National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for quark gluon plasma

  1. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  2. Heavy hadrons in quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narodetskii, I. M. Simonov, Yu. A.; Veselov, A. I.

    2011-03-15

    We use the nonperturbative quark-antiquark potential derived within the Field Correlator Method and the screened Coulomb potential to calculate binding energies and melting temperatures of heavy mesons and baryons in the deconfined phase of quark-gluon plasma.

  3. HUNTING THE QUARK GLUON PLASMA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUDLAM, T.; ARONSON, S.

    2005-04-11

    density and temperature--a medium in which the predictions of QCD can be tested, and new phenomena explored, under conditions where the relevant degrees of freedom, over nuclear volumes, are expected to be those of quarks and gluons, rather than of hadrons. This is the realm of the quark gluon plasma, the predicted state of matter whose existence and properties are now being explored by the RHIC experiments.

  4. Quark-gluon plasma (Selected Topics)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakharov, V. I.

    2012-09-15

    Introductory lectures to the theory of (strongly interacting) quark-gluon plasma given at the Winter School of Physics of ITEP (Moscow, February 2010). We emphasize theoretical issues highlighted by the discovery of the low viscosity of the plasma. The topics include relativistic hydrodynamics, manifestations of chiral anomaly in hydrodynamics, superfluidity, relativistic superfluid hydrodynamics, effective stringy scalars, holographic models of Yang-Mills theories.

  5. Adomian Decomposition Method for Quark Gluon Plasma Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantinescu, Radu; Ionescu, Carmen; Stoicescu, Mihai

    2011-10-03

    The paper investigates the possibility of obtaining analytical solutions for the Quark Gluon Plasma model using the Adomian decomposition method.

  6. Chromodynamic fluctuations in quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2008-05-15

    Fluctuations of chromodynamic fields in the collisionless quark-gluon plasma are found as a solution of the initial value linearized problem. The plasma initial state is on average colorless, stationary, and homogeneous. When the state is stable, the initial fluctuations decay exponentially and in the long-time limit a stationary spectrum of fluctuations is established. For the equilibrium plasma it reproduces the spectrum which is provided by the fluctuation-dissipation relation. Fluctuations in the unstable plasma, where the memory of initial fluctuations is not lost, are also discussed.

  7. Quark-Gluon Plasma: a New State of Matter

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains the nature of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter produced at Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  8. Quark-Gluon Plasma: a New State of Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains the nature of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a new state of matter produced at Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  9. Thermalization of heavy quarks in the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hees, Hendrik van; Rapp, Ralf

    2005-03-01

    Charm- and bottom-quark rescattering in a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is investigated with the objective of assessing the approach toward thermalization. Employing a Fokker-Planck equation to approximate the collision integral of the Boltzmann equation we augment earlier studies based on perturbative parton cross sections by introducing resonant heavy-light quark interactions. The latter are motivated by recent QCD lattice calculations that indicate the presence of 'hadronic' states in the QGP. We model these states by colorless (pseudo-) scalar and (axial-) vector D and B mesons within a heavy-quark effective theory framework. We find that the presence of these resonances at moderate QGP temperatures substantially accelerates the kinetic equilibration of c quarks as compared to using perturbative interactions. We also comment on consequences for D-meson observables in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  10. Geek-Up[11.05.10]: Quark Gluon Plasma, Solar-Power Generating...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    which will be used to investigate the quark gluon plasma - a state of matter ... The LHC experiments' investigations into how the quark gluon plasma behaves at such ...

  11. Quark-Gluon Plasma Model and Origin of Magic Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghahramany, N.; Ghanaatian, M.; Hooshmand, M.

    2008-04-21

    Using Boltzman distribution in a quark-gluon plasma sample it is possible to obtain all existing magic numbers and their extensions without applying the spin and spin-orbit couplings. In this model it is assumed that in a quark-gluon thermodynamic plasma, quarks have no interactions and they are trying to form nucleons. Considering a lattice for a central quark and the surrounding quarks, using a statistical approach to find the maximum number of microstates, the origin of magic numbers is explained and a new magic number is obtained.

  12. Time evolution of the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, F. |

    1993-03-01

    We review progress in our understanding the production and time evolution of the quark gluon plasma starting with boost invariant initial conditions in a filed theory model based on the Schwinger mechanism of particle production via tunneling.

  13. Quarkonium in a weakly-coupled quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vairo, Antonio

    2010-12-22

    We report about a recent calculation of the heavy quarkonium mass and decay width in a quark-gluon plasma, whose temperature T and screening mass m{sub D} satisfy the hierarchy m{alpha}{sub s}>>T>>m{alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}>>m{sub D}, m being the heavy-quark mass, up to order m{alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}. The calculation may be relevant to understand the behavior of the {Upsilon}(1S) in a quark-gluon plasma at present-day colliders.

  14. Jet conversions in a quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W.; Ko, C. M.; Zhang, B. W.

    2007-05-15

    Quark and gluon jets traversing through a quark-gluon plasma not only lose their energies but also can undergo flavor conversions. The conversion rates via the elastic q(q)g{yields}gq(q) and the inelastic qq{r_reversible}gg scatterings are evaluated in the lowest order in QCD. Including both jet energy loss and conversions in the expanding quark-gluon plasma produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions, we have found a net of quark jets to gluon jets. This reduces the difference between the nuclear modification factors for quark and gluon jets in central heavy ion collisions and thus enhances the p/{pi}{sup +} and p/{pi}{sup -} ratios at high transverse momentum. However, a much larger net quark-to-gluon jet conversion rate than the one given by the lowest order QCD is needed to account for the observed similar ratios in central Au+Au and p+p collisions at the same energy. Implications of our results are discussed.

  15. Viscous quark-gluon plasma model through fluid QCD approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djun, T. P.; Soegijono, B.; Mart, T.; Handoko, L. T. E-mail: Laksana.tri.handoko@lipi.go.id

    2014-09-25

    A Lagrangian density for viscous quark-gluon plasma has been constructed within the fluid-like QCD framework. Gauge symmetry is preserved for all terms inside the Lagrangian, except for the viscous term. The transition mechanism from point particle field to fluid field, and vice versa, are discussed. The energy momentum tensor that is relevant to the gluonic plasma having the nature of fluid bulk of gluon sea is derived within the model. By imposing conservation law in the energy momentum tensor, shear viscosity appears as extractable from the equation.

  16. Two-component quark-gluon plasma in stringy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verschelde, H.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2011-05-23

    The two-component liquid model reproduces the basic properties of the quark-gluon plasma as observed in heavy-ion collisions. The key dynamic element of the model is existence of a light scalar. We argue that existence of such a scalar is a generic feature of the stringy models of quantum chromodynamics. The lattice data provides evidence for a condensed, three-dimensional scalar field as well. We outline a possible crucial check of the model on the lattice.

  17. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. V. Structure factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Sungtae; Zahed, Ismail

    2010-10-15

    We show that the classical and strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma is characterized by a multiple of structure factors that obey generalized Orstein-Zernicke equations. We use the canonical partition function and its associated density functional to derive analytical equations for the density and charge monopole structure factors for arbitrary values of {Gamma}=V/K, the ratio of the mean potential to the Coulomb energy. The results are compared with SU(2) molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Quantum simulations of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filinov, V. S.; Ivanov, Yu. B.; Bonitz, M.; Levashov, P. R.; Fortov, V. E.

    2012-06-15

    A strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP) of heavy constituent quasi-particles is studied by a path-integral Monte-Carlo method. This approach is a quantum generalization of the classical molecular dynamics by Gelman, Shuryak, and Zahed. It is shown that this method is able to reproduce the QCD lattice equation of state. The results indicate that the QGP reveals liquid-like rather than gaslike properties. Quantum effects turned out to be of prime importance in these simulations.

  19. Quasilinear transport approach to equilibration of quark-gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrowczynski, Stanislaw; Mueller, Berndt

    2010-03-15

    We derive the transport equations of quark-gluon plasma in the quasilinear approximation. The equations are either of the Balescu-Lenard or Fokker-Planck form. The plasma's dynamics is assumed to be governed by longitudinal chromoelectric fields. The isotropic plasma, which is stable, and the two-stream system, which is unstable, are considered in detail. A process of equilibration is briefly discussed in both cases. The peaks of the two-stream distribution are shown to rapidly dissolve in time.

  20. Thermal axion production in the primordial quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, Peter; Steffen, Frank Daniel

    2011-04-01

    We calculate the rate for thermal production of axions via scattering of quarks and gluons in the primordial quark-gluon plasma. To obtain a finite result in a gauge-invariant way that is consistent to leading order in the strong gauge coupling, we use systematic field theoretical methods such as hard thermal loop resummation and the Braaten-Yuan prescription. The thermally produced yield, the decoupling temperature, and the density parameter are computed for axions with a mass below 10 meV. In this regime, with a Peccei-Quinn scale above 6x10{sup 8} GeV, the associated axion population can still be relativistic today and can coexist with the axion cold dark matter condensate.

  1. Yoctosecond Photon Pulses from Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ipp, Andreas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Evers, Joerg

    2009-10-09

    Present ultrafast laser optics is at the frontier between atto- and zeptosecond photon pulses, giving rise to unprecedented applications. We show that high-energetic photon pulses down to the yoctosecond time scale can be produced in heavy-ion collisions. We focus on photons produced during the initial phase of the expanding quark-gluon plasma. We study how the time evolution and properties of the plasma may influence the duration and shape of the photon pulse. Prospects for achieving double-peak structures suitable for pump-probe experiments at the yoctosecond time scale are discussed.

  2. Structure functions and pair correlations of the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, Markus H.

    2005-11-01

    Recent experiments at RHIC and theoretical considerations indicate that the quark-gluon plasma, present in the fireball of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, might be in a liquid phase. The liquid state can be identified by characteristic correlation and structure functions. Here definitions of the structure functions and pair correlations of the quark-gluon plasma are presented as well as perturbative results. These definitions might be useful for verifying the quark-gluon-plasma liquid in QCD lattice calculations.

  3. Comparison of jet quenching formalisms for a quark-gluon plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Comparison of jet quenching formalisms for a quark-gluon plasma "brick" Authors: Armesto, Nestor ; Cole, Brian ; Gale, Charles ; Horowitz, William A. ; Jacobs, Peter ; Jeon, ...

  4. Spectral sum rules for the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romatschke, P.; Son, D. T.

    2009-09-15

    We derive sum rules involving the spectral density of the stress-energy tensor in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory and pure Yang-Mills theory. The sum rules come from the hydrodynamic behavior at small momenta and the conformal (in the case of N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory) or asymptotically free (as for the pure Yang-Mills theory) behavior at large momenta. These sum rules may help constrain quark-gluon plasma transport coefficients obtained from lattice QCD.

  5. Direct photon production from viscous quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhuri, A. K.; Sinha, Bikash

    2011-03-15

    We simulate direct photon production in the evolution of viscous quark-gluon plasma medium. Photons from Compton and annihilation processes are considered. The viscous effect on photon production is very strong and reliable simulation is possible only in a limited p{sub T} range. For minimally viscous fluid ({eta}/s=0.08), direct photons can be reliably computed only up to p{sub T}{<=}1.3 GeV. With reduced viscosity ({eta}/s=0.04), the limit increases to p{sub T}{<=}2 GeV.

  6. Quantum simulations of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filinov, V. S.; Ivanov, Yu. B.; Bonitz, M.; Levashov, P. R.; Fortov, V. E.

    2011-09-15

    A strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP) of heavy constituent quasiparticles is studied by a path-integral Monte-Carlo method. This approach is a quantum generalization of the model developed by B.A. Gelman, E.V. Shuryak, and I. Zahed. It is shown that this method is able to reproduce the QCD lattice equation of state and also yields valuable insight into the internal structure of the QGP. The results indicate that the QGP reveals liquid-like rather than gas-like properties. At temperatures just above the critical one it was found that bound quark-antiquark states still survive. These states are bound by effective string-like forces and turn out to be colorless. At the temperature as large as twice the critical one no bound states are observed. Quantum effects turned out to be of prime importance in these simulations.

  7. ABSORPTION OF HARD AND THERMAL PHOTONS IN A QUARK-GLUON PLASMA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * 1 R. J. Fries, B. Muller, D. K. Srivastava, "High-energy photons from passage of jets through quark gluon plasma", Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 132301 (2003). * 2 P.B. Arnold,...

  8. Non-perturbative effects for the Quark-Gluon Plasma equation of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begun, V. V. Gorenstein, M. I. Mogilevsky, O. A.

    2012-07-15

    The non-perturbative effects for the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) equation of state (EoS) are considered. The modifications of the bag model EoS are constructed to satisfy the main qualitative features observed for the QGP EoS in the lattice QCD calculations. A quantitative comparison with the lattice results is done for the SU(3) gluon plasma and for the QGP with dynamical quarks. Our analysis advocates a negative value of the bag constant B.

  9. Chiral electric separation effect in the quark-gluon plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-02-02

    In this paper we introduce and compute a new transport coefficient for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at very high temperature. This new coefficient σχe, the CESE (Chiral Electric Separation Effect) conductivity, quantifies the amount of axial current JA that is generated in response to an externally applied electric field eE: JA=σχe(eE). Starting with a rather general argument in the kinetic theory framework, we show how a characteristic structure σχe∝μμ5 emerges, which also indicates the CESE as an anomalous transport effect occurring only in a parity-odd environment with nonzero axial charge density μ5 ≠ 0. Using the Hard-Thermal-Loop framework, the CESEmore » conductivity for the QGP is found to be σχe = (#)TTrfQeQA/g⁴ln(1/g) μμ5/T² to the leading-log accuracy with the numerical constant (#) depending on favor content, e.g., (#)=14.5163 for u, d light flavors.« less

  10. Chiral electric separation effect in the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-02-02

    In this paper we introduce and compute a new transport coefficient for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at very high temperature. This new coefficient ??e, the CESE (Chiral Electric Separation Effect) conductivity, quantifies the amount of axial current JA that is generated in response to an externally applied electric field eE: JA=??e(eE). Starting with a rather general argument in the kinetic theory framework, we show how a characteristic structure ??e???5 emerges, which also indicates the CESE as an anomalous transport effect occurring only in a parity-odd environment with nonzero axial charge density ?5 ? 0. Using the Hard-Thermal-Loop framework, the CESE conductivity for the QGP is found to be ??e = (#)TTrfQeQA/g?ln(1/g) ??5/T to the leading-log accuracy with the numerical constant (#) depending on favor content, e.g., (#)=14.5163 for u, d light flavors.

  11. High-energy jet quenching in weakly coupled quark-gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Peter; Xiao Wei

    2008-12-15

    q is the average squared transverse momentum transfer per unit length to a high-energy particle traversing a QCD medium such as a quark-gluon plasma. We find the (UV-regulated) value of q to leading order in the weak coupling limit, {alpha}{sub s}(T)<<1. We then use this value to generalize previous analytic results on the gluon bremsstrahlung and pair production rates for massless high-energy particles in a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma, at next-to-leading logarithmic order.

  12. Viscosity and dilepton production of a chemically equilibrating quark-gluon plasma at finite baryon density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guan Nana; Li Jianwei; He Zejun; Long Jiali; Cai Xiangzhou; Ma Yugang; Shen Wenqing

    2009-07-15

    By considering the effect of shear viscosity we have investigated the evolution of a chemically equilibrating quark-gluon plasma at finite baryon density. Based on the evolution of the system we have performed a complete calculation for the dilepton production from the following processes: qq{yields}ll, qq{yields}gll, Compton-like scattering (qg{yields}qll,qg{yields}qll), gluon fusion (gg{yields}cc), annihilation (qq{yields}cc), as well as the multiple scattering of quarks. We have found that quark-antiquark annihilation, Compton-like scatterring, gluon fusion, and multiple scattering of quarks give important contributions. Moreover, we have also found that the dilepton yield is an increasing function of the initial quark chemical potential, and the increase of the quark phase lifetime because of the viscosity also obviously raises the dilepton yield.

  13. Energy loss of charm quarks in the quark-gluon plasma: Collisional vs radiative losses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mustafa, Munshi G.

    2005-07-01

    In considering the collisional energy loss rates of heavy quarks from hard light parton interactions, we computed the total energy loss of a charm quark for a static medium. For the energy range E{approx}5-10 GeV of charm quark, it proved to be almost the same order as that of radiative ones estimated to a first-order opacity expansion. The collisional energy loss becomes much more important for lower energy charm quarks, and this feature could be very interesting for the phenomenology of hadrons spectra. Using such collisional energy loss rates, we estimate the momentum loss distribution employing a Fokker-Planck equation and the total energy loss of a charm quark for an expanding quark-gluon plasma under conditions resembling the energies presently available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The fractional collisional energy loss is found to be suppressed by a factor of 5 as compared to the static case and does not depend linearly on the system size. We also investigate the heavy to light hadrons D/{pi} ratio at moderately large (5-10 GeV/c) transverse momenta and comment on its enhancement.

  14. Quarkonia and heavy-quark relaxation times in the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riek, F.; Rapp, R.

    2010-09-15

    A thermodynamic T-matrix approach for elastic two-body interactions is employed to calculate spectral functions of open and hidden heavy-quark systems in the quark-gluon plasma. This enables the evaluation of quarkonium bound-state properties and heavy-quark diffusion on a common basis and thus to obtain mutual constraints. The two-body interaction kernel is approximated within a potential picture for spacelike momentum transfers. An effective field-theoretical model combining color-Coulomb and confining terms is implemented with relativistic corrections and for different color channels. Four pertinent model parameters, characterizing the coupling strengths and screening, are adjusted to reproduce the color-average heavy-quark free energy as computed in thermal lattice QCD. The approach is tested against vacuum spectroscopy in the open (D, B) and hidden ({Psi} and {Upsilon}) flavor sectors, as well as in the high-energy limit of elastic perturbative QCD scattering. Theoretical uncertainties in the static reduction scheme of the four-dimensional Bethe-Salpeter equation are elucidated. The quarkonium spectral functions are used to calculate Euclidean correlators which are discussed in light of lattice QCD results, while heavy-quark relaxation rates and diffusion coefficients are extracted utilizing a Fokker-Planck equation.

  15. Fluctuations driven isotropization of the quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkelin, S. V.

    2008-07-15

    Averaged over ensemble of initial conditions kinetic transport equations of weakly coupled systems of quarks and gluons are derived. These equations account for the correlators of fluctuations of particles and classical gluon fields. The isotropization of particle momenta by field fluctuations at the early prethermal stage of matter evolution in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is discussed. Our results can be useful for understanding under what conditions isotropization of the quark-gluon plasma in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions can be reached within phenomenologically observed time scales.

