6.70 per barrel above the year-ago level (Figure 1), the WTI average price for fourth quarter 2002 is now projected to soften to $28.20, which is about $2 per barrel below our fourth-quarter projection from last month. Meanwhile, OECD inventory levels, which are now approaching 5 -year lows, should begin to rise over the next few months as additional supplies reach markets, and return to the middle of their observed range by spring.

24

Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 1 September 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights Monthly average crude oil prices increased for the fourth consecutive month in August 2013, as...

25

August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2012 1 August 2012 1 August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights  EIA projects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average about $103 per barrel during the second half of 2012, about $3.50 per barrel higher than in last month's Outlook. The forecast Brent crude oil spot price falls to an average of $100 per barrel in 2013. The projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price discount to Brent crude oil narrows from about $14 in the third quarter of 2012 to $9 by late 2013. These price forecasts assume that world oil-consumption-weighted real gross domestic product (GDP), which increased by 3.0 percent in 2011, grows by 2.8 percent in 2012 and 2.9

26

Short-Term Energy Outlook- May 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The April 24 meeting of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) raised official quotas for members (excluding Iraq) by 0.9 million barrels per day from the previous (suspended) quota to 25.4 million barrels per day. OPEC members also sought tighter compliance with quotas, calling for production cuts of 2 million barrels per day from April levels. We expect these measures to result in an average total OPEC (including Iraq) crude oil production rate of about 26.7 million barrels per day in the second and third quarters. This production level is not significantly different from our base case assumptions in last month's report. Individual OPEC country shares of these output levels will depend upon the speed with which

27

Short Term Energy Outlook, January 2003  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The oil market is vulnerable to a number of forces that could cause substantial price volatility over the...

28

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO) Highlights * Crude oil prices increased during the first three weeks of July 2013 as world oil markets tightened in the face of seasonal increases in world consumption, unexpected supply disruptions, and heightened uncertainty over the security of supply with the renewed unrest in Egypt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price, which averaged $108 per barrel over the first half of 2013, will average $104 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. * The discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent crude oil, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012 and increased to a monthly average of $21 per barrel in February 2013, closed below $1.50 per barrel on July 19, 2013, and averaged $3 per barrel for the

29

Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis" Independent Statistics & Analysis" ,"U.S. Energy Information Administration" ,"Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures, December 2013" ,"U.S. Prices" ,,"West Texas Intermediate (WTI) Crude Oil Price" ,,"U.S. Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"U.S. Diesel Fuel and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Price" ,,"U.S. Natural Gas Prices" ,"World Liquid Fuels" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Production and Consumption Balance" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Outages Among OPEC Producers" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Disruptions Among non-OPEC Producers" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption Growth"

30

Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. This forecast assumes there are no disruptions to energy markets arising from the recent unrest in Egypt. After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then recovered to an average of $103 per barrel in May and June, about the same as its average over the same two-month period last year.  The discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent crude oil, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012 and increased to a monthly average of more than $20 per barrel in

31

Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 June 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then recovered to an average of $103 per barrel in May. EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. * EIA expects the price of regular gasoline will average $3.53 per gallon over the summer driving season (April through September). The annual average regular gasoline retail price is projected to decline from $3.63 per gallon in 2012 to $3.49 per gallon in 2013 and to $3.37 per gallon in 2014. Energy price forecasts are highly uncertain, and the current values of

32

Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. World oil markets will likely remain tight through most of 2003, as petroleum inventories and global spare production capacity continue to dwindle amid blasts of cold weather and constrained output from Venezuela. OPEC efforts to increase output to make up for lower Venezuela output has reduced global spare production capacity to only 2 million barrels per day, leaving little room to make up for unexpected supply or demand surprises. Meanwhile, the average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price increased by $3.50 to $33 per barrel from December to January (Figure 1). For the year 2003, WTI oil prices are expected to remain over $30 per barrel, even though Venezuelan output appears to be moving toward normal sooner than expected. Also,

33

Short Term Energy Outlook, March 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. February crude oil prices moved higher than expected pushed by fears of a war in Iraq, low inventories, slow recovery in Venezuelan exports, continued cold weather and sharply higher natural gas prices in the United States. West Texas Intermediate prices averaged close to $36 for the month (Figure 1), a level not seen since October 1990. Oil inventories continued lower through the month resulting in a cumulative reduction in total commercial stocks of 101 million barrels since September 30, 2002, the beginning of the heating season. Total OECD inventories reached an estimated 2,424 million barrels at the end of February, which would be the lowest level since

34

Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2002 October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $29.75 in September, about $3.50 per barrel above the year-ago level and about $10 per barrel above a low point seen last January. Home Heating Costs Outlook: While fuel supplies should remain sufficient under normal weather

35

Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2002 December 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices fell by about $2.50 per barrel between October and November in response to continued high production levels from OPEC 10 countries (Figure 1). However, by the end of November oil prices had risen to end-October levels as concerns over the situations in Iraq and Venezuela pushed prices up. Oil inventories, which are currently in the lower portion of the previous 5-year range, are poised to rise to more comfortable levels soon if OPEC output continues at or above current levels. OPEC is considering cutbacks from current levels. Heating Fuels Update. As in October, weather was m uch colder than normal in November, boosting

36

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - July 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2005 July 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) Retail regular-grade gasoline prices moved up from about $2.12 per gallon at the beginning of June to $2.33 on July 11. Gasoline pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.25 per gallon, 8 cents per gallon higher than last month's projection and about 35 cents per gallon above the year-ago level. Crude oil prices are expected to remain high enough to keep quarterly average gasoline prices above $2.20 per gallon through 2006. The projected average for retail diesel this summer is $2.33 per gallon, up about 56 cents per gallon from last summer. Nationally, annual average diesel fuel prices

37

Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2014  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 October November December January February March U.S. Winter Heating Degree Days population-weighted 201112 201213 201314 201415 Source: Short-Term...

38

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook - Regional Enhancements Starting with this edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA is introducing regional projections (the scope of which will vary by fuel) of energy prices, consumption, and production. The addition of regional data and forecasts will allow us to examine regional fuel demands and prices, regional fuel inventory trends, the interaction between regional electricity demand shifts, and regional electric generating capacity. This edition of STEO includes regional projections for heating oil, propane, and gasoline prices and natural gas and electricity demand and prices. Over the next 2 months, we will include additional regional

39

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

spring, averaging 4.89 per MMBtu in March, 4.92 in April, and 4.84 in May (Short-Term Energy Outlook, March 2004). Spot prices averaged 5.90 per MMBtu in January but fell to...

40

Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995 ii Contacts Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be directed to W. Calvin Kilgore (202/586-1617),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Short-Term Energy Outlook, Annual Supplement 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1994 ii Contacts Contacts The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU). General questions concerning the content of the report may be directed to W. Calvin Kilgore (202/586-1617),

42

Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

the 2014 renewable fuel standards are identical to those for 2013. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions. EIA estimates that carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels...

43

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - October 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 October 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook October 12, 2005 Release (Next Update: November 8, 2005) Overview Warnings from previous Outlooks about the potential adverse impacts of an active hurricane season on domestic energy supply and prices are unfortunately being reflected in the challenging realities brought about by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The impact of the hurricanes on oil and natural gas production, oil refining, natural gas processing, and pipeline systems have further strained already-tight natural gas and petroleum product markets on the eve of the 2005-2006 heating season (October through March). This combined Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook provides a current view of domestic energy supply and

44

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook This summary is based on the most recent Short-Term Energy Outlook released May 6, 2002. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will average $2.73 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 per MMBtu last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, May 2002). This projection reflects the sharp increases in spot and near-term futures prices in recent weeks. Average wellhead prices have risen 38 percent from $2.14 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $2.96 in April. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have increased to an even greater extent, rising more than $1.50 per MMBtu since early February. The upward price trend reflects a number of influences, such as unusual weather patterns that have led to increased gas consumption, and tensions in the Middle East and rising crude oil prices. Other factors contributing to the recent price surge include the strengthening economy, the increased capacity and planned new capacity of gas-burning power plants, and concerns about the decline in gas-directed drilling.

45

Short-Term Solar Energy Forecasting Using Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short-Term Solar Energy Forecasting Using Wireless Sensor Networks Stefan Achleitner, Tao Liu an advantage for output power prediction. Solar Energy Prediction System Our prediction model is based variability of more then 100 kW per minute. For practical usage of solar energy, predicting times of high

Cerpa, Alberto E.

46

Management and Conservation Short-Term Impacts of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management and Conservation Short-Term Impacts of Wind Energy Development on Greater Sage associated with wind energy development on greater sage-grouse populations. We hypothesized that greater sage-grouse nest, brood, and adult survival would decrease with increasing proximity to wind energy infrastructure

Beck, Jeffrey L.

47

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - January 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2005 January 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Consumer prices for heating fuels are relatively unchanged since the December Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously projected, despite continued warm weather in the middle of the heating season. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 30 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about 20 percent this winter.

48

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - February 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 2005 February 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Despite some cold weather during the second half of January, expected average consumer prices for heating fuels this heating season are little changed since the January Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously reported. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 32 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices averaging $1.82 per gallon for the October-to-March period. Expenditures for propane-heated households are expected to increase about

49

Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly higher than last winter, spending for gas heat will still be lower than the previous 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow).  Brent crude oil spot prices fell from a recent peak of $117 per barrel in early September to

50

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2005 April 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook (Figure 1) Gasoline prices in 2005 are projected to remain high, at an expected average of $2.28 per gallon for the April to September summer season, 38 cents above last summer. Similar high motor gasoline prices are expected through 2006. Monthly average prices are projected to peak at about $2.35 per gallon in May. Summer diesel fuel prices are expected to average $2.24 per gallon. As in 2004, the primary factor behind these price increases is crude oil costs. WTI, for example, is projected to average 37 cents per gallon higher than last summer. High world oil demand will continue to support crude oil prices and increase competition for

51

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - June 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) In May, while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices oscillated from the low $50s range to $47 and back again, retail gasoline prices declined steadily from about $2.24 per gallon at the beginning of the month to $2.10 on May 30. On June 6, average retail prices were $2.12 per gallon. Pump gasoline prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, similar to last month's projection but still about 26 cents per gallon above the year-ago level. Crude oil prices are expected to remain high enough to keep monthly average gasoline prices above $2.00 per gallon through 2006. The

52

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 1 April 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Summer Fuels Outlook April 11, 2006 Release Contents Overview Global Petroleum Markets U.S. Petroleum Markets Motor Gasoline Diesel Fuel Natural Gas Markets Electricity Markets Coal Markets Overview Continued steady world oil demand growth, combined with only modest increases in world spare oil production capacity and the continuing risks of geopolitical instability, are expected to keep crude oil prices high through 2006. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil is projected to average $65 per barrel in 2006 and $61 in 2007 (Figure 1. West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price). Retail regular gasoline prices are projected to average $2.50 per gallon in 2006 and $2.40 in

53

Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - May 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Update (Figure 1) A considerable break in the expected strength of near-term crude oil prices has resulted in a lower forecast for retail gasoline prices this spring. Gasoline prices may well have seen their peak for the year, barring sharp disruptions in crude oil supply or refinery operations. Pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, still high by historical standards but well below the $2.28 anticipated last month. Our projection has been revised downward from the last Outlook as crude oil prices fell from the high $50s per barrel to the low $50s. However, oil prices remain high enough to keep expected

54

Short-Term Test Results: Multifamily Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multifamily deep energy retrofits (DERs) represent great potential for energy savings, while also providing valuable insights on research-generated efficiency measures, cost-effectiveness metrics, and risk factor strategies for the multifamily housing industry. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a base scope retrofit with a goal of achieving 30% savings (relative to pre-retrofit), and a DER scope with a goal of 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit). The base scope has been applied to the entire complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. Findings from the implementation, commissioning, and short-term testing at Bay Ridge include air infiltration reductions of greater than 60% in the DER building; a hybrid heat pump system with a Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) > 1 (relative to a high efficiency furnace) which also provides the resident with added incentive for energy savings; and duct leakage reductions of > 60% using an aerosolized duct sealing approach. Despite being a moderate rehab instead of a gut rehab, the Bay Ridge DER is currently projected to achieve energy savings ? 50% compared to pre-retrofit, and the short-term testing supports this estimate.

Lyons, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

QUARTER SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

production will be limited to domestic requirements plus a small volume of exports to Jordan. This assumes that the United Nations embargo against Iraq continues and Iraq does not...

56

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

63 and $2.72 per MMBtu during the months through October without the wide variations that occurred over the spring and early summer months (Short-Term Energy Outlook, August 2002). Prices are expected to be less variable unless unusually hot weather in late summer results in gas being diverted from storage to meet the added cooling demand, or colder-than-normal weather for October results in an unexpected drawdown of storage stocks. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.73 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average close to $3.12 per MMBtu, which is about $0.75 higher than last winter's price but only about 10-15 percent higher than current prices.

57

January 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO)  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2014.  EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price, which averaged $112 per barrel in 2012, will fall to an average of $105 per barrel in 2013 and $99 per barrel in 2014. The projected discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012, falls to an average of $16 per barrel in 2013 and $8 per barrel in 2014, as planned new pipeline capacity lowers the cost of moving Mid-continent crude oil to the Gulf Coast refining centers.  EIA expects that falling crude prices will help national average regular gasoline retail prices

58

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: December 10, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Custom Table Builder Frequency: Annual Monthly Quarterly Select a Year Range: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 to 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

59

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in September and range between $4.37 and $4.58 per MMBtu in the last 3 months of 2003 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2003). Spot prices at the Henry Hub have fallen somewhat from the unusually high levels that prevailed in the first half of the year and most of July, as mild summer weather in many areas of the country has reduced cooling demand and allowed record storage refill rates. As of September 5, working gas levels were only 5.5 percent below the 5-year average and, barring any disruptions, are on target to reach 3 Tcf by the end of October. However, gas prices remain high-wellhead prices this summer are estimated to be 60 to 70 percent higher than levels last summer. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.84 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, assuming normal weather, wellhead prices are projected to drop by about $1 per MMBtu, or almost 20 percent, to $3.89 per MMBtu, as the overall supply situation improves.

60

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.57 per MMBtu in January 2004 and $5.40 in February, and then decrease to $4.77 in March as the heating season winds down (Short-Term Energy Outlook, January 2004). Spot prices were quite variable in December, with prices at the Henry Hub starting the month at around $5.00 per MMBtu, spiking to roughly $7.00 in the middle of the month, then falling to $5.50 toward the end of the month as warmer-than-normal weather eased demand. Spot prices will likely remain well above $5.00 over the next few months if normal or colder weather prevails, especially with oil prices remaining at relatively high levels. (Oil prices this winter are expected to average $31.35 per barrel (19 cents higher than last winter's average), or 5.41 per MMBtu.) Natural gas storage levels were 8 percent above average as of January 2, which could place downward pressure on prices if warm temperatures and weak heating demand occur later this winter, just as rising prices are possible if the weather becomes colder. Overall in 2004, natural gas wellhead prices are expected to average $4.73 per MMBtu, while spot prices will average nearly $5.00. In 2005, natural gas spot prices are projected to fall to an average of $4.83 per MMBtu under the assumption that domestic and imported supply can continue to grow by about 1-1.5 percent per year.

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61

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Now that the heating season has ended, natural gas wellhead prices have fallen from the exceptionally high levels seen in February and early March. Nevertheless, they still remain historically and unseasonably high, hovering around $5.00 per MMBtu. EIA projects that natural gas wellhead prices will remain above $5.00 per MMBtu in April and then decrease to $4.36 in May and $4.26 in June (Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2003). Wellhead prices for the 2002-2003 heating season (November through March) averaged $4.44 per MMBtu, or $2.08 more than last winter's price. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.53 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $4.40 per MMBtu. This projection is based on the expectation of lower volumes of natural gas in underground storage compared with last year and continued increases in demand over 2002 levels. Cold temperatures this past winter led to a record drawdown of storage stocks. By the end of March, estimated working gas stocks were 676 Bcf (prior estimates were 696 Bcf), which is the lowest end-of-March level in EIA records and 44 percent below the previous 5-year average. In 2004, continued tightness of domestic natural gas supply and high demand levels are expected to keep the average wellhead price near the 2003 level.

62

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.20 per MMBtu through January 2003 and then increase to $4.61 in February and $4.23 in March (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released January 8, 2003). Wellhead prices for the overall heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average about $4.10 per MMBtu, or $1.74 more than last winter's levels, while prices to residential customers are expected to average $8.51 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. Natural gas prices were higher than expected in November and December as below-normal temperatures throughout much of the nation increased heating demand, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Spot prices at the Henry Hub climbed above $5.00 per MMBtu in the second week of December and stayed near or above this threshold through the end of the month. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average $2.90 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. In 2003, average wellhead prices are projected to increase about $1.00 per MMBtu over the 2002 level to $3.90 per MMBtu, owing to expectations of higher demand levels than in 2002 and lower storage levels for most of the year compared with 2002 levels.

63

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 per MMBtu during the last 2 months of 2003 and increase to $4.36 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2003). Prices have fallen in the past few months as mild weather and reduced industrial demand have allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 31, 2003, working gas levels had reached 3,155 Bcf, which is about 3 percent higher than the 5-year average and the first time since October 2002 that stocks exceeded the year-earlier levels. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the current heating season (November through March) are expected to be about 12 percent less than last winter ($4.12 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). However, prices in the residential sector will likely be about 8 percent higher than last winter, as accumulated natural gas utility costs through 2003 are recovered in higher household delivery charges. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.76 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 18 percent, to $3.88 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

64

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the rest of the winter and the first part of spring, with prices averaging $5.19 per MMBtu through March and $4.58 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2004). Wellhead prices for the current heating season (November 2003 through March 2004) are expected to average $4.99 per MMBtu, or about 7 percent higher than last winter's level. Spot prices at the Henry Hub averaged $5.90 per MMBtu in January as cold temperatures (6 percent colder than normal nationally and 19 percent colder than normal in the Northeast) kept natural gas prices and heating demand high. Despite the severe weather, natural gas storage stocks were 3 percent above average as of January 30 and spot prices in early February have moved down somewhat. Overall in 2004, spot prices are expected to average about $4.90 per MMBtu and wellhead prices are expected to average $4.63 per MMBtu, declining moderately from the 2003 levels. In 2005, natural gas spot prices are projected to average about $5.00 per MMBtu, under the assumption that domestic and imported supply can continue to grow by about 1 percent per year.

65

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

this summer and continue at elevated levels through the rest of 2003 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2003). Natural gas wellhead prices are expected to average $5.40 per MMBtu in June and remain above $5.13 through December 2003. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have stayed well above $5.00 per MMBtu on a monthly basis since the beginning of the year and have been above $6.00 for the first 10 days of June. The low level of underground storage is the principal reason for these unusually high prices. As of June 6, 2003, working gas stocks were 1,324 Bcf, which is about 35 percent below year-earlier levels and 25 percent below the 5-year average. Natural gas prices are likely to stay high as long as above-normal storage injection demand competes with industrial and power sector demand for gas. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are projected to increase about $2.33 per MMBtu (the largest U.S. annual wellhead price increase on record) over the 2002 level to a record annual high of about $5.20 per MMBtu. For 2004, prices are projected to ease only moderately, as supplies are expected to remain tight.

66

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

range from $2.91 to $3.19 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.53 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2002). Natural gas prices climbed sharply in late September as hurricanes Isidore and Lili caused production shut downs in the Gulf of Mexico. However, this price surge is expected to be short-lived, unless the weather in October is unusually cold or if additional storm activity in the Gulf curbs production further. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.76 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.32 per MMBtu, which is about $0.96 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.55 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter.

67

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prices will remain relatively high during the storage refill season (April through October) and the rest of 2004. Wellhead prices are expected to average $4.87 per MMBtu in April and May, $4.71 from June through October, and $5.12 for November and December (Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2004). Spot prices during the storage refill months will likely average $5.23 per MMBtu, virtually the same as the average price ($5.22) this past heating season. Overall in 2004, spot prices are expected to average $5.31 per MMBtu, slightly less than the 2003 price ($5.35), while wellhead prices will average about $4.90. In 2005, natural gas spot prices will likely average about $5.25 per MMBtu, under the assumption that domestic supply can continue to grow by about 1 percent per year. Total available supply (including imports and storage inventories) is expected to increase to 22.31 Tcf in 2004 compared with 21.78 Tcf in 2003. Storage stocks at the end of the traditional heating season (March 31) were about 6 percent less than the 5-year average but nearly 50 percent more than year-earlier levels.

68

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

average $2.83 per MMBtu in 2002 compared with about $4.00 last year (Short-Term Energy Outlook, June 2002). Average wellhead prices have increased by nearly 50 percent from $2.09 per MMBtu in February to an estimated $3.11 per MMBtu in May. Spot prices at the Henry Hub have also increased, rising more than $1.00 per MMBtu since early February. It is atypical to see higher spot gas prices in the cooling season than during the heating season, particularly when working gas in underground storage is at high levels, as it has been for the past several months. As of the end of May, working gas levels were more than 20 percent above the previous 5-year average for that month. Moreover, gas-directed drilling, while down sharply from summer 2001 levels, is still quite strong from a historical perspective. The gas rig count as of May 31 was up 22 percent from the recent low of 591 for the week ending April 5.

69

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.41 per MMBtu in December 2003, although spot prices are expected to average $5.38 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2003). The average wellhead price is expected to increase moderately to $4.56 during the first three months of 2004. Natural gas prices were lower in November than previously expected but forward price expectations remain sensitive to weather conditions. Prices increased rapidly in futures trading in early December as some cold weather moved into the Eastern United States and reported withdrawals from gas storage were slightly larger than expected. Spot prices above $5 per MMBtu remain likely over the next few months if normal (or colder) weather prevails, especially with oil prices remaining at relatively high levels. Natural gas storage levels are still above average and hold the potential to push prices back down if warm temperatures and weak heating demand materialize later in the winter, just as upward spikes remain a strong possibility if the weather turns cold.

70

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about $3.49 per MMBtu through December 2002 and then increase to $3.76 in January 2003, the peak demand month of the heating season (Short-Term Energy Outlook, released November 7, 2002). Natural gas prices were higher than expected in October as storms in the Gulf of Mexico in late September temporarily shut in some gas production, causing spot prices at the Henry Hub and elsewhere to rise above $4.00 per million Btu for most of October. In addition, early winter-like temperatures, particularly in the Midwest and Northeast, increased demand for natural gas, placing upward pressure on gas prices. Overall in 2002, wellhead prices are expected to average about $2.84 per MMBtu compared with $4.00 in 2001. Prices during the heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to average $3.56 per MMBtu, which is about $1.20 higher than last winter's price. Prices to residential customers during the heating season are expected to average $7.81 per MMBtu compared with $7.14 last winter. In 2003, wellhead prices are projected to average $3.28 per MMBtu, or about $0.44 per MMBtu more than in 2002, owing to expectations of increasing economic growth, little or no change in the annual average crude oil price for 2003, and lower storage levels for most of 2003 compared with 2002 levels.

71

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 per MMBtu during the last 3 months of 2003 and increase to $4.32 in January 2004 (Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2003). Prices have fallen somewhat from the unusually high levels that prevailed in the first half of the year and most of July, as mild summer weather and reduced industrial demand allowed record storage refill rates. As of October 3, 2003, working gas levels were only 1 percent below the 5-year average and, barring any disruptions, are on target to reach 3 Tcf by the end of October. With the improved storage situation, wellhead prices during the upcoming heating season (November through March), assuming normal weather, are expected to be about 13 percent less than last winter ($4.17 vs. $4.68 per MMBtu). But prices in the residential sector are projected to be about 9 percent higher than last winter, as the recent decline in wellhead prices is too recent and insufficient to offset the impact of the substantial spring-summer increase in wellhead prices on residential prices. Overall in 2003, wellhead prices are expected to average $4.75 per MMBtu, which is nearly $2 more than the 2002 annual average and the largest year-to-year increase on record. For 2004, wellhead prices are projected to drop by nearly $0.90 per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $3.86 per MMBtu as the overall supply situation improves.

72

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in the summer months (June-August) and 6.00 per MMBtu in the fourth quarter, while composite spot prices will likely stay well above 6.00 through December. Spot prices averaged...

73

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that natural gas prices will remain relatively high for the rest of 2004. Wellhead prices are expected to average $5.41 per MMBtu through the end of the storage refill season (October 31) and $5.59 in November and December. Spot prices (composites for producing-area hubs) averaged about $5.30 per MMBtu in the first quarter of this year but are currently near $6.00. Barring cooler-than-normal weather this summer, the likelihood appears small that spot prices will fall significantly below $5.65 per MMBtu for the rest of 2004. Overall in 2004, spot prices will likely average $5.62 per MMBtu and wellhead prices will average $5.33. In 2005, spot prices are expected to increase to $5.90 per MMBtu. As in other recent projections, this outcome depends on modest growth in domestic production and total available supply (including imports and storage inventories) in both 2004 and 2005. Underground storage facilities reported net injections of 199 Bcf for April, well above the previous 5-year average of 139 Bcf. At the end of April, storage stocks were only about 2 percent below the 5-year average level and 37 percent higher than last year at this time based on monthly survey data.

74

December 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO)  EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $110 per barrel in the fourth quarter of 2012, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price will average $89 per barrel. The Brent and WTI crude oil spot prices are forecast to average $104 per barrel and $88 per barrel, respectively, in 2013. The projected WTI discount to Brent crude oil, which averaged $23 per barrel in November 2012, falls to an average of $11 per barrel by the fourth quarter of 2013. This forecast rests on the assumption that U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) grows by 2.1 percent in 2012 and 1.8 percent in 2013, while world

75

Microsoft PowerPoint - Arseneau_EIA_ShortTermDriversofEnergyPrices.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SHORT-TERM ENERGY PRICES: SHORT-TERM ENERGY PRICES: WHAT DRIVERS MATTER MOST? DAVID M. ARSENEAU FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD U.S. Energy Information Administration & Johns Hopkins University - SAIS FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD Johns Hopkins University SAIS 2010 Energy Conference Washington, D.C., U.S.A. A il 6 2010 April 6, 2010 BROAD COMMODITY PRICES SINCE 2000 Short-term Energy Prices: What Drivers Matters Most? BROAD COMMODITY PRICES SINCE 2000 April 6, 2010 Seminar: 2010 EIA/SAIS Energy Conference 2 A (GROSSLY OVERSIMPLIFIED) FRAMEWORK Short-term Energy Prices: What Drivers Matters Most? A (GROSSLY OVERSIMPLIFIED) FRAMEWORK ...  Two candidate explanations:  "Fundamentals"  Fundamentals  Trend price movements appear broadly interpretable through lens of fundamental market developments...

76

The Application of Flywheels in Short-term Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT In many alternative energy systems there is a requirement for energy storage over periods of up to 20 seconds in order to match supply and demand at times when these are changing rapidly and independently. The flywheel forms an ideal basis for such storage because of its relatively high cycle life and potential power and energy density. Wind energy conversion is taken as an example and the requirement for energy storage in WTG systems is assessed. Flywheel energy storage is compared with other forms of storage and is shown to be potentially suitable for this requirement. Power transmission between the flywheel and the WTG grid system requires a variable speed regenerative drive and associated frequency conversion. Such a scheme might permit variable speed WTG operation. A DC link converter is described.

C.M. Jefferson; N. Larsen

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

February 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in the western United States. Producers reported wellhead freeze-offs in the San Juan, Green River, Uinta, and Piceance basins, according to recent Bentek Energy reports. As...

78

Newporter Apartments: Deep Energy Retrofit Short-Term Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project demonstrates a path to meet the goal of the Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30% in multi-family buildings. The project demonstrates cost effective energy savings targets as well as improved comfort and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) associated with deep energy retrofits by a large public housing authority as part of a larger rehabilitation effort. The project focuses on a typical 1960's vintage low-rise multi-family apartment community (120 units in three buildings).

