Sample records for quantitative trait loci

  1. Brief Genetics Report Quantitative Trait Loci for Obesity-and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheverud, James M.

    Brief Genetics Report Quantitative Trait Loci for Obesity- and Diabetes-Related Traits led to increases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. The examination of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for both obesity- and diabetes-related traits and their responses to a high-fat diet can be effectively

  2. High resolution linkage and association study of quantitative trait loci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Jeesun

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) of complex human disease. For many complex diseases, quantitative phenotype values contain more information than dichotomous traits do. Much research has been done on conducting high resolution mapping using information of linkage and linkage disequilibrium...

  3. Quantitative traits loci (QTL) involved in body colour, wing morphometry, cuticular hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative traits loci (QTL) involved in body colour, wing morphometry, cuticular hydrocarbons for wing morphometry, 12 for cuticular hydrocarbons and five for venom components. We detected 50 QTL / cuticular hydrocarbons / venom 1. INTRODUCTION The first genetic map built from RAPD markers (Hunt and Page

  4. High resolution linkage and association study of quantitative trait loci 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Jeesun

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and microsatellite markers are available, high resolution mapping employing multiple markers or multiple allele markers is an important step to identify quantitative ...

  5. Identification of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes for cadmium tolerance in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Zhang, Xinye [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding genetic variation for the response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and Populus deltoides Bart. was characterized for growth and performance traits after Cd exposure. A total of 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio 2.5 were detected for total dry weight, its components and root volume. Major QTL for Cd responses were mapped to two different linkage groups and the relative allelic effects were in opposing directions on the two chromosomes, suggesting differential mechanisms at these two loci. The phenotypic variance explained by Cd QTL ranged from 5.9 to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. A whole-genome microarray study led to the identification of nine Cd-responsive genes from these QTL. Promising candidates for Cd tolerance include an NHL repeat membrane-spanning protein, a metal transporter and a putative transcription factor. Additional candidates in the QTL intervals include a putative homolog of a glutamate cysteine ligase, and a glutathione-S-transferase. Functional characterization of these candidate genes should enhance our understanding of Cd metabolism and transport and phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  6. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) Associated with Maintenance of Bread Making Quality under Heat Stress in Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beecher, Francis Ward

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , Dirk B. Hays Amir M. H. Ibrahim Committee Member, Joseph Awika Head of Department, Jean H. Gould August 2009 Major Subject: Molecular and Environmental Plant Sciences iii ABSTRACT Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) Associated... with Maintenance of Bread Making Quality under Heat Stress in Wheat (Triticum aestivum). (August 2009) Francis Ward Beecher, B.S., Gannon University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dirk B. Hays Dr. Amir M. H. Ibrahim The aim of this study was to identify QTLs...

  7. Developing a web accessible integrated database and visualization tool for bovine quantitative trait loci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polineni, Pavana

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    tend to fall into discrete categories. Usually just one or a few genes have a major effect on qualitative traits and the environment usually has a minor role in influencing the category into which the animal falls. In this case, the phenotype... (marbling) ? Warner-Bratzler shear force (tenderness) ? Feed efficiency The combined influence of many genes and the effects of the environment on quantitative traits make it much more difficult to determine the genotype accurately compared...

  8. Quantitative trait loci(qtl) analysis of yield components and heat tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Jung Hwa

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    component traits in the 62 RILs in four individual environments?.. 94 Table XV Summary of QTLs identified by composite interval mapping for heat tolerance based on simple score of yield and its component traits in the 62 RILs in four...

  9. Genetic and interval mapping of the bovine X chromosome for quantitative trait loci using microsatellite markers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Chen-Chen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mapping MATERIALS AND METHODS . 16 16 17 18 19 20 20 22 22 23 25 Animals . Microsatellite markers Polymerase chain reaction Genetic/Linkage map QTL detection Phenotypic data Statistical analysis . 25 28 31 31 32 33 35 RESULTS... AND DISCUSSION 36 Microsatellite scoring . Linkage analysis . QTL analysis . Interval mapping . 36 37 51 52 CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED 65 VITA 85 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page A summary of bovine X-linked traits . 12 Structure and breed composition...