  16. Stopping distance for high energy jets in weakly coupled quark-gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Peter; Cantrell, Sean; Xiao Wei

    2010-02-15

    We derive a simple formula for the stopping distance for a high-energy quark traveling through a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. The result is given to next-to-leading order in an expansion in inverse logarithms ln(E/T), where T is the temperature of the plasma. We also define a stopping distance for gluons and give a leading-log result. Discussion of stopping distance has a theoretical advantage over discussion of energy loss rates in that stopping distances can be generalized to the case of strong coupling, where one may not speak of individual partons.

  17. Momentum broadening of a fast parton in a perturbative quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumder, Abhijit; Mueller, Berndt; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2009-12-15

    The average transverse momentum transfer per unit path length to a fast parton scattering elastically in a perturbative quark-gluon plasma is related to the radiative energy loss of the parton. We first calculate the momentum transfer coefficient q-circumflex in terms of a classical Langevin problem and then define it quantum mechanically through a scattering matrix element. After treating the well-known case of a quark-gluon plasma in equilibrium, we consider an off-equilibrium unstable plasma. As a specific example, we treat the two-stream plasma with unstable modes of longitudinal chromoelectric field. In the presence of the instabilities, q-circumflex is shown to exponentially grow in time.

  18. Anti pp searches for quark-gluon plasma at TeV I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turkot, F.

    1986-06-01

    Three experiments that have been approved to run at TeV I are discussed from the viewpoint of their capability to search for evidence of the QCD phase transition in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.6 TeV. One of these experiments, E-735, was proposed as a dedicated search for quark-gluon plasma effects with a detector designed to study large total E/sub T/, low P/sub T/ individual particles. The other two, E-741 (CDF) and E-740 (DO), embody general purpose four-pi detectors designed primarily to study the physics of W and Z bosons and other large P/sub T/ phenomena. The detectors and their quark-gluon plasma signals are compared. 8 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs. (LEW)

  19. Spatially Modulated Phase in the Holographic Description of Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Chang-Soon

    2011-02-11

    We present a string theory construction of a gravity dual of a spatially modulated phase. Our earlier work shows that the Chern-Simons term in the five-dimensional Maxwell theory destabilizes the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes in anti-de Sitter space if the Chern-Simons coupling is sufficiently high. In this Letter, we show that a similar instability is realized on the world volume of 8-branes in the Sakai-Sugimoto model in the quark-gluon plasma phase. Our result suggests a new spatially modulated phase in quark-gluon plasma when the baryon density is above 0.8N{sub f} fm{sup -3} at temperature 150 MeV.

  20. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. III. The free energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Sungtae; Zahed, Ismail

    2009-04-15

    We explore further the classical quark-gluon plasma using methods from classical liquids. The partition function of an ensemble of SU(N{sub c}) colored charge spheres is constructed. We analyze it using a cumulant expansion (low density) and a loop expansion (high temperature) after resumming the Debye screening effects. The pertinent free energies are derived in both limits and compared with recent molecular dynamics results.

  1. Event-by-event hydrodynamics: A better tool to study the Quark-Gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grassi, Frederique

    2013-03-25

    Hydrodynamics has been established as a good tool to describe many data from relativistic heavyion collisions performed at RHIC and LHC. More recently, it has become clear that it is necessary to use event-by-event hydrodynamics (i.e. describe each collision individually using hydrodynamics), an approach first developed in Brazil. In this paper, I review which data require the use of event-by-event hydrodynamics and what more we may learn on the Quark-Gluon Plasma with this.

  2. A mean field theory for the cold quark gluon plasma applied to stellar structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogaca, D. A.; Navarra, F. S.; Franzon, B.; Horvath, J. E.

    2013-03-25

    An equation of state based on a mean-field approximation of QCD is used to describe the cold quark gluon plasma and also to study the structure of compact stars. We obtain stellar masses compatible with the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 that was determined to have a mass of (1.97 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }), and the corresponding radius around 10-11 km.

  3. Structure of the ground state of a nonsuperfluid dense quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khodel, V. A. Zverev, M. V. Pankratov, S. S.; Clark, J. W.

    2009-08-15

    The single-particle spectrum and momentum distribution of quasiparticles in a cold dense quark-gluon plasma are calculated within the Fermi liquid approach. It is shown that this system does not behave as a standard Fermi liquid: at zero temperature, the single-particle spectrum has a plateau at the Fermi surface, while the Fermi surface itself has a nonzero volume in momentum space.

  4. Probing the Properties of the Strongly-Interacting Quark Gluon Plasma at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, J.

    2010-03-01

    Experimental evidences at RHIC, for a strongly-interacting quark gluon plasma (sQGP), are reviewed. We discuss three related phenomena, elliptic flow, jet quenching and medium responses, that have provided much of the evidences. We examine current constraints on the transport properties of sQGP from these phenomena, point out their intrinsic connections and uncertainties, and outline future improvements on the study of the sQGP, particularly those using heavy flavor probes.

  5. Color-singlet clustering of partons and recombination model for hadronization of quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abir, Raktim; Mustafa, Munshi G.

    2009-11-15

    SU(N{sub c}) color-singlet restriction, along with flavor and spin symmetry, on a thermal partonic ensemble is shown to recombine the partons with internal color structure into color-singlet multiquark clusters, which can be identified with various hadronic modes at a given temperature. This can provide a possible basis for a recombination model for hadronization of quark-gluon plasma. This also leads to a natural explanation for the ratio of (anti)protons to pions and the quark number scaling of the elliptic flow coefficient in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  6. Evolution of collectivity as a signal of quark gluon plasma formation in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Payal; Alam, Jan-e; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2011-08-15

    A measurement for studying the mass dependence of dilepton interferometry in relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments as a tool to characterize the quark gluon phase is proposed. In calculations involving dileptons, we show that the mass dependence of radii extracted from the virtual photon (dilepton) interferometry provide access to the development of collective flow with time. It is argued that the nonmonotonic variation of Hanbury Brown-Twiss radii with invariant mass of the lepton pairs signals the formation of quark gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions. Our proposal of experimentally measuring the ratio, R{sub out}/R{sub side} for dileptons can be used to estimate the average lifetimes of the partonic as well as the hadronic phases.

  7. Radiative energy loss in an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Pradip; Dutt-Mazumder, Abhee K.

    2011-04-15

    We calculate radiative energy loss of heavy and light quarks in an anisotropic medium (static) in a first-order opacity expansion. Such an anisotropy can result from the initial rapid longitudinal expansion of the matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Significant dependency of the energy loss on the anisotropy parameter {xi} and the direction of propagation of the partons with respect to the anisotropy axis is found. It is shown that the introduction of early-time momentum-space anisotropy can enhance the fractional energy loss in the direction of the anisotropy, whereas it decreases when the parton propagates perpendicular to the direction of the anisotropy.

  8. Charm degrees of freedom in the quark gluon plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mukherjee, Swagato; Petreczky, Peter; Sharma, Sayantan

    2016-01-11

    The lattice QCD studies on fluctuations and correlations of charm quantum number have established that deconfinement of charm degrees of freedom sets in around the chiral crossover temperature, Tc; i.e., charm degrees of freedom carrying fractional baryonic charge start to appear. When we reexamine those same lattice QCD data we show that, in addition to the contributions from quarklike excitations, the partial pressure of charm degrees of freedom may still contain significant contributions from open-charm-meson- and baryonlike excitations associated with integral baryonic charges for temperatures up to 1.2Tc. Finally, charm-quark quasiparticles become the dominant degrees of freedom for temperatures T>1.2Tc.

  9. Effects of the running of the QCD coupling on the energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Jens; Pirner, Hans-Juergen

    2007-03-01

    Finite temperature modifies the running of the QCD coupling {alpha}{sub s}(k,T) with resolution k. After calculating the thermal quark and gluon masses self-consistently, we determine the quark-quark and quark-gluon cross sections in the plasma based on the running coupling. We find that the running coupling enhances these cross sections by factors of two to four depending on the temperature. We also compute the energy loss (dE/dx) of a high-energy quark in the plasma as a function of temperature. Our study suggests that, beside t-channel processes, inverse Compton scattering is a relevant process for a quantitative understanding of the energy loss of an incident quark in a hot plasma.

  10. Comparison of models of critical opacity in the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xiangdong; Shakin, C.M.

    2004-12-01

    In this work we discuss two methods of calculation of quark propagation in the quark-gluon plasma. Both methods make use of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The essential difference of these calculations is the treatment of deconfinement. A model of confinement is not included in the work of Gastineau, Blanquier, and Aichelin (e-print hep-ph/0404207), however, the meson states they consider are still bound for temperatures greater than the deconfinement temperature T{sub c}. On the other hand, our model deals with unconfined quarks and includes a description of the qq resonances found in lattice QCD studies that make use of the maximum entropy method. We compare the qq cross sections calculated in these models.

  11. Jet energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma by stream instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Manuel, Cristina; Gonzalez-Solis, Sergi; Strickland, Michael

    2010-04-01

    We study the evolution of the plasma instabilities induced by two jets of particles propagating in opposite directions and crossing a thermally equilibrated non-Abelian plasma. In order to simplify the analysis we assume that the two jets of partons can be described with uniform distribution functions in coordinate space and by Gaussian distribution functions in momentum space. We find that while crossing the quark-gluon plasma, the jets of particles excite unstable chromomagnetic and chromoelectric modes. These fields interact with the particles (or hard modes) of the plasma inducing the production of currents; thus, the energy lost by the jets is absorbed by both the gauge fields and the hard modes of the plasma. We compare the outcome of the numerical simulations with the analytical calculation performed assuming that the jets of particles can be described by a tsunamilike distribution function. We find qualitative and semiquantitative agreement between the results obtained with the two methods.

  12. RHIC PHYSICS: THE QUARK GLUON PLASMA AND THE COLOR GLASS CONDENSATE: 4 LECTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLERRAN,L.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to provide an introduction to the physics issues which are being studied in the RHIC heavy ion program. These center around the production of new states of matter. The Quark Gluon Plasma is thermal matter which once existed in the big bang which may be made at RHIC. The Color Glass Condensate is a universal form of matter which controls the high energy limit of strong interactions. Both such forms of matter might be produced and probed at RHIC.

  13. New method for the experimental study of topological effects in the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajitanand, N. N.; Lacey, Roy A.; Taranenko, A.; Alexander, J. M.

    2011-01-15

    A new method is presented for the quantitative measurement of charge separation about the reaction plane. A correlation function is obtained whose shape is concave when there is a net separation of positive and negative charges. Correlations not specifically associated with charge, from flow, jets, and momentum conservation, do not influence the shape or magnitude of the correlation function. Detailed simulations are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method for the quantitative measurement of charge separation. Such measurements are a prerequisite to the investigation of topological charge effects in the quark-gluon plasma as derived from the 'strong CP problem'.

  14. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. II. Screening and equation of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelman, Boris A.; Shuryak, Edward V.; Zahed, Ismail

    2006-10-15

    We analyze the screening and bulk energy of a classical and strongly interacting plasma of color charges, a model we recently introduced for the description of a quark-gluon plasma at T=(1-3)T{sub c}. The partition function is organized around the Debye-Hueckel limit. The linear Debye-Hueckel limit is corrected by a virial expansion. For the pressure, the expansion is badly convergent even in the dilute limit. The nonlinear Debye-Hueckel theory is studied numerically as an alternative for moderately strong plasmas. We use the Debye theory of solid to extend the analysis to the crystal phase at very strong coupling. The analytical results for the bulk energy per particle compare well with the numerical results from molecular dynamics simulations for all couplings.

  15. Quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    We briefly give an elementary introduction to the expansion of the Early Universe till when the phase transition of the quark-gluon plasma to a hadronic matter takes place. Then we describe some main element of the study of QGP by mean of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC's)

  16. Energy dependence of jet transport parameter and parton saturationin quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2007-06-24

    We study the evolution and saturation of the gluondistribution function in the quark-gluon plasma as probed by apropagating parton and its effect on the computation of jet quenching ortransport parameter $\\hat q $. For thermal partons, the saturation scale$Q2_s$ is found to be proportional to the Debye screening mass $\\mu_D2$.For hard probes, evolution at small $x=Q2_s/6ET$ leads to jet energydependence of hat q. We study this dependence for both a conformal gaugetheory in weak and strong coupling limit and for (pure gluon) QCD. Theenergy dependence can be used to extract the shear viscosity $\\eta$ ofthe medium since $\\eta$ can be related to the transport parameter forthermal partons in a transport description. We also derive upper boundson the transport parameter for both energetic and thermal partons. Thelater leads to a lower bound on shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratiowhich is consistent with the conjectured lower bound $\\eta/s\\geq 1/4\\pi$.Implications on the study of jet quenching at RHIC and LHC and the bulkproperties of the dense matter are discussed.

  17. Flavor diagonal and off-diagonal susceptibilities in a quasiparticle model of the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluhm, M.; Kaempfer, B.

    2008-06-01

    The Taylor coefficients of flavor diagonal and off-diagonal susceptibilities as well as baryon number, isovector, and electric charge susceptibilities are considered within a phenomenological quasiparticle model of the quark-gluon plasma and successfully compared with available lattice QCD data up to fourth-order for two degenerate quark flavors. These susceptibility coefficients represent sensible probes of baryon-density effects in the equation of state. The baryon charge is carried, in our model, by quark-quasiparticle excitations for hard momenta.

  18. Quark-gluon correlation functions relevant to single transverse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FUNCTIONS; GLUONS; NUCLEONS; QUARK MODEL; QUARK-GLUON INTERACTIONS; QUARKS; SPIN ANGULAR MOMENTUM; BARYONS; BOSONS; COMPOSITE MODELS; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; FERMIONS; ...

  19. Direct Photons at Low Transverse Momentum: A Signal for Quark-Gluon Plasma in pp Collisions at LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Fuming; Werner, Klaus

    2011-06-17

    We investigate photon production in a scenario of quark-gluon plasma formation in proton-proton scattering at 7 TeV. It is shown that thermal photon yields increase quadratically with the charged particle multiplicity. This gives an enhanced weight to high multiplicity events, and leads to an important photon production even in minimum-bias events, where the thermal photons largely dominate over the prompt ones at transverse momentum values smaller than 10 GeV/c.

  20. Shear viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma in a kinetic theory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puglisi, A.; Plumari, S.; Scardina, F.; Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    One of the main results of heavy ions collision (HIC) at relativistic energy experiments is the very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, close to the conjectured lower bound ?/s=1/4? for systems in the infinite coupling limit. Transport coefficients like shear viscosity are responsible of non-equilibrium properties of a system: Green-Kubo relations give us an exact expression to compute these coefficients. We compute shear viscosity numerically using Green-Kubo relation in the framework of Kinetic Theory solving the relativistic transport Boltzmann equation in a finite box with periodic boundary conditions. We investigate a system of particles interacting via anisotropic and energy dependent cross-section in the range of temperature of interest for HIC. Green-Kubo results are in agreement with Chapman-Enskog approximation while Relaxation Time approximation can underestimates the viscosity of a factor 2. The correct analytic formula for shear viscosity can be used to develop a transport theory with a fixed ?/s and have a comparison with physical observables like elliptic flow.

  1. Thermal charm production in a quark-gluon plasma in Pb-Pb collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=5.5 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Benwei; Ko Cheming; Liu Wei

    2008-02-15

    Charm production from the quark-gluon plasma created in the midrapidity of central heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is studied in the next-to-leading order in QCD. Using a schematic longitudinally boost-invariant and transversally expanding fire-cylinder model, we find that charm production could be appreciably enhanced at LHC as a result of the high temperature that is expected to be reached in the produced quark-gluon plasma. Sensitivities of our results to the number of charm quark pairs produced from initial hard scattering, the initial thermalization time and temperature of the quark-gluon plasma, and the charm quark mass are also studied.

  2. SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF HEAVY ION COLLISIONS TO SEARCH FOR QUARK-GLUON PLASMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuqiang Wang

    2007-11-29

    This is the final technical report for DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI) Award, 'Systematic Studies of Heavy Ion Collisions to Search for Quark-Gluon Plasma', grant DE-FG02-02ER41219, Principal Investigator (PI) Fuqiang Wang. The research under the grant was divided into two phases. The first concentrated on systematic studies of soft hadron production at low transverse momentum (p{sub T}), in particular the production of (anti-)baryon and strangeness in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. The second concentrated on measurements of di-hadron and multi-hadron jet-correlations and investigations of medium response to jets. The research was conducted at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL with the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. The total grant is $214,000. The grant established a PC farm solely used for this research. The PC farm consists of 8 nodes with a total of 16 CPUs and 3 disk servers of total 2 TB shared storage. The current balance of the grant is $19,985. The positive balance is because an initial purchase of $22,600 for the PC farm came out of the PI's start-up fund due to the lateness of the award. The PC farm is an integral part of the Purdue Physics Department's computer cluster. The grant supported two Ph.D. graduate students. Levente Molnar was supported from July 2002 to December 2003, and worked on soft hadron production. His thesis title is Systematics of Identified Particle Production in pp, d-Au and Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies. He graduated in 2006 and now is a Postdoctoral fellow at INFN Sezione di Bari, Italy working on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. Jason Ulery was supported from January 2004 to July 2007. His thesis title is Two- and Three-Particle Jet-Like Correlations. He defended his thesis in October 2007 and is moving to Frankfurt University, Germany to work on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The research by this grant resulted in 7 journal publications (2 PRL, 1 PLB, 1 PRC, 2 submitted and

  3. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma and soft photon spectrum in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Yi

    2014-10-06

    We extract the electrical conductivity σ0 of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and study the effects of magnetic field and chiral anomaly on soft photon azimuthal anisotropy, v₂, based on the thermal photon spectrum at 0.4GeV < p⊥< 0.6GeV at the RHIC energy. As a basis for my analysis, we derive the behavior of retarded photon self-energy of a strongly interacting neutral plasma in hydrodynamic regime in the presence of magnetic field and chiral anomaly. By evolving the resulting soft thermal photon production rate over the realistic hydrodynamic background and comparing the results with the data from the PHENIX Collaboration, I found that the electrical conductivity at QGP temperature is in the range: 0.4 < σ₀/(e²T) < 1.1, which is comparable with recent studies on lattice. I also compare the contribution from the magnetic field and chiral anomaly to soft thermal photon v₂ with the data. I argue that at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the chiral magnetic wave would give negative contribution to photon v₂.

  4. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma and soft photon spectrum in heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yin, Yi

    2014-10-06

    We extract the electrical conductivity σ0 of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and study the effects of magnetic field and chiral anomaly on soft photon azimuthal anisotropy, v₂, based on the thermal photon spectrum at 0.4GeV < p⊥< 0.6GeV at the RHIC energy. As a basis for my analysis, we derive the behavior of retarded photon self-energy of a strongly interacting neutral plasma in hydrodynamic regime in the presence of magnetic field and chiral anomaly. By evolving the resulting soft thermal photon production rate over the realistic hydrodynamic background and comparing the results with the data from the PHENIX Collaboration,more » I found that the electrical conductivity at QGP temperature is in the range: 0.4 < σ₀/(e²T) < 1.1, which is comparable with recent studies on lattice. I also compare the contribution from the magnetic field and chiral anomaly to soft thermal photon v₂ with the data. I argue that at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the chiral magnetic wave would give negative contribution to photon v₂.« less

  5. Tomography of quark gluon plasma at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gossiaux, P. B.; Bierkandt, R.; Aichelin, J.