Gordon, A.; Howard, L.; Kunkle, R.; Lubliner, M.; Auer, D.; Clegg, Z.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

March 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO) Highlights  The weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail price fell in early March for the first time since mid-December. The March 11 average was $3.71 per gallon, down $0.07 per gallon from February 25. EIA expects that lower crude oil prices will result in monthly average regular gasoline prices staying near the February average of $3.67 per gallon over the next few months, with the annual average regular gasoline retail price declining from $3.63 per gallon in 2012 to $3.55 per gallon in 2013 and $3.38 per gallon in 2014. Energy price forecasts are highly uncertain and the current values of futures and options contracts suggest that prices

80

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Next Release Date: February 11, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty < Back to list of tables Working correctly. Table 1 : U.S. Energy Markets Summary Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Includes lease condensate.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ducklings Exhibit Substantial Energy-Saving Mechanisms as a Response to Short-Term Food Shortage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

90 Ducklings Exhibit Substantial Energy-Saving Mechanisms as a Response to Short-Term Food Shortage platyrhyncos domesticus) exhibited any energy-saving mechanisms that could lessen the detrimental effects ex- hibited substantial energy-saving mechanisms as a response to diet restriction. After 5 d of diet

Bech, Claus

82

Short-Term Throughput Maximization for Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Nodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for energy recharge. Under the assumption of an increasing concave power-rate relationship, the short completion time of a given amount of data were found for an energy harvesting node under the assumptionShort-Term Throughput Maximization for Battery Limited Energy Harvesting Nodes Kaya Tutuncuoglu

Yener, Aylin

83

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Next Release Date: February 11, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Highlights This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015. After falling to the lowest monthly average of 2013 in November, U.S. regular gasoline retail prices increased slightly to reach an average of $3.28 per gallon (gal) during December. The annual average regular

84

Session 4: "Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most?"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4: "Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most?" 4: "Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most?" Speakers: Howard K. Gruenspecht, EIA David M. Arseneau, Federal Reserve Board Guy F. Caruso, Center for Strategic and International Studies Christopher Ellsworth, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Edward L. Morse, Credit Suisse Securities [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Howard: And this presentation could not be more timely, given current developments in oil and natural gas markets and the start of the traditional summer driving season. In discussions of rapidly rising oil prices leading to a peak of $147 per barrel in the summer of 2008, the factors that were traditionally the focus of EIA's

85

DSM savings verification through short-term pre-and-post energy monitoring at 90 facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the DSM impact results obtained from short-term energy measurements performed at sites monitored as part of the Commercial, Industrial and Agricultural (CIA) Retrofit Incentives Evaluation Program sponsored by the Pacific Gas & Electric Company. The DSM measures include those typically found in these sectors; i.e., lighting, motors, irrigation pumps and HVAC modifications. The most important findings from the site measurements are the estimated annual energy and demand savings. Although there may be large differences of projected energy savings for individual sites, when viewed in the aggregate the total energy savings for the program were found to be fairly comparable to engineering estimates. This paper describes the lessons learned from attempting in-situ impact evaluations of DSM savings under both direct and custom rebate approaches. Impact parameters of interest include savings under both direct and custom rebate approaches. Impact parameters of interest include gross first-year savings and load shape impacts. The major method discussed in this paper is short-term before/after field monitoring of affected end-uses; however, the complete impact evaluation method also includes a billing analysis component and a hybrid statistical/engineering model component which relies, in part, on the short-term end-use data.

Misuriello, H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

‹ Analysis & Projections ‹ Analysis & Projections Short-Term Energy Outlook Release Date: December 10, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Full Report | Text Only | All Tables | All Figures Glossary › FAQS › Overview STEO Report Highlights Prices Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and CO2 Emissions U.S. Economic Assumptions Data Figures Tables Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer Forecast Changes (PDF) Special Analysis Price Uncertainty Highlights After falling by more than 40 cents per gallon from the beginning of September through mid-November, weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail prices increased by 8 cents per gallon to reach $3.27 per gallon on December 2, 2013, due in part to unplanned refinery maintenance and higher

87

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release Schedule Release Schedule Release Date. The Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) scheduling procedure calls for the release of the STEO on the first Tuesday following the first Thursday of each month. For example, since the first Thursday of July 2009 was July 2, under this plan, the July edition was released on Tuesday, July 7. If a Federal holiday falls on the Monday before the normal release date the release is delayed until Wednesday. There may be the occasional unusual delay in the release because of scheduling around other events, such as the annual EIA Conference in April 2009. Barring holidays or unusual rescheduling, the STEO will normally appear between the 6th and the 12th of the month. Any unforeseen scheduling adjustments will be posted here and/or on the STEO homepage.

88

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Special Analysis Special Analysis + EXPAND ALL Feature Articles Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields September 2013 PDF EIA Estimates of Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply Disruptions September 2013 PDF 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 PDF Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 PDF Key drivers for EIA's short-term U.S. crude oil production outlook February 2013 PDF Constraints in New England likely to affect regional energy prices this winter January 2013 PDF Change in STEO Regional and U.S. Degree Day Calculations September 2012 PDF Changes to Electricity and Renewables Tables August 2012 PDF Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast July 2012 PDF 2012 Outlook for Hurricane-Related Production Outages in the Gulf of Mexico June 2012 PDF

89

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Market Prices and Uncertainty Report This is a regular monthly supplement to the EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook. Contact: James Preciado (James.Preciado@eia.gov) Full Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil benchmarks moved higher in November, showing their first month-over-month increase since August, while U.S. crude oil prices moved higher during the first week of December. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $110.98 per barrel on December 5, an increase of $5.07 per barrel since its close on November 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures contract rose $2.77 per barrel compared to November 1, settling at $97.38 per barrel on December 5. Figure 1: Historical crude oil front month futures prices

90

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

STEO Archives STEO Archives Previous Short-Term Energy Outlook reports are available in the original Adobe Acrobat PDF file with text, charts, and tables, or just the monthly data tables in an Excel file. + EXPAND ALL 2013 STEO Issues Release Date Full PDF Report Excel Data File Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty December 2013 12/10/2013 dec13.pdf dec13_base.xlsx dec13_uncertainty.pdf November 2013 11/13/2013 nov13.pdf nov13_base.xlsx nov13_uncertainty.pdf October 2013 10/08/2013 oct13.pdf oct13_base.xlsx oct13_uncertainty.pdf September 2013 09/10/2013 sep13.pdf sep13_base.xlsx sep13_uncertainty.pdf August 2013 08/06/2013 aug13.pdf aug13_base.xlsx aug13_uncertainty.pdf July 2013 07/09/2013 jul13.pdf jul13_base.xlsx jul13_uncertainty.pdf

91

Wind diesel design and the role of short term flywheel energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind diesel hybrid systems can often provide a cost effective solution to electricity supply in many rural and grid remote applications. The potential market for such stand alone systems is vast. The sizing and design of these systems to suite a given application is non-trivial. Design principles for wind diesel systems are presented with stress placed on the role of short term energy storage. It is shown that flywheels are the most appropriate form of energy storage. A user-friendly software package to help engineers design wind diesel systems has been developed over the last three years with support from the CEC's JOULE programme. The modelling and software development was undertaken cooperatively by several EEC and EFTA countries. An brief introduction to the software, which models both logistic and dynamic aspects of system operation, is provided and there is a discussion of its validation.

D.G. Infield

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Methodology for Analyzing Energy and Demand Savings From Energy Services Performance Contract Using Short-Term Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METHODOLOGY FOR ANALYZING ENERGY AND DEMAND SAVINGS FROM ENERGY SERVICES PERFORMANCE CONTRACT USING SHORT-TERM DATA Zi Liu, Jeff Haberl, Soolyeon Cho Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University System College Station, TX 77843 Bobby... Contract, and includes the methodology developed to calculate the electricity and demand use savings based on different data sources including hourly data from permanently installed logger, hourly data from portable loggers, and weekly manual readings...

Liu, Z.; Haberl, J. S.; Cho, S.; Lynn, B.; Cook, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 24, NO. 1, MARCH 2009 125 Short-Term Prediction of Wind Farm Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 24, NO. 1, MARCH 2009 125 Short-Term Prediction of Wind Farm Power: A Data Mining Approach Andrew Kusiak, Member, IEEE, Haiyang Zheng, and Zhe Song, Student Member, IEEE Abstract--This paper examines time series models for predicting the power of a wind

Kusiak, Andrew

94

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the production level at the end of August was far lower. At the end of August, an armed group blocked pipelines that connect the El Sharara and El Feel (Elephant) fields to the Zawiya and Mellitah export terminals, respectively, forcing the shutdown of those fields. El Sharara had been

95

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 : U.S. Energy Markets Summary 1 : U.S. Energy Markets Summary Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Includes lease condensate. b Total consumption includes Independent Power Producer (IPP) consumption. c Renewable energy includes minor components of non-marketed renewable energy that is neither bought nor sold, either directly or indirectly, as inputs to marketed energy. EIA does not estimate or project end-use consumption of non-marketed renewable energy. d The conversion from physical units to Btu is calculated by using a subset of conversion factors used in the calculations of gross energy consumption in EIA’s Monthly Energy Review (MER). Consequently, the historical data may not precisely match those published in the MER or the Annual Energy Review (AER).

96

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

and forecast data STEO Custom Table Builder Real Prices Viewer In beta testing: STEO Data browser Related Tables Table 1. U.S. Energy Markets Summary PDF Table...

97

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 : U.S. Energy Prices 2 : U.S. Energy Prices Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Average for all sulfur contents. b Average self-service cash price. c Includes fuel oils No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, and topped crude. - = no data available Notes: Prices are not adjusted for inflation. The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with estimates and forecasts in italics. Prices exclude taxes unless otherwise noted. Historical data: Latest data available from Energy Information Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly, DOE/EIA-0380; Weekly Petroleum Status Report, DOE/EIA-0208; Natural Gas Monthly, DOE/EIA-0130; Electric Power Monthly, DOE/EIA-0226; and Monthly Energy Review, DOE/EIA-0035.

98

DOE/EIA-0202(86/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Ter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6/4Q) 6/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Ter m Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1986 .m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term ion-Term lort-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term -rt-Term -t-Term -Term iiergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy " Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

99

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Tables All Tables Tables Table WF01. Average Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter PDF Table 1. U.S. Energy Markets Summary PDF Table 2. U.S. Energy Prices PDF Table 3a. International Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Production, Consumption, and Inventories PDF Table 3b. Non-OPEC Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply PDF Table 3c. OPEC Crude Oil (excluding condensates) Supply PDF Table 3d. World Liquid Fuels Consumption PDF Table 4a. U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF Table 4b. U.S. Petroleum Refinery Balance PDF Table 4c. U.S. Regional Motor Gasoline Prices and Inventories PDF Table 5a. U.S. Natural Gas Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF Table 5b. U.S. Regional Natural Gas Prices PDF Table 6. U.S. Coal Supply, Consumption, and Inventories PDF

100

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Overview Tancred Lidderdale 202-586-7321 tancred.lidderdale@eia.gov World Oil Prices/International Petroleum Erik Kreil 202-586-6573 erik.kreil@eia.gov Energy Prices Sean Hill 202-586-4247 sean.hill@eia.gov Futures Markets and Energy Price Uncertainty James Preciado 202-586-8769 james.preciado@eia.gov U.S. Crude Oil Production John Staub 202-586-6344 john.staub@eia.gov U.S. Petroleum Demand Michael Morris 202-586-1199 michael.morris@eia.gov U.S. Refinery Supply Arup Mallik 202-586-7713 arup.mallik@eia.gov U.S. Ethanol Tony Radich 202-586-0504 anthony.radich@eia.gov U.S. Biodiesel Sean Hill 202-586-4247 sean.hill@eia.gov U.S. Natural Gas Katherine Teller 202-586-6201 katherine.teller@eia.gov U.S. Coal Supply and Demand Elias Johnson 202-586-7277 elias.johnson@eia.gov U.S. Coal Prices

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE/EIA-0202(86/1Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6/1Q) 6/1Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1986 Outlook Short-Term _ uergy Outlook Short-Term Ent,. , Energy Outlook Short-Term Energ^ .m Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy L .erm Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Ou Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Out, t-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlc rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outloc 3rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlocx .ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook .iort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook nort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook iort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook '.ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook

102

DOE/EIA-0202(86/2Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1986 Outlook Short-Term _ Outlook Short-Term Exit,. . Energy Outlook Short-Term Energ^ .-m Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy L .erm Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Ou Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy OuU t-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlc rt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outloc jrt-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlocx .ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook. lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook lort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook <.ort-Term Energy Outlook Short-Term Energy Outlook

103

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region Projected Winter Fuel Expenditures by Fuel and Region The average household winter heating fuel expenditures discussed in this STEO provide a broad guide to changes compared with last winter. However, fuel expenditures for individual households are highly dependent on local weather conditions, market size, the size and energy efficiency of individual homes and their heating equipment, and thermostat settings (see Winter Fuels Outlook table). Forecast temperatures are close to last winter nationally, with the Northeast about 3% colder and the West 3% warmer. Natural Gas About one-half of U.S. households use natural gas as their primary heating fuel. EIA expects households heating with natural gas to spend an average of $80 (13%) more this winter than last winter. The increase in natural gas

104

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity So far this year (through October 2013), the electricity industry has added 10.0 gigawatts (GW) of new generating capacity. Much of this new capacity (6.2 GW) is fueled by natural gas. Renewable energy sources are used in 2.3 GW of the new capacity while two new coal plants (1.5 GW) have also started producing electricity this year. However, these new sources for power generation have been more than offset by 11.1 GW of retired capacity. Coal-fired and nuclear plants comprise the largest proportion of year-to-date retired capacity (3.8 GW and 3.6 GW, respectively). A total of 2.3 GW of natural-gas-fired capacity has been retired so far this year. U.S. Electricity Consumption Electricity sales during 2013 have experienced little, if any, growth.

105

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9c : U.S. Regional Weather Data 9c : U.S. Regional Weather Data Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available Notes: Regional degree days for each period are calculated by EIA as contemporaneous period population-weighted averages of state degree day data published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). See STEO Supplement: Change in Regional and U.S. Degree-Day Calculations for more information. The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with historical data printed in bold; estimates and forecasts in italics. Regions refer to U.S. Census divisions. See "Census division" in EIA's Energy Glossary for a list of states in each region.

106

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9b : U.S. Regional Macroeconomic Data 9b : U.S. Regional Macroeconomic Data Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available Notes: The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with estimates and forecasts in italics. Regions refer to U.S. Census divisions. See "Census division" in EIA's Energy Glossary for a list of states in each region. Historical data: Latest data available from U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis; Federal Reserve System, Statistical release G17. Minor discrepancies with published historical data are due to independent rounding. Projections: Macroeconomic projections are based on the Global Insight Model of the U.S. Economy

107

Chapter 6 - Incorporating Short-Term Stored Energy Resource into MISO Energy and Ancillary Service Market and Development of Performance-Based Regulation Payment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter analyzes various approaches to incorporate short-term stored energy resources (SERs) into MISO co-optimized energy and ancillary service market. Based on analysis, the best approach is to utilize short-term storage energy resources for regulating reserve with the real-time energy dispatch of the \\{SERs\\} to be set in such a way that the maximum regulating reserve on \\{SERs\\} can be cleared. It also introduces the implementation of market based regulation performance payment. The purpose of the enhancement is to provide fair compensation for resources such as \\{SERs\\} that can provide fast and accurate responses.

Yonghong Chen; Marc Keyser; Matthew H. Tackett; Ryan Leonard; Joe Gardner

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Summer 2013 Outlook for Residential Electric Bills 1

109

DOE/EIA-0202(84/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

As required by Government regulation, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is conduct ing its annual publications mailing list review. If you are on the EIA mailing...

110

American Solar Energy Society Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, 2011 SHORT-TERM IRRADIANCE VARIABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual Conference, Raleigh, NC, 2011 SHORT, as hypothesized in Hoff and Perez's optimum point. #12;© American Solar Energy Society ­ Proc. ASES Annual is the factor that determines whether the combined relative fluctuations of two solar systems add up when

Perez, Richard R.

111

DOE/EIA-0202|83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ministration (EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use, under the direc tion "of Wray Smith (202252-1617). General supervision is provided by W. Calvin Kilgore (202252-1130),...

112

DOE/EIA-0202(86/3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1986 t rt ort .ort lort lort nort iort lort \ort ort Tt "t- . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Enbrgy ^nergy -OJ.VJUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

113

Short-term resource scheduling of a renewable energy based micro grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In recent years due to the decreasing fossil fuel reserves and the increasing social stress, complex power networks have no other choices except to seek for alternative energy sources to eliminate the environmental issues caused by the traditional power systems. Thus, the scheduling of energy sources in a complex Micro-Grid (MG) comprising Micro Turbine (MT), Photo Voltaic (PV), Fuel Cell (FC), battery units and Wind Turbine (WT) has been investigated in this paper. Furthermore, a multi-objective framework is presented to simultaneously handle the two objective functions including minimization of total operation cost and minimization of emission. In this regard, Normal Boundary intersection (NBI) technique is employed to solve the proposed multi-objective problem and generate the Pareto set. Besides, a fuzzy satisfying method is used for decision making process. Afterward, the results obtained from the presented method are compared to the ones derived from other methods. Finally, it is verified that the proposed solution method results in better solutions for operation cost, emission and the execution time.

Maziar Izadbakhsh; Majid Gandomkar; Alireza Rezvani; Abdollah Ahmadi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DOE/EIA-0202(85/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook OBIS Quarterly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

overall average MPG increased by about 2.7 percent per year between 1982 and 1984. Automobile efficiency is expected to improve by 1.4 percent between 1984 and 1985 and by 2.5...

115

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) is a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research project whose overarching goals are to improve the accuracy of short-term wind energy forecasts, and to demonstrate the economic value of these improvements.

116

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2014 Alabama ...

117

Shortterm solar effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...J. L. Culhane and J. C. R. Hunt Short-term solar effects Richard A. Harrison Space Science and Technology...OX11 0QX, UK Short-term transient events in the solar atmosphere, namely solar flares and coronal mass ejections, can have a direct...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2013 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2013 Hurricane Outlook 1

119

US energy industry financial developments, 1994 first quarter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report traces key financial trends in the US energy industry for the first quarter of 1994. Financial data (only available for publicly-traded US companies) are included in two broad groups -- fossil fuel production and rate-regulated electric utilities. All financial data are taken from public sources such as energy industry corporate reports and press releases, energy trade publications, and The Wall Street Journal`s, Earnings Digest. Return on equity is calculated from data available from Standard and Poor`s Compustat data service. Since several major petroleum companies disclose their income by lines of business and geographic area. These data are also presented in this report. Although the disaggregated income concept varies by company and is not strictly comparable to corporate income, relative movements in income by lines of business and geographic area are summarized as useful indicators of short-term changes in the underlying profitability of these operations.

Not Available

1994-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

US Energy Industry Financial Developments, 1993 fourth quarter, April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report traces key financial trends in the US energy industry for the fourth quarter of 1993. Financial data (only available for publicly-traded US companies) are included in two broad groups -- fossil fuel production and rate-regulated electric utilities. All financial data are taken from public sources such as energy industry corporate reports and press releases, energy trade publications, and The Wall Street Journal`s Earnings Digest; return on equity is calculated from data available from Standard and Poor`s Compustat data service. Since several major petroleum companies disclose their income by lines of business and geographic area, these data are also presented in this report. Although the disaggregated income concept varies by company and is not strictly comparable to corporate income, relative movements in income by lines of business and geographic area are summarized as useful indicators of short-term changes in the underlying profitability of these operations. Based on information provided in 1993 fourth quarter financial disclosures, the net income for 82 petroleum companies -- including 18 majors -- was unchanged between the fourth quarter of 1992 and the fourth quarter of 1993. An 18-percent decline in crude oil prices resulted in a deterioration of the performance of upstream (oil and gas production) petroleum companies during the final quarter of 1993. However, prices for refined products fell much less than the price of crude oil, resulting in higher refined product margins and downstream (refining, marketing and transport) petroleum earnings. An increase in refined product demand also contributed to the rise in downstream income.

Not Available

1994-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(STEO) (STEO) Highlights  After falling by more than 40 cents per gallon from the beginning of September through mid-November, weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail prices increased by 8 cents per gallon to reach $3.27 per gallon on December 2, 2013, due in part to unplanned refinery maintenance and higher crude oil prices. The annual average regular gasoline retail price, which was $3.63 per gallon in 2012, is expected to average $3.50 per gallon in 2013 and $3.43 per gallon in 2014.  The North Sea Brent crude oil spot price averaged near $110 per barrel for the fifth consecutive month in November. EIA expects the Brent crude oil price to average $108 per barrel in December and decline gradually to $104 per barrel in 2014. Projected West Texas

122

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

123

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; Prices are not adjusted for inflation. (b) Average self-service cash price....

124

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

capacity slightly more than doubled in 2013. EIA expects that utility-scale solar capacity will about double again between the end of 2013 and the end of 2015; about two-thirds...

125

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in customer-sited distributed generation installations, utility-scale solar capacity doubled in 2013. EIA expects that utility-scale solar capacity will increase by 96%...

126

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in 2015 comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

127

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

128

October 2007 CEELP Quarterly Environmental & Energy Newsletter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 2007 CEELP Quarterly Environmental & Energy Newsletter Issue 2 The following items appear in this edition: (1) Responsibilities for Energy Policy: Movements in Wales and Westminster (2) Meeting the Energy Challenge - A White Paper on Energy, 2007 (3) The Energy White Paper and Devolution (4) Energy Aspects

Martin, Ralph R.

129

OE Releases 2014 Issue 2 of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4 Issue 2 of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (August 2014) OE Releases 2014 Issue 2 of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (August 2014) August 7, 2014 - 3:16pm Addthis...

130

EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly Jump to: navigation, search Name EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy, Water Focus Area Buildings, Energy Efficiency - Utility, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Grid Assessment and Integration, People and Policy, Transportation, Renewable Energy, Biomass, Solar, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy, Wind Phase Bring the Right People Together, Evaluate Options, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Free; publicly available Website http://www.edinenergy.org/usvi Locality U.S. Virgin Islands References EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Highlights

131

Quarterly Coal Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Report Quarterly Coal Report Release Date: October 02, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | full report Previous Quarterly Coal Data historical data (PDF): 1st quarter 2013 4th quarter 2012 3rd quarter 2012 2nd quarter 2012 1st quarter 2012 4th quarter 2011 3rd quarter 2011 2nd quarter 2011 1st quarter 2011 prior to 2011 Go The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. coal production, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, quality, stocks, and refined coal. Data on U.S. coke production, consumption, stocks, imports, and exports are also provided. All data for 2011 and prior years are final. All data for 2012 and 2013 are preliminary. Highlights for second quarter 2013: U.S. coal production during second quarter 2013 totaled 243.1

132

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 J 3 J U L Y 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OE Hosts National Energy Assurance Conference Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director Infrastructure Reliability ISER Stewart Cedres DOE Supports 2012 NATO Summit Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness OE and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) hosted the 2012 National Energy Assurance Conference on June 28-29 at the Gaylord National Hotel in National Harbor, MD. The conference culminated the DOE/OE's ongoing American Recovery

133

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director, Preparedness and Response ISER Stewart Cedres Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness V O L U M E 2 , I S S U E 4 O C T O B E R 1 5 , 2 0 1 3 Next year the Department of Energy will celebrate an important milestone-the 25th anniversary of the Department's first energy emergency field deployments to provide disaster support to an impacted State or U.S. Territory. As the Department's energy response has evolved over time, so too, has the office charged with leading

134

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 A 2 A P R I L 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY In January, OE's energy infrastructure monitoring capability was offically given the name Environment for Analysis of Geo-Located Energy Information (EAGLE-I). Through EAGLE-I, OE's Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) division has developed the capability to monitor the Nation's energy infrastructure in near real-time and to geospatially map energy assets and systems, tying together a variety of data sources into one visualization platform. EAGLE-I provides ISER staff with automated alert notifications when abnormal conditions are detected. Through e-mail, text

135

Wind Program Newsletter: Third Quarter 2011 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Newsletter: Third Quarter 2011 Department of Energy Awards 43 Million to Spur Offshore Wind Energy In the News Current R&D Funding Opportunities Recent Publications...

136

Short term forecasting of solar radiation based on satellite data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short term forecasting of solar radiation based on satellite data Elke Lorenz, Annette Hammer University, D-26111 Oldenburg Forecasting of solar irradiance will become a major issue in the future integration of solar energy resources into existing energy supply structures. Fluctuations of solar irradiance

Heinemann, Detlev

137

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 J 3 J U L Y 1 5 , 2 0 1 3 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director, Preparedness and Response ISER Stewart Cedres Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness President Obama Discusses Hurricane Preparedness with Utility CEOs at DOE P President Obama, accompanied by DOE senior response officials, including Acting Secretary Daniel Poneman, Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman, and Deputy Assistant Secretary Bill Bryan, met with electric company CEOs and energy sector trade association representatives at Department of Energy headquarters to discuss preparations for the upcoming Atlantic hurricane

138

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 A 2 A P R I L 1 5 , 2 0 1 3 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY New Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity Executive Order Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director, Preparedness and Response ISER Stewart Cedres Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness The continued growth of cyber threats against our critical infrastructure (CI) is one of the most significant national security issues facing the Nation. In an effort to improve cybersecurity and enhance the security and resiliency of the Nation's CI, on February 12, 2013, President Obama released Executive Order 13636 - Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity (E.O. 13636). Critical infrastructure refers to those systems

139

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 J 1 J A N U A R Y 1 5 , 2 0 1 3 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Superstorm Sandy: DOE's Efforts to Help the Nation Recover Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director, Preparedness and Response ISER Stewart Cedres Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness November 30 marked the end of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season-another busy season in a multi-decadal period of high activity in the Atlantic that extends back to 1995. During this current period of elevated activity, over 70 percent of the hurricane seasons have been above the 30-year

140

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 1st Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 807 158 282 - 1,247 Alabama Railroad 449 71 14 - 534 Alabama River 358 - - - 358 Alabama Truck - 87 267 - 354 Colorado Total 204 - - - 204 Colorado Railroad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 3, Issue 1- January 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Division of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) to highlight a few of the OE/ISER energy preparedness activities that occur each quarter.

142

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 4- October 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Division of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) to highlight a few of the OE/ISER energy preparedness activities that occur each quarter.

143

ANALYSIS OF SHORT-TERM SOLAR RADIATION DATA Gayathri Vijayakumar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and short- term radiation data. 1. INTRODUCTION Analyses to predict long-term performances of solar energy commonly used in these analyses and are readily available; (e.g., hourly data for 239 US locations for 30, TN, Madison, WI, Seattle, WA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Sterling, VA. One year of ISIS data, from

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

144

Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 J 1 J A N U A R Y 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Released in November 2011, The National Preparedness System is an integrated set of guidance, programs, and processes that will enable the Nation to meet the National Preparedness Goal. The National Preparedness System is the second deliverable mandated by Presidential Policy Directive 8: National Preparedness (PPD-8), which the President signed in March 2011. PPD-8 describes the Nation's approach to preparing for the threats and hazards that pose the greatest risk to the security of the United States. PPD-8, which replaces Homeland Security Presidential Directive 8: National Preparedness (HSPD-8), is designed to facilitate an integrated, all-of-nation/whole community, capabilities-

145

QUARTER SHORT-T ERM ENERGY OUTLOO K QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) 1991 3 QUARTER SHORT-T ERM ENERGY OUTLOO K QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION August 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintenden t of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunica tions device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunic ations Device for the

146

Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of a new-generation numerical weather prediction model for application to short-term wind energy prediction.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wind power is a growing economy and science. It has far reaching consequences in all aspects of society and if goals of energy sustainability and (more)

Fowler, Padriac

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Fourth Quarter 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fourth Quarter 2005 Fourth Quarter 2005 Overview The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or fail to provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $28.7 billion on revenues of $298.4 billion (i.e., 9.6 cents of net income per dollar of revenue) during the fourth quarter of 2005 (Q405). The level of net income for Q405 was 43 percent higher than in the fourth quarter of 2004 (Q404) (Table 1). Net income for Q405

148

OE Releases Third Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (July  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Third Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Third Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (July 2012) OE Releases Third Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (July 2012) July 13, 2012 - 12:45pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has released the third issue of the Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (EEPQ), designed to briefly highlight a few of the energy preparedness activities that occur each quarter. The third issue of the EEPQ includes news items on the release of the Electricity Cybersecurity Risk Management Process guideline and the Electricity Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model, and the National Energy Assurance Conference and 3rd Electric Infrastructure Security Summit, both co-sponsored by DOE. All issues of the EEPQ are available for download from the Emergency

149

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: October 01, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 3, 2014 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. Quarterly data for all years are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the second quarter 2013: Total domestic coal distribution was an estimated 205.8 million short tons (mmst) in the second quarter 2013. This value is 0.7 mmst (i.e. 0.3 percent) higher than the previous quarter and 6.3 mmst (i.e. 3.1 percent) higher than the second quarter of 2012 estimates.