  10. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) and Candidate Genes for Cadmium Tolerance in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of genetic variation in response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa and Populus deltoides was characterized for Cd exposure. The pedigree showed significant variation for Cd tolerance thus enabling the identification of relatively tolerant and susceptible genotypes for intensive characterization. A total of 16 QTLs at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio > 2.5, were found to be associated with total dry weight, its components, and root volume. Four major QTLs for total dry weight were mapped to different linkage groups in control (LG III) and Cd conditions (LG XVI) and had opposite allelic effects on Cd tolerance, suggesting that these genomic regions were differentially controlled. The phenotypic variation explained by Cd QTL for all traits under study varied from 5.9% to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. Leaf Cd contents also showed significant variation suggesting the phytoextraction potential of Populus genotypes, though heritability of this trait was low (0.22). A whole-genome microarray study was conducted by using two genotypes with extreme responses for Cd tolerance in the above study and differentially expressed genes were identified. Candidate genes including CAD2 (CADMIUM SENSITIVE 2), HMA5 (HEAVY METAL ATPase5), ATGTST1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-Transferase1), ATGPX6 (Glutathione peroxidase 6), and ATMRP 14 (Arabidopsis thaliana Multidrug Resistance associated Protein 14) were identified from QTL intervals and microarray study. Functional characterization of these candidate genes could enhance phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  11. Copyright 2000 by the Genetics Society of America Quantitative Trait Loci for Floral Morphology in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackay, Trudy F.C.

    indicate that many of the iden- ORGANS (UFO)], influence the setting of boundaries tified loci that control floral development encode either between whorls [SUPERMAN (SUP) and UFO], and alter DNA

  12. A powerful likelihood method for the analysis of linkage disequilibrium between trait loci and one or more polymorphic marker loci

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, J.D. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, most methods for detecting linkage disequilibrium were designed for use with diallelic marker loci, for which the analysis is straightforward. With the advent of polymorphic markers with many alleles, the normal approach to their analysis has been either to extend the methodology for two-allele systems (leading to an increase in df and to a corresponding loss of power) or to select the allele believed to be associated and then collapse the other alleles, reducing, in a biased way, the locus to a diallelic system. I propose a likelihood-based approach to testing for linkage disequilibrium, an approach that becomes more conservative as the number of alleles increases, and as the number of markers considered jointly increases in a multipoint test for linkage disequilibrium, while maintaining high power. Properties of this method for detecting associations and fine mapping the location of disease traits are investigated. It is found to be, in general, more powerful than conventional methods, and it provides a tractable framework for the fine mapping of new disease loci. Application to the cystic fibrosis data of Kerem et al. is included to illustrate the method. 12 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Lect 13: Quantitative genetics II Evolution at multiple loci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection (FFT) Generalizations R = h2S Phenotypic trait value population mean fitness · removes less fit phenotypes Generalizations Phenotypic trait value W 3. The rate fitness ·Selection removes less fit phenotypes ·Rate of evolution depends on S, h2 (FFT) ·Directional

  14. Bioinformatics tools for the genetic dissection of complex traits in chickens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabrera Cárdenas, Claudia Paola

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the genetic characterization of the mechanisms underlying complex traits in chicken through the use and development of bioinformatics tools. The characterization of quantitative trait loci controlling complex traits has proven...

  15. Quantitative Genetic Mapping of Life History Traits in Drosophila melanogaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Casey Lee

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Results Discussion Literature Cited Chapter V: Conclusion 67 74 77 94 95 96 98 103 107 111 128 vii List of Figures Chapter 2 Figure 1: Variation in posterior lobe shape in D. melanogaster Figure 2: mPC1 lobe shape... lobes from 15 D. melanogaster inbred lines Figure S2: Outlines of lobes from different genotypes showing the change in shape associated with the mPC1 measure Figure S3: Coarse- and fine-mapping likelihood profiles for all traits Figure S4: Frequency...