    2009-04-15

    Using the recently published model [Gossiaux and Aichelin, Phys. Rev. C 78, 014904 (2008)] for the collisional energy loss of heavy quarks in a quark gluon plasma (QGP), based on perturbative QCD (pQCD) with a running coupling constant, we study the interaction between heavy quarks and plasma particles in detail. We discuss correlations between the simultaneously produced c and c quarks, study how central collisions can be experimentally selected, predict observable correlations, and extend our model to the energy domain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We finally compare the predictions of our model with that of other approaches such as anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT)

  6. Binding Energies and Melting Temperatures of Heavy Hadrons in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narodetskii, I. M.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Veselov, A. I.

    2011-05-23

    We discuss the consequences of the suggestion that the non-perturbative quark-antiquark potential at T{>=}T{sub c}, where T{sub c} is a temperature of a deconfinement phase transition in QCD can be studied through the modification of the correlation functions, which define the quadratic field correlators of the nonperturbative vaccuum fields. We use the non-perturbative quark-antiquark potential derived within the Field Correlator Method and the screened Coulomb potential with T-dependent Debye mass to calculate J/{psi}, {Upsilon} and {Omega}{sub bbb} binding energies and melting temperatures in the deconfined phase of QCD.

  7. Gluon propagators and center vortices in gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chernodub, M. N.; Nakagawa, Y.; Nakamura, A.; Saito, T.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    We study electric and magnetic components of the gluon propagators in quark-gluon plasma in terms of center vortices by using a quenched simulation of SU(2) lattice theory. In the Landau gauge, the magnetic components of the propagators are strongly affected in the infrared region by removal of the center vortices, while the electric components are almost unchanged by this procedure. In the Coulomb gauge, the time-time correlators, including an instantaneous interaction, also have an essential contribution from the center vortices. As a result, one finds that magnetic degrees of freedom in the infrared region couple strongly to the center vortices in the deconfinement phase.

  8. Elliptic flow of thermal photons and formation time of quark gluon plasma at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Rupa; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2009-02-15

    We calculate the elliptic flow of thermal photons from Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies for a range of values for the formation time {tau}{sub 0} but a fixed entropy (or particle rapidity density). The results are found to be quite sensitive to {tau}{sub 0}. The value of v{sub 2} for photons decreases as {tau}{sub 0} decreases and admits a larger contribution from the quark gluon plasma phase, which has a smaller v{sub 2}. The elliptic flow coefficient for hadrons, however, is only marginally dependent on {tau}{sub 0}.

  9. SEARCHING FOR QUARK - GLUON PLASMA (QGP) BUBBLE EFFECTS AT RHIC / LHC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LINDENBAUM,S.J.; LONGACRE,R.S.; KRAMER,M.

    2003-03-01

    Since the early eighties, we have shared with Leon Van Hove the view that if a QGP were produced in high energy heavy ion colliders that its hadronization products would likely come from small localized in phase space bubbles of plasma. In previous papers we have discussed the case where one to at most a few separated bubbles were produced. In this paper we develop a model based on HIJING to which we added a ring of adjoining multi bubble production, which we believe is a higher cross-section process which dominates the near central rapidity region. We have performed simulations which were designed to be tested by the expected first to become available suitable test data, namely the forthcoming RHIC STAR detector data on 65Gev/n Au colliding with 65 Gev/n Au. We took into account background effects and resonance effects so that a direct comparison with the data, and detailed test of these ideas could be made in the near future. Subsequently 100 Gev/n Au on 100 Gev/n Au forthcoming data can be tested, and of course these techniques, suitably modified by experience can be applied to it and eventually to LHC. We concluded that two charged particle correlations versus the azimuthal angle {Delta}{phi}; vs the opening angle, and vs psuedorapidity {eta}, can detect important bubble signals in the expected background, with statistical significances of 5 - 20{sigma}, provided the reasonably conservative assumptions we have made for bubble production occur. We also predicted charge fluctuation suppressions which increase with the bubble signal, and range from {approx} 5% to 27% in the simulations performed. We demonstrated reasonably that in our model, these charge suppression effects would not significantly be affected by resonances.

  10. Role of monopoles in a gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratti, Claudia; Shuryak, Edward

    2009-08-01

    We study the role of magnetic monopoles at high enough temperature T>2T{sub c}, when they can be considered heavy, rare objects embedded into matter consisting mostly of the usual 'electric' quasiparticles, quarks, and gluons. We review available lattice results on monopoles at finite temperatures. Then we proceed to classical and quantum charge-monopole scattering, solving the problem of gluon-monopole scattering for the first time. The explicit calculations are performed in the framework of the Georgi-Glashow model; the results that we obtain are nevertheless quite general. Connections to QCD are carefully discussed. We find that, while the gluon-monopole scattering hardly influences thermodynamic quantities, it does produce a large transport cross section, significantly exceeding that for pQCD gluon-gluon scattering up to quite high T. Thus, in spite of their relatively small density at high T, monopoles are extremely important for quark-gluon plasma transport properties, keeping viscosity small enough for hydrodynamics to work at the LHC.

  11. A new scheme of causal viscous hydrodynamics for relativistic heavy-ion collisions: A Riemann solver for quarkgluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Nonaka, Chiho; Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 ; Takamoto, Makoto; Max-Planck-Institut fr Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a state-of-the-art algorithm for solving the relativistic viscous hydrodynamics equation with the QCD equation of state. The numerical method is based on the second-order Godunov method and has less numerical dissipation, which is crucial in describing of quarkgluon plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We apply the algorithm to several numerical test problems such as sound wave propagation, shock tube and blast wave problems. In sound wave propagation, the intrinsic numerical viscosity is measured and its explicit expression is shown, which is the second-order of spatial resolution both in the presence and absence of physical viscosity. The expression of the numerical viscosity can be used to determine the maximum cell size in order to accurately measure the effect of physical viscosity in the numerical simulation.

  12. Geek-Up[12.03.2010]: Halomonadaceae Bacteria and the Return of Quark Gluon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plasma | Department of Energy 2.03.2010]: Halomonadaceae Bacteria and the Return of Quark Gluon Plasma Geek-Up[12.03.2010]: Halomonadaceae Bacteria and the Return of Quark Gluon Plasma December 3, 2010 - 4:59pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs As a fellow geek, you probably heard NASA's big news yesterday. If not, here's a recap: It was once assumed that all life on Earth, from humans and giraffes to scorpions and plankton, are all based

  13. Glueballs and statistical mechanics of the gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brau, Fabian; Buisseret, Fabien

    2009-06-01

    We study a pure gluon plasma in the context of quasiparticle models, where the plasma is considered as an ideal gas of massive bosons. In order to reproduce SU(3) gauge field lattice data within such a framework, we review briefly the necessity to use a temperature-dependent gluon mass which accounts for color interactions between the gluons near T{sub c} and agrees with perturbative QCD at large temperatures. Consequently, we discuss the thermodynamics of systems with temperature-dependent Hamiltonians and clarify the situation about the possible solutions proposed in the literature to treat those systems consistently. We then focus our attention on two possible formulations which are thermodynamically consistent, and we extract the gluon mass from the equation of state obtained in SU(3) lattice QCD. We find that the thermal gluon mass is similar in both statistical formalisms. Finally, an interpretation of the gluon plasma as an ideal gas made of glueballs and gluons is also presented. The glueball mass is consistently computed within a relativistic formalism using a potential obtained from lattice QCD. We find that the gluon plasma might be a glueball-rich medium for T < or approx. 1.13T{sub c} and suggest that glueballs could be detected in future experiments dedicated to quark-gluon plasma.

  14. Measuring the isotropization time of quark-gluon plasma from direct photons at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Lusaka; Roy, Pradip

    2009-05-15

    We calculate transverse momentum distribution of direct photons from various sources by taking into account the initial state momentum anisotropy of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and late stage transverse flow effects. To evaluate the photon yield from hadronic matter we include the contributions from baryon-meson reactions. The total photon yield, calculated for various combinations of initial conditions and transition temperatures, is then compared with the recent measurement of photon transverse momentum distribution by the PHENIX Collaboration. It is shown that because of the initial state anisotropy the photon yield from the QGP is larger by a factor of 8-10 than that of the isotropic case in the intermediate p{sub T} regime. It is also demonstrated that the presence of such an anisotropy can describe the PHENIX photon data better than the isotropic case in the present model. We show that the isotropization time thus extracted lies within the range 1.5{>=}{tau}{sub iso}{>=}0.5 fm/c for the initial conditions used here.

  15. Deepening the Understanding of Interactions between Quarks and Gluons |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility A frame from an animation illustrating the typical four-dimensional structure of gluon-field configurations used in describing the vacuum properties of QCD. A frame from an animation illustrating the typical four-dimensional structure of gluon-field configurations used in describing the vacuum properties of QCD. Deepening the Understanding of Interactions between Quarks and Gluons PI Name: Bob Sugar PI Email: sugar@physics.ucsb.edu Institution:

  16. Nucleon g{sub 2} Structure Function and Quark-Gluon Correlations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY ... QUARK-GLUON INTERACTIONS; QUARKS; SPIN; STRUCTURE FUNCTIONS Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  17. The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E

    2012-05-10

    This technical report describes the work done under the DOE grant DE-FG-88ER41723 (final award number DE-SC0005645), "The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter", during the year of 12/01/2010 through 11/30/2011. As planned in the proposal, the performed research focused along two main thrusts: 1) topological effects in hot quark-gluon matter and 2) phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions. The results of research are presented in 12 papers published in reputable refereed journals (Physical Review Letters, Physical Review, Physics Letters and Nuclear Physics). All of the performed research is directly related to the experimental programs of DOE, especially at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Much of it also has broader interdisciplinary implications - for example, the work on the non-dissipative chiral magnetic current is directly relevant for quantum computing. The attached report describes the performed work in detail.

  18. Jet quenching parameter in the gluon plasma with soft and hard components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonov, D.; Pirner, H.-J.

    2008-08-29

    We put forward a model of jet quenching, in which a parton traversing the quark-gluon plasma loses its energy by interacting with hard thermal gluons through the exchanges by soft gluons. The hard gluons are modeled by the Hard Thermal Loop effective theory, the soft gluons by the chromo-magnetic condensate, the interaction mechanism between the two is Landau damping of the soft gluons by the hard ones. Within such a model, we calculate the jet quenching parameter of a gluon in SU(3) quenched QCD and find that, when the temperature varies from T = T{sub c} = 270 MeV to T = 900 MeV, the jet quenching parameter rises from q- circumflex = 0 to approximately 1.8 GeV{sup 2}/fm. We compare our results with the predictions of perturbative QCD and some other nonperturbative calculations.

  19. Probing Quark-Gluon Interactions with Transverse Polarized Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, K.; Rondon, O. A.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Frlez, E.; Lindgren, R.; McKee, P.; Norum, B.; Pocanic, D.; Prok, Y.; Sawatzky, B.; Smith, C.; Tajima, S.; Wang, K.; Zeier, M.; Zhu, H.; Aghalaryan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Ahmidouch, A.

    2010-09-03

    We have extracted QCD matrix elements from our data on doubly polarized inelastic scattering of electrons on nuclei. We find the higher twist matrix element d{sub 2}-tilde, which arises strictly from quark-gluon interactions, to be unambiguously nonzero. The data also reveal an isospin dependence of higher twist effects if we assume that the Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule is valid. The fundamental Bjorken sum rule obtained from the a{sub 0} matrix element is satisfied at our low momentum transfer.

  20. Seeing Quarks and Gluons Through Jets and Silhouettes | U.S....

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Each award funds a scientist for five years. The 2.5-million grant allowed him to devise and test a new way to study the fundamental particles. While firing quarks and gluons into ...

  1. Debye mass and heavy quark potential in a PNJL quark plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowski, J. Blaschke, D.

    2012-07-15

    We calculate the Debye mass for the screening of the heavy quark potential in a plasma of massless quarks coupled to the temporal gluon background governed by the Polyakov loop potential within the PNJL model in RPA approximation. We give a physical motivation for a recent phenomenological fit of lattice data by applying the calculated Debye mass with its suppression in the confined phase due to the Polyakov loop to a description of the temperature dependence of the singlet free energy for QCD with a heavy quark pair at infinite separation. We compare the result to lattice data.

  2. Quark Flavors and Conserved Charges at Finite Density in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transition from the Quark-Gluon Plasma to a gas of hadrons during the evolution of the universe. Credit: Sandor Katz, Eotvos University Quark Flavors and Conserved Charges ...

  3. First Measurement of the Fraction of Top Quark Pair Production Through Gluon-Gluon Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration, CDF; Aaltonen, T.

    2007-12-01

    We present the first measurement of {sigma}(gG {yields} t{bar t})/{sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t}). We use 0.96 fb{sup -1} of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collision data recorded with the CDF II detector at Fermilab. We identify the candidate t{bar t} events with a high-energy charged lepton, a neutrino candidate, and four or more jets with at least one identified as originating from a b quark. Using charged particles with low transverse momentum in t{bar t} events, we find {sigma}(gg {yields} t{bar t})/{sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t}) = 0.07 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst), in agreement with the standard model NLO prediction of 0.15 {+-} 0.05.

  4. How do quarks and gluons lose energy in the QGP?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2015-03-10

    RHIC introduced the method of hard scattering of partons as an in-situ probe of the the medium produced in A+A collisions. A suppression, RAA ≈ 0.2 relative to binary-scaling, was discovered for π⁰ production in the range 5 < ρT < 20 GeV/c in central Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV, and surprisingly also for single-electrons from the decay of heavy quarks. Both these results have been confirmed in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC at √sNN = 2.76 TeV. Interestingly, in this ρT range the LHC results for pions nearly overlap the RHIC results. Thus, due to the flattermore » spectrum, the energy loss in the medium at LHC in this ρT range must be ~ 40% larger than at RHIC. Unique at the LHC are the beautiful measurements of the fractional transverse momentum imbalance 1 – (ρ-carotT2/ρ-carotT1) of di-jets in Pb+Pb collisions. At the Utrecht meeting in 2011, I corrected for the fractional imbalance of di-jets with the same cuts in p-p collisions and showed that the relative fractional jet imbalance in Pb+Pb/p-p is ≈ 15% for jets with 120 < ρ-carotT1 < 360 GeV/c. CMS later confirmed this much smaller imbalance compared to the same quantity derived from two-particle correlations of di-jet fragments at RHIC corresponding to ρ-carotT jet ≈ 10 – 20 GeV/c, which appear to show a much larger fractional jet imbalance ≈ 45% in this lower ρ-carotT range. The variation of apparent energy loss in the medium as a function of both ρT and √sNN is striking and presents a challenge to both theory and experiment for improved understanding. There are many other such unresolved issues, for instance, the absence of evidence for a q-carot effect, due to momentum transferred to the medium by outgoing partons, which would widen the away-side di-jet and di-hadron correlations in a similar fashion as the kT-effect. Another issue well known from experiments at the CERN ISR, SpS and SpS collider is that parton-parton hard-collisions make negligible contribution to

  5. How do quarks and gluons lose energy in the QGP?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2015-03-10

    RHIC introduced the method of hard scattering of partons as an in-situ probe of the the medium produced in A+A collisions. A suppression, RAA ? 0.2 relative to binary-scaling, was discovered for ?? production in the range 5 < ?T < 20 GeV/c in central Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV, and surprisingly also for single-electrons from the decay of heavy quarks. Both these results have been confirmed in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC at ?sNN = 2.76 TeV. Interestingly, in this ?T range the LHC results for pions nearly overlap the RHIC results. Thus, due to the flatter spectrum, the energy loss in the medium at LHC in this ?T range must be ~ 40% larger than at RHIC. Unique at the LHC are the beautiful measurements of the fractional transverse momentum imbalance 1 (?-carotT2/?-carotT1) of di-jets in Pb+Pb collisions. At the Utrecht meeting in 2011, I corrected for the fractional imbalance of di-jets with the same cuts in p-p collisions and showed that the relative fractional jet imbalance in Pb+Pb/p-p is ? 15% for jets with 120 < ?-carotT1 < 360 GeV/c. CMS later confirmed this much smaller imbalance compared to the same quantity derived from two-particle correlations of di-jet fragments at RHIC corresponding to ?-carotT jet ? 10 20 GeV/c, which appear to show a much larger fractional jet imbalance ? 45% in this lower ?-carotT range. The variation of apparent energy loss in the medium as a function of both ?T and ?sNN is striking and presents a challenge to both theory and experiment for improved understanding. There are many other such unresolved issues, for instance, the absence of evidence for a q-carot effect, due to momentum transferred to the medium by outgoing partons, which would widen the away-side di-jet and di-hadron correlations in a similar fashion as the kT-effect. Another

  6. Gluons and the Quark Sea at High Energies: Distributions, Polarization, Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Daniel; Diehl, Markus; Milner, Richard; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner; Kaplan, David; Montgomery, Hugh; Vigdor, Steven; Accardi, A.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Burkardt, M.; Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hasch, D.; Kumar, K.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Li, Ying-chuan; Marciano, W.; Marquet, C.; Sabatie, F.; Stratmann, M.; /more authors..

    2012-06-07

    This report on the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is the result of a ten-week program at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle (from September 13-November 19, 2010), motivated by the need to develop a strong case for the continued study of the QCD description of hadron structure in the coming decades. Hadron structure in the valence quark region will be studied extensively with the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV science program, the subject of an INT program the previous year. The focus of the INT program was on understanding the role of gluons and sea quarks, the important dynamical degrees of freedom describing hadron structure at high energies. Experimentally, the most direct and precise way to access the dynamical structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies is with a high luminosity lepton probe in collider mode. An EIC with optimized detectors offers enormous potential as the next generation accelerator to address many of the most important, open questions about the fundamental structure of matter. The goal of the INT program, as captured in the writeups in this report, was to articulate these questions and to identify golden experiments that have the greatest potential to provide definitive answers to these questions. At resolution scales where quarks and gluons become manifest as degrees of freedom, the structure of the nucleon and of nuclei is intimately connected with unique features of QCD dynamics, such as confinement and the self-coupling of gluons. Information on hadron sub-structure in DIS is obtained in the form of 'snapshots' by the 'lepton microscope' of the dynamical many-body hadron system, over different momentum resolutions and energy scales. These femtoscopic snapshots, at the simplest level, provide distribution functions which are extracted over the largest accessible kinematic range to assemble fundamental dynamical insight into hadron and nuclear sub-structure. For the proton, the EIC would be the brightest

  7. Dissociation of a heavy meson in the quark medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Chanyong

    2010-02-15

    We investigate the dissociation of a heavy meson in the medium composed of light quarks and gluons. In the quark-gluon plasma, the dissociation length of the heavy meson becomes short as the temperature or quark chemical potential increases. On the contrary, in the hadronic phase the dissociation length becomes large as the chemical potential increases, due to the different dissociation mechanism with one used in the quark-gluon plasma.