150

FTCP Quarterly Indicator Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » FTCP Quarterly Indicator Reports FTCP Quarterly Indicator Reports November 20, 2013 FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, November 20, 2013 This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls. August 16, 2013 FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, August 16, 2013 This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis.

151

Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service...

152

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations the Southern Study Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report presents a comprehensive description, findings, and conclusions for the Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP)--Southern Study Area (SSA) work led by AWS Truepower (AWST). This multi-year effort, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), focused on improving short-term (15-minute 6 hour) wind power production forecasts through the deployment of an enhanced observation network of surface and remote sensing instrumentation and the use of a state-of-the-art forecast modeling system. Key findings from the SSA modeling and forecast effort include: 1. The AWST WFIP modeling system produced an overall 10 20% improvement in wind power production forecasts over the existing Baseline system, especially during the first three forecast hours; 2. Improvements in ramp forecast skill, particularly for larger up and down ramps; 3. The AWST WFIP data denial experiments showed mixed results in the forecasts incorporating the experimental network instrumentation; however, ramp forecasts showed significant benefit from the additional observations, indicating that the enhanced observations were key to the model systems ability to capture phenomena responsible for producing large short-term excursions in power production; 4. The OU CAPS ARPS simulations showed that the additional WFIP instrument data had a small impact on their 3-km forecasts that lasted for the first 5-6 hours, and increasing the vertical model resolution in the boundary layer had a greater impact, also in the first 5 hours; and 5. The TTU simulations were inconclusive as to which assimilation scheme (3DVAR versus EnKF) provided better forecasts, and the additional observations resulted in some improvement to the forecasts in the first 1 3 hours.

Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Manobianco, John; Schroeder, John; Ancell, Brian; Brewster, Keith; Basu, Sukanta; Banunarayanan, Venkat; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Flores, Isabel

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 4th Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,226 162 274 - 1,662 Alabama Railroad 803 17 22 - 842 Alabama River 384 - - - 384 Alabama Truck 39 144 252 - 436 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s Indiana Total

154

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 3rd Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,198 151 353 - 1,702 Alabama Railroad 796 26 20 - 842 Alabama River 307 - 3 - 310 Alabama Truck 96 125 330 - 551 Georgia Total - - 3 - 3 Georgia Truck - - 3 - 3 Indiana Total

155

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,714 158 238 - 2,110 Alabama Railroad 1,056 12 45 - 1,113 Alabama River 464 - - - 464 Alabama Truck 194 146 193 - 532 Colorado Total 275 - - - 275

156

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 2nd Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,066 210 301 - 1,577 Alabama Railroad 495 116 26 - 638 Alabama River 512 - 2 - 513 Alabama Truck 59 94 273 - 426 Colorado Total 97 - - - 97 Colorado

157

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,714 158 238 - 2,110 Alabama Railroad 1,056 12 45 - 1,113 Alabama River 464 - - - 464 Alabama Truck 194 146 193 - 532 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s

158

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,837 167 196 - 2,200 Alabama Railroad 1,051 25 10 - 1,087 Alabama River 730 - - - 730 Alabama Truck 56 141 186 - 384 Colorado Total 456 - 16 - 472

159

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 4th Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,226 162 274 - 1,662 Alabama Railroad 803 17 22 - 842 Alabama River 384 - - - 384 Alabama Truck 39 144 252 - 436 Colorado Total 301 - 25 - 326 Colorado

160

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 2nd Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,066 210 301 - 1,577 Alabama Railroad 495 116 26 - 638 Alabama River 512 - 2 - 513 Alabama Truck 59 94 273 - 426 Georgia Total - - 2 - 2 Georgia Truck - - 2 - 2 Indiana Total

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 1st Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 807 158 282 - 1,247 Alabama Railroad 449 71 14 - 534 Alabama River 358 - - - 358 Alabama Truck - 87 267 - 354 Indiana Total - 164 - - 164 Indiana Railroad - 164 - - 164

162

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 2013 March 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2013 In this issue, we highlight the many benefits of NEPA to DOE, including improved planning, and better public involvement and environmental protection. Articles in this issue include: Sharing DOE's NEPA Success Stories Integrating NEPA and Project Planning Works Minimize EIS Printing Costs DOE Cooperating Agency Report Electronic Guidance Compendium Tribal Energy Resource CEQ IT Working Group Conferences DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Transitions EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results Cost and Time Facts LLQR-2013-Q1.pdf More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September

163

OE Releases Third Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Preparedness Quarterly (July 2012) July 13, 2012 - 12:45pm Addthis The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has released the third issue of the Energy...

164

Financial News for Major Energy Companies, Second Quarter 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Second Quarter 2006 Overview The "Financial News for Major Energy Companies" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy companies. These include the respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System (FRS)), with the exception of the FRS companies that do not issue quarterly earnings releases or do not provide separate information for the company's U.S. operations. Twenty-one major energy companies 1 reported overall net income (excluding unusual items) of $30.1 billion on revenues of $297.1 billion during the second quarter of 2006 (Q206). The level of net income for Q206 was 36 percent higher than in the second quarter of 2005 (Q205) (Table 1). Net income for Q206 increased primarily as a result of higher crude oil

165

September 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights  Brent crude oil spot prices have increased at a relatively steady pace from their 2012 low of $89 per barrel on June 25 to their recent high of $117 per barrel on August 23 because of the seasonal tightening of oil markets and continuing unexpected production outages. EIA expects Brent crude oil prices to fall from recent highs over the rest of 2012, averaging $111 per barrel over the last 4 months of 2012 and $103 per barrel in 2013. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices rose by a more modest $17 per barrel between June 25 and August 23, as the WTI discount to Brent crude oil widened from $10 per barrel to $22 per barrel. EIA expects WTI spot prices to average

166

Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; Prices are not adjusted for inflation. (b) Average self-service cash price....

167

Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

168

Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

169

Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

170

Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2014  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Administration databases supporting the following reports: Petroleum Marketing Monthly , DOEEIA-0380; 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 2013 2014 2015 Supply...

171

Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2014  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by the U.S. Supreme Court reversing a lower court opinion that vacated the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR). CSAPR will replace the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). The...

172

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Lessons Learned Quarterly Report DOE's NEPA Lessons Learned Program was initiated in 1994 to foster continuous improvement in NEPA compliance by measuring DOE NEPA performance and gathering information learned through NEPA experience. The Program collects and publishes time and cost metrics to help DOE objectively focus on controlling these aspects of its NEPA compliance, and disseminates information broadly relevant to NEPA implementation, such guidance on public participation and interagency coordination procedures. The keystone of DOE's NEPA Lessons Learned Program is the Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR). The LLQR is produced as a means of disseminating NEPA program metrics, along with related guidance, case studies, analysis,

173

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Nuclear Reports All Nuclear Reports Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly Data for 3rd Quarter 2013 | Release Date: October 31, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 2014 | full report Previous Issues Year: 2013-Q2 2013-Q1 2012-Q4 2012-Q3 2012-Q2 2012-Q1 2011-Q4 2011-Q3 2011-Q2 2011-Q1 2010-Q4 2010-Q3 2010-Q2 2010-Q1 2009-Q4 2009-Q3 2009-Q2 2009-Q1 2008-Q4 2008-Q3 2008-Q2 2008-Q1 Go 3rd Quarter 2013 U.S. production of uranium concentrate in the third quarter 2013 was 1,171,278 pounds U3O8, down 16 percent from the previous quarter and up 12 percent from the third quarter 2012. Third quarter 2013 uranium production is at its highest level since 1999. During the third quarter 2013, U.S. uranium was produced at six U.S. uranium facilities. U.S. Uranium Mill in Production (State)

174

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3rd Quarter 2010 3rd Quarter 2010 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 Inside this Update: Public Access Established for the Dr. Modesto Iriarte Technological Museum in Rincόn, Puerto Rico; Draft LM Strategic Plan Available for Review; Legacy Management Business Center Awarded Second Energy-Efficiency Award; LM Assumes Responsibility for Yucca Mountain Records and Information; Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico; Rio Blanco and Rulison, Colorado; Nuclear Gas Sites; Students from Native American Environmental Youth Camp Tour Tuba City, Arizona, Site; 2010 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Conference, and more. Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, July-September 2010 More Documents & Publications Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2011 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2012

175

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2008 - 2014 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Table ES-1. U.S. Coal Summary...

176

Berkeley Lab: Nearby Short-Term Accommodations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accommodations Accommodations Visitor Information Maps and Directions to the Lab Offsite Shuttle Bus Service Bay Area Mass Transit Information Site Access Parking Permits and Gate Passes UC Berkeley Campus Map Nearby Short-Term Accommodations Guest House Berkeley Lab Guest House - The Berkeley Lab guest house is conveniently located on the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory campus and features 57 tastefully appointed guest rooms, many with spectacular views of the San Francisco bay, skyline, and City of Berkeley. The guest house is only a few minutes away from the University of California Berkeley Campus and the dynamic Berkeley community itself. It is available to visiting researchers and those conducting business with the University. The Faculty Club * U.C. Campus

177

Energy programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, is engaged in developing energy resource, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigation, reports on a neotectonic investigation in Connecticut. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains two articles, the first on OTEC core unit testing supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST), and the second on an analysis of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the US Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

OE Releases Second Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (April 2012)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has released the second issue of the Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (EEPQ), designed to briefly highlight a few of the energy preparedness activities that occur each quarter.

179

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 Welcome to the 53rd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Many in the Department's NEPA Community were called on to give extraordinary time and resources to the preparation of key EISs issued recently and highlighted in this LLQR. We anticipate a busy 2008 as well. As always, we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Included in this issue: Multiple, Complex EISs Support DOE Missions; What Will the New Year Bring? Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in DOE NEPA Documents Is Evolving OMB and OSTP Issue Risk Analysis Principles Feature: Key EISs Yucca Mountain EISs Clean Coal EISs Western Energy Corridors Programmatic EIS FONSI Not a Foregone Conclusion

180

Program Update: 1st Quarter 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1st Quarter 2013 1st Quarter 2013 Program Update: 1st Quarter 2013 Inside this Update: Abandoned Uranium Mines Report to Congress: LM Wants Your Input; LM Discusses Management of LTS&M Records; LM Launches New Website Under energy.gov; Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident; Completion of the CERCLA Natural Resource Damage Process at the Rocky Flats Site; Environmental Justice Activities; Mound Museum Volunteers: Preserving a Laboratory's Legacy; DOE Evaluates Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining on Government Land in Western Colorado; Solar Photovoltaic System at Tuba City Site; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2004 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2004 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2004 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2004 Welcome to the 38th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are continuing a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned. We invite your suggestions on how to improve the Lessons Learned program. Thank you for your continuing support. Included in this issue: New, Improved "Green Book" Is on the Way Modern Pit Facility Final EIS Delayed NNSA Withdraws FONSI for LANL Biosafety Lab BLM Programmatic EIS On Wind Energy Lesson Learned about Schedule and Teamwork CEQ Chair Emphasizes NEPA's "Productive Harmony" Goal Supporting Flexible Decisionmaking in Practice NEPA Champions Brief Congressional Staff

182

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2003 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2003 Welcome to the 34th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the synergy between NEPA and the new DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Articles included in this issue: New DOE Order Focuses on EMS, Supports Basic NEPA Principles Few Comments Received on Proposed Floodplain/Wetlands Rule Changes China's Environmental Impact Assessment Law DOI/Forest Service Proposed Categorical Exclusions Potential Resources for NEPA Practitioners A View from the Trenches Fossil Energy Launches EIS Process Improvement Team CEQ Updates EIS Distribution Saves Yucca Mountain Project $200,000

183

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2001 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2001 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2001 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2001 Welcome to the 28th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This completes our seventh year of providing performance metrics, news, and guidance to the DOE NEPA Community. We thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Articles included in this issue: NEPA Compliance Officers Consider Further Improvements NCO Meeting Federal/State/Tribal Coordination Forest Fire; Forest Preserved View From EPA Streamlining Approvals of Energy Projects NEPA Pilot Projects to Demonstrate Mediation DOE-wide NEPA Contracting Executive Order on Migratory Birds FERC Outreach for Natural Gas Approvals Life-Cycle Assessment for "Green" Projects

184

Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Release Date: January 5, 2011 Next Release Date: To Be Determined Report Sections: Corporate and Petroleum Net Income Worldwide Oil and Gas Production Operations Worldwide Refining/Marketing Operations Worldwide Petroleum Capital Expenditures Worldwide Downstream Natural Gas and Power, and Chemicals Operations Supplemental Figures Supplemental Tables Download this Report: Full Report in PDF-Format Past Issues in PDF-Format Additional Information FRS Home Financial Terms Glossary Contacts Notes: The "Financial News for Major Energy Producers" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy producers. "Major energy producers" are respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System). All U.S.-based respondent companies that

185

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Questionnaire | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Questionnaire NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Questionnaire NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Questionnaire This questionnaire is used to collect information from the Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Community. In accordance with DOE Order 451.1B, NEPA Compliance Program, NEPA Document Managers and NEPA Compliance Officers should fill out a questionnaire (separately or jointly) as soon as possible after completing each environmental impact statement (EIS) and environmental assessment (EA). Questionaires also may be returned earlier, at any time during the NEPA process, to share valuable lessons learned with others. Other document preparation team members also are encouraged to submit a questionnaire. Information provided through this questionaire helps the Office of NEPA

186

QUARTERLY NUCLEAR DEPLOYMENT SCORECARD - JULY 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

QUARTERLY NUCLEAR DEPLOYMENT SCORECARD - JULY 2013 QUARTERLY NUCLEAR DEPLOYMENT SCORECARD - JULY 2013 QUARTERLY NUCLEAR DEPLOYMENT SCORECARD - JULY 2013 News Updates Dominion Resources, Inc. has informed the NRC that Dominion Virginia Power will amend its COL application (COLA) to reflect the ESBWR technology by the end of 2013. In 2009 Dominion dropped the ESBWR from its COLA after failing to reach a commercial agreement with General Electric-Hitachi (GEH). A COL is expected no earlier than late 2015. Dominion Virginia Power has not yet committed to building a new nuclear unit at North Anna. NRC has determined that the latest revision to the South Texas Project COLA does not alleviate foreign interest concerns; the staff found that despite having only a 10% ownership stake in Nuclear Innovation North America LLC (NINA), Toshiba American Nuclear Energy Corporation's

187

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2001 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2001 Welcome to the 27th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles included in this issue: DOE Issues Supplement to Yucca Mountain Draft EIS Los Alamos Project Guided by MAP BPAs Readers Guide Cultural, Tribal, and Historic Updates Secretarial Policy on Cultural Resources Working with Indian Tribal Nations Historic Preservation Final Regulations Can Pilot Projects, Dispute Resolution Techniques Improve NEPA Implementation? DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Mini-guidance: DOE Public Reading Rooms Drafting Federal Register Notices Potential NEPA Implications of a National Energy Policy Nominee for CEQ Transitions Training Opportunities EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Recent EIS Milestones Cost and Time Facts

188

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2010 Inside this Update: Public Access Established for the Dr. Modesto Iriarte Technological Museum in Rincόn, Puerto Rico; Draft LM Strategic Plan Available for Review; Legacy Management Business Center Awarded Second Energy-Efficiency Award; LM Assumes Responsibility for Yucca Mountain Records and Information; Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico; Rio Blanco and Rulison, Colorado; Nuclear Gas Sites; Students from Native American Environmental Youth Camp Tour Tuba City, Arizona, Site; 2010 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Conference, and more. Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, July-September 2010 More Documents & Publications Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2011 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2013

189

Program Update: 4th Quarter 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Program Update: 4th Quarter 2013 Program Update: 4th Quarter 2013 Inside this Update: Agencies Assist LM to Develop Reports on Defense-Related Uranium Mines; DOE Responds to Public Input on the Draft ULP PEIS; Groundwater Remedy Is Evaluated at the Mound, Ohio, Site; Visitors Learn About the History of LM's Unique Facility in Puerto Rico; German Remediation Offi cials Benchmarking Visit; International Atomic Energy Agency Accepts Consultation from LM; Environmental Justice Activities; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, October-December 2013 More Documents & Publications

190

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deployment Summary, January 2013 Deployment Summary, January 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2013 January 30, 2013 - 5:59pm Addthis Quarterly Updates On October 22 Dominion Resources Inc. announced that it would close and decommission its Kewaunee Power Station located in Carlton, Wis. after failing to find a buyer for the plant. The company said that the plant closure was a purely economic decision resulting from low projected wholesale electricity prices. Power production will cease in the second quarter of 2013. On November 20, 2012, the Department of Energy announced that it had selected the Generation mPower team as a recipient for Government cost-shared funding as part of its Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support program. The Department also announced plans to issue a

191

Fossil Energy Today - Second Quarter, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Quarter, 2011 Topics In This Issue... Office Reorganization McConnell Joins FE Staff Coal Cleaning Commercial Success Sonar Survey Program Heating Oil Reserve Converts Stock...

192

Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Quarterly Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Imports and Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Quarterly Reports Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Quarterly Reports September 13, 2013 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Second Quarter Report 2013 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Second Quarter Report 2013 July 1, 2013 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - First Quarter Report 2013 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - First Quarter Report 2013 March 29, 2013 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Fourth Quarter Report 2012 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Fourth Quarter Report 2012 December 31, 2012 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Third Quarter Report 2012 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Third Quarter Report 2012 September 28, 2012 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Second Quarter Report 2012 Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Second Quarter Report 2012

193

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 1, 2002 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2002 Welcome to the 30th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. December 5, 2001 Lessons Learned Quarterly...

194

Short-term CO? abatement in the European power sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper focuses on the possibilities for short term abatement in response to a CO2 price through fuel switching in the European power sector. The model E-Simulate is used to simulate the electricity generation in Europe ...

Delarue, Erik D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A model for short term electric load forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MODEL FOR SHORT TERM ELECTRIC LOAD FORECASTING A Thesis by JOHN ROBERT TIGUE, III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major... Subject: Electrical Engineering A MODEL FOR SHORT TERM ELECTRIC LOAD FORECASTING A Thesis by JOHN ROBERT TIGUE& III Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head Depart t) (Member) ;(Me r (Member) (Member) May 1975 ABSTRACT...

Tigue, John Robert

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2003 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2003 Welcome to the 37th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are starting a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned. We invite your suggestions on how to improve the Lessons Learned program. Thank you for your continuing support. Articles included in this issue: What's Next? CEQ Seeks More Input on Task Force Recommendations What Have We Learned from Lessons Learned? BLM Preparing Wind Energy Programmatic EIS DOE Submits Cooperating Agency Report EA Measures Protect Wetland EIS to Re-review Transmission Lines DOE Web Site Turns 10! DOE Promotes NEPA 101 Goals New E.O. Addresses Historic Heritage Meeting on Protection of Indian Sacred Sites Summer Detail at the NEPA Office

197

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2005 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2005 Welcome to the 44th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue completes our 11th year publishing LLQR, and as we go to press, we're preparing to mark an even more impressive milestone - our observance of the 35th anniversary of NEPA. We're busily working on all the details that will make this a great conference. We hope to see YOU there. As always, we welcome your suggestions for continuous improvement. Articles included in this issue: Secretary Bodman on DOE's NEPA 35th Anniversary DOE Supports Interagency NEPA Modernization Work Groups Energy Policy Act Affects DOE NEPA Activities CEQ Cumulative Effects Guidance DOE Supplement Analysis Guidance 2005 Stakeholders Directory DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update

198

Program Update: 1st Quarter 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Program Update: 1st Quarter 2012 Inside this Update: Interagency Working Group Collaborates on Codisposal of Uranium Mine and Mill Tailings Waste in New Mexico; Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Benchmarking Visit to the LMBC; LM Creates Cooperative Agreement with the Northern Arapaho Tribe; LM Participates in 2012 WM Conference; M Partners with Diné Environmental Institute on Remediation of Uranium Processing Sites; LM Stakeholder Survey 2012 Update; LM: LEEDing the Way; Yucca Mountain Transition Progress - Congressional Interest; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time. Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, January-March 2012

199

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2007 Welcome to the 53rd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Many in the Department's NEPA Community were called on to give extraordinary time and resources to the preparation of key EISs issued recently and highlighted in this LLQR. We anticipate a busy 2008 as well. As always, we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Included in this issue: Multiple, Complex EISs Support DOE Missions; What Will the New Year Bring? Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in DOE NEPA Documents Is Evolving OMB and OSTP Issue Risk Analysis Principles Feature: Key EISs Yucca Mountain EISs Clean Coal EISs Western Energy Corridors Programmatic EIS FONSI Not a Foregone Conclusion CEQ's Collaboration Handbook

200

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2005 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 2005 March 2005 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2005 Welcome to the 42nd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to introduce our new Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. John Spitaleri Shaw is a strong supporter of good NEPA compliance, as evidenced during our interview with him and in his February 16, 2005, memorandum, both of which are summarized in this issue. Articles included in this issue: New Assistant Secretary Shaw Promotes NEPA as Essential to Energy Mission and Goals EH Brief on Consultation with Native Americans Updated Green Book Issued New Forest Service Regulations EIS Distribution Guidance in Preparation CEQ Revises Cooperating Agency Reporting IAIA Conference NAEP Conference Transitions DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2006 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2006 June 2006 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2006 Welcome to the 47th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. The quality of our NEPA process affects the quality of DOE's decisions. Our appreciation goes out to all the NCOs and NEPA Document Managers who work every day to build quality into NEPA documents. As always, we welcome your suggestions for continuous improvement. Articles included in this issue include: Quality + Leadership = NEPA Success Security Reviews Needed for EISs on DOE NEPA Website NAEP Presents Award for NEPA 35 Conference FedCenter Website CRS Report on NEPA Streamlining Global Nuclear Energy Partnership EIS Sites Proposed for FutureGen Project Hanford EIS Scoping 2006 NAEP Conference Renewed Emphasis on EMS DOE Headquarters, Field Sites Celebrate Earth Day

202

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2008 Welcome to the 54th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. As noted in articles on recently issued DOE EISs (Complex Transformation, Yucca Mountain Repository and Railroad, and Western Energy Corridors), DOE has received and is responding to extensive public comment. This issue also pays tribute to two women who have made extraordinary contributions to NEPA implementation. As always, we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Articles included in this issue: Programmatic EIS on Nuclear Weapons Complex Draws National Interest, Many Comments Restructured Approach to FutureGen Yucca Mountain Final EISs on Track Enriched Uranium Disposition Supplement Analysis DOE 2007 Cooperating Agency Report

203

Fossil Energy Today- Second Quarter, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here are just some of the stories featured in this issue: NETL Share Computing Speed, Efficiency to Tackle Barriers; Global Collaboration in Clean Fossil Energy; Charles McConnell Confirmed Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy; and, New Catalyst Technology Reduces Diesel Engine Idling.

204

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 3, Issue 2- Spring/Summer 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Division of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) to highlight a few of the OE/ISER energy preparedness activities that occur each quarter.

205

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 1, 2001 June 1, 2001 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2001 Welcome to the 27th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. March 1, 2001 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2001 Welcome to the 26th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. December 1, 2000 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2000 Welcome to the 25th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. September 1, 2000 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2000 Welcome to the 24th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Note that this issue includes a cumulative index covering the past six years of reports. June 1, 2000 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2000 Welcome to the 23rd quarterly report on lessons learned in theNEPA process.

206

Summary Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook Short-Term Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook 1/12/01 Click here to start Table of Contents Summary Short-Term Petroleum. and Natural Gas Outlook WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Real and Nominal Crude Oil Prices OPEC Crude Oil Production 1999-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* U.S. Crude Oil Inventory Outlook U.S. Distillate Inventory Outlook Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Costs U.S. Total Gasoline Inventory Outlook Retail Motor Gasoline Prices* U.S. Propane Total Stocks Average Weekly Propane Spot Prices Current Natural Gas Spot Prices: Well Above the Recent Price Range Natural Gas Spot Prices: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval Working Gas in Storage (Percentage Difference fron Previous 5-Year Average)

207

Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

Status and evaluation of hybrid electric vehicle batteries for short term applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to compile information regarding batteries which could be use for electric cars or hybrid vehicles in the short term. More specifically, this study applies lead-acid batteries and nickel-cadmium battery technologies which are more developed than the advanced batteries which are presently being investigated under USABC contracts and therefore more accessible in production efficiency and economies of scale. Moreover, the development of these batteries has advanced the state-of-the-art not only in terms of performance and energy density but also in cost reduction. The survey of lead-acid battery development took the biggest part of the effort, since they are considered more apt to be used in the short-term. Companies pursuing the advancement of lead-acid batteries were not necessarily the major automobile battery manufacturers. Innovation is found more in small or new companies. Other battery systems for short-term are discussed in the last part of this report. We will review the various technologies investigated, their status and prognosis for success in the short term.

Himy, A. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Machinery Technology Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7 Be concentrations Ilya G. Usoskin,1; published 21 March 2009. [1] Variations of the cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be in the global atmosphere the variations in the 7 Be concentration in the atmosphere for the period from 1 January to 28 February 2005

210

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NOX control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

211

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NO{sub x} control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Coal Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Reserves Consumption Production Stocks Imports, Exports & Distribution Coal Transportation Rates International All Coal Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption Environment Imports & Exports Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Reserves Stocks All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for coal › image chart of U.S. Natural Gas Production and Imports projections as described in linked Short-Term Energy Outlook Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. U.S. coal production by quarter › Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Quarterly Coal Report. Quarterly data for coal shipments between states ›

213

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1999 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1999 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1999 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1999 Welcome to the 21st Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This report includes: Good Information, Good Government; CEQ 1997 Report to Congress on Environmental Quality" Managing a National Public Participation Program for the Yucca Mountain EIS New Executive Order on Trade Agreements NEPA Challenges for Western Area Power Administration Is CD-ROM a Useful Complement to Paper Documents? Pollution Prevention and NEPA Clean Air Act Conformity and NEPA National Natural Landmark Considerations Include Distribution List in EIS Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR) More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2002 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2002

214

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1999 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 1999 March 1999 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1999 Welcome to the first quarter FY 1999 Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles in this issue include: Dr. David Michaels DOEs New Leader for Environment, Safety and Health Society Promotes Lessons Learned Exchange at DOE Partnering Facilitates SPR Pipeline EA Mini-guidance An EIS Needs an Index When We Dont Know, Say So Extending Public Comment Periods Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to Issue New Section 106 Regulations DOE -wide NEPA Contracts Litigation Updates Executive Order Issued on Invasive Species Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR) More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1998 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1999 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2002

215

Financial News for Independent Energy Companies, Second Quarter 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release Date: September 21, 2010 Next Release Date: To Be Determined Report Sections: Net Income Revenues Supplemental Figures Supplemental Tables Download this Report: Full Report in PDF-Format Past Issues in PDF-Format Additional Information FRS Home Financial Terms Glossary Contacts Notes: The "Financial News for Independent Energy Companies" reviews the financial performance of companies that are typically smaller than the majors and do not have integrated production/refining operations. While the composition of the companies in this report changes over time, the changes are usually incremental, and don't significantly affect comparisons across time periods. All dollar figures and comparisons are in constant second-quarter 2010 dollars unless otherwise specified.