  16. Expression quantitative trait loci detected in cell lines are often present in primary tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coop, Graham

    conducted in lympho- blastoid cell lines (LCLs), rather than primary tissues, mostly by using the Hap assays in LCLs may often be the only feasible approach (e.g. 16) to further study the potential function the overlap of eQTLs found in LCLs and primary tissues. For one, differences in study designs, platforms

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF DROUGHT-RELATED QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI (QTLs) IN SUGARCANE (Saccharum spp.) USING GENIC MARKERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vivek

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    associations in this study. Fifty-six polymorphisms produced by 13 EST-SSR primers were used to produce genetic similarity matrix for 80 genotypes. Dendrogram prepared from this genetic similarity matrix will be useful in selecting parents carrying diversity...

  18. Mapping and analysis of quantitative trait loci in Bos indicus x Bos Taurus cattle: chromosome 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutaaya, Emmanuel

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A genetic map of bovine chromosome 10 was constructed from 10 microsatellite markers and one erythrocyte antigen that were scored in a reciprocal backcross and F2 Angus x Brahman beef cattle population. The sex averaged map length is 89.7c...

  19. Genet. Res., Camb. (2001), 77, pp. 107116. With 2 figures. Printed in the United Kingdom # 2001 Cambridge University Press 107 Quantitative trait locus mapping of fitness-related traits in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackay, Trudy F.C.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cambridge University Press 107 Quantitative trait locus mapping of fitness-related traits in Drosophila We examined the genetic architecture of four fitness-related traits (reproductive success, ovariole populations. Fisher's Fundamental Theorem states that the response to natural selection for fitness is equal

  20. Multiple Quantitative Trait Loci Influence the Shape of a Male-Specific Genital Structure in Drosophila melanogaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Casey Lee; Bain, Clint L.; Macdonald, Stuart J.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (1982). However, we obtained practically identical QTL mapping results for the mPC1 shape measure whether or not we ap- plied these functions (data not shown). In addition, because posterior lobe morphology is largely unaffected by variation in overall... the species diversity PCA with an “s” (e.g., sPC1) and those from the mapping experiment PCA with an “m” (e.g., mPC1). Finally, we estimated the size of each lobe as the area enclosed by the outline, lobe height (width) as the length of the vertical...

  1. Copyright 2002 by the Genetics Society of America Quantitative Trait Loci for Inflorescence Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackay, Trudy F.C.

    ). The reproductive shoot apex con-opment of the inflorescence, including the timing of tains the indeterminate

  2. Statistical associations between restriction fragment length polymorphisms and quantitative traits in beef cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Joao Luis Lopes da Costa

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -EcoR1 on gestation length and yearling weight were detected, but the absence of linkage analyses for this marker, and some doubt on the true nature of the polymorphisms utilized require caution in the interpretation of such effects. No associations... Markers The basic idea behind the utilization of genetic markers for QTL was formulated by Sax (1923), when he found an association between seed size and seed coat pigmentation, which he attributed to linkage between genetic factors for the two traits...

  3. Closely linked non-additive blood pressure quantitative trait loci Edward J. Toland Yasser Saad Shane Yerga-Woolwine Steven Ummel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Nader G.

    region remained differentially expressed. The congenic strain S.LEW(D1Mco36-D1Mco101), which harbors

  4. Quantitative genetics of growth, carcass-quality traits, and disease resistance in hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops [female] x Morone saxatilis [male])

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaoxue

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 10 x 10 factorial mating design and a ‘common-garden’ rearing approach were employed to examine genetic effects and heritability of growth, carcass-quality traits, and disease resistance, important production traits in the aquaculture of hybrid...

  5. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. assaying quantitative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    511-100. + 1 12;+ + Outline) quantitative traits Song, Suzuki, Slocum, Williams and Osborn (1990) Song, Slocum and Osborn (1990) + 3 12 Yandell, Brian S. 153 and...