  8. Strangeness production with massive'' gluons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biro, T.S. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen ); Levai, P.; Mueller, B. )

    1990-11-01

    We present a perturbative calculation of strange-quark production by the processes {ital g}{r arrow}{ital s}+{ital {bar s}}, {ital g}+{ital g}{r arrow}{ital s}+{ital {bar s}}, and {ital q}+{ital {bar q}}{r arrow}{ital s}+{ital {bar s}} in a quark-gluon plasma containing gluons that are effectively massive'' due to medium effects. We consider only transverse polarizations of the gluons. We find that for a gluon mass beyond 300 MeV the one-gluon decay dominates, and that there is an {ital enhancement} of {ital s{bar s}} production from massive gluons compared with the massless case.

  9. Probing the Quark Sea and Gluons: the Electron-Ion Collider Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolf Ent

    2012-04-01

    EIC is the generic name for the nuclear science-driven Electron-Ion Collider presently considered in the US. Such an EIC would be the world’s first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world’s first e-A collider. Very little remains known about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). A large community effort to sharpen a compelling nuclear science case for an EIC occurred during a ten-week program taking place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle from September 13 to November 19, 2010. The critical capabilities of a stage-I EIC are a range in center-of-mass energies from 20 to 70 GeV and variable, full polarization of electrons and light ions (the latter both longitudinal and transverse), ion species up to A=200 or so, multiple interaction regions, and a high luminosity of about 10{sup 34} electron-nucleons per cm{sup 2} and per second. The physics program of such a stage-I EIC encompass inclusive measurements (ep/A{yields}e'+X), which require detection of the scattered lepon and/or the full scattered hadronic debris with high precision, semi-inclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+h+X), which require detection in coincidence with the scattered lepton of at least one (current or target region) hadron; and exclusive processes (ep/A{yields}e'+N'/A'+{gamma}/m), which require detection of all particles in the reaction. The main science themes of an EIC are to i) map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, ii) discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and (iii) understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge. In addition, there are opportunities at an EIC for fundamental symmetry and nucleon structure measurements using the electroweak probe. To truly make headway to image the sea quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, the EIC needs high luminosity over a range of energies as more exclusive

  10. How perfect can a gluon plasma be in perturbative QCD?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Deng Jian; Dong Hui; Wang Qun

    2011-02-01

    The shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, {eta}/s, characterizes how perfect a fluid is. We calculate the leading order {eta}/s of a gluon plasma in perturbation using the kinetic theory. The leading order contribution only involves the elastic gg{r_reversible}gg (22) process and the inelastic gg{r_reversible}ggg (23) process. The hard-thermal-loop (HTL) treatment is used for the 22 matrix element, while the exact matrix element in vacuum is supplemented by the gluon Debye mass insertion for the 23 process. Also, the asymptotic mass is used for the external gluons in the kinetic theory. The errors from not implementing HTL and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect in the 23 process, and from the uncalculated higher order corrections, are estimated. Our result smoothly connects the two different approximations used by Arnold, Moore, and Yaffe (AMY) and Xu and Greiner (XG). At small {alpha}{sub s} ({alpha}{sub s}<<1), our result is closer to AMY's collinear result while at larger {alpha}{sub s} the finite angle noncollinear configurations become more important and our result is closer to XG's soft bremsstrahlung result. In the region where perturbation is reliable ({alpha}{sub s} < or approx. 0.1), we find no indication that the proposed perfect fluid limit {eta}/s{approx_equal}1/(4{pi}) can be achieved by perturbative QCD alone. Whether this can be achieve for {alpha}{sub s} > or approx. 0.1 is still an open question.

  11. Thermodynamics of Quark Flavors from Lattice QCD | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ian McVicar, University of Glasgow (Courtesy of ALICE and CERN) Thermodynamics of Quark ... that ordinary hadronic matter will undergo a phase transition to quark-gluon plasma (QGP). ...

  12. Workshop on nuclear chromodynamics: Quarks and gluons in particles and nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.; Moniz, Ernest

    1985-01-01

    The assertion that quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the correct theory describing strong interaction phenomena has, largely by repetition, become rather non-controversial. It is likely even true. However, whether or not it is correct in detail, the experimentally supported realization that colored quarks and gluons are the elementary degrees of freedom, that asymptotic freedom makes short distance phenomena rather ''simple'' to understand, and that color is confined on the hadronic length scale of -- 1 fm has led to a profound change in the character of our attempts to understand the structure and interactions of both hadrons and nuclei. Many of the most important issued in particle physics and in nuclear physics are now seen to be intimately connected. An understanding of the validity and limits of effective theories based upon hadron degrees of freedom, so phenomenologically successful in describing a host of low energy phenomena, is coming into focus. The existence of new forms of matter grounded in the hidden color degree of freedom is predicted. These considerations form the subject of nuclear chromodynamics (NCD). The subject is far from mature and is developing rapidly.

  13. Gluons and the quark sea at high energies: distributions, polarization, tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, D.; Venugopalan, R.; Diehl, M.; Milner, R.; Vogelsang, W.; et al.

    2011-09-30

    This report is based on a ten-week program on Gluons and the quark sea at high-energies, which took place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle in Fall 2010. The principal aim of the program was to develop and sharpen the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), a facility that will be able to collide electrons and positrons with polarized protons and with light to heavy nuclei at high energies, offering unprecedented possibilities for in-depth studies of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This report is organized around the following four major themes: (i) the spin and flavor structure of the proton, (ii) three dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space, (iii) QCD matter in nuclei, and (iv) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Beginning with an executive summary, the report contains tables of key measurements, chapter overviews for each of the major scientific themes, and detailed individual contributions on various aspects of the scientific opportunities presented by an EIC.

  14. Investigation of the dynamics of gluon distributions in the production of heavy quarks and quarkonia at the LEP2 collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipatov, A. V.

    2006-09-15

    The inclusive production of heavy quarks and quarkonia in photon-photon collisions at the LEP2 collider is considered within the semihard (k{sub T}-factorization) QCD approach. The dependence of the total and differential cross sections for the production of heavy (c and b) quarks and D* and J/{psi} mesons on the choice of unintegrated gluon distribution is studied. The transition of a cc-bar charmed pair to observed J/{psi} mesons is described on the basis of the color-singlet model. The results of the calculations are compared with currently available experimental data obtained by the L3, OPAL, ALEPH, and DELPHI Collaborations. It is shown that the polarization properties of J/{psi} mesons at the LEP2 collider are sensitive to the behavior of unintegrated gluon distributions. This means that experimental investigations of the polarization properties of quarkonia in photon-photon collisions may provide a direct test of the dynamics of gluon distributions in the photon.

  15. Physics of hot hadronic matter and quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1990-07-01

    This Introductory talk contains a brief review of the current status of theoretical and experimental activities related to physics of superdense matter. In particular, we discuss latest lattice results on the phase transition, recent progress in chiral symmetry physics based on the theory of interacting instantons, new in the theory of QGP and of hot hadronic matter, mean p{sub t} and collective flow, the shape of p{sub t} distribution, strangeness production, J/{psi} suppression and {phi} enhancement, two puzzles connected with soft pion and soft photon enhancements, and some other ultrasoft'' phenomena. 56 refs., 6 figs.

  16. The study of the phase structure of hadronic matter by searching for the deconfined quark-gluon phase transition using 2 TeV {bar p}-p collisions; and by searching for critical phenomena in an exclusive study of multifragmentation using 1 GeV/nucleon heavy ion collisions. Progress report, January 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scharenberg, R.; Hirsch, A.; Tincknell, M.

    1993-09-15

    This report discusses the Fermilab experiment E735 which is dedicated to the search for the quark-gluon plasma from proton-antiproton interactions; multifragmentation using the EOS-TPC; STAR R&D; silicon avalanche diodes as direct time-of-flight detectors; and soft photons at the AGS-E855.

  17. Small shear viscosity in the semiquark gluon plasma (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    about a constant field for the vector potential, Asub 0, which is diagonal in color. ... fields decreases according to their color representation, with the density of quarks ...

  18. New Mechanism for Quark Energy Loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Fernandez, Daniel; Mateos, David

    2010-04-30

    We show that a heavy quark moving sufficiently fast through a quark-gluon plasma may lose energy by Cherenkov-radiating mesons. We demonstrate that this takes place in all strongly coupled, large-N{sub c} plasmas with a gravity dual. The energy loss is exactly calculable in these models despite being an O(1/N{sub c}) effect. We discuss implications for heavy-ion collision experiments.

  19. Momentum broadening in an anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romatschke, Paul

    2007-01-15

    The rates governing momentum broadening in a quark-gluon plasma with a momentum anisotropy are calculated to leading-log order for a heavy quark using kinetic theory. It is shown how the problematic singularity for these rates at leading order is lifted by next-to-leading-order gluon self-energy corrections to give a finite contribution to the leading-log result. The resulting rates are shown to lead to larger momentum broadening along the beam axis than in the transverse plane, which is consistent with recent STAR results. This might indicate that the quark-gluon-plasma at RHIC is not in equilibrium.

  20. Antiangular Ordering of Gluon Radiation in QCD Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine; Salgado, Carlos A.; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2011-03-25

    We investigate angular and energy distributions of medium-induced gluon emission off a quark-antiquark antenna in the framework of perturbative QCD as an attempt toward understanding, from first principles, jet evolution inside the quark-gluon plasma. In-medium color coherence between emitters, neglected in all previous calculations, leads to a novel mechanism of soft-gluon radiation. The structure of the corresponding spectrum, in contrast with known medium-induced radiation, i.e., off a single emitter, retains some properties of the vacuum case; in particular, it exhibits a soft divergence. However, as opposed to the vacuum, the collinear singularity is regulated by the pair opening angle, leading to a strict angular separation between vacuum and medium-induced radiation, denoted as antiangular ordering. We comment on the possible consequences of this new contribution for jet observables in heavy-ion collisions.

  1. One-loop gluon amplitude for heavy-quark production at next-to-next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Aybat, S. Mert

    2008-12-01

    We compute the one-loop QCD amplitude for the process gg{yields}QQ in dimensional regularization through order {epsilon}{sup 2} in the dimensional regulator and for arbitrary quark mass values. This result is an ingredient of the next-to-next-to-leading order cross section for heavy-quark production at hadron colliders. The calculation is performed in conventional dimensional regularization using well-known reduction techniques as well as a method based on recent ideas for the functional form of one-loop integrands in four dimensions.

  2. Anisotropic flow of thermal photons as a quark-gluon plasma viscometer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: SC0004286 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review C Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ...

  3. Photon emission from a momentum-anisotropic quark-gluon plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: SC0004286; SC0004104 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review C Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: ...

  4. Suppression of the shear viscosity in a 'semi'-quark-gluon plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (QGP), where the vacuum expectation value of the renormalized Polyakov loop is near ... We find that near Tsub c, where the expectation value of the Polyakov loop is small, ...

  5. J/psi Production in Quark-Gluon Plasma (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 97; Journal Issue: 23; Related ...

  6. Comparison of jet quenching formalisms for a quark-gluon plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1103PhysRevC.86.064904 Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA ...

  7. Photon emission from a momentum-anisotropic quark-gluon plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text ...

  8. Equilibrium Distribution of Heavy Quarks in Fokker-Planck Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D. Brian; Rafelski, Johann

    2000-01-03

    We obtain an explicit generalization, within Fokker-Planck dynamics, of Einstein's relation between drag, diffusion, and the equilibrium distribution for a spatially homogeneous system, considering both the transverse and longitudinal diffusion for dimension n>1 . We provide a complete characterization of the equilibrium distribution in terms of the drag and diffusion transport coefficients. We apply this analysis to charm quark dynamics in a thermal quark-gluon plasma for the case of collisional equilibration. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  9. Plasma Instabilities in Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attems, M.; Rebhan, A.; Strickland, M.

    2011-05-23

    Non-Abelian plasma instabilities play a crucial role in the nonequilibrium dynamics of a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. The Chromo-Weibel instabilities have been proposed as a possible mechanism for the fast apparent thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma and have been extensively studied in stationary anisotropic plasmas using the so-called hard-loop approximation. The generalization to the hard-expanding-loop (HEL) formalism allows the (numerical) calculation of the time evolution of gluonic mean fields in the more realistic dynamical case of anisotropic expansion.

  10. Quarkyonic Matter and Quark Number Scaling of Elliptic Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Csernai, L. P.; Zschocke, S.; Horvat, Sz.; Cheng Yun; Mishustin, I. N.

    2011-05-23

    The constituent quark number scaling of elliptic flow is studied in a non-equilibrium hadronization and freeze-out model with rapid dynamical transition from ideal, deconfined and chirally symmetric Quark Gluon Plasma, to final non-interacting hadrons. In this transition a Bag model of constituent quarks is considered, where the quarks gain constituent quark mass while the background Bag-field breaks up and vanishes. The constituent quarks then recombine into simplified hadron states, while chemical, thermal and flow equilibrium break down one after the other. In this scenario the resulting temperatures and flow velocities of baryons and mesons are different. Using a simplified few source model of the elliptic flow, we are able to reproduce the constituent quark number scaling, with assumptions on the details of the non-equilibrium processes.

  11. The gluon Sivers distribution: Status and future prospects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boer, Daniël; Lorcé, Cédric; Pisano, Cristian; Zhou, Jian

    2015-06-28

    In this study, we review what is currently known about the gluon Sivers distribution and what are the opportunities to learn more about it. Because single transverse spin asymmetries in p↑p → πX provide only indirect information about the gluon Sivers function through the relation with the quark-gluon and tri-gluon Qiu-Sterman functions, current data from hadronic collisions at RHIC have not yet been translated into a solid constraint on the gluon Sivers function.

  12. Photoproduction of Vector Mesons at LHC and the Nuclear Gluon Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griep, M. T.; Goncalves, V. P.; Ayala Filho, A. L.

    2010-11-12

    A systematic measurement of the nuclear gluon distribution is of fundamental interest in understanding the parton structure of nuclei and to determine the initial conditions of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) predicted to be formed in central heavy ion collisions. At the moment the behavior of this distribution is completely undetermined by the fixed target experiments, with a possible improvement in the future electron-nucleus colliders. However, as the date of construction and start of operation of these colliders is still in debate, we need to obtain alternative searches to estimate the medium effects in the nuclear gluon distribution. An alternative is the study of the vector meson production in ultraperipheral heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC in order to constrain the nuclear medium effects present in the nuclear gluon distribution. In this contribution we present our main results for the J/{Psi} photoproduction.

  13. Jet quenching and broadening: The transport coefficient q in an anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baier, Rudolf; Mehtar-Tani, Yacine

    2008-12-15

    The jet quenching parameter q is analyzed for a quark jet propagating in an anisotropic plasma. The momentum anisotropy is calculated at high temperature of the underlying quark-gluon plasma. q is explicitly estimated in leading-logarithmic approximation by the broadening of the massless quark interacting via gluon exchange. A plasma instability is present. Strong indications are found that q is increasing with increasing anisotropy. Possible implications for the saturation scale Q{sub s} in A-A collisions are pointed out.

  14. Gluon polarization in the proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, Steven D.; Casey, Andrew; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2011-03-15

    We combine heavy-quark renormalization group arguments with our understanding of the nucleon's wave function to deduce a bound on the gluon polarization {Delta}g in the proton. The bound is consistent with the values extracted from spin experiments at COMPASS and RHIC.

  15. Quark Flavors and Conserved Charges at Finite Density in the QCD Phase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagram | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility An illustration of the formation of protons, neutrons, and other hadrons at the QCD crossover transition from the Quark-Gluon Plasma to a gas of hadrons during the evolution of the universe. Credit: Sandor Katz, Eotvos University Quark Flavors and Conserved Charges at Finite Density in the QCD Phase Diagram PI Name: Rene Bellwied PI Email: bellwied@uh.edu Institution: University of Houston Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF:

  16. INTERACTING QUARK MATTER EQUATION OF STATE FOR COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraga, Eduardo S.; Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2014-02-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) studies of the thermodynamics of hot quark-gluon plasma demonstrate the importance of accounting for the interactions of quarks and gluons if one wants to investigate the phase structure of strongly interacting matter. Motivated by this observation and using state-of-the-art results from perturbative QCD, we construct a simple, effective equation of state (EOS) for cold quark matter that consistently incorporates the effects of interactions and furthermore includes a built-in estimate of the inherent systematic uncertainties. This goes beyond the MIT bag model description in a crucial way, yet leads to an EOS that is equally straightforward to use. We also demonstrate that, at moderate densities, our EOS can be made to smoothly connect to hadronic EOSs, with the two exhibiting very similar behavior near the matching region. The resulting hybrid stars are seen to have masses similar to those predicted by the purely nucleonic EOSs.

  17. Neutrons and Quarks Share Dual Nature | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gluons, which glue the quarks together so tightly that no quark can ever be found alone. ... This odd phenomenon is called quark-hadron duality. According to Patricia Solvignon, a ...

  18. G-Zero Finds that Ghostly Strange Quarks Influence Proton Structure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strange quarks in the proton's quark-gluon sea contribute to a proton's properties. ... They determined that the next-lightest quark, the "strange" quark, would be the most ...

  19. Heavy-quark production in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions within a partonic transport model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uphoff, Jan; Fochler, Oliver; Greiner, Carsten; Xu Zhe

    2010-10-15

    The production and space-time evolution of charm and bottom quarks in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are investigated with the partonic transport model BAMPS (Boltzmann approach of multiparton scatterings). Heavy quarks, produced in primary hard parton scatterings during nucleon-nucleon collisions, are sampled using the Monte Carlo event generator pythia or the leading-order minijet model in conjunction with the Glauber model, revealing a strong sensitivity on the parton distribution functions, scales, and heavy-quark mass. In a comprehensive study exploring different charm masses, K factors, and possible initial gluon conditions, secondary production and the evolution of heavy quarks are examined within a fully dynamic BAMPS simulation for central heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Although charm production in the quark-gluon plasma can be neglected at RHIC, it is significant at LHC but very sensitive to the initial conditions and the charm mass. Bottom production in the quark-gluon plasma, however, is negligible both at RHIC and LHC.

  20. The study of the phase structure of hadronic matter by searching for the deconfined quark-gluon phase transition using 2 TeV {bar p}p collisions; and by searching for critical phenomena in an exclusive study of multifragmentation using 1 GeV/nucleon heavy ion collisions. Progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scharenberg, R.P.; Hirsch, A.S.; Tincknell, M.L.