216

FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q1 2013) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Q1 2013) Q1 2013) FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q1 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA's exemptions to protect information that is: classified as restricted data or formerly restricted data; proprietary; personal; and pre-decisional and deliberative. These types of information may not be granted under the FOIA to protect national security, proprietary interests of submitters; personal privacy of

217

FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2013) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Q2 2013) Q2 2013) FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA's exemptions to protect information that is: classified as restricted data or formerly restricted data; proprietary; personal; and pre-decisional and deliberative. These types of information may not be granted under the FOIA to protect national security, proprietary interests of submitters; personal privacy of

218

FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Q3 2013) Q3 2013) FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q3 2013) The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA's exemptions to protect information that is: classified as restricted data or formerly restricted data; proprietary; personal; and pre-decisional and deliberative. These types of information may not be granted under the FOIA to protect national security, proprietary interests of submitters; personal privacy of

219

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2001 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2001 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2001 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2001 Welcome to the 29th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Included in this issue: CEQ Chair Describes Goals, Supports NEPA Principles DOE NEPA Post-9/11: Reconciling the Need to Protect and the Need to Inform the Public Agencies Responses to Terrorist Attacks Forest Service Succeeds with NEPA Training Oak Ridge Holds NEPA Community Meeting DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Training Opportunities New on the NEPA Bookshelf Litigation Update EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Recent EIS-Related Milestones Fourth Quarter FY 2001 Questionnaire Results NEPA Document Cost and Time Facts

220

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 4, 2007 September 4, 2007 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2007 Welcome to the 52nd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue highlights the start of two major DOE EISs and features several guest-written articles. June 1, 2007 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2007 Welcome to the 51st quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue features collaboration as a key element of a successful NEPA process. Related articles discuss approaches to and benefits of collaboration and illustrate various applications. March 1, 2007 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2007 Welcome to the 50th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. The Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance launched the Lessons Learned program in December 1994 to support continuous improvement in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1998 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 1998 September 1998 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1998 Welcome to the third quarter FY 1998 Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles in this issue include: DOE NEPA Community to Meet in October Guidance Underway to Assist NEPA Process National Academy of Public Administration Examines the DOE NEPA Process NEPA Practitioners Bookshelf Publishing a Draft EIS on the Web DOE-Wide NEPA Contracts Showing Benefits NAEP Conference in San Diego Litigation Updates Presidential Memorandum on Plain Language Third Quarter FY 1998 Questionnaire Results NEPA Document Cost and Time Facts NEPA Documents Completed EIS-related Documents Recent Milestones Cumulative Index Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR) More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2002

222

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012 This issue highlights practices of DOE's NEPA Community that help ensure the quality of our NEPA reviews. Emphasizing quality throughout the NEPA process is essential to meeting schedules and providing useful information to the public and decisionmakers. Articles in this issue include: Quality Assurance Integral to NEPA Implementation DOE NEPA Guidance Plans OMB-CEQ Affirm Commitment to ECR Canada's New NEPA-Like Law Transitions John Jediny Joins DOE NEPA Office EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results Cost and Time Facts LLQR-2012-Q4-r1.pdf More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2013

223

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1999 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1999 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1999 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1999 Welcome to the 20th Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue includes a cumulative index for the past five years. Articles in this issue include: Proposed Arizona-Mexico Transmission Project Presents Challenges to NEPA Process and Analysis CEQ Memo on Non-Federal Cooperating Agencies EPA Guidance on Cumulative Impacts DOE NEPA Web Demonstration Publishing a Draft EIS on NEPA Web NAEP Conference Forest Services Decision Protocol DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update DOE Litigation Update Other Agency NEPA Cases EAs and EISs Completed this Quarter Other EIS-related Documents Third Quarter FY 1999 Questionnaire Results Cost and Time Facts Training Opportunities

224

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1997 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1997 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1997 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1997 Welcome again to the Quarterly Report on Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. This report includes: CEQ Effectiveness Study CEQ Handbook on Cumulative Effects DOE Sites Enhancing Public Participation in EAs Stockpile Stewardship and Management ROD Issued EIS Distribution: Coordination with Congressional, Public and Intergovernmental Affairs EPA EIS Rating System Results of EA Quality Review DOE NEPA Web as Research Tool Litigation Updates DOE NEPA Process Data Misused GC to Provide Administrative Record Guidance Questions and Answers on Supplement Analyses First Quarter FY 1997 Lessons Learned Questionnaire Results, including EIS and EA Cost and Time reports Lessons Learned Quarterly Report

225

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guidance & Requirements » Lessons Learned » Lessons Learned Guidance & Requirements » Lessons Learned » Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive December 2, 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2013 Welcome to the 77th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue reminds us that, through teamwork and dedication by DOE's NEPA community, we can produce high quality documents that enhance the Department's decisionmaking and help protect the environment. September 6, 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2013 Welcome to the 76th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue features a look at DOE's NEPA performance metrics, including a historical perspective. As DOE NEPA practitioners strive to control time and cost while maintaining quality, this most recent NEPA

226

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1996 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1996 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1996 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1996 Welcome again to the Quarterly Report on Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. This report includes: "NEPA Compliance Officers Meeting: Continuous Improvement" DOE Comments on CEQ Cumulative Impacts Handbook DOE-wide NEPA Procurement Environmental Justice Guidance Update Senate Subcommittee Focuses on NEPA DOE NEPA Rule Amendments for Power Marketing Activities Litigation Updates: Rulings on Alternatives Environmental Assessment Quality Study Fourth quarter FY1996 Lessons Learned Questionnaire results, including EIS and EA cost and time reports Analysis of EA and EIS cost and time outliers EA and EIS cost and time trend analysis Lessons Learned Quarterly Report

227

Quarterly Progress Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Quarterly Progress Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

228

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEPA process. This issue examines some recent developments and practices in the use of GIS for NEPA and related environmental reviews. December 2, 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly...

229

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2007 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51st quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue features collaboration as a key element of a successful NEPA process. Related articles discuss approaches...

230

F&I Quarterly Program Update (October 27, 2009) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F&I Quarterly Program Update (October 27, 2009) F&I Quarterly Program Update (October 27, 2009) F&I Quarterly Program Update (October 27, 2009) Agenda OMB 4th Quarterly Goals Review Whitepaper on Real Property Right-Sizing and Carbon Footprint Reduction F&I QPR 1st Quarter Deliverables FY 2010 FIMS Data Validation FY 2010 FIMS Data Validation Schedule FY 2010 FIMS and RPAM Training Schedule 2009 Dispositions E.O. 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance Annual Deferred Maintenance Report Bridge Inspection Follow-up Bridge Inspection Requirements Space Planning Findings, Where We are ... Where We Need to Go FIMS Occupant Data Tools - Population Due Crosswalk of RPAM and Energy Order Schedule for Getting RPAM Revision Signed out by S2 Brief on LED Lighting How to Obtain an iPortal Account

231

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations the Northern Study Area.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results from research aimed at improving short-range (0-6 hour) hub-height wind forecasts in the NOAA weather forecast models through additional data assimilation and model physics improvements for use in wind energy forecasting. Additional meteorological observing platforms including wind profilers, sodars, and surface stations were deployed for this study by NOAA and DOE, and additional meteorological data at or near wind turbine hub height were provided by South Dakota State University and WindLogics/NextEra Energy Resources over a large geographical area in the U.S. Northern Plains for assimilation into NOAA research weather forecast models. The resulting improvements in wind energy forecasts based on the research weather forecast models (with the additional data assimilation and model physics improvements) were examined in many different ways and compared with wind energy forecasts based on the current operational weather forecast models to quantify the forecast improvements important to power grid system operators and wind plant owners/operators participating in energy markets. Two operational weather forecast models (OP_RUC, OP_RAP) and two research weather forecast models (ESRL_RAP, HRRR) were used as the base wind forecasts for generating several different wind power forecasts for the NextEra Energy wind plants in the study area. Power forecasts were generated from the wind forecasts in a variety of ways, from very simple to quite sophisticated, as they might be used by a wide range of both general users and commercial wind energy forecast vendors. The error characteristics of each of these types of forecasts were examined and quantified using bulk error statistics for both the local wind plant and the system aggregate forecasts. The wind power forecast accuracy was also evaluated separately for high-impact wind energy ramp events. The overall bulk error statistics calculated over the first six hours of the forecasts at both the individual wind plant and at the system-wide aggregate level over the one year study period showed that the research weather model-based power forecasts (all types) had lower overall error rates than the current operational weather model-based power forecasts, both at the individual wind plant level and at the system aggregate level. The bulk error statistics of the various model-based power forecasts were also calculated by season and model runtime/forecast hour as power system operations are more sensitive to wind energy forecast errors during certain times of year and certain times of day. The results showed that there were significant differences in seasonal forecast errors between the various model-based power forecasts. The results from the analysis of the various wind power forecast errors by model runtime and forecast hour showed that the forecast errors were largest during the times of day that have increased significance to power system operators (the overnight hours and the morning/evening boundary layer transition periods), but the research weather model-based power forecasts showed improvement over the operational weather model-based power forecasts at these times. A comprehensive analysis of wind energy forecast errors for the various model-based power forecasts was presented for a suite of wind energy ramp definitions. The results compiled over the year-long study period showed that the power forecasts based on the research models (ESRL_RAP, HRRR) more accurately predict wind energy ramp events than the current operational forecast models, both at the system aggregate level and at the local wind plant level. At the system level, the ESRL_RAP-based forecasts most accurately predict both the total number of ramp events and the occurrence of the events themselves, but the HRRR-based forecasts more accurately predict the ramp rate. At the individual site level, the HRRR-based forecasts most accurately predicted the actual ramp occurrence, the total number of ramps and the ramp rates (40-60% improvement in ramp rates over the coarser resolution forecast

Finley, Cathy [WindLogics

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply 9302 Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply As a result of the new regulations issued by the U.S. Estimating Components of the Distillate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for ultra-low- Blend Pool sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) the U.S. refining industry faces two major challenges: to meet the more stringent specifi- The initial step of the analysis was to analyze the poten- cations for diesel product, and to keep up with demand tial economics of producing ULSD for each refinery. by producing more diesel product from feedstocks of Using input and output data submitted to the Energy lower quality. Some refineries in the United States and Information Administration (E1A) by refiners, the cur-

233

Record of Decision for BPA Short-Term Marketing and Operating Arrangements (1/31/96)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 21 / Wednesday, January 31, 1996 / Notices Bonneville Power Administration Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for Short-Term Marketing and Operating Arrangements AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of Availability of Record of Decision (ROD). SUMMARY: BPA has decided to enter into short-term marketing and operational arrangements in order to participate continuously in the open electric power market. These arrangements would enable BPA to achieve the best reliability and expected economic outcome, as well as to best meet its environmental responsibilities, given diverse market conditions. This decision would support power cost control, enhance BPA competitiveness, and provide public benefits. The

234

Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Major for Major Energy Producers > Company List Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010 What is FRS? | Contacts | FRS Home Corporate and Petroleum Net Income Worldwide Oil and Gas Production Operations Worldwide Refining/Marketing Operations Worldwide Petroleum Capital Expenditures Worldwide Downstream Natural Gas and Power Operations, Supplemental Figures Supplemental Tables Download this Report: pdf icon Full Report in PDF-format pdf icon Past issues in PDF-format Additional Information FRS Home Financial Terms Glossary Contacts Company List for the Financial News for Major Energy Producers Links to the press releases of 21 companies are provided below, which is the number of companies that are included in this report. Only 20 of the companies are included in compilation of corporate revenue and corporate net income because the U.S. operations of BP are included in the results of the U.S. lines of business, but not in the foreign or corporate results because it is foreign based and does not report the overall revenues and net income of its U.S. affiliate.

235

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1998 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1998 1998 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1998 Welcome to the second quarter FY 1998 Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles in this issue include: NCO Meeting in DC The Role of the NCO Special Considerations in Applying Categorical Exclusions NEPA Training Anticipated DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Integrating NEPA with Other Reviews Advice from GC NRC Adopts DOE NEPA Documents at NEEL Alternative Dispute Resolution Clean Air Act Conformity Requirements Ecological Society Briefing NAPA Evaluates DOE NEPA Program NEPA Guidance Updates Litigation Updates Second Quarter FY98 Questionnaire Results EIS-related Documents Recent EIS Milestones EA Completion Times and Costs Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR) More Documents & Publications ADR Revised Policy

236

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2009 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2009 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2009 Welcome to the 58th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We have been very busy addressing our NEPA responsibilities arising from the recovery act as well as the new policies of the obama administration. In this issue of the Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR), we share ideas and experiences that will foster an improved and expedited NEPA compliance process. Articles included in this issue: NEPA Efficiency Essential to Recovery Plan NEPA Opportunities in a New Era of Openness Secretary Chu to DOE Employees: "Help Turn the Ship" Secretary Chu Pledges to Improve DOE Management New DOE-Wide NEPA Support Contracts! Sutley Brings Breadth of Government Experience to CEQ

237

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1998 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1998 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1998 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1998 Welcome to the first quarter FY 1998 Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles in this issue include: Managing Progress on the Repository EIS Richland EA: Public Involvement and Classified Information WIPP and WM RODs Issued DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Early NEPA Review Saves Resources Technical Assistance from Core Technical Group Recent NEPA Guidance EPA Proposes Changes to Voluntary EIS Policy Anticipating the Discovery of Unknown Waste DOE Planning Summaries Provide NEPA Forecasts Recent EIS Milestones NAEP Identifies Accepted NEPA Practices Environmental Restoration's NCO Describes His Role Richlands NEPA Process Game Enlivens Training Transitions

238

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2000 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2000 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2000 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2000 Welcome to the 22nd Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles in this issue include: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS Helps DOE Preserve Unique Resources DOE Inspector General Report Questions Categorical Exclusion Application DOE Decides Disposition of Surplus Plutonium Interview with New NEPA Director at CEQ Transitions DOE Issues Decisions on Low-level and Mixed Low-level Waste Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's 25-Year History Considering Essential Fish Habitat in NEPA Reviews NEPA Guidance Updates Web Site of Interest DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Training Opportunities DOE Litigation Updates Other NEPA Cases EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter

239

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1996 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1996 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1996 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1996 Welcome again to the Quarterly Report on Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. This report includes: Defense Programs NCO Fosters Teamwork through Meetings Internal Scoping at Richland Visual Excellence Responding to Comments on DOE EISs Improving Comment Resolution with EPA EPA Commends DOE for "Model" Pollution Prevention Analysis Litigation Updates 1996 Federal Environmental Quality Award Winners: USACE and MMS Amended Rule Streamlines DOE NEPA Process Book Review: Environmental Impact Assessment Third quarter FY 1996 Lessons Learned Questionnaire results, including EIS and EA cost and time reports, and analysis models and codes used in DOE EAs and EISs

240

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1999 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1999 1999 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1999 Welcome to the second quarter FY 1999 Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In addition to the articles beginning on page 1, this issue includes: Consolidated Decision Ends Tritium Trilogy Tale NEPA and Habitat Management Plan: Environmental Synergy Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Revises Section 106 Regulations Mini-guidance Plain Language for NEPA Federal Register Notices Distributing a Record of Decision A Helpful Hint for EIS Glossaries New Books for the NEPA Practitioners Bookshelf DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Court Allows WIPP to Open Transitions at the CEQ EH Electronic Publishing Standards and Guidelines Training Opportunities Documents Issued, Second Quarter FY 1999 Second Quarter FY 1999 Questionnaire Results

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

75th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 5th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 75th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued June 3, 2013 - 4:11pm Addthis The 75th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process was issued on June 3, 2013. This issue of Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR) includes articles on recent guidance by the Council on Environmental Quality and Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to promote better integration of NEPA and Section 106 reviews, and on the Federal Highway Administration's Every Day Counts intitiative to better integrate planning and NEPA. "Efforts such as these to improve NEPA implementation are indicative of what we strive for at DOE every day -- better NEPA review, better decisions," said Carol Borgstrom, Director, Office of NEPA Policy and

242

77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued 77th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Issued December 3, 2013 - 3:18pm Addthis The 77th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process was issued on December 2, 2013. This issue of Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR) examines positive outcomes of the NEPA process. Featured articles include a review by the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance of nearly 400 excerpts from questionnaire responses published in LLQR during the past 10 years regarding the usefulness and effectiveness of the NEPA process. An overwhelming majority of the questionnaire responses describe positive outcomes and illustrate that we can produce high quality documents that enhance the Department's decisionmaking and help protect the environment.

243

Conditional Reliability Modeling of Short-term River Basin Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDITIONAL RELIABILITY MODELING OF SHORT-TERM RIVER BASIN MANAGEMENT ASCE Texas Section Spring Meeting 2003 By: A.Andr?s Salazar, Ph.D. Freese and Nichols, Inc. and Ralph A. Wurbs, P.E., Ph.D. Texas A&M University 2 TEXAS WATER AVAILABITY MODEL...-88Year Storage (x 1000 ac-ft) Periods without shortage = 657 out of 672 (97.8%) What is the probability of satisfying demand when reservoir falls below 100,000 ac-ft? 9 CONDITIONAL RELIABILITY Statistical analysis of small sequences. Simulation 1...

Salazar, A.; Wurbs, R. A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Short-Term Energy Outlook April 1999-Summer Gasoline Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook This year's base case outlook for summer (April-September) motor gasoline markets may be summarized as follows: * Pump Prices: (average regular) projected to average about $1.13 per gallon this summer, up 9-10 cents from last year. The increase, while substantial, still leaves average prices low compared to pre-1998 history, especially in inflation-adjusted terms. * Supplies: expected to be adequate, overall. Beginning-of-season inventories were even with the 1998 level, which was at the high end of the normal range. However, some refinery problems on the West Coast have tightened things up, at least temporarily. * Demand: up 2.0 percent from last summer due to solid economic growth and low (albeit rising) fuel prices; highway travel may reach 1.4 trillion miles for the

245

April 2013 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Summer Fuels Outlook and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  During the April-through-September summer driving season this year, regular gasoline retail prices are forecast to average $3.63 per gallon. The projected monthly average regular retail gasoline price falls from $3.69 per gallon in May to $3.57 per gallon in September. EIA expects regular gasoline retail prices to average $3.56 per gallon in 2013 and $3.39 per gallon in 2014, compared with $3.63 per gallon in 2012. The July 2013 New York harbor reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) futures contract averaged $2.97 per gallon for the five trading days ending April 4, 2013. Based on the market value of

246

Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2000--STEO Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2000 April 2000 Summer 2000 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary For the upcoming summer season (April to September), motor gasoline markets are projected to exhibit an extraordinarily tight supply/demand balance. * Retail gasoline prices (regular grade) are expected to average $1.46 per gallon, 25 percent higher than last summer's average of $1.17 per gallon. That projection also exceeds the previous (current-dollar) record summer average of $1.35 recorded in 1981. Nominal prices are expected to reach a peak of $1.52 per gallon in April-a new record--and decline steadily to $1.39 per gallon by September due to the impact of increases in world-wide crude oil production. These projections presume no disruptions of refinery motor gasoline production. *

247

Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

prices are expected to average 5.85 per MMBtu from July through December, while composite spot prices will likely stay well above 6.00. Spot prices at the Henry Hub averaged...

248

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Weather Sensitivity in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

last winter. EIA projects higher residential and commercial prices, but lower overall heating bills in the residential and commercial sectors because of lower consumption. Weather...

249

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Uncertainties in the Short...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

headed to the Bonny terminal as Shell closed the Nembe Creek Trunkline and Trans Niger Pipeline multiple times to repair leaks attributed to oil theft. There will be lingering...

250

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2013 In this issue, we highlight DOE's NEPA performance metrics, including a historical perspective. As DOE NEPA practitioners strive to control time and cost while maintaining quality, this most recent NEPA metrics analysis shows that overall performance generally appears to have remained stable, notwithstanding a substantial workload. Articles in this issue include: 10 Years of NEPA Metrics: 2003-2012 DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Historical Perspective on EIS Completion Times Responding to Comments NEPA Search Tool NAEP Abstracts, Nominations Document Managers and CORs Eating the NEPA Elephant Web-based Scoping Meeting A Summer with NEPA Stakeholders Directory EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter

251

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, April 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, April 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, April 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, April 2012 April 30, 2012 - 12:31pm Addthis Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary The U.S. NRC voted to approve the issuance of the COLs for Southern Nuclear's Vogtle Units 3 and 4 on February 9, 2012. The issuance marks the first COL ever to be issued and the construction of a new nuclear power plant in more than 30 years. SCE&G's V.C Summer Units 2 and 3 received approval for COLs on March 30, 2012, making them the second US new-build in 30 years. The Tennessee Valley Authority has revised the cost and time estimates of Unit 2 at the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant. The new schedule estimates the cost to be in the range of $4 billion with a completion date of late 2015. South Mississippi Electric Power Association (SMEPA) has signed a

252

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1995 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 1995 September 1995 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 1995 This quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between April 1 and June 30, 1995. It is based primarily on responses to the revised questionnaire that was provided for use during January 1995, and includes information on direct and indirect NEPA process costs and on total project costs. The report includes a Question and Answer section as well as guidance on selected topics. REPORT CONTENTS: NEPA Document Preparation Times NEPA Cost Data NEPA Document Content The Document Preparation Process Effectiveness of the NEPA Process Other Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Questions and Answers EISs Completed 3rd Quarter FY 1995 EAs Completed 3rd Quarter FY 1995

253

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2012 January 30, 2012 - 1:10pm Addthis Quarterly News The U.S. NRC voted to approve the amended AP1000 design certification on December 22, 2011. The Commission also announced the rule would be effective immediately after it was published in the Federal Register on December 30, 2011. A final rule for the GE-ABWR design certification amendment was approved and published in the Federal Register on December 16, 2011. The rule will become effective January 17, 2012. The condenser for Vogtle Unit 3 has been completed by Japan's Toshiba and began its journey from Sacheon to Savannah, Georgia on November 21. The condenser marks the first major component Toshiba has shipped for

254

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2002 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2002 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2002 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2002 Welcome to the 33rd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Have you noticed that NEPA has been in the news a lot lately? Although this issue of LLQR is longer than usual, I encourage you to read all the news, views, and lessons learned. We thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Articles included in this issue: CEQ Asks How to Improve NEPA Implementation; Responses Vary Widely DOE Cooperating Agency Report DOE Proposes Floodplain/Wetland Rule Revisions Adaptive Management and the NEPA Process Impact Mitigation at Los Alamos Institute Establishes NEPA Advisory Committee Office of Science Promotes Early NEPA Planning

255

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2005 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2005 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2005 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2005 Welcome to the 45th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We thank all those who participated in the NEPA 35 conference. You made it successful. We hope you are as inspired as we are by the spirit of NEPA Section 101and the challenge to improve the implementation of NEPA. As always, we welcome your suggestions for continuous improvement. Articles included in this issue: NEPA 35: Back to Basics, Back to the Future Congressional NEPA Task Force Holds Final Hearings NEPA 35 Conference Highlights CEQ Chairman Connaughton's Keynote Address Plenary Sessions NECRAC Final Report Environmental Justice and Indian Country Training Sesssions Breakout Sessions

256

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2004 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2004 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2004 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2004 Welcome to the 39th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we are continuing a multi-part examination of lessons learned from Lessons Learned. We invite your suggestions on how to improve the Lessons Learned program. Thank you for your continuing support. Articles included in this issue: "Open House" Format for Scoping Meetings Provides DOE Valuable Input for Yucca Rail EIS Lesson Learned from Lessons Learned Apply Common Sense: Reduce Unfamilar Abbreviations Carbon Sequestration Programmatic EIS The Libyan Connection: Emergency Action Needed NEPA Strategy Adjusts to Changing Circumstances Card Game Highlights Diversity at NEPA Clinic

257

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2004 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2004 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2004 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2004 Welcome to the 40th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. That's 40 issues! Have you read them all? We are pleased to feature the July 2004 NEPA Community Meeting in this issue, as well as our annual update of the cumulative index to LLQR. Thank you for your continuing support. Articles included in this issue: DOE's NEPA Process - Getting Better and Better NEPA Community Meeting Highlights Awards for Contributions to DOE's NEPA Program Working with Cooperating Agencies e-NEPA Improves Access and Efficiency Getting Better Through Guidance More Thoughts on Getting Better and Better NEPA Office Shares Best Practices Lessons Learned from Lessons Learned Part 4

258

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2005 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2005 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2005 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2005 Welcome to the 43rd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we take a look at our hard-working NEPA Compliance Officers, who share bits of wisdom (and a little humor) gained from their lessons learned implementing NEPA. Countless thanks to all NCOs for their dedication, flexibility, and perseverance. As always, we welcome your suggestions for continuous improvement. Articles in this issue include: Who Has More Than 500 Years of NEPA Experience? A Closer Look at the DOE NEPA Compliance Officers CEQ Asks Federal Agencies to Lead NEPA Modernization Congressional NEPA Task Force Earth Day 2005 EPA Rates Action Alternatives in Moab EIS Update on Cape Wind Project

259

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2006 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2006 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2006 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2006 Welcome to the 49th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue, we feature the initiation of three significant EISs: the Complex 2030 Supplemental Programmatic EIS, the Supplemental Yucca Mountain Repository EIS, and the expanded Yucca Mountain Rail EIS. As always, we welcome your suggestions for continuous improvement. Articles included in this issue: NNSA Pursues Complex 2030 Vision Through Supplemental Programmatic EIS Scoping Process Underway for Two Yucca Mountain EISs Address Sabotage and Terrorism in EISs and EAs Special Environmental Analysis for Emergency Actions CEQ Work Groups Develop NEPA Guidance EIS Study Emphasizes Need for Quality and Clarity

260

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2007 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2007 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2007 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2007 Welcome to the 50th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. The Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance launched the Lessons Learned program in December 1994 to support continuous improvement in the NEPA process. The Office began by presenting cost and time metrics and "What Worked and What Didn't Work." Other features were soon introduced. As always, we hope you read all of LLQR, and we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Articles included in this issue: Flexibility of NEPA Process Facilitates Decisions for Strategic Petroleum Reserve Expansion DOE Cooperating Agency Report to CEQ GNEP PEIS to Examine Nuclear Fuel Recycling Proposal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2008 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2008 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2008 Welcome to the 55th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the recent NAEP conference, Changing Climates, thanks to our on-the-scene reporter Carolyn Osborne. There are also several articles related to global climate change and NEPA. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Articles included in this issue: Old NEPA Tools Still Work in a "Changing Climate" September Meeting: Making NEPA Work for DOE Strategic Petroleum Reserve Scoping Underappreciated Provisions of the CEQ Regulations CEQ Interagency Work Groups Make Progress

262

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2009 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2009 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2009 Welcome to the 59th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the DOE NCO meeting and the NAEP annual conference, where streamlining the NEPA process for Recovery Act projects and consideration of climate change in NEPA documents were both addressed. We've begun to follow up on suggestions from the NCO meeting (below). Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: DOE NEPA Compliance Officers Share Strategies 2009 NCO Meeting: Expediting a Quality NEPA Process Expedite Schedule and Maintain Quality Preparing Focused, Concise EAs

263

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2003 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2003 Welcome to the 36th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the July 2003 NEPA Community Meeting in this issue. Also, please note that the cumulative index, a useful reference tool, is printed in this issue. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Included in this issue: DOE NEPA Community Gauges Progress In Its Continuing Pursuit of Excellence Floodplain and Wetland Regulations Effective September 26, 2003 NEPA Community Meeting Highlights Metrics Show Progress In Meeting Goals Getting from Here to There Lessons Learned Along the Way e-Government Approaches to EIS Distribution Procedures Evolving for Sensitive Information

264

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1997 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1997 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1997 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1997 Welcome again to the Quarterly Report on Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. This report includes: DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Will Be Ready to Use Soon! CEQ Initiative on NEPA Implementation DOE Submits Comments on CEQ Environmental Justice Guidance NEPA Order to Be Reissued with Conforming Changes DOE Sued on Stockpile Stewardship and Waste Management PEISs Effective NEPA Hearings Bob Strickler and Linda Thurston Retire Reminder about Stakeholder Notification Litigation Updates New Executive Order on Protecting Children from Environmental Risks Annual NEPA Planning Summaries What's New with Electronic NEPA Questionnaire Results Other Completed EIS-Related Documents

265

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2009 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2009 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2009 Welcome to the 60th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the extraordinary support provided by our NCO volunteers and to introduce Scott Blake Harris, DOE General Counsel, and his plans for improving the DOE NEPA process. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: DOE NCO Volunteers Lend a Hand To Expedite Recovery Act Projects DOE General Counsel Scott Blake Harris Aims To Improve the NEPA Review Process CEQ Report to Congress on Recovery Act DOE Grants NEPA Variances for Two Solicitations Introducing DOE's New General Counsel

266

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2010 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2010 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2010 Welcome to the 62nd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue, we start a year-long observance of the 40th anniversary of the National Environmental Policy Act. The occasion calls for celebration of NEPA's successes as well as reflection on opportunities for improvement. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: CEQ Celebrates NEPA at 40. . . and So Do We! DOE Launches Categorical Exclusion Database Celebrating 40 Years with NEPA CEQ Issues Draft NEPA Guidance CEQ NEPA Symposium Presidential Proclamation Reflections: Professor Mandelker

267

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 This issue features suggestions from experienced NEPA practitioners on ways to meet Secretary Chu's challenge to make better use of existing tools and integrate project management with NEPA compliance. Articles in this issue include: Secretary's Memorandum Key Principles OLC Training Suggestions from NETL Effective EIS Management Teams EPA Requires Electronic EIS Filing 2012 DOE NEPA Stakeholders Directory DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update GIS Tools for the NEPA Practitioner CEQ Cooperating Agency Report NEPA Office Summer Interns Transitions Appeals Court Upholds BELLA EA Using Social Media for NEPA NNSA Webcast SPD SEIS Hearing EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results

268

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2001 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2001 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2001 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2001 Welcome to the 26th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles included in this issue: Innovative Field Research Benefits from NEPA Review Mini-guidance: $aving $ on EIS Distribution NEPA Office Needs Fewer Paper Copies of Issued Documents Analyzing All Reasonable Alternatives in an EIS NOAA Issues New Coastal Zone Regulations DOE Solicits Comments on Public Participation Policy More NNSA NEPA Procedures BLM Tool for Better Scoping Comments NEPA Staff Supported CEQ Technology Task Force Transitions When to Provide Cost Estimates in Annual NEPA Planning Summaries Some Considerations in Selecting NEPA Document Preparers DOE-Wide NEPA Contracts Update

269

Program Update: 4th Quarter 2013 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Program Update: 4th Quarter 2013 Inside this Update: Agencies Assist LM to Develop Reports on Defense-Related Uranium Mines; DOE Responds to Public Input on the Draft ULP PEIS;...