  7. Design and analysis of genetical genomics studies and their potential applications in livestock research 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Alex C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping has been widely used to identify genetic loci attributable to the variation observed in complex traits. In recent years, gene expression phenotypes have emerged as a new type of ...

  8. Dynamics of a Multilocus Trait Center for the Study of Evolution, School of Biological Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waxman, David

    Dynamics of a Multilocus Trait D. WAXMAN Center for the Study of Evolution, School of Biological: 6 May 2000) A detailed theoretical study of the dynamical behaviour of a quantitative trait under the explicit dynamics. Numerical tests of dynamical results over 104 generations and equilibrium results

  9. additional susceptibility loci: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    loci for endometriosis with near, Gary Dawson, Vicki Smith, Alisoun Carey, and Simon T.Bennett; Queensland Endometriosis Research@well.ox.ac.uk BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is a...

  10. autosomal str loci: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: We have characterized 68 unrelated Basque individuals from Vizcaya, Spain, for 13 tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci: CSF1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820,...

  11. Introduction Some quantitative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

    Introduction Some quantitative analysis Simulations Conclusion, further work Risk indicators Simulations Conclusion, further work Plan 1 Introduction Context Risk indicators 2 Some quantitative analysis;Introduction Some quantitative analysis Simulations Conclusion, further work Context Risk indicators

  12. Microfluidics for quantitative biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Micha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Quantitative BiologyChapter 1: Microfluidics.………………………………………………………..… 1 1.1OF THE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Quantitative Biology

  13. Computational modeling of personality traits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansonnet, Jean-Paul

    database glosses FFM/NEO PIR taxonomy Behavioral Schemes Set of operators FFM/NEO PIR taxonomy i j 1 2 FFM/NEO PIR with Wordnet glosses JeanPaul Sansonnet LIMSICNRS 6 O.C.E.A.N. Trait NEO PIR Facet Scheme of the synsets; 3. Classify the glosses into FFM/NEO PI-R end Foreach position pi in FFM/NEO PI-R do 1

  14. Plant improvement Contribution of some agronomic traits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Plant improvement Contribution of some agronomic traits to durum wheat performance in a dry, the contribution of these traits to genotype discrimination proved rather lim- ited when combined with grain yield; Contribution de quelques caractères agronomiques au rendement du blé dur dans une région mé- diterranéenne

  15. Essays in Quantitative Macroeconomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumuller, Seth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative model), I choose to focus on the volatility of permanent shocks to wages as the measure of risk for my analysis.

  16. SNP screening via best subsets regression Address reprint requests to Marc A. Suchard, Department of Biomathematics, UCLA Medical School,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suchard, Marc A.

    between these SNPs and all five quantitative traits. After initial screening using one way analysis to determine the best subset of SNP loci that model quantitative risk factors for the simulated disease related to quantitative traits and apply our methods to the simulated GAW 12 dataset. In the dataset we

  17. Automated Quantitative Software Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    quantitative properties such as "the worst-case probability that the airbag fails to deploy within 10ms", instead of qualitative properties such as "the airbag eventually deploys". Although many model checking

  18. Does selection for production traits affect the ability to cope with pathogens? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coltherd, Jennifer Carolyn

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenotypic selection for production traits causes changes in the underlying genetics of the animal. As such, intensive selection on one trait may have consequences on other traits. Indeed alterations to traits seemingly ...

  19. Theor Appl Genet DOI 10.1007/s00122-011-1649-x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chee, Peng W.

    . tomentosum were used to iden- tify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling Wber quality traits. A total quality from a wild Hawaiian cotton, Gossypium tomentosum Zhengsheng Zhang · Junkang Rong · Vijay N of 28 QTLs for Wber quality traits were identi- Wed (P

  20. INVESTIGATION HIGHLIGHTED ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Mike

    , Benjamin K. Blackman,,3 Andrew R. Norman,,4 Michael D. Shapiro,,5 Bonnie L. Cole,,6 Catherine L. Peichel,,7 by Additive and Clustered Quantitative Trait Loci Craig T. Miller,*,,1,2 Andrew M. Glazer,*,1 Brian R. Summers