    1992-09-15

    An experiment to search for the production of quark{endash}gluon plasma in proton{endash}antiproton interactions is described with emphasis on 1992 results. Next, a search for critical phenomena using the EOS Time Projection Chamber is similarly described, including the results of 1992 test runs, nucleus{endash}nucleus collision simulations, and the extraction of critical indices from small percolation lattices. Analysis of results from experiments to detect the possible production of anomalous photons in the central rapidity region with transverse momentum between 5 and 50 MeV/c are discussed. Initial work on an experiment to study the high-density, high-temperature state of matter formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at relativistic energies, planned to begin in fall 1997, is related. Finally, work on a research and development project to investigate silicon avalanche diodes as time-of-flight detectors for nuclear and particle physics applications is reviewed. The principle is to detect the ionization of charged particles directly in the Si; feasibility has been demonstrated.

  1. The study of the phase structure of hadronic matter by searching for the deconfined quark-gluon phase transition using 2 TeV [bar p]p collisions; and by searching for critical phenomena in an exclusive study of multifragmentation using 1 GeV/nucleon heavy ion collisions. [Detect ionization of charged particles directly in Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scharenberg, R.P.; Hirsch, A.S.; Tincknell, M.L.

    1992-09-15

    An experiment to search for the production of quark[endash]gluon plasma in proton[endash]antiproton interactions is described with emphasis on 1992 results. Next, a search for critical phenomena using the EOS Time Projection Chamber is similarly described, including the results of 1992 test runs, nucleus[endash]nucleus collision simulations, and the extraction of critical indices from small percolation lattices. Analysis of results from experiments to detect the possible production of anomalous photons in the central rapidity region with transverse momentum between 5 and 50 MeV/c are discussed. Initial work on an experiment to study the high-density, high-temperature state of matter formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at relativistic energies, planned to begin in fall 1997, is related. Finally, work on a research and development project to investigate silicon avalanche diodes as time-of-flight detectors for nuclear and particle physics applications is reviewed. The principle is to detect the ionization of charged particles directly in the Si; feasibility has been demonstrated.

  2. Nuclear-matter--quark-matter phase diagram with strangeness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barz, H. W.; Friman, B. L.; Knoll, J.; Schulz, H.

    1989-07-01

    A phenomenological equation of state of strongly interacting matter, including strange degrees of freedom, is presented. It is shown that the hyperon and kaon interactions must be included, in order to obtain a reasonable description of the deconfinement transition at high baryon densities. The consequences of kaon condensation on the nuclear-matter--quark-matter phase diagram are explored. The relative particle abundances obtained in an isentropic expansion of a blob of quark-gluon plasma are presented for different initial conditions. Implications for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are briefly discussed.

  3. Gluons and the NJL coupling constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braghin, Fbio L.; Barros Jr, Ednaldo; Paulo Jr, Ademar

    2014-11-11

    The QCD origin of the NJL model is re-analysed by considering the gluon condensate of order two . The key point is the treatment of the gluon interactions. To linearize the action the auxiliary variable method is employed to introduce a scalar variable ?(x) that yield such condensate by means of its value in the vacuum, and then another auxiliary variable that corresponds to an antisymmetric gluon configuration ?(x). For that, besides that, two different possible limits of the fourth order non local quark interaction that may contribute to the NJL coupling are compared.

  4. Geek-Up[11.05.10]: Quark Gluon Plasma, Solar-Power Generating Windows and CCS Field Studies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) first record-setting run of high-energy proton collisions, new transparent film capable of absorbing light and generating electrical charge developed, and field test finds that opportunities to permanently store carbon in unmineable seams of lignite may be more widespread than previously documented -- all in this week's Geek-Up.

  5. Equation of state and heavy-quark free energy at finite temperature and density in two flavor lattice QCD with Wilson quark action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ejiri, S.; Maezawa, Y.; Ukita, N.; Aoki, S.; Hatsuda, T.; Ishii, N.; Kanaya, K.; Umeda, T.

    2010-07-01

    We study the equation of state at finite temperature and density in two-flavor QCD with the renormalization group improved gluon action and the clover-improved Wilson quark action on a 16{sup 3}x4 lattice. Along the lines of constant physics at m{sub PS}/m{sub V}=0.65 and 0.80, we compute the second and forth derivatives of the grand canonical partition function with respect to the quark chemical potential {mu}{sub q}=({mu}{sub u}+{mu}{sub d})/2 and the isospin chemical potential {mu}{sub I}=({mu}{sub u}-{mu}{sub d})/2 at vanishing chemical potentials, and study the behaviors of thermodynamic quantities at finite {mu}{sub q} using these derivatives for the case {mu}{sub I}=0. In particular, we study density fluctuations at nonezero temperature and density by calculating the quark number and isospin susceptibilities and their derivatives with respect to {mu}{sub q}. To suppress statistical fluctuations, we also examine new techniques applicable at low densities. We find a large enhancement in the fluctuation of the quark number when the density increased near the pseudocritical temperature, suggesting a critical point at finite {mu}{sub q} terminating the first order transition line between hadronic and quark-gluon-plasma phases. This result agrees with the previous results using staggered-type quark actions qualitatively. Furthermore, we study heavy-quark free energies and Debye screening masses at finite density by measuring the first and second derivatives of these quantities for various color channels of heavy quark-quark and quark-antiquark pairs. The results suggest that, to the leading order of {mu}{sub q}, the interaction between two quarks becomes stronger at finite densities, while that between quark and antiquark becomes weaker.

  6. Sambamurti Memorial Lecture: Spotlight on the Gluon

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Michael Begelas

    2010-09-01

    Begel uses results from the Fermilab D0 and E706 experiments to explain how the production rate and energy spectrum of photons produced during proton collisions helped to clarify how the energy inside the proton is shared between quarks and gluons.

  7. Initial conditions dependency in heavy-quarks suppression in ultra-relativistic collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Alarcon do Passo Suaide, Alexandre

    2013-05-06

    Heavy quark suppression in central Au+Au collisions is expected to be smaller than that of light quarks. However experimental data suggest that they are evenly suppressed. We propose considering fluctuations in the medium as they may lead to high-density regions which in turn can cause a considerable quark suppression at the early stages of the collision evolution. To analyse the overall effect of these fluctuations we perform computer simulations of charm and bottom propagating through the quark-gluon plasma and obtain estimates of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA}. This quantity gives us information about the heavy quark suppression that can be compared to published experimental data from the STAR experiment.

  8. Nucleation of quark matter in the PQM model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mintz, Bruno W.; Stiele, Rainer; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2013-03-25

    We use Langer's theory to calculate the surface tension of critical bubbles in a first-order quark-hadron phase transition at moderate and high baryon chemical potential, as predicted by the Polyakov-Quark-Meson (PQM) model at the mean-field level. We define an effective 4-dimensional order parameter, which is used to overestimate the surface tension of nucleating bubbles within the thin-wall approximation. We find relatively low values for the surface tension, {Sigma} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 15MeV/fm{sup 2}. This implies that a metastable state, such as a supercooled quark-gluon plasma (QGP), quickly decays even in regions relatively close to the coexistence line of the phase diagram. Possible consequences for cosmology are briefly outlined.

  9. Gluon-glueball duality and glueball searches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nussinov, Shmuel; Shrock, Robert

    2009-09-01

    We discuss a notion of gluon-glueball duality analogous to quark-hadron duality. We apply this idea to the radiative decay of heavy orthoquarkonium, QQ{yields}{gamma}gg, which has been used to search for glueballs. The duality is first introduced in two simplified contexts: (i) a hypothetical version of QCD without any light quarks and (ii) QCD in the large-N{sub c} limit. We then discuss how an approximate form of this duality could hold in real QCD, based on a hierarchy of time scales in the temporal evolution of the gg subsystem in radiative orthoquarkonium decay. We apply this notion of gluon-glueball duality to suggest a method that could be useful in experimental searches for glueballs.

  10. Constituent quark scaling violation due to baryon number transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlop J. C.; Lisa, M.A., Sorensen, P.

    2011-10-31

    In ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx} 200 GeV, the azimuthal emission anisotropy of hadrons with low and intermediate transverse momentum (p{sub T} {approx}< 4 GeV/c) displays an intriguing scaling. In particular, the baryon (meson) emission patterns are consistent with a scenario in which a bulk medium of flowing quarks coalesces into three-quark (two-quark) 'bags.' While a full understanding of this number-of-constituent-quark (NCQ) scaling remains elusive, it is suggestive of a thermalized bulk system characterized by colored dynamical degrees of freedom - a quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In this scenario, one expects the scaling to break down as the central energy density is reduced below the QGP formation threshold; for this reason, NCQ-scaling violation searches are of interest in the energy scan program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. However, as {radical}s{sub NN} is reduced, it is not only the initial energy density that changes; there is also an increase in the net baryon number at midrapidity, as stopping transports entrance-channel partons to midrapidity. This phenomenon can result in violations of simple NCQ scaling. Still in the context of the quark coalescence model, we describe a specific pattern for the breakdown of the scaling that includes different flow strengths for particles and their antipartners. Related complications in the search for recently suggested exotic phenomena are also discussed.

  11. Direct Probes of Linearly Polarized Gluons inside Unpolarized Hadrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Daniel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian; /Cagliari U. /INFN, Cagliari

    2011-02-07

    We show that the unmeasured distribution of linearly polarized gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be directly probed in jet or heavy quark pair production both in electron-hadron and hadron-hadron collisions. We present expressions for the simplest cos 2{phi} asymmetries and estimate their maximal value in the particular case of electron-hadron collisions. Measurements of the linearly polarized gluon distribution in the proton should be feasible in future EIC or LHeC experiments.

  12. Accessing the Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons in Unpolarized Hadrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Daniel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian; /Cagliari U. /INFN, Cagliari

    2011-08-19

    Gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be linearly polarized provided they have a nonzero transverse momentum. The simplest and theoretically safest way to probe this distribution of linearly polarized gluons is through cos2{phi} asymmetries in heavy quark pair or dijet production in electron-hadron collisions. Future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) or Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) experiments are ideally suited for this purpose. Here we estimate the maximum asymmetries for EIC kinematics.

  13. An effective field theory for collinear and soft gluons: Heavy to light

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    decays (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect An effective field theory for collinear and soft gluons: Heavy to light decays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An effective field theory for collinear and soft gluons: Heavy to light decays We construct the Lagrangian for an effective theory of highly energetic quarks with energy Q, interacting with collinear and soft gluons. This theory has two low energy scales, the transverse momentum of the collinear particles, p{sub {perpendicular}},

  14. Dark matter and dark energy from quark bag model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brilenkov, Maxim; Eingorn, Maxim; Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Zhuk, Alexander E-mail: maxim.eingorn@gmail.com E-mail: ai.zhuk2@gmail.com

    2013-08-01

    We calculate the present expansion of our Universe endowed with relict colored objects quarks and gluons that survived hadronization either as isolated islands of quark-gluon ''nuggets'' or spread uniformly in the Universe. In the first scenario, the QNs can play the role of dark matter. In the second scenario, we demonstrate that uniform colored objects can play the role of dark energy providing the late-time accelerating expansion of the Universe.

  15. Direct Probes of Linearly Polarized Gluons inside Unpolarized Hadrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Danieel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2011-04-01

    We show that linearly polarized gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be directly probed in jet or heavy quark pair production in electron-hadron collisions. We discuss the simplest cos2{phi} asymmetries and estimate their maximal value, concluding that measurements of the unknown linearly polarized gluon distribution in the proton should be feasible in future Electron-Ion Collider or Large Hadron electron Collider experiments. Analogous asymmetries in hadron-hadron collisions suffer from factorization breaking contributions and would allow us to quantify the importance of initial- and final-state interactions.

  16. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. W. Zhang Thermal charm production in quark-gluon plasma at LHC......from strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma......

  17. Probing the Linear Polarization of Gluons in Unpolarized Hadrons at EIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Daniel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian; /Cagliari U. /INFN, Cagliari

    2011-08-17

    Gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be linearly polarized provided they have a nonzero transverse momentum. The simplest and theoretically safest way to probe this TMD distribution of linearly polarized gluons is through cos 2{phi} asymmetries in heavy quark pair or dijet production in electron-hadron collisions. Future EIC or LHeC experiments are ideally suited for this purpose. Here we estimate the maximum asymmetries for EIC kinematics.

  18. Heavy-quark physics in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1991-04-01

    Heavy quarks can expose new symmetries and novel phenomena in QCD not apparent in ordinary hadronic systems. In these lectures I discuss the use of effective-Lagrangian and light-cone Fock methods to analyze exclusive heavy hadron decays such as {Upsilon} {yields} p{bar p} and B {yields} {pi}{pi}, and also to derive effective Schroedinger and Dirac equations for heavy quark systems. Two contributions to the heavy quark structure functions of the proton and other light hadrons are identified: an extrinsic'' contribution associated with leading twist QCD evolution of the gluon distribution, and a higher twist intrinsic'' contribution due to the hardness of high-mass fluctuations of multi-gluon correlations in hadronic wavefunctions. A non-perturbative calculation of the heavy quark distribution of a meson in QCD in one space and one time is presented. The intrinsic higher twist contributions to the pion and proton structure functions can dominate the hadronic production of heavy quark systems at large longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} and give anomalous contributions to the quark structure functions of ordinary hadrons at large x{sub bj}. I also discuss a number of ways in which heavy quark production in nuclear targets can test fundamental QCD phenomena and provide constraints on hadronic wavefunctions. The topics include color transparency, finite formation time, and predictions for charm production at threshold, including nuclear-bound quarkonium. I also discuss a number of QCD mechanisms for the suppression of J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production in nuclear collisions, including gluon shadowing, the peripheral excitation of intrinsic heavy quark components at large x{sub F}, and the coalescence of heavy quarks with co-moving spectators at low x{sub F}.

  19. Final Report for Project. Quark matter under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Incera, Vivian; Ferrer, Efrain

    2015-12-31

    The results obtained in the two years of the grant have served to shine new light on several important questions about the phases of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) under extreme conditions that include quark matter at high density, as well quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures, both in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The interest in including an external magnetic field on these studies is motivated by the generation of large magnetic fields in off-central heavy-ion collisions and by their common presence in astrophysical compact objects, the two scenarios where the physics of quark matter becomes relevant. The tasks carried out in this DOE project led us, among other things, to discover the first connection between the physics of very dense quark matter and novel materials as for instance topological insulators and Weyl semimetals; they allowed us to find a physical explanation for and a solution to a standing puzzle in the apparent effect of a magnetic field on the critical temperature of the QCD chiral transition; and they led us to establish by the first time that the core of the observed two-solar-mass neutron stars could be made up of quark matter in certain inhomogeneous chiral phases in a magnetic field and that this was consistent with current astrophysical observations. A major goal established by the Nuclear Science Advisory committee in its most recent report “Reaching for the Horizon” has been “to truly understand how nuclei and strongly interacting matter in all its forms behave and can predict their behavior in new settings.” The results found in this DOE project have all contributed to address this goal, and thus they are important for advancing fundamental knowledge in the area of nuclear physics and for enhancing our understanding of the role of strong magnetic fields in the two settings where they are most relevant, neutron stars and heavy-ion collisions.

  20. Gluon-gluon contributions to W+ W- production and Higgs interference effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R.Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we complete our re-assessment of the production of W boson pairs at the LHC, by calculating analytic results for the gg {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} {yields} {nu}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}} process including the effect of massive quarks circulating in the loop. Together with the one-loop amplitudes containing the first two generations of massless quarks propagating in the loop, these diagrams can give a significant contribution with a large flux of gluons. One of the component parts of this calculation is the production of a standard model Higgs boson, gg {yields} H and its subsequent decay, H {yields} W{sup +}({yields} {nu}{ell}{sup +})W{sup -}({yields} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}). We will quantify the importance of the interference between the Higgs boson production process and the gluon-induced continuum production in the context of searches for the Higgs boson at the Tevatron and the LHC. For instance, for m{sub H} < 140 GeV the effect of the interference typically results in around a 10% reduction in the expected number of Higgs signal events. The majority of this interference is due to non-resonant contributions. Therefore cuts on the transverse mass such as those currently used by the ATLAS collaboration reduce the destructive interference to about a 1% effect. We advocate that a cut on the maximum transverse mass be used in future Higgs searches in this channel.

  1. Bulk viscosity of anisotropically expanding hot QCD plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, Vinod

    2011-11-01

    The bulk viscosity, {zeta} and its ratio with the shear viscosity, {zeta}/{eta} have been studied in an anisotropically expanding pure glue plasma in the presence of turbulent color fields. It has been shown that the anisotropy in the momentum distribution function of gluons, which has been determined from a linearized transport equation eventually leads to the bulk viscosity. For the isotropic (equilibrium) state, a recently proposed quasiparticle model of pure SU(3) lattice QCD equation of state has been employed where the interactions are encoded in the effective fugacity. It has been argued that the interactions present in the equation of state, significantly contribute to the bulk viscosity. Its ratio with the shear viscosity is significant even at 1.5T{sub c}. Thus, one needs to take in account the effects of the bulk viscosity while studying the hydrodynamic expansion of quark-gluon plasma in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.

  2. How much do heavy quarks thermalize in a heavy ion collision?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Guy D.; Teaney, Derek

    2005-06-01

    We investigate the thermalization of charm quarks in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. To this end, we calculate the diffusion coefficient in the perturbative quark gluon plasma and relate it to collisional energy loss and momentum broadening. We then use these transport properties to formulate a Langevin model for the evolution of the heavy quark spectrum in the hot medium. The model is strictly valid in the nonrelativistic limit and for all velocities {gamma}v<{alpha}s{sup -1/2} to leading logarithm in T/m{sub D}. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation can be solved analytically for a Bjorken expansion and the solution gives a simple estimate for the medium modifications of the heavy quark spectrum as a function of the diffusion coefficient. Finally we solve the Langevin equations numerically in a hydrodynamic simulation of the heavy-ion reaction. The results of this simulation are the medium modifications of the charm spectrum R{sub AA} and the expected elliptic flow v{sub 2}(p{sub T}) as a function of the diffusion coefficient.

  3. Measurement of the Gluon Polarization {delta}g/g from Open Charm at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunne, Fabienne

    2009-08-04

    We have measured the gluon polarization in the nucleon by detecting charm production via D{sup 0} meson decay to charged K and {pi} in polarized muon scattering off a longitudinally polarized deuteron target. The dominant process for charm production is the photon gluon fusion into a charm anti-charm quark pair. By using all deuteron statistics from COMPASS accumulated between 2002 and 2006, we extract double spin asymmetries in bins of the transverse momentum and the energy of the D{sup 0} meson and we perform a leading order analysis of the data to extract the gluon polarization <{delta}g/g> = -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst) at a Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) scale {mu}{sup 2} = 13 GeV{sup 2} and at a gluon momentum fraction = 0.11.

  4. Production of b-quark jets at the large Hadron Collider in the parton-reggeization approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleev, V. A. Shipilova, A. V.