270

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2003 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2003 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2003 Welcome to the 35th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to include in this issue three new mini-guidance articles. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Articles included in this issue: Responding to Comments Is Work, But It Makes the NEPA Process Work DOE NEPA Meeting in July Mini-guidance: Multiple RODs Offer Flexibility Effective and Efficient EIS Distribution Keep the Public Informed When EIS Plans Change DOE Updates Public Participation Policy Observations on Annual NEPA Planning Summaries DOE-Wide NEPA Contracts Guidance Issued Not Meeting CAA Requirements Can Cause Delays Floodplain and Wetland Regulations Update

271

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1996 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1996 1996 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1996 Welcome again to the Quarterly Report of Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. This Quarterly Report includes: March 1996 NEPA Contracting Workshop: Do it Right the First Time EIS Coordination between Headquarters and Field Bounding Analysis in DOE NEPA Documents Questions and Answers on EIS References Suggestions from a NEPA Document Manager (Hanford K-Basins Spent Fuel EIS) Toll-Free Phone for Public Involvement Video Conferencing for Public Hearings Alternative Dispute Resolution and the NEPA Process Litigation Updates Comments on Proposed Amendments to DOE NEPA Regulations Second quarter FY 1996 Lessons Learned Questionnaire results,including EIS and EA cost and time reports Analysis of recent trends in costs and time

272

Fossil Energy Today - First Quarter, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Topics In This Issue... NETL's High Speed Imaging System Welcome to Fossil Energy Today Carbon Sequestration Atlas Coal-Fired Project of the Year National Risk Assessment Program...

273

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nuclear & Uranium - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear & Uranium Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Nuclear Power Plants Radioactive Waste International All Nuclear Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Nuclear Plants and Reactors Projections Uranium All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for electricity › chart showing U.S. electricity generation by fuel, all sectors Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. Quarterly uranium production data › image chart of Quarterly uranium production as described in linked report Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly, 3rd Quarter 2013, October 31, 2013. Uprates can increase U.S. nuclear capacity substantially without building

275

Fossil Energy Today - Fourth Quarter, 2011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CCUS FE R&D: A Legacy of Benefit NETL Helps Develop Improved Coronary Stents for Heart Patients CSLF Ministerial Reinforces Support for CCUS Fossil Energy Today - Issue No....

276

Microsoft Word - Alcoa_short-term_amendments_CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Miller Account Executive, Long-term Sales and Purchases - PT-5 Proposed Action: Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A2 - Clarifying or administrative contract actions Location: Portland, OR and Ferndale, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to execute one or more additional amendments to its existing 2009 Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) with Alcoa, Inc. (Alcoa) to further extend the Agreement's Initial Period provisions. The current date for expiration of these provisions under the most recent amendment (Amendment Number 2) is July 31, 2012.

277

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1997 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1997 1997 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1997 Welcome to the fourth quarter FY 1997 Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles in this issue include: NEPA Review Adds Value to Proposed Sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve INEEL EIS: New Approaches to Scoping CEQ Environmental Justice Guidance Strategies for EIS Savings ISO 14000 and NEPA Recent EIS Milestones NAEP NEPA Recommendations New National Environmental Training Office Beneficial Landscaping Practices Draft CEQ Guidance on Global Climate Change Transitions DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Transboundary Environmental Impacts Annual NEPA Planning Summaries Recent NEPA Guidance Public Involvement: If You Don't Know Where You're Going Litigation Updates Questionnaire Results EIS-related Documents

278

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1998 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 1998 December 1998 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1998 Welcome to the fourth quarter FY 1998 Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles in this issue include: New and Improved NEPA Compliance Guide Issued in 2 Volumes NEPA Community Meeting in Las Vegas Managing Baseline Environmental Information for the Sandia Site-wide EIS Water Project Mini-guidance Regulatory Compliance and NEPA Procedures for an Environmental Critique and Synopsis, and a Supplement Analysis EPA Broadens Voluntary EIS Policy Historic Preservation Proposed Regulatory Revision Withdrawn Acting Chair at CEQ Training Opportunities Environmental Lessons Learned Seminars Litigation Updates DOE NEPA Community Members in Transition Annual NEPA Planning Summaries Performance-based Statements of Work

279

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2002 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2002 2002 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2002 Welcome to the 31st quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Articles in this issue include: Beverly Cook Balances NEPA Objectives: Both Flexibility and Consistency Are Needed DOE NEPA Community Meeting in July Expanding Online Access to DOE NEPA Documents Change in e-file Submittal Address Perspectives from a Town Official EH Priority: Guidance to Improve NEPA Implementation EPA Distributes Reminders on Filing an EIS Interior Department Welcomes Electronic EISs New on the NEPA Bookshelf Transitions Whats New from CEQ Training Opportunities Litigation Updates Proposals Due for New DOE-wide Contracts EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter

280

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 News Updates The final ruling on the design certification for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries' APWR has been revised until 2015. Structural changes were made to the design by vendor, which requires a new seismic analysis to be performed. Because of this, the review schedule for the COL applications for Comanche Peak and North Anna has been delayed by approximately 18 months. The final ruling on Areva's EPR design certification has been revised from June 2013 until the end of 2014. The change is to allow Areva to respond to outstanding technical issues and provide additional information related to post-Fukushima requirements. DOE released a funding opportunity announcement on March, 22 2012 to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 2013 December 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2013 Welcome to the 77th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue reminds us that, through teamwork and dedication by DOE's NEPA community, we can produce high quality documents that enhance the Department's decisionmaking and help protect the environment. Articles in this issue include: Was Your NEPA Process Just One More Hurdle, or Did It Make a Difference? Bonneville Participates in Regional Infrastructure Team EPA EIS Mapper Tool Online Tribal Training Key Reference Document on Climate Change Golden Field Office Relocates Golden FONSI Template EPA Ratings of DOE Draft EISs New Migratory Bird MOU Jim Daniel To Retire Transitions EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Cost and Time Facts

282

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 1, 1995 March 1, 1995 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1995 This second quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between October 1 and December 31, 1994. It is based on responses to the revised questionnaire that was provided for use during Janua~ 1995, and includes information on direct and indirect NEPA process costs and on total project costs. Additionally, the report includes a feature story on lessons learned during preparation of the F-Canyon Plutonium Solutions Environmental Impact Statement. December 1, 1994 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1994 On August 12, 1994 the Office of NEPA Oversight distributed an interim/draft lessons learned questionnaire to NEPA contacts to be used for reporting on environmental impact statements and environmental assessments

283

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2004 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2004 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2004 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2004 The National Environmental Policy Act turns 35 on January 1, 2005! This landmark legislation altered the Federal decisionmaking process. In this issue of LLQR, Ray Berube, retired Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment, looks back at how NEPA compliance procedures have evolved at DOE. Our lead article looks at how the Internet is becoming an increasingly useful NEPA tool. We hope you will find helpful suggestions throughout LLQR on how we can continue to improve and modernize NEPA implementation, and, as always, we welcome your suggestions for continuous improvement. Articles included in this issue: Putting the Web to Work for NEPA Case Studies Address NEPA Section 101

284

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2009 Welcome to the 58th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We have been very busy addressing our NEPA responsibilities arising from the recovery act as well as the new policies of the obama administration. In this issue of the Lessons Learned Quarterly Report (LLQR), we share ideas and experiences that will foster an improved and expedited NEPA compliance process. Articles included in this issue: NEPA Efficiency Essential to Recovery Plan NEPA Opportunities in a New Era of Openness Secretary Chu to DOE Employees: "Help Turn the Ship" Secretary Chu Pledges to Improve DOE Management New DOE-Wide NEPA Support Contracts! Sutley Brings Breadth of Government Experience to CEQ DOE Advances NEPA Process for Loan Guarantees

285

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2002 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2002 Welcome to the 32nd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Much of this issue is devoted to reporting on the July DOE NEPA Community Meeting. Also featured is new NEPA-related guidance. We thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. Articles included in this issue: NEPA Community Meeting Addresses Reform Initiatives New Guidance Issued, More Underway Accident Analysis Guidance Agencies Discuss Indian Sacred Sites e-NEPA: Security Certification Needed Draft Information Quality Guidelines Litigation Updates DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Training Opportunities EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter NEPA Document Cost and Time Facts Recent EIS-Related Milestones What Worked and Didn't Work

286

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1996 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1996 1996 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1996 Welcome to the newly-revised Quarterly Report of Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. In response to reader suggestions, we have expanded the scope of the report to provide a wider variety of NEPArelated information, and enhanced the format for better clarity and overall readability. This Quarterly Report includes: A NEPA SUCCESS STORY: Environmental Impact Statement for the Safe Interim Storage of Hanford Tank Wastes NEPA lessons learned at the Hanford Site Mini-guidance on the preparation of EIS summaries, properly eliminating alternatives and impacts from detailed analysis, application of DOE NEPA regulations to procurement, and NEPA questions and answers Updates on the proposed amendments to DOE's NEPA regulations,

287

54th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

54th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2008 54th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2008 54th Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2008 Welcome to the 54th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. As noted in articles on recently issued DOE EISs (Complex Transformation, Yucca Mountain Repository and Railroad, and Western Energy Corridors), DOE has received and is responding to extensive public comment. This issue also pays tribute to two women who have made extraordinary contributions to NEPA implementation. As always, we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Articled included in this issue: Restructured Approach to FutureGen Yucca Mountain Final EISs on Track Highly Enriched Uranium Disposition Supplement Analysis DOE 2007 Cooperating Agency Report CEQ Citizen's Guide Enhances Public Involvement

288

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2011 Welcome to the 67th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue showcases BPA's mitigation and monitoring activities and best practices of DOE Program and Field Offices for efficiently preparing NEPA documents, involving the public, and making a difference in the quality of environmental protection. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: Bonneville's "Balanced Scorecard" Approach to Mitigation, Monitoring, and Adaptive Management Make Reference Documents Available Online Promoting NEPA Transparency and Public Engagement "Sunshine Week" Symposium DOE Evaluating NEPA Compliance in Audits

289

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2009 Welcome to the 61st quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue, we highlight many of the ways that the NEPA process furthers transparency in government decisionmaking. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: DOE Begins Online Posting of Categorical Exclusion Determinations CEQ Reports Timely NEPA Reviews for Recovery Act Comprehensive Draft EIS for Hanford Issued Y-12 Public Hearings Show Different Perspectives Revised Background Radiation Exposure Estimates Electronic CX Determination Form New Executive Order on Greenhouse Gases, Sustainability BPA Environmental Leadership Award

290

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2000 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2000 Welcome to the 25th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Included in this issue: CEQ Fosters Communication Among Federal NEPA Liaisons DOE NEPA Order Revised, National Nuclear Security Administration Responsibilities Outlined Focus on CEQ NEPA Liaison Topics Get to Know Your EPA EIS Reviewers List Cooperating Agencies on EIS Cover Sheets Amphibian Declines Federal Agencies Adopt Unified Watershed Management Policy Revised Historic Preservation Regulations To Be Issued Accurate Electronic NEPA Files Mini-guidance: Reduce Abbreviations Mini-guidance Collection Available Use the Glossary of Terms NAEP Award Nominations Due NEPA Contracts: Measuring Performance Quality DOE-Wide NEPA Contracts Update

291

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2012 Inside this Update: LM Co-Hosts International Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites; LM Communication and Stakeholder Satisfaction Independent Survey; LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood; LM's First Year with the Title X Uranium/Thorium Reimbursement Program; DOE and Colorado Mesa University Education Agreement Expands LM's Site Reuse Portfolio; Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively Contaminated Properties Site (Monticello Vicinity Properties) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during

292

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Title Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5330E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bode, Josh, Michael J. Sullivan, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 120 Date Published 01/2012 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords consortium for electric reliability technology solutions (certs), electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Several recent demonstrations and pilots have shown that air conditioner (AC) electric loads can be controlled during the summer cooling season to provide ancillary services and improve the stability and reliability of the electricity grid. A key issue for integration of air conditioner load control into grid operations is how to accurately measure shorter-term (e.g., ten's of minutes to a couple of hours) demand reductions from AC load curtailments for operations and settlement. This report presents a framework for assessing the accuracy of shorter-term AC load control demand reduction measurements. It also compares the accuracy of various alternatives for measuring AC reductions - including methods that rely on regression analysis, load matching and control groups - using feeder data, household data and AC end-use data. A practical approach is recommended for settlement that relies on set of tables, updated annually, with pre-calculated load reduction estimates. The tables allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on the daily maximum temperature, geographic region and hour of day and simplify the settlement process.

293

Program, Course or Contract Title: Energy Systems & Climate Change Quarter and Academic Year: Fall 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workshops with hands-on statistical methods for data presentation. Our primary texts for energy and climate Initiative. Our primary texts for policy were Global Environmental Governance by Speth & Haas, Who OwnsProgram, Course or Contract Title: Energy Systems & Climate Change Quarter and Academic Year: Fall

294

Natural gas imports and exports: First quarter report 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Fuels Programs prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports with the OFP. This quarter`s focus is market penetration of gas imports into New England. Attachments show the following: % takes to maximum firm contract levels and weighted average per unit price for the long-term importers, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters, volumes and prices for gas imported on short-term or spot market basis, and gas exported short-term to Canada and Mexico.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2008 Welcome to the 56th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature EPA 's web-based tool for NEPA practitioners, as well as the new DOE NEPA Website. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: NEPAssist: EPA's New Tool for NEPA Practitioners Loan Guarantee Office Plans NEPA Reviews New DOE NEPA Website Launched Two USDA Agencies Revise NEPA Procedures NEST Environmental Indicators Program Santa Susana Area IV EIS: Making Your Voice Heard DOE Conducts Public Scoping for Transmission Line EA EPA Comments on Yucca Mountain Final EISs 2008 Stakeholders Directory Issued

296

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2007 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2007 Welcome to the 51st quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue features collaboration as a key element of a successful NEPA process. Related articles discuss approaches to and benefits of collaboration and illustrate various applications. As always, we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Collaborating to Cultivate a Shared Vision Focus on Collaboration DOI Dialogues Bring Agencies Together Draft CEQ Collaboration Handbook MUSIC Uses Joint Fact Finding Environmental Justice Conference Environmental Conflict Resolution Training Nye County to Cooperate in Yucca SEIS Corps Works with Public for Hurricane Protection Public Input Sought on FutureGen Draft EIS Environmental Document Facilitates NEPA Reviews

297

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2009 Welcome to the 60th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the extraordinary support provided by our NCO volunteers and to introduce Scott Blake Harris, DOE General Counsel, and his plans for improving the DOE NEPA process. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: DOE NCO Volunteers Lend a Hand To Expedite Recovery Act Projects DOE General Counsel Scott Blake Harris Aims To Improve the NEPA Review Process CEQ Report to Congress on Recovery Act DOE Grants NEPA Variances for Two Solicitations Introducing DOE's New General Counsel Mercury Storage EIS Under Way

298

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2009 Welcome to the 59th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the DOE NCO meeting and the NAEP annual conference, where streamlining the NEPA process for Recovery Act projects and consideration of climate change in NEPA documents were both addressed. We've begun to follow up on suggestions from the NCO meeting (below). Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: DOE NEPA Compliance Officers Share Strategies 2009 NCO Meeting: Expediting a Quality NEPA Process Expedite Schedule and Maintain Quality Preparing Focused, Concise EAs Stakeholder Views on DOE's NEPA Process

299

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2010 Welcome to the 64th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue, we feature reflections on the 40th Anniversary of NEPA from the DOE NEPA Community. We also continue to report on activities to enhance transparency in the NEPA process, including a new DOE policy and recent recommendations from CEQ. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: DOE Uses e-NEPA To Enhance Public Participation Lessons from Oil Spill Review Apply Broadly Reflections on NEPA at 40 CX Determination: NEPA Review or Exemption? 2010 Stakeholders Directory Issued DOE NEPA Order Updated Recovery Act NEPA Reviews Keep Pace

300

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 This issue features suggestions from experienced NEPA practitioners on ways to meet Secretary Chu's challenge to make better use of existing tools and integrate project management with NEPA compliance. Articles in this issue include: Secretary's Memorandum Key Principles OLC Training Suggestions from NETL Effective EIS Management Teams EPA Requires Electronic EIS Filing 2012 DOE NEPA Stakeholders Directory DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update GIS Tools for the NEPA Practitioner CEQ Cooperating Agency Report NEPA Office Summer Interns Transitions Appeals Court Upholds BELLA EA Using Social Media for NEPA NNSA Webcast SPD SEIS Hearing EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results Cost and Time Facts LLQR-2012-Q3.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2010 Welcome to the 65th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue, we conclude our celebration of the 40th Anniversary of NEPA and look forward in the year ahead to implementing new tools from the Council on Environmental Quality and finalizing our NEPA rulemaking. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: Celebrating NEPA's Origins and Enduring Value CEQ Issues Categorical Exclusion Guidance NEPA 40th Anniversary Symposium NEPA Reviews Support Recovery Act Goals Recovery Act Makes 2010 a Busy Year for NEPA Best Practices Manual on Public Outreach Hanford Tank EIS Workshop

302

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2000 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2000 Welcome to the 23rd quarterly report on lessons learned in theNEPA process. This issue features highlights from the May 2000 NEPA Compliance Officers Meeting. Also featured is an article on NEPA and the wildfire at Los Alamos. This is an unusually long issue, due simply to the abundance of information to be shared. I encourage you to read the report cover to cover and file it for future reference. Articles included in this issue: NEPA Compliance Officers Celebrate 10 Years of Progress: Lessons Learned from Seasoned NCOs NEPA and Clean Air Act Conformity Guidance Draft Environmental Justice, Accident Analysis Guidance e-NEPA: What's New and What's Next Los Alamos Site-wide EIS Analyzed Wildfire, Prompted Mitigation

303

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2010 Welcome to the 62nd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue, we start a year-long observance of the 40th anniversary of the National Environmental Policy Act. The occasion calls for celebration of NEPA's successes as well as reflection on opportunities for improvement. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: CEQ Celebrates NEPA at 40. . . and So Do We! DOE Launches Categorical Exclusion Database Celebrating 40 Years with NEPA CEQ Issues Draft NEPA Guidance CEQ NEPA Symposium Presidential Proclamation Reflections: Professor Mandelker NEPA Process Benefits DOE CEQ Cites DOE Examples on Climate Change, NEPA

304

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2012 The need for timely preparation of quality EISs has not lessened since DOE initiated the NEPA Lessons Learned program in 1994. This issue provides advice on developing and maintaining EIS schedules from some of the Department's most experienced NEPA practitioners and highlights guidance and GIS tools that can help DOE prepare NEPA documents more efficiently. Articles in this issue include: How to Manage an EIS Schedule Successfully EPA Electronic Filing Scientific Integrity CEQ NEPA Efficiency Guidance Online Mapping Tools Keeping Track of NEPA Documents NAEP Conference Report Transitions 2013 NAEP Conference Announcement DOE-Wide NEPA Contracts Update EAs and EISs Completed This Quarter Questionnaire Results Cost and Time Facts

305

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2006 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2006 Welcome to the 46th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. DOE's senior managers play a vital role in NEPA implementation as evidenced by the settlement of Hanford NEPA litigation. Their participation in every EIS is important to ensure the scope and schedule support DOE's needs, as shown by an analysis of EIS metrics in this issue. As always, we welcome your suggestions for continuous improvement. Articles included in this issue: Collaboration Yields Win-Win Solution at Hanford DOE Applies "Alternative NEPA Arrangements" After Ordering Coal Power Plant to Operate Congressional NEPA Task Force Staff Initial Report Quality Assurance in NEPA Documents NAEP Annual Conference DOE Solicits Comments on FutureGen

306

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2006 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 2006 December 2006 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2006 Welcome to the 49th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue, we feature the initiation of three significant EISs: the Complex 2030 Supplemental Programmatic EIS, the Supplemental Yucca Mountain Repository EIS, and the expanded Yucca Mountain Rail EIS. As always, we welcome your suggestions for continuous improvement. Articles included in this issue: NNSA Pursues Complex 2030 Vision Through Supplemental Programmatic EIS Scoping Process Underway for Two Yucca Mountain EISs Address Sabotage and Terrorism in EISs and EAs Special Environmental Analysis for Emergency Actions CEQ Work Groups Develop NEPA Guidance EIS Study Emphasizes Need for Quality and Clarity Transitions

307

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1995 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 1995 December 1995 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 1995 This quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between July 1 and September 30, 1995. It is based primarily on responses to the revised questionnaire that was provided for use during January 1995, and includes information on direct and indirect NEPA process costs and on total project costs. Included in this issue: NEPA Document Preparation Times NEPA Cost Date NEPA Document Content The Document Preparation Process Effectiveness of the NEPA Process Other Lessons Learned Feature Stories Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Supplemental EIS Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility EIS Updates from the Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance The Need for Consistency in Accident Analyses

308

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2011 Welcome to the 66th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue focuses on the Administration's new NEPA guidance and related initiatives - on scientific integrity, regulatory improvement, mitigation and monitoring, and filing EISs - and DOE's proposal to modernize its NEPA regulations. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: DOE Proposes Revisions to Its NEPA Rule To Modernize Categorical Exclusions EPA Issues EIS Filing Guidance Executive Order Seeks To Improve Regulations CEQ Mitigation and Monitoring Guidance White House Guidance on Scientific Integrity Cooperating Agency Report to CEQ

309

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2013 Inside this Update: Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress; Weaving Community and Science; LM Completes Construction of Well Pad at CNTA; DOE Salute - Grand Junction, Colorado, Business Incubator of the Year; Replacement of Rocky Flats Water Monitoring Flume; LM Data Safer than Ever with FM-200; LM Security Guard Saves a Life; Fernald Preserve Mini-BioBlitzs; Mound Site Property Transfer; Flag Raising Ceremony at Grand Junction Office; Injection of Soybean Oil at Pinellas Site; Support Contractor Receives VPP Award; Environmental Justice Activities; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during

310

Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2013 Inside this Update: Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Center; LM Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress; Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System (GIS); State and Tribal Government Working Group Visits the Fernald Preserve; Lakeview GCAP Acceptance; LM Support Services Contract Extended; Release of American Burying Beetles at the Fernald Preserve; Electronic Equipment Donated to Elementary Schools on Hopi Reservation; Environmental Justice Activities; LM Welcomes New Employees; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time. Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, April-June 2013

311

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2008 Welcome to the 57th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the September DOE NEPA Community Meeting as well as recent case studies. Articles in this issue include: NEPA Helps Us Make Good Decisions, Accomplish Missions, Secretary Bodman Says 2008 NEPA Meeting - Plenary Session General Counsel Emphasizes Value of NEPA Leadership Recognized Keys to Yucca NEPA Success Sabotage and Terrorism; Global Climate Change NEPAssist Demonstration DOJ Advice: "Show Your Work" NNSA NCO Offers Lessons CEQ Hot Topics 2008 NEPA Meeting - NCO Session The Essential Role of the NCO Advice from Counsel Applicants and the DOE NEPA Process DOE NEPA Metrics Update A Closer Look at the DOE NCOs - Round 2

312

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2008 Welcome to the 55th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We are pleased to feature the recent NAEP conference, Changing Climates, thanks to our on-the-scene reporter Carolyn Osborne. There are also several articles related to global climate change and NEPA. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for further improvement. Articles included in this issue: Old NEPA Tools Still Work in a "Changing Climate" September Meeting: Making NEPA Work for DOE Strategic Petroleum Reserve Scoping Underappreciated Provisions of the CEQ Regulations CEQ Interagency Work Groups Make Progress CEQ Highlights Innovative NEPA Procedures

313

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 2012 January 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, January 2012 January 30, 2012 - 1:10pm Addthis Quarterly News The U.S. NRC voted to approve the amended AP1000 design certification on December 22, 2011. The Commission also announced the rule would be effective immediately after it was published in the Federal Register on December 30, 2011. A final rule for the GE-ABWR design certification amendment was approved and published in the Federal Register on December 16, 2011. The rule will become effective January 17, 2012. The condenser for Vogtle Unit 3 has been completed by Japan's Toshiba and began its journey from Sacheon to Savannah, Georgia on November 21. The condenser marks the first major component Toshiba has shipped for the new generation of U.S nuclear power plants.