    2013-11-15

    The inclusive hadroproduction of b-quark jets and bb-bar-quark dijets at the Large Hadron Collider is considered by using the hypothesis of gluon Reggeization in t-channel exchanges at high energies. Experimental data obtained by the ATLAS Collaboration are described well within all of the presented kinematical regions for single b-quark jets and bb-bar-quark dijets without resort to any free parameters.

  5. Quark-gluon correlations and Color Polarizabilities (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 870; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: CIPAN2006: 9. conference on intersections of particle and nuclear ...

  6. Quarks and gluons in low-p/sub T/ physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunion, J.F.

    1980-09-01

    Review and comment are given on some of the existing approaches to low-p/sub T/ particle production based on ideas of quantum chromodynamics. The relationships between the various theories are emphasized and, the points of overlap between them are noted. Constraints upon the models coming from deep inelastic and e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation data are discussed.

  7. First measurement of the fraction of top-quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Kwang, S.; Levy, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yorita, K.

    2008-12-01

    We present the first measurement of {sigma}(gg{yields}tt)/{sigma}(pp{yields}tt). We use 0.96 fb{sup -1} of {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV pp collision data recorded with the CDF II detector at Fermilab. Using charged particles with low transverse momentum in tt events, we find {sigma}(gg{yields}tt)/{sigma}(pp{yields}tt)=0.07{+-}0.14(stat){+-}0.07(syst), corresponding to a 95% confidence level upper limit of 0.33, in agreement with the standard model next-to-leading-order prediction of 0.15{+-}0.05.

  8. Search for Charged Strange Quark Matter Produced in 11.5{ital A} GeV/{ital c} Au+Pb Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Cataldo, G.; Giglietto, N.; Raino, A.; Spinelli, P.; Huang, H.Z.; Hill, J.C.; Hoversten, R.A.; Libby, B.; Wohn, F.K.; Rabin, M.S.; Haridas, P.; Pless, I.A.; Van Buren, G.; Armstrong, T.A.; Lewis, R.A.; Reid, J.D.; Smith, G.A.; Toothacker, W.S.; Davies, R.; Hirsch, A.S.; Porile, N.T.; Rimai, A.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Srivastava, B.K.; Tincknell, M.L.; Lainis, T.; Greene, S.V.; Bennett, S.J.; Cormier, T.M.; Dee, P.; Fachini, P.; Kim, B.; Li, Q.; Munhoz, M.G.; Pruneau, C.A.; Wilson, W.K.; Zhao, K.; Barish, K.N.; Bennett, M.J.; Chikanian, A.; Coe, S.D.; Diebold, G.E.; Finch, L.E.; George, N.K.; Kumar, B.S.; Lajoie, J.G.; Majka, R.D.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Rotondo, F.S.; Sandweiss, J.; Slaughter, A.J.; Wolin, E.J.; Xu, Z.

    1997-11-01

    We present results of a search for strange quark matter (strangelets) in 11.5A GeV /c Au+Pb collisions from the 1994 and 1995 runs of experiment E864 at Brookhaven{close_quote}s Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. We observe no strangelet candidates and set a 90{percent} confidence level upper limit of approximately 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} per 10{percent} central interaction for the production of {vert_bar}Z{vert_bar}=1 and {vert_bar}Z{vert_bar}=2 strangelets over a large mass range and with metastable lifetimes of about 50ns or more. These results place constraints primarily on quark-gluon plasma based production models for strangelets. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Gluon transversity in the hard exclusive reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kivel, Nikolay

    2005-06-14

    We discuss contributions of the gluon transversity in several hard exclusive reactions and suggest observables sensitive to such amplitudes.

  10. Improving the Top Quark Forward-Backward Asymmetry Measurement at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Yang; Han, Zhenyu; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-15

    At the LHC, top quark pairs are dominantly produced from gluons, making it difficult to measure the top quark forward-backward asymmetry. To improve the asymmetry measurement, we study variables that can distinguish between top quarks produced from quarks and those from gluons: the invariant mass of the top pair, the rapidity of the top-antitop system in the lab frame, the rapidity of the top quark in the top-antitop rest frame, the top quark polarization and the top-antitop spin correlation. We combine all the variables in a likelihood discriminant method to separate quark-initiated events from gluon-initiated events. We apply our method on models including G-prime's and W-prime's motivated by the recent observation of a large top quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron. We have found that the significance of the asymmetry measurement can be improved by 10% to 30%. At the same time, the central values of the asymmetry increase by 40% to 100%. We have also analytically derived the best spin quantization axes for studying top quark polarization as well as spin-correlation for the new physics models.

  11. Quark Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasser, Juerg

    2005-10-26

    In my talk, I reviewed some basic aspects of quark masses: what do they mean, how can they be determined, what is our present knowledge on them. The talk was addressed to non specialists in the field, and so is this write up.

  12. Measurements of Top Quark Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerrito, Lucio

    2009-05-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of four selected properties of the top quark are presented. The relative fraction of t{bar t} production through gluon fusion has been measured in the t{bar t} dilepton decay channel by the CDF Collaboration as F{sub gg} = 0.53{sub -0.38}{sup +0.36}. Using an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector, we also determine the t{bar t} differential cross section with respect to values up to {approx}1 TeV of the t{bar t} invariant mass. We present a model-independent measurement of the helicity of W bosons produced in top quark decays, using an integrated luminosity of up to 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector, and find the fraction of longitudinal W bosons f{sub 0} = 0.49 {+-} 0.14, and the fraction of right-handed W bosons f{sub +} = 0.11 {+-} 0.08. Finally, we measure the parton level forward-backward asymmetry of pair produced top quarks using an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector, and find A{sub FB} = 0.19 {+-} 0.07. All results are consistent with the predictions of the standard model.

  13. Meson Spectroscopy in the Light Quark Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Vita, Raffaella

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the hadron spectrum is one of the fundamental issues in modern particle physics. We know that existing hadron configurations include baryons, made of three quarks, and mesons, made of quark-antiquark pairs. However most of the mass of the hadrons is not due to the mass of these elementary constituents but to their binding force. Studying the hadron spectrum is therefore a tool to understand one of the fundamental forces in nature, the strong force, and Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD), the theory that describes it. This investigation can provide an answer to fundamental questions as what is the origin of the mass of hadrons, what is the origin of quark confinement, what are the relevant degrees of freedom to describe these complex systems and how the transition between the elementary constituents, quarks and gluons, and baryons and mesons occurs. In this field a key tool is given by meson spectroscopy. Mesons, being made by a quark and an anti-quark, are the simplest quark bound system and therefore the ideal benchmark to study the interaction between quarks and understand what the role of gluons is. In this investigation, it is fundamental to precisely determine the spectrum and properties of mesons but also to search for possible unconventional states beyond the configuration q{anti q} as tetraquarks (qq{anti qq}), hybrids (q{anti q}g) and glueballs. These states can be distinguished unambiguously from regular mesons when they have exotic quantum numbers, i.e. combinations of total angular momentum, spin and parity that are not allowed for q{anti q} states. These are called exotic quantum numbers and the corresponding states are referred to as exotics. The study of the meson spectrum and the search for exotics is among the goals of several experiments in the world that exploit different reaction processes, as e{sup +}e{sup −} annihilation, p{anti p} annihilation, pion scattering, proton-proton scattering and photo-production, to produce meson states

  14. Quark matter symmetry energy and quark stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-01-10

    We extend the confined-density-dependent-mass (CDDM) model to include isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass. Within the confined-isospin-density-dependent-mass (CIDDM) model, we study the quark matter symmetry energy, the stability of strange quark matter, and the properties of quark stars. We find that including isospin dependence of the equivalent quark mass can significantly influence the quark matter symmetry energy as well as the properties of strange quark matter and quark stars. While the recently discovered large mass pulsars PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 with masses around 2 M {sub ☉} cannot be quark stars within the CDDM model, they can be well described by quark stars in the CIDDM model. In particular, our results indicate that the two-flavor u-d quark matter symmetry energy should be at least about twice that of a free quark gas or normal quark matter within the conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in order to describe PSR J1614–2230 and PSR J0348+0432 as quark stars.

  15. HoravaLifshitz cosmology, entropic interpretation and quarkhadron phase transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheyri, F. Khodadi, M. Sepangi, Hamid Reza

    2013-05-15

    Based on the assumptions of the standard model of cosmology, a phase transition associated with chiral symmetry breaking after the electroweak transition has occurred at approximately 10 ?s after the Big Bang to convert a plasma of free quarks and gluons into hadrons. We consider such a phase transition in the context of a deformed HoravaLifshitz cosmology. The Friedmann equation for the deformed HoravaLifshitz universe is obtained using the entropic interpretation of gravity, proposed by Verlinde. We investigate the effects of the parameter ? appearing in the theory on the evolution of the physical quantities relevant to a description of the early universe, namely, the energy density and temperature before, during and after the phase transition. Finally, we study the cross-over phase transition in both high and low temperature regions in view of the recent lattice QCD simulations data. -- Highlights: ? We study the problem of the quarkhadron phase transition in the early universe, in the context of HoravaLifshitz cosmology. ? We conduct this study by including the recently introduced entropic principle. ? We study the behavior of thermodynamical parameters of the theory.

  16. Integral equation for gauge invariant quark Green's function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sazdjian, H.

    2008-08-29

    We consider gauge invariant quark two-point Green's functions in which the gluonic phase factor follows a skew-polygonal line. Using a particular representation for the quark propagator in the presence of an external gluon field, functional relations between Green's functions with different numbers of segments of the polygonal lines are established. An integral equation is obtained for the Green's function having a phase factor along a single straight line. The related kernels involve Wilson loops with skew-polygonal contours and with functional derivatives along the sides of the contours.

  17. Quarkonium states in an anisotropic QCD plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumitru, Adrian; Guo Yun; Mocsy, Agnes; Strickland, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We consider quarkonium in a hot quantum chromodynamics (QCD) plasma which, due to expansion and nonzero viscosity, exhibits a local anisotropy in momentum space. At short distances the heavy-quark potential is known at tree level from the hard-thermal loop resummed gluon propagator in anisotropic perturbative QCD. The potential at long distances is modeled as a QCD string which is screened at the same scale as the Coulomb field. At asymptotic separation the potential energy is nonzero and inversely proportional to the temperature. We obtain numerical solutions of the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation for this potential. We find that quarkonium binding is stronger at nonvanishing viscosity and expansion rate, and that the anisotropy leads to polarization of the P-wave states.

  18. Study on the top quark pair production mechanism in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naganoma, Junji; /Waseda U.

    2008-03-01

    The study of the top quark pair production mechanism in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is described. The main subjects are the measurements of the top quark pair production cross section, the top quark mass and a search for a new particle decaying to the top quark pair. The analyses are based on 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Run II experiment between March 2002 and May 2007, using the lepton+jets events. The measured top quark pair production cross section is 8.2 {+-} 0.5 (stat.) {+-} 0.8 (syst.) {+-} 0.5 (lum.) pb, which is slightly higher than the standard model prediction at the top mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. The top quark mass is an important parameter in the standard model, and also in the experimental studies. The measured top quark mass if 171.6 {+-} 2.0 (stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. Finally, they report on a search for a new gauge boson decaying to t{bar t}, which interferes with the standard model gluon in the q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} production process. They call such a hypothetical particle a 'Massive Gluon'. The observed t{bar t} invariant mass distribution is consistent with the standard model expectations, and also the measured massive gluon coupling strength with quarks is consistent within a statistical fluctuation of the standard model expectation in the wide range of the massive gluon masses and widths. They set the upper and lower limits on the coupling strength of the massive gluon.

  19. U.S. Department of Energy and India Partner to Advance Accelerator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of a new form of matter, a quark-gluon plasma, at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The quark-gluon plasma is thought to have existed a mere instant ...

  20. QCDOC -Quantum Chromodynamics on a Chip at BNL | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... with those of a strongly coupled plasma of subatomic quarks and gluons - the so-called quark-gluon plasma that existed a few microseconds after the birth of the universe. ...

  1. Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    discovery during the years 2001-2003 that quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in nuclear ... a new stage of quantitative precision in the description of quark-gluon plasma properties. ...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Jpsi Production in Quark-Gluon Plasma Yan, Li ; Zhuang, Pengfei ; Xu, Nu We study Jpsi ... in phase space and the hydrodynamic equation for evolution of quark-gluon plasma. ...

  3. Phenomenological analysis of Higgs boson production through gluon fusion in association with jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greiner, Nicolas; Hoeche, Stefan; Luisoni, Gionata; Schonherr, Marek; Winter, Jan -Christopher; Yundin, Valery

    2016-01-27

    We present a detailed phenomenological analysis of the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson in association with up to three jets. We consider the gluon fusion channel using an effective theory in the large top-quark mass limit. Higgs boson production in gluon fusion constitutes an irreducible background to the vector boson fusion (VBF) process; hence the precise knowledge of its characteristics is a prerequisite for any measurement in the VBF channel. The calculation is carried out at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD in a fully automated way by combining the two programs GoSAM and SHERPA. We present numerical resultsmore » for a large variety of observables for both standard cuts and VBF selection cuts.« less

  4. Phenomenological analysis of Higgs boson production through gluon fusion in association with jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, Nicolas; Hoeche, Stefan; Luisoni, Gionata; Schonherr, Marek; Winter, Jan -Christopher; Yundin, Valery

    2015-06-09

    We present a detailed phenomenological analysis of the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson in association with up to three jets. We consider the gluon fusion channel using an effective theory in the large top-quark mass limit. Higgs boson production in gluon fusion constitutes an irreducible background to the vector boson fusion (VBF) process; hence the precise knowledge of its characteristics is a prerequisite for any measurement in the VBF channel. The calculation is carried out at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD in a fully automated way by combining the two programs GoSAM and SHERPA. We present numerical results for a large variety of observables for both standard cuts and VBF selection cuts.

  5. Basic features of the pion valence-quark distribution function

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, Lei; Mezrag, Cdric; Moutarde, Herv; Roberts, Craig D.; Rodrguez-Quintero, Jose; Tandy, Peter C.

    2014-10-07

    The impulse-approximation expression used hitherto to define the pion's valence-quark distribution function is flawed because it omits contributions from the gluons which bind quarks into the pion. A corrected leading-order expression produces the model-independent result that quarks dressed via the rainbowladder truncation, or any practical analogue, carry all the pion's light-front momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale. Corrections to the leading contribution may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea-quarks. Working with available empirical information, we use an algebraic model to express the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables amorerealistic comparison with experiment that allows us to highlight the basic features of the pion's measurable valence-quark distribution, q?(x); namely, at a characteristic hadronic scale, q?(x)~(1-x)2 for x?0.85; and the valence-quarks carry approximately two-thirds of the pion's light-front momentum.less

  6. Microsoft Word - strickland_abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quark gluon plasma Dr. Michael Strickland Gettysburg College Abstract: In this talk I will review our theoretical understanding of the dynamics of a non- equilibrium quark ...

  7. Soliton in the global color model with a sophisticated effective gluon propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Bin; Chen Huan; Chang Lei; Liu Yuxin

    2007-08-15

    With a sophisticated effective gluon propagator, Maris-Tandy model, we solve the Dyson-Schwinger equation to get the quark propagator and then study the soliton solution in the global color model (GCM). Along the constraints on the parameters fitted to the pion decay constant, we take several sets of parameters and find that some of the properties of soliton can be produced in the GCM soliton model with a special choice of parameters. We also discuss the influences of the parameters and the ultraviolet perturbative term on the property of the soliton. We find that the interaction among quarks is the one with self-adjusting characteristic and only the fine-tuned interaction can generate an appropriate solition, but not that much stronger attraction produces more stable soliton.

  8. Higgs production via gluon fusion in k{sub T} factorisation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hautmann, F.; Jung, H.; Pandis, V.

    2011-07-15

    Theoretical studies of Higgs production via gluon fusion are frequently carried out in the limit where the top quark mass is much larger than the Higgs mass, an approximation which reduces the top quark loop to an effective vertex. We present a numerical analysis of the error thus introduced by performing a Monte Carlo calculation for gg{yields}h in k{sub T}-factorisation, using the parton shower generator CASCADE. By examining both inclusive and exclusive quantities, we find that retaining the top-mass dependence results in only a small enhancement of the cross-section. We then proceed to compare CASCADE to the collinear Monte Carlos PYTHIA, MC-NLO and POWHEG.

  9. Instabilities of an anisotropically expanding non-Abelian plasma: 1D+3V discretized hard-loop simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebhan, Anton; Attems, Maximilian; Strickland, Michael

    2008-08-15

    Non-Abelian plasma instabilities play a crucial role in the nonequilibrium dynamics of a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma, and they importantly modify the standard perturbative bottom-up thermalization scenario in heavy-ion collisions. Using the auxiliary-field formulation of the hard-loop effective theory, we study numerically the real-time evolution of instabilities in an anisotropic collisionless Yang-Mills plasma undergoing longitudinal free-streaming expansion. In this first real-time lattice simulation we consider the most unstable modes, long-wavelength coherent color fields that are constant in transverse directions and which therefore are effectively 1+1 dimensional in space-time, except for the auxiliary fields which also depend on discretized momentum rapidity and transverse velocity components. We reproduce the semianalytical results obtained previously for the Abelian regime, and we determine the nonlinear effects which occur when the instabilities have grown such that non-Abelian interactions become important.

  10. Quark propagation in the presence of a condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xiangdong; Shakin, C.M.

    2004-12-01

    There is a good deal of current interest in the condensate which has recently be shown to be the Landau gauge version of a more general gauge-invariant expression. In the present work we consider quark propagation in the presence of such a condensate which we assume to be present in the vacuum. We describe the vacuum as a random medium of gluon fields. We discuss quark propagation in that medium and show that the quark propagator has no on-mass-shell pole indicating that a quark cannot propagate over extended distances. That is, the quark is a nonpropagating mode in the gluon condensate.

  11. Gluons in our future | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gluons in our future Gluons in our future July 30, 2014 If one were to eavesdrop on the conversations that we have with our visitors - students of all kinds, politicians or the general public - one might come to the conclusion that we here at Jefferson Lab are crazy about glue/must run a glue factory. It is, indeed, the goal of one of the major experiments that we are to pursue following the upgrade to attempt to measure particles that can tell us more about glue. But what sort of glue are we

  12. Shear Viscosity in a Gluon Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2008-05-02

    The relation of the shear viscosity coefficient to the recently introduced transport rate is derived within relativistic kinetic theory. We calculate the shear viscosity over entropy ratio {eta}/s for a gluon gas, which involves elastic gg{yields}gg perturbative QCD (PQCD) scatterings as well as inelastic gg{r_reversible}ggg PQCD bremsstrahlung. For {alpha}{sub s}=0.3 we find {eta}/s=0.13 and for {alpha}{sub s}=0.6, {eta}/s=0.076. The small {eta}/s values, which suggest strongly coupled systems, are due to the gluon bremsstrahlung incorporated.

  13. Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the ...