314

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, October 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 2012 October 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, October 2012 October 30, 2012 - 8:58am Addthis Quarterly Updates On August 7, NRC issued an order halting issuance of any new construction licenses or license renewals until the Commission can respond to a June 8 court ruling striking down the NRC's waste confidence rule, which assumes that a waste repository will be available "when necessary"; reviews of license applications will continue and the order does not apply to design certifications. On September 6, NRC directed the agency's staff to develop an environmental impact statement (EIS) and a revised waste confidence decision and rule on the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel. The EIS and rule are to be completed within 24 months. Due to low natural gas prices and unfavorable economic conditions,

315

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, July 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 2012 July 2012 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Summary, July 2012 July 30, 2012 - 3:27pm Addthis Quarterly News The final ruling on the design certification for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries' APWR has been revised until 2015. Structural changes were made to the design by vendor, which requires a new seismic analysis to be performed. Because of this, the review schedule for the COL applications for Comanche Peak and North Anna has been delayed by approximately 18 months. The final ruling on Areva's EPR design certification has been revised from June 2013 until the end of 2014. The change is to allow Areva to respond to outstanding technical issues and provide additional information related to post-Fukushima requirements. DOE released a funding opportunity announcement on March, 22 2012 to

316

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2000 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 2000 September 2000 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2000 Welcome to the 24th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Note that this issue includes a cumulative index covering the past six years of reports. Articles included in this issue: Emergency NEPA Procedures Invoked for Actions Taken after Los Alamos Fire DOE Programs Win NAEP Awards U.S. Forest Service Receives Massive Response Interim DOE Technical Standard on Biota Doses Draft Guidelines for Environmental Review of Trade e-NEPA: Progress Made in Adding NEPA Documents Mini-Guidance: Affected Environment and No Action Alternative Label an EA for Pre-Approval Review Using Significant Digits NEPA Guidance Updates New on the NEPA Bookshelf Transitions DOE-Wide NEPA Contract Updates

317

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2011 Welcome to the 68th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue features an analysis of recent NEPA performance metrics. While we are pleased that EA cost and time metrics have improved, we are continuing to analyze how to apply lessons learned from the Recovery Act experiences more broadly. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles in this issue include: DOE NEPA Metrics Show Positive Results New DOE NEPA Website Design Federal Agencies Completing Recovery Act NEPA Work Environmental Reports To Streamline NEPA Analyses Uranium Leasing Program PEIS Scoping Meetings More Stakeholders Accept NEPA Documents Online

318

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2010 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2010 Welcome to the 63rd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue, we continue our observance of the 40th anniversary of NEPA. This is a time to address the need to reinvigorate NEPA implementation for the next 40 years. Thank you for your continuing support of the Lessons Learned program. As always, we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Articles included in this issue: NAEP Conference Looks to NEPA's Future Celebrating 40 Years with NEPA and Earth Day DOE NEPA Website Pursues Continuous Improvement Experience in Posting CX Determinations NEPA Then and Now: Anne Norton Miller DOE Celebrates Earth Day 40 NAEP NEPA Excellence Award BPA Honors NEPA Accomplishments Jointly Issued FR Notices

319

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2013 June 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2013 In this issue, we highlight recent guidance by the Council on Environmental Quality and Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to promote better integration of NEPA and Section 106 reviews and on the Federal Highway Administration's Every Day Counts initiative to better integrate planning and NEPA. Articles in this issue include: Integrating NEPA and NHPA Section 106 ACHP Extension of Programmatic Agreements Sutley Testifies on Importance of NEPA Every Day Counts at FHWA Guide for Public-Private Projects Earth Day at DOE GAO: Consider Climate Change Risks NAEP 2012 NEPA Report NAEP 2014 Conference Announcement NAEP Environmental Awards CEQ IT Working Group NEPA-CEQA Handbook in Preparation

320

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2006 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2006 Welcome to the 48th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. We remember Lynton Caldwell, who promoted a vision of productive harmony - a balance of the interests of the environment and human society. The NEPA process remains a useful tool for pursuing that vision by integrating environmental analysis into the decisionmaking process. With this issue, we have completed 12 years of LLQR, with an emphasis on continuous improvement. As always, we welcome your suggestions. Articles included in this issue: Court Rejects Challenges to Yucca EIS, Transportation Plan Lynton Caldwell, "Father of NEPA," 1914-2006 Congressional NEPA Task Force Staff Final Report CEQ Work Groups Developing NEPA Guidance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Establishing robust short-term distributions of load extremes of offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel method with a rigorous theoretical foundation is proposed for establishing robust short-term distributions of load extremes of offshore wind turbines. Based on the wind turbine load time series, the proposed method begins with incorporating a declustering algorithm into the peaks over threshold (POT) method and searching for an optimum threshold level with the aid of a Mean Residual Life (MRL) plot. Then, the method of L-moments is utilized to estimate the parameters in the generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) of the largest values in all the selected clusters over the optimal threshold level. As an example of calculation, an optimal threshold level of the tower base fore-aft extreme bending moments of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 5-MW OC3-Hywind floating wind turbine has been obtained by utilizing the novel method. The short-term extreme response probability plots based on this optimal threshold level are compared with the probability plots based on the empirical and semi-empirical threshold levels, and the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed novel method are substantiated. Diagnostic plots are also included in this paper for validating the accuracy of the proposed novel method. The method has been further validated in another calculation example regarding an NREL 5-MW fixed-bottom monopile wind turbine.

Yingguang Wang; Yiqing Xia; Xiaojun Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

330E 330E Measuring Short-term Air Conditioner Demand Reductions for Operations and Settlement Josh Bode, Michael Sullivan, Joseph H. Eto January 2012 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

323

VPR RESEARCH BRIDGE PROGRAM Objective: Toprovide short-term,limitedfinancial support whenexternallyfundedresearchprogramshave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VPR RESEARCH BRIDGE PROGRAM Objective: Toprovide short-term,limitedfinancial support following: pastrecord of external funding,effortsunderwaytosecure external fundingbeyondthe bridge

Kihara, Daisuke

324

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2012 This issue features successful practices from recent NEPA reviews and current Council on Environmental Quality initiatives promoting efficient NEPA compliance. Articles in this issue include: Keys to Managing an Expanded NEPA Workload Recent NEPA Reviews Ilustrate Lessons Learned NEPA Order Revision Incorporates Public Review of EAs Bureau of Reclamation Updates NEPA Handbook CEQ Expands NEPA Modernization Activities CEQ Draft Guidance Promotes Efficiencies CEQ Selects Pilot Projects DOE-Wide NEPA Contracts Update NEPA Contracts: Task Ordering Process Most DOE EISs Involve Cooperating Agencies Annual Planning Summaries Transitions Litigation Updates 2012 National Environmental Justice Conference Training Opportunities

325

Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/DGE), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigation, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reports on a neotectonic investigation in Connecticut. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains two articles, the first on OTEC core unit testing supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST), and the second on an analysis of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va. This work is supported by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, Naval Facilities Engineering Command/Atlantic Division.

Entingh, Daniel J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly: Volume 2, Issue 1, June 2012 (Newsletter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly newsletter provides timely news and information about the plans and progress of the Energy Development in Island Nations-U.S. Virgin Islands pilot project, including significant events and milestones, work undertaken by each of the working groups, and project-related technology deployment efforts.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Forecasting short-term electricity consumption using a semantics-based genetic programming framework: The South Italy case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Accurate and robust short-term load forecasting plays a significant role in electric power operations. This paper proposes a variant of genetic programming, improved by incorporating semantic awareness in algorithm, to address a short term load forecasting problem. The objective is to automatically generate models that could effectively and reliably predict energy consumption. The presented results, obtained considering a particularly interesting case of the South Italy area, show that the proposed approach outperforms state of the art methods. Hence, the proposed approach reveals appropriate for the problem of forecasting electricity consumption. This study, besides providing an important contribution to the energy load forecasting, confirms the suitability of genetic programming improved with semantic methods in addressing complex real-life applications.

Mauro Castelli; Leonardo Vanneschi; Matteo De Felice

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Short-term Wind Power Forecasting Using Advanced Statistical T.S. Nielsen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short-term Wind Power Forecasting Using Advanced Statistical Methods T.S. Nielsen1 , H. Madsen1 , H considered in the ANEMOS project for short-term fore- casting of wind power. The total procedure typically in for prediction of wind power or wind speed, estimating the uncertainty of the wind power forecast, and finally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

329

Weather or Other Short-Term Closing Policy 6.15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weather or Other Short-Term Closing Policy 6.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Faculty, staff, graduate associates, student employees, and students 1 1 This policy does not apply to Health State University ­ Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Policy 6.15 Weather or Other Short-Term Closing

Howat, Ian M.

330

Short-term effects of salinity declines on juvenile hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be compounded or mitigated by other factors, such as other environmental conditions or handling effects. #12Short-term effects of salinity declines on juvenile hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria. Final report to Florida Sea Grant, for a Program Development Award Project title: Short-term effects of rapid salinity

Florida, University of

331

Short-Term Audio-Visual Atoms for Generic Video Concept Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short-Term Audio-Visual Atoms for Generic Video Concept Classification Wei Jiang1 Courtenay Cotton1 the challenging issue of joint audio-visual analysis of generic videos targeting at semantic concept de- tection. We propose to extract a novel representation, the Short-term Audio-Visual Atom (S-AVA), for improved

Ellis, Dan

332

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2011 This issue celebrates the revision of DOE's NEPA regulations, which became effective on November 14, 2011. The culmination of a 2-year rulemaking process, the regulations establish 20 new categorical exclusions and revise other provisions to promote efficiency and transparency. Articles in this issue include: DOE Updates NEPA Regulations to Improve Efficiency and Transparency EPA Web Resource on EJ and NEPA DOE NEPA Website Tools Informal Public Involvement at Livermore Can We Issue a ROD on Monday? Keep the Public Informed When EIS Plans Change Final CEQ Recovery Act Report to Congress CEQ Selects Pilot Projects to Improve NEPA Efficiency Fugitive Emissions Working Group Wins Award Guidance on Health Impact Assessment

333

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1995 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 1995 June 1995 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 1995 January 1 and March 31, 1995. It is based primarily on responses to the revised questionnaire that was provided for use during January 1995, and includes information on direct and indirect NEPA process costs and on total project costs. The report also includes a feature story that compares the techniques used to analyze environmental justice in the preparation of three environmental impact statements (EISs): the Savannah River Waste Management Draft EIS, the Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs EIS, and the Draft EIS on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent

334

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013 3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table ES-3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year and Quarter Coal Receipts Average Price of Coal Receipts (dollars per short ton) Coal Used Coal Stocks 1 2012 January - March 2,151 27.47 1,756 771 April - June 3,844 25.42 3,688 825 July - September 5,399 24.32 5,286 812 October - December 4,919 24.55 4,680 787 Total 16,313 25.06 15,410 2013 January - March 5,067 24.60 4,989 793 April - June 4,015 25.24 3,754 756 Total 9,082 24.88 8,744 1 Reported as of the last day of the quarter.

335

Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, January-March 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1981. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into three sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Siting of Critical Facilities, supported by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and in-house funds, contains reports on geologic investigations in western Connecticut and areas in adjacent New York, development of seismotectonic domains, and fracture permeability in siting hazardous waste repositories. The third section, Energy Conservation and Storage Techniques, supported by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), reports on institutional barriers to landfill methane recovery and the need for state legislation.

None

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A field study evaluation of short-term refined Gaussian dispersion models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tracer study was conducted at the Duke Forest Site in Chapel Hill, North Carolina in January, 1995 to evaluate the ability of three short-term refined Gaussian dispersion models to predict the fate of volume source emissions under field study conditions. Study participants included the American Petroleum Institute (API), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and private consulting firms. The models evaluated were Industrial Source Complex--Short Term versions 2 and 3 (ISC2, ISC3) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Model Improvement Committee (AERMIC) model, AERMOD. All three models are based on the steady-state Gaussian plume dispersion equation, which predicts concentrations at downwind receptor locations when integrated over the distance between the source and receptor. Chemicals were released at known rates and measurements were taken at various points in the study field using Tedlar bag point sampling and open-path Fourier Transform infrared (OP-FTIR) monitoring. The study found that ISC and AERMOD underpredicted the measured concentrations for each dataset collected in the field study. ISC and AERMOD each underpredicted the OPFTIR dataset by a factor of approximately 1.6. ISC underpredicted the Tedlar{reg_sign} dataset by approximately 2.1, while AERMOD underpredicted by a factor of approximately 2.6. Regardless of source configuration or measurement technique used, under-prediction with respect to the measured concentration was consistently observed. This indicates that safety factors or other corrections may be necessary in predicting contaminant concentrations over the distances examined in this study, i.e., in the near field of less than 200 meters.

Piper, A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Texas Tech University Energy Conservation Plan -Quarterly Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plan, reporting to the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO) is the two-year energy reduction goal Energy Reduction Plans 1. Campus Energy Use Texas Tech is currently seeking funding from Texas Public Energy Conservation Office. The Fleet Fuel Management Plan, reporting to the State Office of Vehicle

Gelfond, Michael

338

Natural gas imports and exports, fourth quarter report 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

None

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Natural gas imports and exports, third quarter report 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the 5 most recent quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Natural gas imports and exports, first quarter report 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports showing natural gas import and export activity. Companies are required to file quarterly reports. Attachments show the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the 5 most recent reporting quarters, volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months, volume and price data for gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis, and the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

None

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, October-December 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains a report on institutional problems for small-scale hydroelectric power development in the southeastern states and a list of documents published by APL in the hydroelectric program and in the geothermal program, above. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, contains an article on work on the geologic structure of the Danbury Quadrangle that is supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and an in-house supported study on a new method for assessing earthquakes in intraplate regions. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains four articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR and D funds. The second concerns fly-wheel technology development at APL supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Energy Storage (DOE/STOR). The third is a report on APL energy conservation efforts at its own buildings, and the fourth is an article on liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety evaluation, supported by the National Academy of Sciences. The fifth section explores the value of establishing an Energy Research Institute at The Johns Hopkins University.

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 3. Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 2,303 2,314 2,365 4,617 4,754 -2.9 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 4,152 4,098 4,104 8,249 8,233 0.2 Coke Total 3,954 3,841 3,863 7,795 7,721 1.0 Breeze Total 198 257 241 455 512 -11.2 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption Report - Coke Plants.'

343

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division 1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 41. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic w w w w East North Central 724 510 509 42.1 South Atlantic w w w w East South Central w w w w U.S. Total 914 690 674 35.6 Coke Total 757 573 594 27.5 Breeze Total 157 117 80 95.2 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

344

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze (thousand short tons and dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 25. Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze (thousand short tons and dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Commodity April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Coke - - - - - - Sales 1,969 1,936 1,996 3,905 3,987 -2.1 Average Price 331.26 364.97 388.87 347.97 395.78 -12.1 Breeze - - - - - - Sales 89 110 158 199 309 -35.7 Average Price 196.05 145.86 103.62 168.27 101.14 66.4 Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report -

345

2013 Second Quarter Clean Energy/Clean Transportation Jobs Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Enivronmental Entrepreneurs (E2) Clean Energy/Clean Transportation Jobs Report tracks clean energy job announcements from companies, elected officials, the media and other sources, to show how how...

346

Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution on Wheeze in Asthmatic Children in Fresno, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of winter air pollution on respira- tory health of asthmaticChildrens Health Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution onEnvironmental Health Perspectives Effects of air pollution

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Spatiotemporal Model for Short-Term Predictions of Air Pollution Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the interest of many environmental agencies is on short-term air pollution predictions referred at high spatial resolution. This ... be informed with visual and easy access to air-quality assessment. We...

Francesca Bruno; Lucia Paci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A New Neuro-Based Method for Short Term Load Forecasting of Iran National Power System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a new neuro-based method for short term load forecasting of Iran national power system (INPS). A MultiLayer Perceptron ( ... were selected through a peer investigation on historical data relea...

R. Barzamini; M. B. Menhaj; Sh. Kamalvand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Short-term irradiance variability: Preliminary estimation of station pair correlation as a function of distance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Short-term irradiance variability: Preliminary estimation of station pair correlation, 2010; SMUD, 2010; IEA, 2010). In a recently published article, Hoff and Perez (2010a,b) advanced

350

Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2009 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2009 More Documents & Publications CERTIFIED REALTY SPECIALIST Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on...

351

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Archive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEPA process. As noted in articles on recently issued DOE EISs (Complex Transformation, Yucca Mountain Repository and Railroad, and Western Energy Corridors), DOE has received...

352

Wind Program Newsletter: First Quarter 2012 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Turbines in U.S. Waters Will Soon Spin Wind into Electricity DOE releases Offshore Demonstration Project Solicitation The U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program is...

353

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, 2007 - 2013 Coal Production, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 1. U.S. Coal Production, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year January - March April - June July - September October - December Total 2007 286,041 285,687 286,035 288,872 1,146,635 2008 289,015 284,331 298,911 299,552 1,171,809 2009 282,772 263,017 269,339 259,796 1,074,923 2010 265,702 264,982 277,505 276,180 1,084,368 2011 273,478 264,291 275,006 282,853 1,095,628 2012 267,071 241,205 258,956 249,591 1,016,822 2013 245,058 243,105 - - 488,163 - = No data reported. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration, Form 7000-2, 'Quarterly Mine Employment and Coal Production Report.'

354

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 37. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Coal Consumers Last Day of Quarter Electric Power Sector 1 Coke Plants Other Industrial 2 Commercial and Institutional Users Total Coal Producers and Distributors Total 2007 March 31 141,389 2,444 5,756 - 149,588 34,007 183,595 June 30 154,812 2,364 5,672 - 162,849 32,484 195,333 September 30 142,666 1,972 5,811 - 150,448 30,090 180,538 December 31 151,221 1,936 5,624 - 158,781 33,977 192,758 2008 March 31 146,497 1,462 4,818 448 153,225 34,876 188,101 June 30 152,542 1,756 4,983 478 159,760 32,086 191,846

355

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 32. U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Other Industrial Commercial and Institutional Year and Quarter Electric Power Sector 1 Coke Plants CHP 2 Non- CHP 3 Total CHP 4 Non- CHP 5 Total Total 2007 January - March 257,516 5,576 5,834 8,743 14,578 547 510 1,058 278,727 April - June 246,591 5,736 5,552 8,521 14,074 426 279 705 267,106 July - September 283,556 5,678 5,546 8,180 13,725 458 247 705 303,665 October - December 257,478 5,726 5,605 8,634 14,238 495 563 1,058 278,500 Total 1,045,141 22,715 22,537 34,078 56,615

356

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013 2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table ES-2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year and Quarter Production Imports Producer and Distributor Stocks 1 Consumption 2 Exports 2007 January - March 4,000 454 717 4,078 343 April - June 4,083 685 767 4,428 291 July - September 4,063 521 637 4,371 344 October - December 4,055 800 632 4,394 466 Total 16,201 2,460 17,270 1,444 2008 January - March 4,036 850 478 4,723 316 April - June 3,810 1,243 505 4,559 466 July - September 4,107 998 464 4,494 653 October - December 3,694 512 916 3,229 524 Total 15,646

357

Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1 Issue 4 - October 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 , I S S U E 4 O C T O B E R 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE Deploys Staff in Support of Hurricane Isaac Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director Infrastructure Reliability ISER Stewart Cedres Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness Hurricane Isaac, the fourth hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, made its first landfall on August 28th in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana and a second landfall along the coast of southeast Louisiana, just west of Port Fourchon, on August 29th. A large storm with a 50 - 60 mile-wide eye and 80 miles per hour sustained winds, Hurricane Isaac intensified

358

Daily prediction of short-term trends of crude oil prices using neural networks exploiting multimarket dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper documents a systematic investigation on the predictability of short-term trends of crude oil prices on a daily basis. In stark contrast with longer-term predictions of crude oil prices, short-term pred...

Heping Pan; Imad Haidar; Siddhivinayak Kulkarni

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report; Second Quarter FY 2003; June 2, 2003; Issue No. 35  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2003 June 2003 1 National Environmental Policy Act N E P A U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT Second Quarter FY 2003 June 2, 2003; Issue No. 35 LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS Responding to Comments Is Work, But It Makes the NEPA Process Work continued on page 3 Ray Berube Retires Beverly Cook, Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, wishes Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment Ray Berube well on his retirement. See tribute on page 19. Considering comments received on a draft EIS, and responding to those comments appropriately in the final EIS, can be a daunting task. Even a "great" draft EIS can generate lots of public comment. At times, the process of collecting, sorting, reviewing, and responding to public comments is complex and time-consuming.

360

Short term performance comparisons between a solar thermosyphon water heater and two numerical models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of a solar thermosyphon domestic water heater was conducted in the indoor solar simulator facility at Colorado State University (Bickford, 1994). The system consisted of a closed-loop collector circuit filled with propylene glycol and water solution and a horizontal storage tank with an annular tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Short-term irradiated tests with and without timed draws were performed to assess overall performance and monitor collector flow rate, storage tank stratification, and heat exchanger temperature distribution. The measured performance was compared with the ``standard`` thermosyphon model in TRNSYS 13.1 (transient system simulation program). A revised TRNSYS model was developed by Graham Morrison at the University of New South Wales, Australia. The revised model specifically addressed the horizontal tank, closed-loop configuration. The standard TRNSYS version predicted solar gain within 17% of the measured values and differed dramatically from experimental collector temperatures, closed-loop flow rate, and tank stratification. This is not surprising since this model does not include the tank and tank heat exchanger. The revised TRNSYS model agreed more closely with experimental results. It predicted closed-loop flow at 8% lower than observed flow and collector temperature rise that was higher than the observed flow by approximately the same amount, resulting in extremely accurate prediction of collector output energy. Losses from the storage tank and piping were significantly underpredicted in both models, however.

Bickford, C.; Hittle, D.C. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Solar Energy Applications Lab.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Scenarios for a South African CSP Peaking System in the Short Term  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The South African Integrated Resource Plan is a policy document, which by law allocates the energy resources that will be built to meet the future electricity needs of South Africa. The current Integrated Resource Plan indicates the electricity generation types that will be built from 2010 to 2030. It states that most of the future peak load will be met by Open Cycle Gas Turbines which operate using diesel and represents an allocation of 4,930M W. Further, the Integrated Resource Plan does not identify CSP as a potential peaking solution and allocates 1,200M W of capacity to CSP. This represents less than 2% of total capacity in 2030. This paper investigates the feasibility of utilizing CSP Plants as peaking plants in the short to medium term based on a proposition that under certain scenarios, a fleet of unsubsidized CSP peaking plants could drop the LCOE of the current Integrated Resource Plan. This is done by modeling a contemporary CSP tower system with Thermal Energy Storage. The Gemasolar CSP plant is used as the reference plant in order to obtain operating parameters. Our analysis suggests that at current fuels costs, diesel powered Open Cycle Gas Turbines produce electricity in excess of 5.08 ZAR/kWh (?0.63 US$/kWh), significantly above current CSP energy generating costs. This is the context that informed the undertaking of this study, to influence policy and provide technical evidence that CSP can guarantee and deliver energy at competitive costs in the short term. Two alternate scenarios show a lower LCOE for providing peak power. The most promising is a combined distributed CSP system wit h diesel powered Open Cycle Gas Turbine system as backup. The LCOE for this system is 2.78 ZAR (?0.34 $/kWh) or a drop of 45% when no fuel price inflation is considered. This system also increases security of supply due to a lower dependence on fuel prices.

C. Silinga; P. Gauch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Quarterly coal report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1995 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1987 through the third quarter of 1995. Appendix A displays, from 1987 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

Young, P.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 GRR/Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-MT-f - Short-term Water Quality Standard for Turbidity (318 Authorization) 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Regulations & Policies MCA 75-5-318 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

364

Short-term effects of Gamma Ray Bursts on oceanic photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We continue our previous work on the potential short-term influence of a gamma ray bursts on Earth's biosphere, focusing on the only important short-term effect on life: the ultraviolet flash which occurs as a result of the retransmission of the {\\gamma} radiation through the atmosphere. Thus, in this work we calculate the ultraviolet irradiances penetrating the first hundred meters of the water column, for Jerlov's ocean water types I, II and III. Then we estimate the UV flash potential for photosynthesis inhibition, showing that it can be important in a considerable part of the water column with light enough for photosynthesis to be done, the so called photic zone.

Penate, Liuba; Cardenas, Rolando; Agusti, Susana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

IEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, VOL. 16, NO. 3, THIRD QUARTER 2014 1709 A Survey of Energy Efficiency in Buildings and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE COMMUNICATIONS SURVEYS & TUTORIALS, VOL. 16, NO. 3, THIRD QUARTER 2014 1709 A Survey of Energy) and the provider-side (smart grids). Hence, combining energy efficiency and networking perspectives, in this paper Efficiency in Buildings and Microgrids using Networking Technologies Jianli Pan, Student Member, IEEE, Raj

Jain, Raj

366

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 34. Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England w w 20 w w w Maine w w w w w w Massachusetts w w w w w w Middle Atlantic 583 589 651 1,171 1,237 -5.3 New York 155 181 206 337 374 -10.1 Pennsylvania 427 407 445 835 863 -3.2 East North Central 2,191 2,385 2,064 4,577 4,457 2.7 Illinois 736 810 679 1,547 1,543 0.3 Indiana 509 534 493 1,043 994 4.9 Michigan

367

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State 3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 43. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State 1 April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England Btu 13,323 13,196 13,391 13,253 13,339 -0.6 Sulfur 0.84 0.89 0.72 0.87 0.72 20.3 Ash 5.95 5.81 5.93 5.87 6.09 -3.6 Maine Btu w w w w w w Sulfur w w w w w w Ash w w w w w w Massachusetts Btu 13,503 13,570 13,592 13,535 13,516 0.1 Sulfur 0.78 0.78 0.75 0.78 0.73 7.7 Ash 5.89 5.55 5.66

368

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by State by State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 2. Coal Production by State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Coal-Producing Region and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Alabama 4,649 4,410 5,171 9,059 10,150 -10.8 Alaska 442 300 542 742 1,091 -32.0 Arizona 2,184 1,825 2,002 4,009 4,169 -3.8 Arkansas 2 4 11 6 33 -83.1 Colorado 5,297 5,781 6,885 11,079 13,914 -20.4 Illinois 13,474 13,996 12,487 27,470 24,419 12.5 Indiana 9,516 9,422 9,147 18,938 18,794 0.8 Kansas 5 5 5 9 8 23.7 Kentucky Total 20,683 20,594 22,803 41,276 49,276 -16.2 Eastern (Kentucky) 10,392 10,144 12,444 20,536 27,516 -25.4 Western (Kentucky) 10,291

369

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 36. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State July - September 2013 April - June 2013 July - September 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic 11 20 13 83 96 -13.0 Pennsylvania 11 20 13 83 96 -13.0 East North Central 89 112 123 398 454 -12.4 Illinois 22 34 29 101 95 6.5 Indiana w w w w w w Michigan w w w w w w Ohio w 19 w w 95 w Wisconsin w w w w 21 w West North Central 77 81 81 296 270 9.7 Iowa w w w w w w

370

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 31. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic 139.64 145.00 158.61 143.29 158.91 -9.8 Pennsylvania 139.64 145.00 158.61 143.29 158.91 -9.8 East North Central 87.62 97.30 87.11 93.56 95.13 -1.7 Illinois 59.27 60.30 62.17 59.86 66.69 -10.2 Indiana w w w w w w Michigan w w w w w w Ohio 127.99

371

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 24. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 157.29 176.84 199.70 166.21 198.26 -16.2 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 157.26 171.51 191.48 163.85 190.51 -14.0 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Average price is based on the cost, insurance, and freight (c.i.f. value). Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding.

372

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 39. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division and State June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 New England w w 21 w Maine w w w w Massachusetts w w w w Middle Atlantic 295 251 286 3.2 New York 137 78 107 27.6 Pennsylvania 158 172 179 -11.5 East North Central 734 692 761 -3.5 Illinois 160 152 187 -14.1 Indiana 113 119 96 18.7 Michigan 252 244 269 -6.3 Ohio 87 66 79 9.9 Wisconsin 122 110 131 -7.0 West North Central

373

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 42. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Census Division and State September 30, 2013 June 30, 2013 September 30, 2012 Percent Change (September 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic 62 62 58 6.7 Pennsylvania 62 62 58 6.7 East North Central 155 168 182 -15.0 Illinois 25 24 41 -38.9 Indiana 73 75 66 10.0 Michigan w w w w Ohio w w w w Wisconsin 5 5 3 46.9 West North Central 65 66 90 -28.1 Iowa w w w w Minnesota w w w w Missouri w w w

374

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 30. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State July - September 2013 April - June 2013 July - September 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic 11 25 15 91 105 -14.0 Pennsylvania 11 25 15 91 105 -14.0 East North Central 79 115 108 377 409 -7.7 Illinois 23 31 29 96 96 -0.4 Indiana w w w w w w Michigan w w w w w w Ohio w 30 w w 81 w Wisconsin w w w w 19 w West North Central 78 74 75 279 265 5.3 Iowa w w w w w w

375

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 Table 4. U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, July - September 2013 January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2007 11,139 8,786 14,702 8,405 16,198 10,559 17,124 8,597 59,163 36,347 2008 15,802 7,640 23,069 8,982 20,321 8,485 22,329 9,101 81,519 34,208 2009 13,335 6,325 12,951 5,426 15,159 5,441 17,653 5,447 59,097 22,639 2010 17,807 4,803 21,965 5,058 21,074 4,680 20,870 4,811 81,716 19,353 2011 26,617 3,381 26,987 3,419 25,976 3,588 27,679 2,700

376

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State 4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 44. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State 1 April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic Btu 12,906 12,815 11,709 12,844 12,440 3.2 Sulfur 1.03 0.92 0.99 0.96 0.97 -1.0 Ash 8.94 8.62 10.00 8.72 9.11 -4.3 Pennsylvania Btu 12,906 12,815 11,709 12,844 12,440 3.2 Sulfur 1.03 0.92 0.99 0.96 0.97 -1.0 Ash 8.94 8.62 10.00 8.72 9.11 -4.3 East North Central

377

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 5. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2007 74.13 45.91 64.30 46.86 72.10 47.38 71.09 50.51 70.25 47.64 2008 81.81 52.91 97.24 55.59 102.51 64.65 104.97 65.33 97.68 59.83 2009 113.08 61.03 93.28 65.44 98.70 64.93 100.98 64.72 101.44 63.91 2010 106.52 62.02 121.36 71.91 125.45 77.12 126.16 76.18 120.41 71.77 2011 139.34 86.00 153.00 105.86 155.88

378

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 27. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England w w w w w w Maine w w w w w w Massachusetts w w w w w w Middle Atlantic 87.05 93.03 93.73 89.93 95.68 -6.0 New York 102.14 105.80 117.15 103.80 117.61 -11.7 Pennsylvania 78.57 86.97 82.64 82.74 85.48 -3.2 East North Central 78.02 80.16 80.91 79.07 81.26 -2.7 Illinois

379

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 26. Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England w w w w w w Maine w w w w w w Massachusetts w w w w w w Middle Atlantic 627 587 637 1,214 1,254 -3.1 New York 214 178 194 392 377 4.0 Pennsylvania 413 409 443 822 877 -6.2 East North Central 2,257 2,170 2,107 4,427 4,187 5.8 Illinois 742 778 677 1,521 1,481 2.7 Indiana 508 500 409 1,008 820 22.9 Michigan 338

380

Next Generation Short-Term Forecasting of Wind Power Overview of the ANEMOS Project.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Next Generation Short-Term Forecasting of Wind Power ­ Overview of the ANEMOS Project. G outperform current state-of-the-art methods, for onshore and offshore wind power forecasting. Advanced forecasts for the power system management and market integration of wind power. Keywords: Wind power, short

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Longitudinal Analysis of Short term Bronchiolitis Air Pollution Association using Semi Parametric Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution, semi parametric models. 1.1 Introduction Time-series studies of air pollution and health was an overestimation of the eect of air pollution on health. More recently, in a issue of Epidemiology, Ramsay et al1 Longitudinal Analysis of Short term Bronchiolitis Air Pollution Association using Semi Parametric

Mesbah, Mounir

382

Combination of Long Term and Short Term Forecasts, with Application to Tourism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combination of Long Term and Short Term Forecasts, with Application to Tourism Demand Forecasting that are combined. As a case study, we consider the problem of forecasting monthly tourism numbers for inbound tourism to Egypt. Specifically, we con- sider 33 source countries, as well as the aggregate. The novel

Abu-Mostafa, Yaser S.

383

SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS Hans. For the conventional power park, the power production of the wind turbines presents a fluctuating 'negative load PRODUCTION OF WIND TURBINES For the forecast of the power production of wind turbines two approaches may

Heinemann, Detlev

384

SHORT-TERM FORECASTING OF SOLAR RADIATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA WITH STATISTICAL METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by one blank line, and from the paper body by two blank lines. 1. INTRODUCTION Fluctuations of solarSHORT-TERM FORECASTING OF SOLAR RADIATION BASED ON SATELLITE DATA WITH STATISTICAL METHODS Annette Solar World Congress. This portion of the paper is the abstract. The abstract should not exceed 250

Heinemann, Detlev

385

Ethical Considerations for Short-term Experiences by Trainees in Global Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-constrained health care set- tings, trainees from resource-replete environments may have inflated ideas aboutCOMMENTARY Ethical Considerations for Short-term Experiences by Trainees in Global Health John A. Crump, MB, ChB, DTM&H Jeremy Sugarman, MD, MPH, MA A CADEMIC GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS ARE BURGEON- ing.1

Tipple, Brett

386

Managing Short-Term Electricity Contracts Under Uncertainty: A Minimax Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the price of which follows supply and demand imbalances. Electricity prices, which were tightly controlled that occurred in the Midwest during the week of June 22, 1998, when the day-ahead electricity price departedManaging Short-Term Electricity Contracts Under Uncertainty: A Minimax Approach Samer Takriti

Ahmed, Shabbir

387

Business-Driven Short-Term Management of a Hybrid IT Infrastructure1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business-Driven Short-Term Management of a Hybrid IT Infrastructure1 Paulo Ditarso Maciel Jr Abstract We consider the problem of managing a hybrid computing infrastructure whose processing elements and associated quality of service guarantees. The applications that run in this hybrid infrastructure are char

Cirne, Walfredo

388

Short-term Forecasting of Offshore Wind Farm Production Developments of the Anemos Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short-term Forecasting of Offshore Wind Farm Production ­ Developments of the Anemos Project J.a.brownsword@rl.ac.uk 6 Overspeed GmBH & Co.KG, 26129 Oldenburg, Germany Email: h.p.waldl@overspeed.de Key words: Offshore to the large dimensions of offshore wind farms, their electricity production must be known well in advance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

Interference of a short-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide with allergic airways responses to allergenic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interference of a short-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide with allergic airways responses, 4 (2002) 251-260" DOI : 10.1080/096293502900000113 #12;Abstract Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a common and may depend to concentration of pollutant. Keywords: Mouse model of asthma; nitrogen dioxide; air

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

390

Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including that minimizes losses in the transmission and costs in the generation of a hydroelectric power system, formulated such perturbing parameter. Keywords-- Hydroelectric power system, Network flow, Predispatch, Primal-dual interior

Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

391

Short Term Hourly Load Forecasting Using Abductive Networks R. E. Abdel-Aal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Term Hourly Load Forecasting Using Abductive Networks R. E. Abdel-Aal Center for Applied for this purpose. This paper proposes using the alternative technique of abductive networks, which offers with statistical and empirical models. Using hourly temperature and load data for five years, 24 dedicated models

Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

392

PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flow. Our results indicate that some aquatic ecosystem variables can return to a more natural statePRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration in Fossil Creek projects, although numerous, rarely include complete sets of data before and after restoration

LeRoy, Carri J.

393

Short-term improvements in public health from global-climate policies on fossil-fuel combustion: an interim report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryBackground Most public-health assessments of climate-control policies have focused on long-term impacts of global change. Our interdisciplinary working group assesses likely short-term impacts on public health. Methods We combined models of energy consumption, carbon emissions, and associated atmospheric particulate-matter (PM) concentration under two different forecasts: business-as-usual (BAU); and a hypothetical climate-policy scenario, where developed and developing countries undertake significant reductions in carbon emissions. Findings We predict that by 2020, 700?000 avoidable deaths (90% CI 3850001034000) will occur annually as a result of additional PM exposure under the BAU forecasts when compared with the climate-policy scenario. From 2000 to 2020, the cumulative impact on public health related to the difference in PM exposure could total 8 million deaths globally (90% CI 4.411.9 million). In the USA alone, the avoidable number of annual deaths from PM exposure in 2020 (without climate-change-control policy) would equal in magnitude deaths associated with human immunodeficiency diseases or all liver diseases in 1995. Interpretation The mortality estimates are indicative of the magnitude of the likely health benefits of the climate-policy scenario examined and are not precise predictions of avoidable death. While characterised by considerable uncertainty, the short-term public-health impacts of reduced PM exposures associated with greenhouse-gas reductions are likely to be substantial even under the most conservative set of assumptions.

Devra Lee Davis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Short Term Load Forecasting with Fuzzy Logic Systems for power system planning and reliability?A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Load forecasting is very essential to the operation of Electricity companies. It enhances the energy efficient and reliable operation of power system. Forecasting of load demand data forms an important component in planning generation schedules in a power system. The purpose of this paper is to identify issues and better method for load foecasting. In this paper we focus on fuzzy logic system based short term load forecasting. It serves as overview of the state of the art in the intelligent techniques employed for load forecasting in power system planning and reliability. Literature review has been conducted and fuzzy logic method has been summarized to highlight advantages and disadvantages of this technique. The proposed technique for implementing fuzzy logic based forecasting is by Identification of the specific day and by using maximum and minimum temperature for that day and finally listing the maximum temperature and peak load for that day. The results show that Load forecasting where there are considerable changes in temperature parameter is better dealt with Fuzzy Logic system method as compared to other short term forecasting techniques.

R. M. Holmukhe; Mrs. Sunita Dhumale; Mr. P. S. Chaudhari; Mr. P. P. Kulkarni

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI): Snapshot of Recent Geothermal Financing Terms, Fourth Quarter 2009 … Second Half 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

: : Snapshot of Recent Geothermal Financing Terms Fourth Quarter 2009 - Second Half 2011 Travis Lowder, Ryan Hubbell, Michael Mendelsohn, and Karlynn Cory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54438 September 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI): Snapshot of Recent Geothermal Financing Terms Fourth Quarter 2009 - Second Half 2011 Travis Lowder, Ryan Hubbell, Michael Mendelsohn, and Karlynn Cory

396

EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly: Volume 1, Issue 2, March 2011, Energy Development in Island Nations, U.S. Virgin Islands (Newsletter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly newsletter provides timely news and information about the plans and progress of the Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands pilot project, including significant events and milestones, work undertaken by each of the five working groups, and project-related renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

Not Available

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Natural gas: Imports and exports third quarter report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Fuels Programs prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies with authorizations to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports with the OFP. This report is for the third quarter of 1993 (July--September). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past twelve months (October 1992--September 1993). Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Natural gas imports and exports: Third quarter report, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports. This report is for the third quarter of 1998 (July--September). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent calendar quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Natural gas imports and exports. Second quarter report, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepared quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports. This report is for the second quarter of 1998 (April through June). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Natural gas imports and exports. Fourth quarter report, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports. This report is for the fourth quarter of 1998 (October through December). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural gas imports and exports. First quarter report, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports. This report is for the first quarter of 1998 (January through March). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Assessing the consistency between short-term global temperature trends in observations and climate model projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing the consistency between short-term global temperature trends in observations and climate model projections is a challenging problem. While climate models capture many processes governing short-term climate fluctuations, they are not expected to simulate the specific timing of these somewhat random phenomena - the occurrence of which may impact the realized trend. Therefore, to assess model performance, we develop distributions of projected temperature trends from a collection of climate models running the IPCC A1B emissions scenario. We evaluate where observed trends of length 5 to 15 years fall within the distribution of model trends of the same length. We find that current trends lie near the lower limits of the model distributions, with cumulative probability-of-occurrence values typically between 5 percent and 20 percent, and probabilities below 5 percent not uncommon. Our results indicate cause for concern regarding the consistency between climate model projections and observed climate behavior...

Michaels, Patrick J; Christy, John R; Herman, Chad S; Liljegren, Lucia M; Annan, James D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Impact of short-term storage on frequency response under increasing wind penetration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, the effort is to study the impact of short-term storage technology in stabilizing the frequency response under increasing wind penetration. The frequency response is studied using Automatic Generation Control (AGC) module, and is quantified in terms of Control Performance Standards (CPS). The single area IEEE Reliability Test System (RTS) was chosen, and battery storage was integrated within the AGC. The battery proved to reduce the frequency deviations and provide good CPS scores with higher penetrations of wind. The results also discuss the ability of the short term storage to benefit the system by reducing the hourly regulation deployment and the cycling undergone by conventional units, by dint of their fast response; and sheds light on the economic implications of their benefits.

Venkat Krishnan; Trishna Das; James D. McCalley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Short-term load forecasting using generalized regression and probabilistic neural networks in the electricity market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the economic and secure operation of power systems, a precise short-term load forecasting technique is essential. Modern load forecasting techniques - especially artificial neural network methods - are particularly attractive, as they have the ability to handle the non-linear relationships between load, weather temperature, and the factors affecting them directly. A test of two different ANN models on data from Australia's Victoria market is promising. (author)

Tripathi, M.M.; Upadhyay, K.G.; Singh, S.N.

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Integrating short-term demand response into long-term investment planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discussions of the model in [79] and [80], and [81] for an application. 6 Developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) of the United States of America [82]. EPRG No 1113 5 Planning (IRP) was developed.7... Integrating short-term demand response into long-term investment planning Cedric De Jonghe, Benjamin F. Hobbs and Ronnie Belmans 20 March 2011 CWPE 1132 & EPRG 1113 www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EP RG W...

De Jonghe, Cedric; Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Belmans, Ronnie

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Short-term wind forecast for the safety management of complex areas during hazardous wind events  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes the short-term wind forecast system realised in the framework of the European Project Wind and Ports: The forecast of wind for the management and safety of port areas. The project?s aim is to contribute improving the safety and accessibility to the harbour areas of the largest ports in the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea, which are frequently exposed to hazardous winds, in order to minimise the risks for users, structures, transport means, stored goods and boats within the ports. The short-term wind forecast system is based on a mixed statistical-numerical procedure, trained by means of local wind measurements and implemented into an operational chain for the real-time prediction of the maximum expected wind velocity corresponding to three forecast horizons (30, 60 and 90min) and three non-exceeding probabilities (90%, 95%, and 99%). The local wind measurements used to train the forecast algorithms have been recorded from the 15 ultra-sonic anemometers installed in the Ports of Savona, La Spezia, and Livorno. This wind-monitoring network is used also to carry out the short-term forecast system a posteriori verification and validation.

M. Burlando; M. Pizzo; M.P. Repetto; G. Solari; P. De Gaetano; M. Tizzi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Ramp Forecasting Performance from Improved Short-Term Wind Power Forecasting: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The variable and uncertain nature of wind generation presents a new concern to power system operators. One of the biggest concerns associated with integrating a large amount of wind power into the grid is the ability to handle large ramps in wind power output. Large ramps can significantly influence system economics and reliability, on which power system operators place primary emphasis. The Wind Forecasting Improvement Project (WFIP) was performed to improve wind power forecasts and determine the value of these improvements to grid operators. This paper evaluates the performance of improved short-term wind power ramp forecasting. The study is performed for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) by comparing the experimental WFIP forecast to the current short-term wind power forecast (STWPF). Four types of significant wind power ramps are employed in the study; these are based on the power change magnitude, direction, and duration. The swinging door algorithm is adopted to extract ramp events from actual and forecasted wind power time series. The results show that the experimental short-term wind power forecasts improve the accuracy of the wind power ramp forecasting, especially during the summer.

Zhang, J.; Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.; Freedman, J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Pages 41-52 Short-term effects of small dam removal on a freshwater mussel assemblage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with appropriate planning, timing, and removal techniques, but additional monitoring is warrantePages 41-52 Short-term effects of small dam removal on a freshwater mussel assemblage. Ryan J 1053-637X EDITORIAL REVIEW BOARD #12;SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF SMALL DAM REMOVAL ON A FRESHWATER MUSSEL

Kwak, Thomas J.

409

ORIGINAL PAPER Short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions Pascal Boeckx negative to positive. We studied the short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions. We site, an intermediately aerated Luvisol in Belgium, were similar. Nitrous oxide and CO2 emissions were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

Research of least squares support vector regression based on differential evolution algorithm in short-term load forecasting model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To improve the accuracy of short-term load forecasting a differential evolution algorithm (DE) based least squares support vector regression (LSSVR) method is proposed in this paper. Through optimizing the regularization parameter and kernel parameter of the LSSVR by DE a short-term load forecasting model which can take load affected factors such as meteorology weather and date types into account is built. The proposed LSSVR method is proved by implementing short-term load forecasting on the real historical data of Yangquan power system in China. The average forecasting error is less than 1.6% which shows better accuracy and stability than the traditional LSSVR and Support vector regression. The result of implementation of short-term load forecasting demonstrates that the hybrid model can be used in the short-term forecasting of the power system more efficiently.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Effects of various uranium leaching procedures on soil: Short-term vegetation growth and physiology. Progress report, April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant volumes of soil containing elevated levels of uranium exist in the eastern United States. The contamination resulted from the development of the nuclear industry in the United States requiring a large variety of uranium products. The contaminated soil poses a collection and disposal problem of a magnitude that justifies the development of decontamination methods. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program to address the problem. The fundamental goal of the USID task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than what can be done using current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics and without generating waste that is difficult to manage and/or dispose of. However, procedures developed for removing uranium from contaminated soil have involved harsh chemical treatments that affect the physicochemical properties of the soil. The questions are (1) are the changes in soil properties severe enough to destroy the soil`s capacity to support and sustain vegetation growth and survival? and (2) what amendments might be made to the leached soil to return it to a reasonable vegetation production capacity? This study examines the vegetation-support capacity of soil that had been chemically leached to remove uranium. The approach is to conduct short-term germination and phytotoxicity tests for evaluating soils after they are subjected to various leaching procedures followed by longer term pot studies on successfully leached soils that show the greatest capacity to support plant growth. This report details the results from germination and short-term phytotoxicity testing of soils that underwent a variety of leaching procedures at the bench scale at ORNL and at the pilot plant at Fernald.

Edwards, N.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highlights Highlights After falling by more than 40 cents per gallon from the beginning of September through mid-November, weekly U.S. average regular gasoline retail prices increased by 8 cents per gallon to reach $3.27 per gallon on December 2, 2013, due in part to unplanned refinery maintenance and higher crude oil prices. The annual average regular gasoline retail price, which was $3.63 per gallon in 2012, is expected to average $3.50 per gallon in 2013 and $3.43 per gallon in 2014. The North Sea Brent crude oil spot price averaged near $110 per barrel for the fifth consecutive month in November. EIA expects the Brent crude oil price to average $108 per barrel in December and decline gradually to $104 per barrel in 2014. Projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices average $95 per barrel during 2014.

413

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Cold weather in December had significant effects on demand, supply, and prices across the country. Cold weather led to a net withdrawal of 285 billion cubic feet (Bcf) for the week ending Friday, December 13. This was the largest storage withdrawal since recordkeeping began in 1994. Another larger-than-normal storage withdrawal of 177 Bcf occurred the following week. Widespread freeze-offs occurred in December and disrupted production for several days in the Piceance Basin in Utah and Wyoming, the Uinta Basin in Utah, the San Joaquin Basin in California, and the Williston Basin in North Dakota. Imports from Canada helped mitigate the loss of supply. During the month, prices rose across most of the country, and the Henry Hub price averaged about $0.60/MMBtu higher than the previous month's average.

414

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Prices Viewer Real Prices Viewer Real Petroleum Prices are computed by dividing the nominal price in a given month by the ratio of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) in that month to the CPI in some "base" period. The Real Petroleum Prices spreadsheet and charts are updated every month so that the current month is the base period in the monthly price series. Consequently, all real prices are expressed in "current" dollars and any current month price may be compared directly with any past or projected real prices. Download all real and nominal price series to an Excel Spreadsheet (Excel xlsx file) Data Sources History Imported Crude Oil Price (refiner average imported crude oil acquisition cost) 1968 - Present: EIA Petroleum Marketing Monthly Motor Gasoline Regular Grade Retail Price (including taxes)

415

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

marginal sources of supply for times of very high demand: liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and pipeline imports from Canada. Although LNG imports have declined...

416

Dependability of Wind Energy Generators with Short-Term Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...individual nuclear reactor. At Riso, the yearly out--o a 0 L-0 L-as a1) 3:0 a2 BWR Power duration curve Vermont Yankee 1974 O I '. l.0 20 40 60 80 1 percent of time in which power exceeds E 2 x average Fig. 2. Typical power duration...

BENT SRENSEN

1976-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

Dependability of Wind Energy Generators with Short-Term Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ca-pacity must be enlarged, or storage facili-ties must be added...re-gions where reservoirs for pumped water storage are available, the wind...Examples of possible storage systems are batteries, flywheels, pumped water, compressed air...

BENT SRENSEN

1976-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

418

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption comes from Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI), which is an international agreement that generally...

419

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Overview EIA expects production from countries outside of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to grow year-over-year by a record high of 1.9 million bbl/d in 2014. OPEC crude oil production is forecast to decline by 0.5 million bbl/d in 2014, mostly as a result of some OPEC producers cutting back production to accommodate non-OPEC supply growth. The projected decline in production by some OPEC producers increases in surplus crude oil production capacity, which grows from an average of 2.2 million bbl/d in 2013 to 2.7 million bbl/d in 2014. The call on OPEC crude oil and global stocks (world consumption less non-OPEC production and OPEC non-crude oil production) falls from an average 30.4 million bbl/d in 2013

420

Dependability of Wind Energy Generators with Short-Term Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...system connected into a common grid. This leads to a maximum possible...power plant. With the present grid size, this means that wind...storage systems are batteries, flywheels, pumped water, compressed...probably being associated with a flywheel system. In Fig. 1, power...

BENT SRENSEN

1976-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Production of hybrid poplar under short-term, intensive culture in Western Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An irrigated study was conducted at the Western Colorado Research Center at Fruita for 6 years to evaluate eight hybrid poplar clones under short-term, intensive culture. The eight clones included in the study were Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii (NM6), P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides (52225, OP367), and P. deltoides x P. nigra (Norway, Noreaster, Raverdaus, 14274, 14272). Data were collected for growth, aerial biomass yield, dry matter partitioning, carbon sequestration, and insect and disease infestation. OP367 and 52225 consistently had larger tree diameters than other hybrids for each of the 6 years. Averaged across clones, yield was 58.4Mgha?1. OP367 had the highest yield at 72.2Mgha?1 and 14274 had the lowest yield at 41.0Mgha?1. The yield of OP367 was 1.8 times greater than that of 14274. Carbon yield over the 6 years of testing was highest for OP367 at 33.4MgCha?1 and lowest for 14274 at 18.8MgCha?1. Of the eight clones tested, OP367 was the most adapted and productive clone in this short-term, intensive culture system in the arid environment of the Grand Valley of western Colorado as evidenced by its productive growth, yield, insect resistance, winterhardiness, and tree architecture. Several insect species infested the poplar clones over the course of the rotation. Best management practices for growers who produce hybrid poplar under short-term, intensive culture should include the following: (1) plant highly productive clones, (2) poplar clones with suitable tree architecture for production and market objectives should be used, (3) if carbon sequestration is an important production objective, plant a suitable clone, (4) some poplar clones develop chlorosis when planted in high pH soils and should be avoided, and (5) use poplar clones that have been shown to exhibit resistance to specific insect species.

C.H. Pearson; A.D. Halvorson; R.D. Moench; R.W. Hammon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Form EIA-5 (July 2011) Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report Coke Plants Page 1 Form Approved OMB No. 1905-0167 Expires: 06/30/2014 Burden: 1.50 Hours General Instructions: A. PURPOSE. The EIA-5 survey collects data related to coal receipts, stocks, and coke production at U.S. coke plants. The data are collected to provide Congress with basic statistics concerning coal consumption, stocks, prices, and quality as required by the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (FEAA) (P.L. 93-275), as amended. These data appear in the Annual Coal Report, the Quarterly Coal Report, the Monthly Energy Review, and the Annual Energy Review. In addition, the Energy Information Administration uses the data for coal demand analyses and in short-term modeling efforts, which produce forecasts of coal demand

423

3rd Quarter 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2nd quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter P Preliminary data. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, "Domestic Uranium Production Report."...

424

Short-term electricity dispatch optimization of Ertan hydropower plant based on data by field tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A short-term electricity dispatch optimization program required by the Ertan hydropower plant is developed to maximize hydropower production. Three field tests in various operating heads were carried out in the period of May 2009 to March 2010. Based on data of five test conditions three operating zones for units in various operating heads were proposed. A short-term electricity dispatch optimization model was developed with physical and operational constraints. Unit commitment strategy was put forward for model solution in which unit statuses and output statuses were classified. The strategy aimed at formulating better unit commitment plan according to forecasted load demand ancillary service requirements and initial operating status. The model and the strategy were verified by real cases. The results show that the optimal load distribution among units at every interval can be easily solved by the genetic algorithm based on a fixed unit commitment plan. Schedules are developed with higher average generation efficiency. Units can also be scheduled to operate for a less time within the rough zone and the second feasible zone. The proposed method is already operational for dispatch engineers of the Ertan hydropower plant to determine half-hourly schedules in one day.

Chao Ma; Haijun Wang; Jijian Lian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report is submitted in accordance with section 165(b) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended, which requires that the Secretary of Energy submit quarterly reports to Congress on Activities undertaken with respect to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This August 15, 1990, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report describes activities related to the site development, oil acquisition, budget and cost of the Reserve during the period April 1, 1990, through June 30, 1990. 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Research on Short-term Load Forecasting of the Thermoelectric Boiler Based on a Dynamic RBF Neural Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As thermal inertia is the key factor for the lag of thermoelectric utility regulation, it becomes very important to forecast its short-term load according to running parameters. In this paper, dynamic radial basis function (RBF) neural network...

Dai, W.; Zou, P.; Yan, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Using a Self Organizing Map Neural Network for Short-Term Load Forecasting, Analysis of Different Input Data Patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research uses a Self-Organizing Map neural network model (SOM) as a short-term forecasting method. The objective is to obtain the demand curve of certain hours of the next day. In order to validate the model...

C. Senabre; S. Valero; J. Aparicio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Using futures prices to filter short-term volatility and recover a latent, long-term price series for oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil prices are very volatile. But much of this volatility seems to reflect short-term,transitory factors that may have little or no influence on the price in the long run. Many major investment decisions should be guided ...

Herce, Miguel Angel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Short term effects of commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures and individual PCB congeners in female Sprague-Dawley rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT TERM EFFECTS OF COMMERCIAL POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL (PCB) MIXTURFS AND INDIVIDUAL PCB CONGENERS IN FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS A Thesis by YU-CHYU CHEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major subject: Toxicology SHORT TERM EFFECTS OF COMMERCIAL POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL (PCB) MIXTURES AND INDIVIDUAL PCB CONGENERS IN FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS A Thesis...

Chen, Yu-Chyu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2008 July 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

431

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2009 September 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

432

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7/01Q) 7/01Q) Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2007 June 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

433

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2008 December 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

434

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2008 September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

435

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8/04Q) 8/04Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2008 March 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

436

Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Second Quarter of 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the second quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010Q1+Q2). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010Q1+Q2 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010Q1+Q2. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $119 billion dollars invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.1 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first two quarters of 2010 is close to $1.8 billion accounting for 17% of all venture capital investments during the first two quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $1.8 billion (30% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first two quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $1.9 billion (19% of all US venture capital investments made during the first half of 2010). Between 2004 and 2009, U.S. venture capital investments in energy/industrial as well as CleanTech have more than quadrupled in real terms.

Dooley, James J.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

EVALUATING SHORT-TERM CLIMATE VARIABILITY IN THE LATE HOLOCENE OF THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This literature study investigated methods and areas to deduce climate change and climate patterns, looking for short-term cycle phenomena and the means to interpret them. Many groups are actively engaged in intensive climate-related research. Ongoing research might be (overly) simplified into three categories: (1) historic data on weather that can be used for trend analysis and modeling; (2) detailed geological, biological (subfossil), and analytical (geochemical, radiocarbon, etc.) studies covering the last 10,000 years (about since last glaciation); and (3) geological, paleontological, and analytical (geochemical, radiometric, etc.) studies over millions of years. Of importance is our ultimate ability to join these various lines of inquiry into an effective means of interpretation. At this point, the process of integration is fraught with methodological troubles and misconceptions about what each group can contribute. This project has met its goals to the extent that it provided an opportunity to study resource materials and consider options for future effort toward the goal of understanding the natural climate variation that has shaped our current civilization. A further outcome of this project is a proposed methodology based on ''climate sections'' that provides spatial and temporal correlation within a region. The method would integrate cultural and climate data to establish the climate history of a region with increasing accuracy with progressive study and scientific advancement (e. g., better integration of regional and global models). The goal of this project is to better understand natural climatic variations in the recent past (last 5000 years). The information generated by this work is intended to provide better context within which to examine global climate change. The ongoing project will help to establish a basis upon which to interpret late Holocene short-term climate variability as evidenced in various studies in the northern Great Plains, northern hemisphere, and elsewhere. Finally these data can be integrated into a history of climate change and predictive climate models. This is not a small undertaking. The goals of researchers and the methods used vary considerably. The primary task of this project was literature research to (1) evaluate existing methodologies used in geologic climate change studies and evidence for short-term cycles produced by these methodologies and (2) evaluate late Holocene climate patterns and their interpretations.

Joseph H. Hartman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Microsoft Word - Alcoa_short-term_amendments2_CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mark Miller Mark Miller Account Executive, Long-term Sales and Purchases - PT-5 Proposed Action: Short-term Additional Amendments to the Alcoa Power Sales Agreement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A2 - Clarifying or administrative contract actions Location: Portland, OR and Ferndale, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to execute one or more additional amendments to its existing 2009 Power Sales Agreement (Agreement) with Alcoa, Inc. (Alcoa) to further extend the Agreement's Initial Period provisions. The current date for expiration of these provisions under the most recent amendment (Amendment Number 4) is September 30, 2012. The current proposal involves executing one or more additional

439

Miller's instability, microchaos and the short-term evolution of initially nearby orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the phase-space behaviour of nearby trajectories in integrable potentials. We show that the separation of nearby orbits initially diverges very fast, mimicking a nearly exponential behaviour, while at late times it grows linearly. This initial exponential phase, known as Miller's instability, is commonly found in N-body simulations, and has been attributed to short-term (microscopic) N-body chaos. However we show here analytically that the initial divergence is simply due to the shape of an orbit in phase-space. This result confirms previous suspicions that this transient phenomenon is not related to an instability in the sense of non-integrable behaviour in the dynamics of N-body systems.