  14. Search for pair production of excited top quarks in the lepton + jets final state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-19

    A search is performed for pair-produced spin-3/2 excited top quarks t*t ¯* , each decaying to a top quark and a gluon. The search uses data collected with the CMS detector from pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV, selecting events that have a single isolated muon or electron, an imbalance in transverse momentum, and at least six jets, of which one must be compatible with originating from the fragmentation of a b quark. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1, show no significant excess over standard model predictions, and provide a lower limit of 803 GeV at 95% confidence on the mass of the spin-3/2 t* quark in an extension of the Randall-Sundrum model, assuming a 100% branching fraction of its decay into a top quark and a gluon. As a result, this is the first search for a spin-3/2 excited top quark performed at the LHC.

  15. Search for pair production of excited top quarks in the lepton + jets final state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-11-19

    A search is performed for pair-produced spin-3/2 excited top quarks t*t ¯* , each decaying to a top quark and a gluon. The search uses data collected with the CMS detector from pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV, selecting events that have a single isolated muon or electron, an imbalance in transverse momentum, and at least six jets, of which one must be compatible with originating from the fragmentation of a b quark. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1, show no significant excess over standard model predictions, and provide a lowermore » limit of 803 GeV at 95% confidence on the mass of the spin-3/2 t* quark in an extension of the Randall-Sundrum model, assuming a 100% branching fraction of its decay into a top quark and a gluon. As a result, this is the first search for a spin-3/2 excited top quark performed at the LHC.« less

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (2) coulomb field (2) interactions (2) quark matter (2) simulation (2) asymmetry (1) b ... components of the gluon propagators in quark-gluon plasma in terms of center vortices ...

  17. Nov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LBNL-59103 The Quark-Gluon Plasma: a Perfect Thermostat and a Perfect Particle Reservoir ... mass spectrum 7, 8, we conclude that quark gluon matter confined in heavy resonances ...

  18. Recent COMPASS results on the gluon polarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintans, Catarina

    2009-03-23

    The spin structure of the nucleon is studied in the COMPASS experiment at CERN/SPS, from the collisions of 160 GeV polarized muon beam with a {sup 6}LiD target. The data collected from 2002 to 2006 provide an accurate measurement of longitudinal double spin cross-section asymmetries. The latest results on the gluon polarization, accessed from two independent analyses of photon-gluon fusion selected events, are presented. The study of the open-charm production allows to extract the gluon polarization (in LO QCD) from the measurement of the asymmetry, the value obtained being {delta}g/g -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst), at an average x{sub g} 0.11{sub -0.05}{sup +0.11} and a scale <{mu}{sup 2}> = 13(GeV/c){sup 2}. An alternative and independent way to study the gluon polarization, by studying the high transverse momentum hadron pairs produced, leads to a value {delta}g/g 0.08{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.05(syst), at x{sub g}{sup a{nu}} 0.082{sub -0.027}{sup +0.041} and <{mu}{sup 2}> = 3(GeV/c){sup 2}.

  19. Sketching the pion's valence-quark generalised parton distribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mezrag, C.; Chang, L.; Moutarde, H.; Roberts, C. D.; Rodrguez-Quintero, J.; Sabati, F.; Schmidt, S. M.

    2015-02-01

    In order to learn effectively from measurements of generalised parton distributions (GPDs), it is desirable to compute them using a framework that can potentially connect empirical information with basic features of the Standard Model. We sketch an approach to such computations, based upon a rainbow-ladder (RL) truncation of QCDs DysonSchwinger equations and exemplified via the pions valence dressed-quark GPD, Hv?(x, ?, t). Our analysis focuses primarily on ?=0, although we also capitalise on the symmetry-preserving nature of the RL truncation by connecting Hv?(x, ?=1, t)with the pions valence-quark parton distribution amplitude. We explain that the impulse-approximation used hitherto to definemorethe pions valence dressed-quark GPD is generally invalid owing to omission of contributions from the gluons which bind dressed-quarks into the pion. A simple correction enables us to identify a practicable improvement to the approximation for Hv?(x, 0, t), expressed as the Radon transform of a single amplitude. Therewith we obtain results for Hv?(x, 0, t) and the associated impact-parameter dependent distribution, qv?(x, |b?|), which provide a qualitatively sound picture of the pions dressed-quark structure at a hadronic scale. We evolve the distributions to a scale ? = 2 GeV, so as to facilitate comparisons in future with results from experiment or other nonperturbative methods.less

  20. Search for a heavy vector boson decaying to two gluons in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khader, M.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Rao, K.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2012-12-01

    We present a search for a new heavy vector boson Z' that decays to gluons. Decays to on-shell gluons are suppressed, leading to a dominant decay mode of Z'?g*g. We study the case where the off-shell gluon g* converts to a pair of top quarks, leading to a final state of ttg. In a sample of events with exactly one charged lepton, large missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb? collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio of this chromophilic Z' at 95% confidence level from 300 to 40 fb for Z' masses ranging from 400 to 1000 GeV/c, respectively.

  1. Measurement of the relative fraction of ttbar events produced via gluon fusion in ppbar collision at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaoka, Jared Andrew; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2007-10-01

    In this thesis we present a measurement of the relative fraction of t{bar t} events produced via gluon-fusion to the total number of t{bar t} events. Using the kinematics of the production and decay of the top and antitop quark pair, we trained a Neural Network to discriminate the gluon-fusion events. The Neural Network was then used as a template to fit for the gluon-fusion fraction in data. Using a total integrated luminosity of 955 pb{sup -1} we find {sigma}(gg{yields}t{bar t})/{sigma}(p{bar p}{yields}t{bar t}) < 0.33 at 68% confidence level and {sigma}(gg{yields}t{bar t})/{sigma}(p{bar p}{yields}t{bar t}) < 0.61 at 95% confidence level.

  2. Search for a heavy vector boson decaying to two gluons in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; et al

    2012-12-05

    We present a search for a new heavy vector boson Z' that decays to gluons. Decays to on-shell gluons are suppressed, leading to a dominant decay mode of Z'→g*g. We study the case where the off-shell gluon g* converts to a pair of top quarks, leading to a final state of tt¯g. In a sample of events with exactly one charged lepton, large missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb⁻¹ collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set upper limitsmore » on the production cross section times branching ratio of this chromophilic Z' at 95% confidence level from 300 to 40 fb for Z' masses ranging from 400 to 1000 GeV/c², respectively.« less

  3. VariableR reclustering in multiple top quark events - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, Jeremy; /SLAC

    2015-08-22

    VariableR jet reclustering is an innovative technique that allows for the reconstruction of boosted object over a wide range of kinematic regimes. Such capability enables the efficient identification of events with multiple boosted top quarks which is a typical signature for new physics processes such as the production of the supersymmetric partner of the gluon. In order to evaluate the performance of the algorithm, the VariableR reclustered jets are compared with fixed radius reclustered jets. The flexibility of the algorithm is tested by reconstructing both boosted top quarks and boosted W bosons. The VariableR reclustering method is found to be more efficient than the fixed radius algorithm at identifying top quarks and W bosons in events with four top quarks, therefore enhancing the sensitivity for gluino searches.

  4. VariableR Reclustering in Multiple Top Quark and W Boson Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, Jeremy

    2015-08-14

    VariableR jet reclustering is an innovative technique that allows for the reconstruction of boosted object over a wide range of kinematic regimes. Such capability enables the efficient identification of events with multiple boosted top quarks which is a typical signature for new physics processes such as the production of the supersymmetric partner of the gluon. In order to evaluate the performance of the algorithm, the VariableR reclustered jets are compared with fixed radius reclustered jets. The flexibility of the algorithm is tested by reconstructing both boosted top quarks and boosted W bosons. The VariableR reclustering method is found to be more efficient than the fixed radius algorithm at identifying top quarks and W bosons in events with four top quarks, therefore enhancing the sensitivity for gluino searches.

  5. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 {+-} 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 {+-} 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 {+-} 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  6. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich [Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim [Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath [Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond [Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd [Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D [Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D [St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K [Michigan U.; Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O [Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Aoki, Masato [Fermilab; Louisiana Tech. U.

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 4.0)%. The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.

  7. Next-to-leading order transverse momentum-weighted Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering: The role of the three-gluon correlator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dai, Ling -Yun; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Prokudin, Alexei; Vitev, Ivan

    2015-12-22

    Here, we study the Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering. We concentrate on the contribution from the photon-gluon fusion channel at O(αem2αs), where three-gluon correlation functions play a major role within the twist-3 collinear factorization formalism. We establish the correspondence between such a formalism with three-gluon correlation functions and the usual transverse momentum-dependent (TMD) factorization formalism at moderate hadron transverse momenta. We derive the coefficient functions used in the usual TMD evolution formalism related to the quark Sivers function expansion in terms of the three-gluon correlation functions. We further perform the next-to-leading order calculation for themore » transverse momentum-weighted spin-dependent differential cross section and identify the off-diagonal contribution from the three-gluon correlation functions to the QCD collinear evolution of the twist-3 Qiu-Sterman function.« less

  8. Next-to-leading order transverse momentum-weighted Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering: The role of the three-gluon correlator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Ling -Yun; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Prokudin, Alexei; Vitev, Ivan

    2015-12-22

    Here, we study the Sivers asymmetry in semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering. We concentrate on the contribution from the photon-gluon fusion channel at O(αem2αs), where three-gluon correlation functions play a major role within the twist-3 collinear factorization formalism. We establish the correspondence between such a formalism with three-gluon correlation functions and the usual transverse momentum-dependent (TMD) factorization formalism at moderate hadron transverse momenta. We derive the coefficient functions used in the usual TMD evolution formalism related to the quark Sivers function expansion in terms of the three-gluon correlation functions. We further perform the next-to-leading order calculation for the transverse momentum-weighted spin-dependent differential cross section and identify the off-diagonal contribution from the three-gluon correlation functions to the QCD collinear evolution of the twist-3 Qiu-Sterman function.

  9. Holographic entropy and real-time dynamics of quarkonium dissociation in non-Abelian plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-04-26

    The peak of the heavy quark pair entropy at the deconfinement transition, observed in lattice QCD, suggests that the transition is effectively driven by the increase of the entropy of bound states. The growth of the entropy with the interquark distance leads to the emergent entropic force that induces dissociation of quarkonium states. Since the quark-gluon plasma around the transition point is a strongly coupled system, we use the gauge-gravity duality to study the entropy of heavy quarkonium and the real-time dynamics of its dissociation. In particular, we employ the improved holographic QCD model as a dual description of largemore » Nc Yang-Mills theory. Studying the dynamics of the fundamental string between the quarks placed on the boundary, we find that the entropy peaks at the transition point. We also study the real-time dynamics of the system by considering the holographic string falling in the black hole horizon where it equilibrates. As a result, in the vicinity of the deconfinement transition, the dissociation time is found to be less than a fermi, suggesting that the entropic destruction is the dominant dissociation mechanism in this temperature region.« less

  10. Identification of high transverse momentum top quarks in pp collisions at $$$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-06-16

    This study presents studies of the performance of several jet-substructure techniques, which are used to identify hadronically decaying top quarks with high transverse momentum contained in large-radius jets. The efficiency of identifying top quarks is measured using a sample of top-quark pairs and the rate of wrongly identifying jets from other quarks or gluons as top quarks is measured using multijet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 20.3 fb-1 of 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Predictions from Monte Carlo simulations are found to provide an accurate description of the performance. The techniques are compared inmore » terms of signal efficiency and background rejection using simulations, covering a larger range in jet transverse momenta than accessible in the dataset. Finally and additionally, a novel technique is developed that is optimized to reconstruct top quarks in events with many jets.« less

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Aircraft (United States) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ ... degrees hot, it transformed from a plasma of quarks and gluons into bound states of ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Aircraft (United States) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ ... the formation of the quark-gluon plasma, which can be studied in PbA collisions ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Aircraft (United States) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ ... the magnetic component of the quark-gluon plasma at RHIC. less Full Text Available ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Aircraft (United States) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ ... Jpsi Production in Quark-Gluon Plasma Yan, Li ; Zhuang, Pengfei ; Xu, Nu We study Jpsi ...

  15. Single Top Quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidi Schellman and Ann Heinson

    2009-03-12

    Fermilab researchers Heidi Schellman and Ann Heinson take a whimsical look at the recent announcement of the discovery of the single top quark, by Fermilab's CDF and DZero experiments.

  16. Study of anomalous top quark flavor-changing neutral current interactions via the tW channel of single-top-quark production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etesami, S. M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.

    2010-06-01

    The potential of the LHC for investigation of anomalous top quark interactions with gluon (tug,tcg) through the production of tW channel of single top quarks is studied. In the standard model, the single top quarks in the tW-channel mode are charge symmetric, meaning that {sigma}(pp{yields}t+W{sup -})={sigma}(pp{yields}t+W{sup +}). However, the presence of anomalous flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) couplings leads to charge asymmetry. In this paper, a method is proposed in which this charge asymmetry may be used to constrain anomalous FCNC couplings. The strength of resulting constraints is estimated for the LHC for the center of mass energies of 7 and 14 TeV.

  17. Measuring the flavor asymmetry in the sea quarks of the proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimer, Paul E.; /Argonne

    2010-01-01

    The proton is a composite object made of fundamental, strongly-interacting quarks. Many of the features of the proton can be described by a simple picture based on three valence quarks bound by the exchange of gluons. However, protons are much more complex objects with the vast majority of their mass dynamically generated by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This mass manifests itself through a 'sea' of gluons and quark-antiquark pairs. By measuring Drell-Yan scattering, the Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest experiment will study the sea quark distribution in the proton and, in particular, the unusually large asymmetry between anti-up and anti-down quarks measured by earlier Drell-Yan experiments. This asymmetry cannot simply be generated through pair creation, but rather indicates an underlying, fundamental antiquark component in the proton. Using the same technique, E-906/SeaQuest will also investigate the differences between the antiquark distributions of the free proton and a proton bound in a nucleus. Nuclear binding is expected to modify the quark distributions and it has long been known that the overall quark distributions are different (the EMC effect). Surprisingly, present data suggests that the antiquark distributions and hence the sea distributions are not modified. To accomplish these goals, the experiment will used a 120 GeV proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Main Injector. While the experiment will be taking advantage of equipment from earlier Drell-Yan experiments, the changes in kinematics of the experiment require several, significant upgrades to the spectrometer. The collaboration expects to begin data collection in fall 2010.

  18. Phenomenological analysis of Higgs boson production through gluon fusion in association with jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greiner, Nicolas; Höche, Stefan; Luisoni, Gionata; Schönherr, Marek; Winter, Jan -Christopher; Yundin, Valery

    2016-01-27

    In this study, we present a detailed phenomenological analysis of the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson in association with up to three jets. We consider the gluon fusion channel using an effective theory in the large top-quark mass limit. Higgs boson production in gluon fusion constitutes an irreducible background to the vector boson fusion (VBF) process; hence the precise knowledge of its characteristics is a prerequisite for any measurement in the VBF channel. The calculation is carried out at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD in a fully automated way by combining the two programs GoSam and Sherpa. Wemore » present numerical results for a large variety of observables for both standard cuts and VBF selection cuts. We find that for all jet multiplicities the NLO corrections are sizeable. This is particularly true in the presence of kinematic selections enhancing the VBF topology, which are based on vetoing additional jet activity. In this case, precise predictions for the background can be made using our calculation by taking the difference between the inclusive H+2 jets and the inclusive H+3 jets result.« less

  19. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-29

    A search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton–proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 are used. Furthermore, candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network.

  20. Table of Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Li, and S. Pal Hadron Production from Quark Coalescence and Jet Fragmentation......III-6 Hendrok van Hees and Ralf Rapp Charm-Quark Thermalization in the Quark-Gluon Plasma ...

  1. Heavy quark diffusion in strong magnetic fields at weak coupling and implications for elliptic flow

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hattori, Koichi; Yee, Ho -Ung; Yin, Yi

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we compute the momentum diffusion coefficients of heavy quarks, κ∥ and κ⊥, in a strong magnetic field B along the directions parallel and perpendicular to B, respectively, at the leading order in QCD coupling constant αs. We consider a regime relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collisions, αseB << T2 << eB, so that thermal excitations of light quarks are restricted to the lowest Landau level (LLL) states. In the vanishing light-quark mass limit, we find κLO⊥ ∝ α2sTeB in the leading order that arises from screened Coulomb scatterings with (1+1)-dimensional LLL quarks, while κ∥ gets nomore » contribution from the scatterings with LLL quarks due to kinematic restrictions. We show that the first nonzero leading order contributions to κLO∥ come from the two separate effects: 1) the screened Coulomb scatterings with thermal gluons, and 2) a finite light-quark mass mq. The former leads to κLO,gluon∥ ∝ α2sT3 and the latter to κLO,massive∥ ∝ αs(αseB)1/2m2q. Based on our results, we propose a new scenario for the large value of heavy-quark elliptic flow observed in RHIC and LHC. Namely, when κ⊥ >> κ∥, an anisotropy in drag forces gives rise to a sizable amount of the heavy-quark elliptic flow even if heavy quarks do not fully belong to an ellipsoidally expanding background fluid.« less

  2. The Top Quark as a Window to Beyond the Standard Model Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Chiu-Tien

    2013-01-01

    The top quark was the last of the Standard Model quarks to be discovered, and is of considerable interest. The closeness of the top quark mass to the electroweak scale is suggestive that the top quark could be closely related to the mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking. Any new physics in electroweak symmetry breaking models could then preferentially couple to the top quark, making the top quark a promising probe for new physics. In this thesis, we will explore two aspects of the top quark as a harbinger to new physics: the top forward-backward asymmetry as seen at the Tevatron and the search for stops. In this thesis, we will discuss the Asymmetric Left-Right Model (ALRM), a model that is based on the gauge group $U'(1)\\times SU(2)\\times SU'(2)$ with couplings $g_1^\\prime, g_2^\\prime,$ and $g'$ associated with the fields $B',W,W'$, respectively, and show how this model can explain the top forward-backward asymmetry. We will then explore the scalar sector of the ALRM, and provide a specific Higgs mechanism that provides the masses for the $W'$ and $Z'$ bosons. The top forward-backward asymmetry is a test of invariance of charge-conjugation. Thus, we look at the $X$-gluon model, a model that was motivated by the top forward-backward asymmetry, and show that one can look at the longitudinal polarization of the top-quark to test parity conservation. Finally, we investigate searches for stop squarks, the supersymmetric partner of the top quark, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using shape-based analyses.

  3. Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    confinement by circularly polarized electromagnetic field in toroidal geometry Vladimir A. Svidzinski University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA and Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA ͑Received 21 May 2007; accepted 2 July 2007; published online 31 October 2007͒ A novel plasma confinement concept based on plasma confinement by electromagnetic pressure of circularly polarized electromagnetic fields is proposed. Practical implementation of this

  4. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian; Tarasov, A.

    2015-10-05

    In this article, we study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at small $x \\ll 1$ to linear evolution at moderate $x \\sim 1$.

  5. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balitsky, Ian; Tarasov, A.

    2015-10-05

    In this article, we study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at smallmore » $$x \\ll 1$$ to linear evolution at moderate $$x \\sim 1$$.« less

  6. Evolution of gluon TMD at low and moderate x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, Andrey; Balitsky, Ian

    2015-03-01

    We study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at small x << 1 to linear double-logarithmic evolution at moderate x ~ 1.

  7. Theory_NuclearGluonsCharmEIC_FY16_Midyear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report 1. Nuclear gluons with charm at EIC Principal Investigator: C. Weiss (Theoretical and Computational Physics Center, 1.757.269.7013) ! Project Status Project execution started October 1, 2015 as planned. Regular group meetings were scheduled (including the external collaborators through videoconferencing) and a public project Wiki was set up for communication and documentation at https://wiki.jlab.org/nuclear_gluons/ . Weiss (20% FTE) and Higinbotham (10% FTE) have been working on the

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and radiation physics nuclear theory, relativistic heavy-ion collisions, quark-gluon plasma, relativistic fluid dynamics (1) Filter by Author Ulrich W. Heinz (1) Save Results...

  9. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter Results Filter by Author Gale, Charles (1) Hidaka, Yoshimasa (1) Jeon, Sangyong (1) ... a Matrix Model of the Quark-Gluon Plasma Gale, Charles ; Hidaka, Yoshimasa ; Jeon, ...

  10. Tsung-Dao Lee, Weak Interactions, and Nonconservation of Parity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, to understand the properties of quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that scientists theorize existed near the beginning of the Universe. ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (United States) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), ... (4) fragmentation (4) quark matter (4) transverse ... Hard collinear gluon radiation and multiple scattering in a ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...CFT) correspondence, from modeling the behavior of quark-gluon plasma to superconductor. ... Since dilation arises naturally in the context of string theory, we study the effect of ...

  14. Cold quark matter in compact stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzon, B.; Fogaca, D. A.; Navarra, F. S.; Horvath, J. E.

    2013-03-25

    We used an equation of state for the cold quark matter to the study of properties of quark stars. We also discuss the absolute stability of quark matter and compute the mass-radius relation for self-bound stars.

  15. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in top-antitop quark production with the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinelt, Julia; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-12-01

    The Fermi National Laboratory (Fermilab) operates the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, the is therefore the only collider which is today able to produce the heaviest known particle, the top quark. The top quark was discovered at the Tevatron by the CDF and D0 collaborations in 1995. At the Tevatron, most top quarks are produced via the strong interaction, whereby quark-antiquark annihilation dominates with 85%, and gluon fusion contributes with 15%. Considering next-to-leading order (NLO) contributions in the cross section of top-antitop quark production, leads to a slight positive asymmetry in the differential distribution of the production angle {alpha} of the top quarks. This asymmetry is due to the interference of certain NLO contributions. The charge asymmetry A in the cosine of {alpha} is predicted [14] to amount to 4-6%. Information about the partonic rest frame, necessary for a measurement of A in the observable cos {alpha}, is not accessible in the experiment. Thus, they use the rapidity difference of the top and the antitop quark as sensitive variable. This quantity offers the advantage of Lorentz invariance and is uniquely correlated with the cosine of {alpha}, justifying the choice of the rapidity difference to describe the behavior of cos {alpha}. In preparation for a measurement of the charge asymmetry, they conduct several Monte Carlo based studies concerning the effect of different event selection criteria on the asymmetry in the selected event samples. They observe a strong dependence of the measured asymmetry on the number of required jets in the particular event sample. This motivates further studies to understand the influence of additional gluon radiation, which leads to more than four observed jets in an event, on the rapidity distribution of the produced top quarks. They find, that events containing hard gluon radiation are correlated with a strong negative shift of the rapidity

  16. Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heating in reversed field pinches at the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency V. A. Svidzinski and S. C. Prager University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 14 November 2001; accepted 29 January 2002͒ The possibility of plasma heating in reversed field pinches ͑RFP͒ by radio-frequency ͑rf͒ waves at ␻Ϸ␻ ci is studied. A simple cylindrical RFP equilibrium which is symmetric in poloidal and axial directions is considered. RF fields are excited with given poloidal

  17. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  18. Press Pass - Press Release - Single top quark

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphics and photos are available at: http:www.fnal.govpubpresspassimagesSingle-Top-Quark-2009.html Fermilab collider experiments discover rare single top quark Batavia, ...

  19. Quark confinement and hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenz, F.; Londergan, J. T.; Moniz, Ernest J.; Rosenfelder, R.; Stingl, M.; Yazaki, K.

    1986-08-01

    A study of quark models for many-hadron systems is presented. The starting point in the construction of these nonrelativistic models is a proper formal definition of the concept of color singlet and nonsinglet clusters in a multiquark system which respects the exchange symmetry of the quarks. This definition provides a natural way to impose saturation of the confining forces.

  20. Constraints on Gluon Sivers Distribution from RHIC Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, M.; D'Alesio, U.; Melis, S.; Murgia, F.

    2007-06-13

    We consider the recent RHIC data on the transverse single spin asymmetry (SSA) AN, measured in p{up_arrow}p {yields} {pi}0X processes at mid-rapidity by the PHENIX collaboration. We analyze this experimental information within a hard scattering approach based on a generalized QCD factorization scheme, with unintegrated, transverse momentum dependent (TMD), parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In this kinematical region, only the gluon Sivers effect could give a large contribution to AN; its vanishing value is thus used to give approximate upper limits on the gluon Sivers function (GSF). Additional constraints from the Burkardt sum rule for the Sivers distributions are also discussed.

  1. Forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-12-12

    We present a measurement of forward-backward asymmetry in top quark-antiquark production in proton-antiproton collisions in the final state containing a lepton and at least four jets. Using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure the t{bar t} forward-backward asymmetry to be (9.2 ± 3.7)% at the reconstruction level. When corrected for detector acceptance and resolution, the asymmetry is found to be (19.6 ± 6.5)%. We also measure a corrected asymmetry based on the lepton from a top quark decay, found to be (15.2 ± 4.0)%.more » The results are compared to predictions based on the next-to-leading-order QCD generator mc@nlo. The sensitivity of the measured and predicted asymmetries to the modeling of gluon radiation is discussed.« less

  2. Unexpected manifestation of quark condensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    A comparative analysis of some quark ensembles governed by a four-fermion interaction is performed. Arguments in support of the statement that the presence of a gas-liquid phase transition is a feature peculiar to them are adduced. The instability of small quark droplets is discussed and is attributed to the formation of a chiral soliton. The stability of baryon matter is due to a mixed phase of the vacuum and baryon matter.

  3. Nonperturbative dynamics in the color-magnetic QCD vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefediev, A. V. Simonov, Yu. A.

    2008-01-15

    In the deconfinement phase of QCD, quarks and gluons interact with the dense stochastic color-magnetic vacuum. We consider the dynamics of quarks in this deconfinement phase using the field correlators method and derive an effective nonperturbative interquark potential, in addition to the usual perturbative short-range interaction. We find the resulting angular-momentum-dependent interaction to be attractive enough to maintain bound states and, for light quarks (and gluons), to cause emission of quark and gluon pairs. Possible consequences for the strong-interacting quark-gluon plasma are briefly discussed.

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for temperatures near and above the quark-hadron transition (165 MeV) is inferred ... short lifetime and small volume of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formed in heavy ion ...

  5. SECTION III: NUCLEAR THEORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy quark three-body collisional energy loss in quark-gluon plasma...... III-1 C. M. Ko and Wei Liu Elliptic flow of deuterons in relativistic heavy ion ...

  6. Quarks Pair Up in Protons (and Neutrons) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarks Pair Up in Protons (and Neutrons) Graph of up quarkdown quark contributions Researchers have published intriguing new observations for how the different kinds of quarks ...

  7. Search for Electroweak Single-Top Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buehler, Matthias; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-08-01

    prediction of the Standard Model or give hints towards physics beyond the Standard Model such as a fourth generation of quarks. In addition, electroweak single-top quark production is an important background for the Higgs boson search in the mass range of 90 GeV/c{sup 2} to 130 GeV/c{sup 2} at the Tevatron in the WH channel. Two single-top quark production modes are dominant at the Tevatron, the t-channel or W-gluon fusion and the s-channel or W* process. Since it is challenging to separate the signal from the various background events we use a neural network to combine several variables into one powerful discriminant. The simulated Monte Carlo sample outputs of the neural networks are used as templates for a likelihood fit to the outputs of the neural networks of the data. In this thesis CDF II data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 695 pb{sup -1} is discussed. As this analysis yields no significant evidence of electroweak single-top production it is not possible to measure any cross sections. Consequently we determine upper limits on the cross sections of the t- and s-channel production separately and combined.

  8. Constraints on the gluon Sivers distribution via transverse single spin asymmetries at midrapidity in p{sup {up_arrow}}p{yields}{pi}{sup 0}X processes at BNL RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, M.; D'Alesio, U.; Melis, S.; Murgia, F.

    2006-11-01

    We consider the recent RHIC data on the transverse single spin asymmetry (SSA) A{sub N}, measured in p{sup {up_arrow}}p{yields}{pi}{sup 0}X processes at midrapidity by the PHENIX Collaboration. The measurement is consistent with a vanishing SSA. We analyze this experimental information within a hard scattering approach based on a generalized QCD factorization scheme, with unintegrated, transverse momentum dependent (TMD), parton distribution and fragmentation functions. It turns out that, in the kinematical region of the data, only the gluon Sivers effect could give a large contribution to A{sub N}; its vanishing value is thus an indication about the possible size of the gluon Sivers function (GSF). Approximate upper limits on its magnitude are derived. Additional constraints obtained combining available parameterizations of the quark Sivers function and the Burkardt sum rule (BSR) for the Sivers distributions are also discussed.

  9. String model for spinning quark jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artru, X.; Belghobsi, Z.

    2012-06-27

    A string model of quark hadronization, taking the quark spin degree of freedom into account, is proposed. The method for using the model in a Monte-Carlo code for jet generation is given.

  10. Structure functions and intrinsic quark orbital motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavada, Petr

    2007-06-13

    Covariant version of the quark model is studied. It is shown how the polarized and unpolarized structure functions depend on the quark intrinsic motion. The important role of the quark orbital momentum, by which the intrinsic motion is generated, appears as a direct consequence of the covariant description. At the same time, the procedure for obtaining 3D quark momentum distribution from the structure functions is suggested.

  11. Effective hadron theories from a quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, S.; Moniz, Ernest J.

    1987-12-01

    In the context of the quark exchange model of Lenz et al., effective hadron theories are constructed and the resulting physical observables compared to their ''experimental'' values as defined by the calculations using the exact quark model operators. This model study illustrates convergence issues for an effective hadron basis in a quark model in which all physical observables can be computed exactly.

  12. A relativistic constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlumpf, F.

    1993-08-01

    We investigate the predictive power of a relativistic quark model formulated on the light-front. The nucleon electromagnetic form factors, the semileptonic weak decays of the hyperons and the magnetic moments of both baryon octet and decuplet are calculated and found to be in excellent agreement with experiment.

  13. Observation of the Top Quark

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Kim, S. B.

    1995-08-01

    Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

  14. Heavy quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Paus

    2002-11-13

    The contribution summarizes the latest results from CDF on heavy quark production. Results from top, bottom and charm production are included. Some new analysis using Run I (1991-1994) data have become available. More importantly there are a number of results using Run II data which began in April 2001. The data indicate the potential of CDF for bottom and charm production physics in the near future.

  15. Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Walsh, Karen McNulty

    2011-03-28

    Near-light-speed collisions of gold ions provide a recipe for in-depth explorations of matter and fundamental forces. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has produced the most massive antimatter nucleus ever discovered—and the first containing an anti-strange quark. The presence of strange antimatter makes this antinucleus the first to be entered below the plane of the classic Periodic Table of Elements, marking a new frontier in physics.

  16. LPM Interference and Cherenkov-like Gluon Bremsstrahlung in DenseMatter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumder, Abhijit; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26

    Gluon bremsstrahlung induced by multiple parton scattering in a finite dense medium has a unique angular distribution with respect to the initial parton direction. A dead-cone structure with an opening angle; theta2{sub 0}; approx 2(1-z)/(zLE) for gluons with fractional energy z arises from the Landau-Pomeran chuck-Migdal (LPM) interference. In a medium where the gluon's dielectric constant is; epsilon>1, the LPM interference pattern is shown to become Cherenkov-like with an increased opening angle determined by the dielectric constant$/cos2/theta{sub c}=z+(1-z)//epsilon$. For a large dielectric constant/epsilon; gg 1+2/z2LE, the corresponding total radiative parton energy loss is about twice that from normal gluon bremsstrahlung. Implications of this Cherenkov-like gluon bremsstrahlung to the jet correlation pattern in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  17. 403rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Saskia Mioduszewski

    2010-09-01

    "Probing the Matter Created at RHIC." Mioduszewski discusses the results from RHIC's experimental collaborations and how researchers hope to create a form of matter in which the basic building blocks of matter -- quarks and gluons -- interact freely in what is called quark gluon plasma.

  18. Quarks in the looking glass | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarks in the looking glass Quarks in the looking glass Jefferson Lab's Experimental Hall A The electron-quark scattering experiment was carried out in Jefferson Lab's Experimental Hall A. In this view from the floor of the hall, the two High Resolution Spectrometers are shown with their shield house doors (white) open. Photo: Jefferson Lab NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Feb. 5, 2014 - From matching wings on butterflies to the repeating six-point pattern of snowflakes, symmetries echo through nature, even

  19. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki U. /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark mass is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model as well as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The CDF Collaboration has measured the top quark mass with high precision in all decay channels with complementary methods. A combination of the results from CDF gives a top quark mass of 170.5{+-}1.3(stat.){+-}1.8(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using themore » lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.« less

  1. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. 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I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using the lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.

  2. Higher order nonlinear equations for the dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma with two temperature-ions and nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emamuddin, M.; Yasmin, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-04-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma whose constituents are negatively charged dust, Maxwellian ions with two distinct temperatures, and electrons following q-nonextensive distribution, is investigated by deriving a number of nonlinear equations, namely, the Korteweg-de-Vries (K-dV), the modified Korteweg-de-Vries (mK-dV), and the Gardner equations. The basic characteristics of the hump (positive potential) and dip (negative potential) shaped dust-acoustic (DA) Gardner solitons are found to exist beyond the K-dV limit. The effects of two temperature ions and electron nonextensivity on the basic features of DA K-dV, mK-dV, and Gardner solitons are also examined. It has been observed that the DA Gardner solitons exhibit negative (positive) solitons for qq{sub c}) (where q{sub c} is the critical value of the nonextensive parameter q). The implications of our results in understanding the localized nonlinear electrostatic perturbations existing in stellar polytropes, quark-gluon plasma, protoneutron stars, etc. (where ions with different temperatures and nonextensive electrons exist) are also briefly addressed.

  3. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  4. Confinement of quarks in dual superconductor models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripka, Georges

    2005-06-14

    We review some aspects and problems of quark confinement models which are based on a dual super-conductor description of the QCD vacuum.

  5. CP Violation in Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, Weigang

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for CP violation in single top quark production with the DØ experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. CP violation in the top electroweak interaction results in different single top quark production cross sections for top and antitop quarks. We perform the search in the single top quark final state using 5.4 fb-1 of data, in the s-channel, t-channel, and for both combined. At this time, we do not see an observable CP asymmetry.

  6. Review of meson spectroscopy: quark states and glueballs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1981-11-01

    A group of three lectures on hadron spectroscopy are presented. Topics covered include: light L = 0 mesons, light L = 1 mesons, antiquark antiquark quark quark exotics, a catalogue of higher quark antiquark excitations, heavy quarkonium, and glueballs. (GHT)

  7. Periods of Congestion in Quark Cafe During Lunch Service: June...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Periods of Congestion in Quark Cafe During Lunch Service: June 15-17 Periods of Congestion in Quark Cafe During Lunch Service: June 15-17 Quark Cafe may experience intermittent ...

  8. Description of gluon propagation in the presence of an A{sup 2} condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xiangdong; Shakin, C.M.

    2005-04-01

    There is a good deal of current interest in the condensate which has been seen to play an important role in calculations which make use of the operator product expansion. That development has led to the publication of a large number of papers which discuss how that condensate could play a role in a gauge-invariant formulation. In the present work we consider gluon propagation in the presence of such a condensate which we assume to be present in the vacuum. We show that the gluon propagator has no on-mass-shell pole and, therefore, a gluon cannot propagate over extended distances. That is, the gluon is a nonpropagating mode in the gluon condensate. In the present work we discuss the properties of both the Euclidean-space and Minkowski-space gluon propagator. In the case of the Euclidean-space propagator we can make contact with the results of QCD lattice calculations of the propagator in the Landau gauge. With an appropriate choice of normalization constants, we present a unified representation of the gluon propagator that describes both the Minkowski-space and Euclidean-space dynamics in which the condensate plays an important role.

  9. A measurement of the top quark's charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unalan, Zeynep Gunay; /Michigan State U.

    2007-11-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). One way to confirm if the observed top quark is really the top quark posited in the Standard Model (SM) is to measure its electric charge. In the Standard Model the top quark is the isospin partner of the bottom quark and is expected to have a charge of +2/3. However, an alternative 'exotic' model has been proposed with a fourth generation exotic quark that has the same characteristics, such as mass, as our observed top but with a charge of -4/3. This thesis presents the first CDF measurement of the top quark's charge via its decay products, a W boson and a bottom quark, using {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of data. The data were collected by the CDF detector from proton anti-proton (p{bar p}) collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab. We classify events depending on the charges of the bottom quark and associated W boson and count the number of events which appear 'SM-like' or 'exotic-like' with a SM-like event decaying as t {yields} W{sup +}b and an exotic event as t {yields} W{sup -}b. We find the p-value under the Standard Model hypothesis to be 0:35 which is consistent with the Standard Model. We exclude the exotic quark hypothesis at an 81% confidence level, for which we have chosen a priori that the probability of incorrectly rejecting the SM would be 1%. The calculated Bayes Factor (BF) is 2 x Ln(BF)=8.54 which is interpreted as the data strongly favors the Standard Model over the exotic quark hypothesis.

  10. Hadronic physics of q anti q light quark mesons, quark molecules and glueballs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1980-10-01

    A brief introduction reviews the development of QCD and defines quark molecules and glueballs. This review is concerned primarily with u, d, and s quarks, which provide practically all of the cross section connected with hadronic interactions. The following topics form the bulk of the paper: status of quark model classification for conventional u, d, s quark meson states; status of multiquark or quark molecule state predictions and experiments; glueballs and how to find them; and the OZI rule in decay and production and how glueballs might affect it. 17 figures, 1 table. (RWR)