Amina Helmi; Facundo Gomez

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

440

Short-term Variations in the Galactic Environment of the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The galactic environment of the Sun varies over short timescales as the Sun and interstellar clouds travel through space. Small variations in the dynamics, ionization, density, and magnetic field strength of the interstellar medium (ISM) surrounding the Sun yield pronounced changes in the heliosphere. We discuss essential information required to understand short-term variations in the galactic environment of the Sun, including the distribution and radiative transfer properties of nearby ISM, and variations in the boundary conditions of the heliosphere as the Sun traverses clouds. The most predictable transitions are when the Sun emerged from the Local Bubble interior and entered the cluster of local interstellar clouds flowing past the Sun, within the past 140,000 years, and again when the Sun entered the local interstellar cloud now surrounding and inside of the solar system, sometime during the past 44,000 years.

Priscilla C. Frisch; Jonathan D. Slavin

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Short-term ecological effects of an offshore wind farm in the Dutch coastal zone;  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The number of offshore wind farms is increasing rapidly, leading to questions about the environmental impact of such farms. In the Netherlands, an extensive monitoring programme is being executed at the first offshore wind farm (Offshore Windfarm Egmond aan Zee, OWEZ). This letter compiles the short-term (twoyears) results on a large number of faunal groups obtained so far. Impacts were expected from the new hard substratum, the moving rotor blades, possible underwater noise and the exclusion of fisheries. The results indicate no short-term effects on the benthos in the sandy area between the generators, while the new hard substratum of the monopiles and the scouring protection led to the establishment of new species and new fauna communities. Bivalve recruitment was not impacted by the OWEZ wind farm. Species composition of recruits in OWEZ and the surrounding reference areas is correlated with mud content of the sediment and water depth irrespective the presence of OWEZ. Recruit abundances in OWEZ were correlated with mud content, most likely to be attributed not to the presence of the farm but to the absence of fisheries. The fish community was highly dynamic both in time and space. So far, only minor effects upon fish assemblages especially near the monopiles have been observed. Some fish species, such as cod, seem to find shelter inside the farm. More porpoise clicks were recorded inside the farm than in the reference areas outside the farm. Several bird species seem to avoid the park while others are indifferent or are even attracted. The effects of the wind farm on a highly variable ecosystem are described. Overall, the OWEZ wind farm acts as a new type of habitat with a higher biodiversity of benthic organisms, a possibly increased use of the area by the benthos, fish, marine mammals and some bird species and a decreased use by several other bird species.

H J Lindeboom; H J Kouwenhoven; M J N Bergman; S Bouma; S Brasseur; R Daan; R C Fijn; D de Haan; S Dirksen; R van Hal; R Hille Ris Lambers; R ter Hofstede; K L Krijgsveld; M Leopold; M Scheidat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2010 June 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/ _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of

443

Application of Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis to Observation Targeting for Short-term Wind Speed Forecasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operators of electrical grids, sometimes referred to as Balancing Authorities (BA), typically make critical decisions on how to most reliably and economically balance electrical load and generation in time frames ranging from a few minutes to six hours ahead. At higher levels of wind power generation, there is an increasing need to improve the accuracy of 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts. Forecasts on this time scale have typically been strongly dependent on short-term trends indicated by the time series of power production and meteorological data from a wind farm. Additional input information is often available from the output of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models and occasionally from off-site meteorological towers in the region surrounding the wind generation facility. A widely proposed approach to improve short-term forecasts is the deployment of off-site meteorological towers at locations upstream from the wind generation facility in order to sense approaching wind perturbations. While conceptually appealing, it turns out that, in practice, it is often very difficult to derive significant benefit in forecast performance from this approach. The difficulty is rooted in the fact that the type, scale, and amplitude of the processes controlling wind variability at a site change from day to day if not from hour to hour. Thus, a location that provides some useful forecast information for one time may not be a useful predictor a few hours later. Indeed, some processes that cause significant changes in wind power production operate predominantly in the vertical direction and thus cannot be monitored by employing a network of sensors at off-site locations. Hence, it is very challenging to determine the type of sensors and deployment locations to get the most benefit for a specific short-term forecast application. Two tools recently developed in the meteorological research community have the potential to help determine the locations and parameters to measure in order to get the maximum positive impact on forecast performance for a particular site and short-term look-ahead period. Both tools rely on the use of NWP models to assess the sensitivity of a forecast for a particular location to measurements made at a prior time (i.e. the look-ahead period) at points surrounding the target location. The fundamental hypothesis is that points and variables with high sensitivity are good candidates for measurements since information at those points are likely to have the most impact on the forecast for the desired parameter, location and look-ahead period. One approach is called the adjoint method (Errico and Vukicevic, 1992; Errico, 1997) and the other newer approach is known as Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA; Ancell and Hakim 2007; Torn and Hakim 2008). Both approaches have been tested on large-scale atmospheric prediction problems (e.g. forecasting pressure or precipitation over a relatively large region 24 hours ahead) but neither has been applied to mesoscale space-time scales of winds or any other variables near the surface of the earth. A number of factors suggest that ESA is better suited for short-term wind forecasting applications. One of the most significant advantages of this approach is that it is not necessary to linearize the mathematical representation of the processes in the underlying atmospheric model as required by the adjoint approach. Such a linearization may be especially problematic for the application of short-term forecasting of boundary layer winds in complex terrain since non-linear shifts in the structure of boundary layer due to atmospheric stability changes are a critical part of the wind power production forecast problem. The specific objective of work described in this paper is to test the ESA as a tool to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the wind generation area of California's Tehachapi Pass during the warm (high generation) season. The paper is organized

Zack, J; Natenberg, E; Young, S; Manobianco, J; Kamath, C

2010-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

444

Effect of short-term material balances on the projected uranium measurement uncertainties for the gas centrifuge enrichment plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program is under way to design an effective International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards system that could be applied to the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP). This system would integrate nuclear material accountability with containment and surveillance. Uncertainties in material balances due to errors in the measurements of the declared uranium streams have been projected on a yearly basis for GCEP under such a system in a previous study. Because of the large uranium flows, the projected balance uncertainties were, in some cases, greater than the IAEA goal quantity of 75 kg of U-235 contained in low-enriched uranium. Therefore, it was decided to investigate the benefits of material balance periods of less than a year in order to improve the sensitivity and timeliness of the nuclear material accountability system. An analysis has been made of projected uranium measurement uncertainties for various short-term material balance periods. To simplify this analysis, only a material balance around the process area is considered and only the major UF/sub 6/ stream measurements are included. That is, storage areas are not considered and uranium waste streams are ignored. It is also assumed that variations in the cascade inventory are negligible compared to other terms in the balance so that the results obtained in this study are independent of the absolute cascade inventory. This study is intended to provide information that will serve as the basis for the future design of a dynamic materials accounting component of the IAEA safeguards system for GCEP.

Younkin, J.M.; Rushton, J.E.

1980-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

445

Modeling and Analysis of short term energy storage for mid-size hydrostatic wind turbine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??University of Minnesota M.S. thesis. August 2012. Major:Mechanical Engineering. Advisor:Prof. Kim A. Stelson. 1 computer file (PDF); vii, 141 pages, appendices A-C. The rise in (more)

Dutta, Rahul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

DOE/EIA-0202(87/1Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

growth is projected to remain steady but weak through 1987, with slower growth in domes tic spending offset by the tendency to substitute some U.S. products for higher priced...

447

Energy Storage on the Grid and the Short-term Variability of Wind.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wind generation presents variability on every time scale, which must be accommodated by the electric grid. Limited quantities of wind power can be successfully integrated (more)

Hittinger, Eric Stephen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Quarterly Notification of the Department of Energy's Differing Professional Opinion Process  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

DOE O 442.2 requires that all DOE employees (including contractors and subcontractors) be notified quarterly of the Differing Professional Opinion (DPO) process to ensure that they are made aware of the process, including the DPO Web page address and the contact information for submitting DPOs.

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Third Quarter Report 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second quarter 1997 Quarterly Report of Natural Gas Imports and Exports featured a Quarterly Focus report on cross-border natural gas trade between the United States and Mexico. This Quarterly Focus article is a follow-up to the 1997 report. This report revisits and updates the status of some of the pipeline projects discussed in 1997, and examines a number of other planned cross-border pipeline facilities which were proposed subsequent to our 1997 report. A few of the existing and proposed pipelines are bidirectional and thus have the capability of serving either Mexico, or the United States, depending on market conditions and gas supply availability. These new projects, if completed, would greatly enhance the pipeline infrastructure on the U.S.-Mexico border and would increase gas pipeline throughput capacity for cross-border trade by more than 1 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. The Quarterly Focus is comprised of five sections. Section I includes the introduction as well as a brief historic overview of U.S./Mexican natural gas trade; a discussion of Mexico's energy regulatory structure; and a review of trade agreements and a 1992 legislative change which allows for her cross-border gas trade in North America. Section II looks at initiatives that have been taken by the Mexican Government since 1995to open its energy markets to greater competition and privatization. Section III reviews Mexican gas demand forecasts and looks at future opportunities for U.S. gas producers to supplement Mexico's indigenous supplies in order to meet the anticipated rapid growth in demand. Section IV examines the U.S.-Mexico natural gas trade in recent years. It also looks specifically at monthly import and export volumes and prices and identifies short-term trends in this trade. Finally, Section V reviews the existing and planned cross-border gas pipeline infrastructure. The section also specifically describes six planned pipelines intended to expand this pipeline network and their planned in-service dates.

none

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

International LNG trade : the emergence of a short-term market; International liquefied natural gas trade : the emergence of a short-term market.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas is estimated to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain is a way of (more)

Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

QuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of natural gas-fired generation, as well as an emphasis on energy efficiency and development of renewableQuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN In March, the Northwest Power and Conservation

452

Comparison of observed and predicted short-term tracer gas concentrations in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory is in the process of conducting a series of atmospheric tracer studies. The inert gas sulfurhexafluoride is released from a height of 62 m for 15 min and concentrations in air are measured on sampling arcs up to 30 km downwind of the release point. Maximum 15 min. air concentrations from 14 of these tracer tests have been compared with the ground-level, centerline air concentration predicted with a Gaussian plume atmospheric transport model using eight different sets of atmospheric dispersion parameters. Preliminary analysis of the results from these comparisons indicates that the dispersion parameters developed at Juelich, West Germany, based on tracers released from a height of 50 m, give the best overall agreement between the predicted and observed values. The median value of the ratio of predicted to observed air concentrations for this set of parameters is 1.3, and the correlation coefficient between the log of the predictions and the log of the observations is 0.72. For the commonly used Pasquill-Gifford dispersion parameters, the values of these same statistics are 4.4 and 0.68, respectively. The Gaussian plume model is widely used to predict air concentrations resulting from short-term radionuclide release to the atmosphere. The results of comparisons such as these must be considered whenever the Gaussian model is used for such purposes. 22 references, 3 tables.

Cotter, S.J.; Miller, C.W.; Lin, W.C.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A hybrid short-term load forecasting with a new data preprocessing framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper proposes a hybrid load forecasting framework with a new data preprocessing algorithm to enhance the accuracy of prediction. Bayesian neural network (BNN) is used to predict the load. A discrete wavelet transform (DWT) decomposes the load components into proper levels of resolution determined by an entropy-based criterion. Time series and regression analysis are used to select the best set of inputs among the input candidates. A correlation analysis together with a neural network provides an estimation of the predictions for the forecasting outputs. A standardization procedure is proposed to take into account the correlation estimations of the outputs with their associated input series. The preprocessing algorithm uses the input selection, wavelet decomposition and the proposed standardization to provide the most appropriate inputs for BNNs. Genetic Algorithm (GA) is then used to optimize the weighting coefficients of different forecast components and minimize the forecast error. The performance and accuracy of the proposed short-term load forecasting (STLF) method is evaluated using New England load data. Our results show a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy when compared to the existing state-of-the-art forecasting techniques.

M. Ghayekhloo; M.B. Menhaj; M. Ghofrani

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Short-term production optimization of offshore oil and gas production using nonlinear model predictive control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The topic of this paper is the application of nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) for optimizing control of an offshore oil and gas production facility. Of particular interest is the use of NMPC for direct short-term production optimization, where two methods for (one-layer) production optimization in NMPC are investigated. The first method is the unreachable setpoints method where an unreachable setpoint is used in order to maximize oil production. The ideas from this method are combined with the exact penalty function for soft constraints in a second method, named infeasible soft-constraints. Both methods can be implemented within standard NMPC software tools. The case-study first looks into the use of NMPC for conventional pressure control, where disturbance rejection of time-varying disturbances (caused, e.g., by the slugging phenomenon) is an issue. Then the above two methods for production optimization are employed, where both methods find the economically optimal operating point. Two different types of reservoir models are studied, using rate-independent and rate-dependent gas/oil ratios. These models lead to different types of optimums. The relative merits of the two methods for production optimization, and advantages of the two one-layer approaches compared to a two-layer structure, are discussed.

Anders Willersrud; Lars Imsland; Svein Olav Hauger; Pl Kittilsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Daily/Hourly Hydrosystem Operation : How the Columbia River System Responds to Short-Term Needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Operation Review, being conducted by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Bureau of Reclamation, is analyzing current and potential future operations of the Columbia River System. One goal of the System Operations Review is to develop a new System Operation Strategy. The strategy will be designed to balance the many regionally and nationally important uses of the Columbia River system. Short-term operations address the dynamics that affect the Northwest hydro system and its multiple uses. Demands for electrical power and natural streamflows change constantly and thus are not precisely predictable. Other uses of the hydro system have constantly changing needs, too, many of which can interfere with other uses. Project operators must address various river needs, physical limitations, weather, and streamflow conditions while maintaining the stability of the electric system and keeping your lights on. It takes staffing around the clock to manage the hour-to-hour changes that occur and the challenges that face project operators all the time.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Changes in mechanical properties of irradiated Zircaloy-2 fuel cladding due to short term annealing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zirconium-lined fuel cladding tubes irradiated to 2.7 1025n/m2 (E > 1MeV) in a BWR, which had experienced recrystallized annealing in the final process in their manufacture, were heat treated at 500700C for 5600 s to simulate short term dry-out. Tensile tests, hardness measurements, fatigue tests and X-ray analyses were made on those specimens. The irradiation hardening in hardness at room temperature and ultimate tensile strength at 343C recovered to approximately 80% of that after heat treatment at 600700C for less than 15 s. Fatigue life and half value width of X-ray analysis recovered to these of unirradiated cladding tube after annealing for 15 s at 600C. These recovery rates were faster than those on cold worked and stress relieved zirconium alloys. An equation to predict the remaining fraction of hardening was proposed by using the regression analysis on tensile strength and hardness values.

Tadahiko Torimaru; Takayoshi Yasuda; Masafumi Nakatsuka

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Development of short-term forecast quality for new offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As the rapid wind power build-out continues, a large number of new wind farms will come online but forecasters and forecasting algorithms have little experience with them. This is a problem for statistical short term forecasts, which must be trained on a long record of historical power production exactly what is missing for a new farm. Focus of the study was to analyse development of the offshore wind power forecast (WPF) quality from beginning of operation up to one year of operational experience. This paper represents a case study using data of the first German offshore wind farm "alpha ventus" and first German commercial offshore wind farm "Baltic1". The work was carried out with measured data from meteorological measurement mast FINO1, measured power from wind farms and numerical weather prediction (NWP) from the German Weather Service (DWD). This study facilitates to decide the length of needed time series and selection of forecast method to get a reliable WPF on a weekly time axis. Weekly development of WPF quality for day-ahead WPF via different models is presented. The models are physical model; physical model extended with a statistical correction (MOS) and artificial neural network (ANN) as a pure statistical model. Selforganizing map (SOM) is investigated for a better understanding of uncertainties of forecast error.

M Kurt; B Lange

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Natural gas imports and exports. First quarter report 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico. 14 figs., 9 tabs.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Natural gas imports and exports. Third quarter report 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report, prepared by The Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Import and Export Activities, summarizes the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Numerical data are presented in four attachments, each of which is comprised of a series of tables. Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent calendar quarters. Volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past year are given in Attachment B. Attachment C shows volume and price information pertaining to gas imported on a short-term or spot market basis. Attachment D lists gas exported on a short-term or spot market basis to Canada and Mexico. Highlights of the report are very briefly summarized.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Short-Term Fates of High Sulfur Inputs in Northern California Vineyard Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The widespread application of elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}) to vineyards may have ecosystem effects at multiple scales. We evaluated the short-term fates of applied S{sup 0} in a Napa Valley vineyard; we determined changes in soil sulfur (S) speciation (measured by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy), soil pH, extractable sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), and total S to evaluate changes in acidity and soil S within the vineyard over time. Surface soil samples were collected immediately prior to and following two applications of S{sup 0} (6.7 kg S{sup 0} ha{sup -1}), with weekly collections in the 2 weeks between applications and following the last application. XANES spectra indicated that the majority of soil S persists in the +6 oxidation state and that S{sup 0} oxidizes within 7 days following application. Soil pH and extractable SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} measurements taken at 30 min after S{sup 0} application revealed generation of acidity and an increase in extractable SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, but by 12 days after application, soil pH increased to approximately pre-application levels. These data suggest that the major consequence of reactive S applications in vineyards may be the accumulation of soil SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and organic S during the growing season, which can be mobilized during storm events during the dormant (wet) season. In spatially-extensive winegrowing regions where these applications are made by hundreds of individual farmers each year, it will be important to understand the long-term implications of this perturbation to the regional S cycle.

E Hinckley; S Fendorf; P Matson

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quarter short-term energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the L-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3 h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB > bupivacaine > AZA > lidocaine > nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart. - Highlights: Study of the effect of sodium channel blocking drugs on embryonic heart function We used a modified method rat whole embryo culture with image analysis. The drugs tested caused a concentration dependent bradycardia and heart block. The effect of drugs acting on multiple ion channels is difficult to predict. This method may be used to detect cardiotoxicity in prenatal development.

Nilsson, Mats F, E-mail: Mats.Nilsson@farmbio.uu.se [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University (Sweden); Skld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma [AstraZeneca R and D Sdertlje (Sweden); Cebers, Gvido [AstraZeneca R and D, iMed, 141 Portland Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee [AstraZeneca R and D Sdertlje (Sweden); Webster, William S [Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Sydney (Australia)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Seismic Activity of the Earth, the Cosmological Vectorial Potential And Method of a Short-term Earthquakes Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To the foundation of a principally new short-term forecasting method there has been laid down a theory of surrounding us world's creation and of physical vacuum as a result of interaction of byuons - discrete objects. The definition of the byuon contains the cosmological vector-potential A_g - a novel fundamental vector constant. This theory predicts a new anisotropic interaction of nature objects with the physical vacuum. A peculiar "tap" to gain new energy (giving rise to an earthquake) are elementary particles because their masses are proportional to the modulus of some summary potential A_sum that contains potentials of all known fields. The value of A_sum cannot be larger than the modulus of A_g. In accordance with the experimental results a new force associated with A_sum ejects substance from the area of the weakened A_sum along a conical formation with the opening of 100 +- 10 and the axis directed along the vector A_sum. This vector has the following coordinates in the second equatorial coordinate system: right ascension alpha = 293 +- 10, declination delta = 36 +- 10. Nearly 100% probability of an earthquake (earthquakes of 6 points strong and more by the Richter scale) arises when in the process of the earth rotation the zenith vector of a seismically dangerous region and/or the vectorial potential of Earth's magnetic fields are in a certain way oriented relative to the vector A_g. In the work, basic models and standard mechanisms of earthquakes are briefly considered, results of processing of information on the earthquakes in the context of global spatial anisotropy caused by the existence of the vector A_g, are presented, and an analysis of them is given.

Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov Jr.; A. A. Spitalnaya; A. A. Abramyan; V. A. Solodovnikov

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

The effect of a large resuspension event in Southern Lake Michigan on the short-term cycling of organic contaminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The effect of a large resuspension event in Southern Lake Michigan on the short-term cycling intensive campaigns before and after the resuspension event and 2) settling sediment collected using a time from increased gas-phase deposition due to the resuspension event was 8 kg for PCBs and 2200 kg

NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Episodic Events

464

The Effect of a Large Resuspension Event in Southern Lake Michigan on the Short-term Cycling of Organic Contaminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of a Large Resuspension Event in Southern Lake Michigan on the Short-term Cycling and after a major resuspension event. It was found that major resuspension events result in a large flux of that occurred in the month of March after a series of intense storms induced a large- scale resuspension event

465

Cloud tracking with optical flow for short-term solar forecasting Philip Wood-Bradley, Jos Zapata, John Pye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud tracking with optical flow for short-term solar forecasting Philip Wood-Bradley, José Zapata: John Pye ­ john.pye@anu.edu.au 1. Abstract A method for tracking and predicting cloud movement using apart with a size of 640 by 480 pixels, were processed to determine the time taken for clouds to reach

466

Volume 29, Issue 2 On the short-term influence of oil price changes on stock markets in gcc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume 29, Issue 2 On the short-term influence of oil price changes on stock markets Rouen & LEO Abstract This paper examines the short-run relationships between oil prices and GCC stock to oil price shocks. To account for the fact that stock markets may respond nonlinearly to oil price

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

467

High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera Short Term Maintenance: Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Quest Camera was installed at the Palomar Obervatory in California. The camera was used to carry out a survey of low redshift Type 1a supernovae.The purpose of this DOE grant was to perform short term maintenance on the QUEST camera.

Baltay, Charles

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

468

Natural gas imports and exports. First quarter report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Fuels Programs Prepares quarterly reports Summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports with the OFP. This report is for the first quarter of 1994 (January--March). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the five most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past twelve months. Attachment C shows volume and price information for gas imported on a short-term basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term basis to Canada and Mexico. During the first three months of 1994, data indicates that gas imports grew by about 14 percent over the level of the first quarter of 1993 (668 vs. 586 Bcf), with Canadian and Algerian imports increasing by 12 and 53 percent, respectively. During the same time period, exports declined by 15 percent (41 vs. 48 Bcf). Exports to Canada increased by 10 percent from the 1993 level (22 vs. 20 Bcf) and exports to Mexico decreased by 64 percent (5 vs. 14 Bcf).

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Implications of geographic diversity for short-term variability and predictability of solar power.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and evaluation of renewable energy policies, is an advisorevaluation of renewable energy policies,and on the costs,provides policy analysis on renewable energy in the United

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Business-driven short-term management of a hybrid IT infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the problem of managing a hybrid computing infrastructure whose processing elements are comprised of in-house dedicated machines, virtual machines acquired on-demand from a cloud computing provider through short-term reservation contracts, and virtual machines made available by the remote peers of a best-effort peer-to-peer (P2P) grid. Each of these resources has different cost basis and associated quality of service guarantees. The applications that run in this hybrid infrastructure are characterized by a utility function: the utility gained with the completion of an application depends on the time taken to execute it. We take a business-driven approach to manage this infrastructure, aiming at maximizing the profit yielded, that is, the utility produced as a result of the applications that are run minus the cost of the computing resources that are used to run them. We propose a heuristic to be used by a contract planner agent that establishes the contracts with the cloud computing provider to balance the cost of running an application and the utility that is obtained with its execution, with the goal of producing a high overall profit. Our analytical results show that the simple heuristic proposed achieves very high relative efficiency in the use of the hybrid infrastructure. We also demonstrate that the ability to estimate the grid behaviour is an important condition for making contracts that allow such relative efficiency values to be achieved. On the other hand, our simulation results with realistic error predictions show only a modest improvement in the profit achieved by the simple heuristic proposed, when compared to a heuristic that does not consider the grid when planning contracts, but uses it, and another that is completely oblivious to the existence of the grid. This calls for the development of more accurate predictors for the availability of P2P grids, and more elaborated heuristics that can better deal with the several sources of non-determinism present in this hybrid infrastructure.

Paulo Ditarso Maciel Jr.; Francisco Brasileiro; Ricardo Arajo Santos; David Candeia; Raquel Lopes; Marcus Carvalho; Renato Miceli; Nazareno Andrade; Miranda Mowbray

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, Fourth Quarter FY 2006  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 1 6 1 Fourth Quarter FY 2006 December 1, 2006; Issue No. 49 National Environmental Policy Act U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A (continued on page 6) Scoping Process Underway for Two Yucca Mountain EISs The Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated public scoping for two EISs related to Yucca Mountain, the Nation's proposed repository for disposal of commercial

472

Simulation of Short-term Wind Speed Forecast Errors using a Multi-variate ARMA(1,1) Time-series Model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The short-term (1 to 48 hours) predictability of wind power production from wind power plants in a power system is critical to the value (more)

Boone, Andrew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

NEAMS Quarterly Report April-June 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) quarterly report includes highlights,a spotlight on personal achievements, accomplishments, milestones and a technical spotlight on...

474

Selling Random Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation in short term energy markets, IEEE Trans. Powerentity into a forward energy market. For my Family, Tony,into a forward energy market. Assuming that coalitional

Bitar, Eilyan Yamen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

An Improved Adaptive Exponential Smoothing Model for Short-term Travel Time Forecasting of Urban Arterial Street  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Short-term forecasting of travel time is essential for the success of intelligent transportation system. In this paper, we review the state-of-art of short-term traffic forecasting models and outline their basic ideas, related works, advantages and disadvantages of each model. An improved adaptive exponential smoothing (IAES) model is also proposed to overcome the drawbacks of the previous adaptive exponential smoothing model. Then, comparing experiments are carried out under normal traffic condition and abnormal traffic condition to evaluate the performance of four main branches of forecasting models on direct travel time data obtained by license plate matching (LPM). The results of experiments show each model seems to have its own strength and weakness. The forecasting performance of IASE is superior to other models in shorter forecasting horizon (one and two step forecasting) and the IASE is capable of dealing with all kind of traffic conditions.

Zhi-Peng LI; Hong YU; Yun-Cai LIU; Fu-Qiang LIU

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Methodological basis to decide short-term investments in distribution systems under uncertainty in performance-based regulatory frameworks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents new concepts and methodological tools to decide the investments that electric distribution utilities must perform under regulatory frameworks based on performance (Performance Based Regulation or PBR). The proposal is focused on short-term investments. In this work, the subject of hierarchical expansion planning and the basis for an investment decision methodology are presented. Furthermore, the uncertainties to be considered in the problem are indicated and uncertainty representation by means of Type-2 Fuzzy Numbers (T2-FN) is proposed due to the fact that T2-FN, besides modelling the uncertainties in quantitative form, can model uncertainties associated to expert knowledge of qualitative characteristics. System diagnosis and identification of problem areas are considered and it is proposed to classify these areas by using performance indices, then the possible short-term investments are analysed. Finally, a profit-cost and risk analysis for a high-priority investment classification are proposed.

Sergio Raul Rivera; Alberto Vargas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Analysis & Projections - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Annual Energy Outlook Related Congressional & Other Requests International Energy Outlook Related Presentations Short-Term Outlook Related Testimony All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Projections Short, timely articles with graphs about recent analyses and projections. Monthly Reports Short-Term Energy Outlook Released: January 7, 2014 Short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections through 2013 for U.S. and International oil forecasts (archived versions) Archived Versions Short-Term Energy Outlook Feature Articles - Archive Short-Term Energy Outlook - Archive Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement Released: January 27, 2011

478

Exploratory Energy Research Program of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project objectives and research progress are briefly summarized for solar energy, biomass, hydrogen, and geothermal energy research projects.

Not Available

1984-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

479

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, Second Quarter FY 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 1 7 1 Second Quarter FY 2007 June 1, 2007; Issue No. 51 National Environmental Policy Act U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A We have all been told to "work together" to accomplish a particular goal. Together Everyone Achieves More illustrates the benefi ts of "teamwork." Federal agencies, including the Council on Environmental Quality