  1. Theor Appl Genet (2009) 119:11551169 DOI 10.1007/s00122-009-1117-z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yandell, Brian S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the modern cultivated carrot and the wild carrot (also known as Queen Anne's Lace, QAL the subject of several research reports. The only quantitative trait loci (QTL) study reporting the inheri

  2. INVESTIGATION Coding Gene Single Nucleotide Polymorphism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernatchez, Louis

    INVESTIGATION Coding Gene Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Mapping and Quantitative Trait Loci QTL detection single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) reproduction Salvelinus fontinalis Linkages maps such as microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Also, compared with previ- ous methods based

  3. Try-A Global Database of Plant Traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant traits the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69 000 out of the world s 300 000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models.

  4. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faircloth, Brant C.; Ramos, Alejandra; Drummond, Hugh; Gowaty, Patricia Adair

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parasitism and extra-pair paternity in blue- footed boobies.Microsatellites Á SSRs Á Blue-footed booby Á Sula nebouxii Ámicrosatellite loci from blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii)

  5. Genomic architecture of risk loci associated with autoimmunity (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wakeland, Ward [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ward Wakeland on "Genomic architecture of risk loci associated with autoimmunity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  6. Digital PCR and Quantitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    quantitation ­ qPCR measures specific (e.g. human) DNA targets Pet Hair #12;Applied Genetics Why Quantitate signal crosses threshold (Ct) 10,000 pg/uL 1,000 pg/uL 100 pg/uL 10 pg/uL ? pg/uL -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 10 20 30 40 DeltaRn Cycle qPCR with Calibration curve Ct=21.59 Ct=24.90 Ct=28.22 Ct=31.54 Ct=26.90 #12

  7. Gene-environment interactions in genetic epidemiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spinka, Christine Marie

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    joint linkage disequilibrium and linkage mapping of quantitative trait loci is developed. Subsequently, methods are needed to determine the interaction, if any, between these genes and environmental risk factors. Many of these factors, such as weight... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Using Complex Pedigrees 2 1.3 Gene-environment Interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II JOINT LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM AND LINKAGE MAP- PING FOR COMPLEX PEDIGREES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2...

  8. Using Extended Genealogy to Estimate Components of Heritability for 23 Quantitative and Dichotomous Traits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaitlen, Noah

    Important knowledge about the determinants of complex human phenotypes can be obtained from the estimation of heritability, the fraction of phenotypic variation in a population that is determined by genetic factors. Here, ...

  9. Genetic Epidemiology 30: 301313 (2006) Improving the Power of Association Tests for Quantitative Traits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Danyu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -disequilibrium tests (QTDT) based on the variance-components model is the most flexible and most powerful. This method transformation is unknown, and incorrect transformations may compromise the type I error and power. We propose components; linkage disequilibrium; transformation; semiparametric models; QTDT; FBAT; PDT Contract grant

  10. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  11. Microsatellite loci for the blue swimming crab (Callinectes bellicosus) (Crustacea: Portunidae) from the Gulf of California, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munguia-Vega, A.; Torre, J.; Castillo-Lopez, A.; Pfister, T.; Cudney-Bueno, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microsatellite loci for the blue swimming crab (Callinectes348 Oesterling MJ (1998) ‘‘Blue’’ crab resources in otherÁ Callinectes bellicosus Á Blue swimming crab Á Connectivity

  12. Evaluation of 13 short tandem repeated loci for use in personal identification applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, H.A.; Caskey, C.T. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Jin, L.; Zhong, Y.; Chakraborty, R. (Univ. of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personal identification by using DNA typing methodologies has been an issue in the popular and scientific press for several years. The authors present a PCR-based DNA-typing method using 13 unlinked short tandem repeat (STR) loci. Validation of the loci and methodology has been performed to meet standards set by the forensic community and the accrediting organization for parentage testing. Extensive statistical analysis has addressed the issues surrounding the presentation of [open quotes]match[close quotes] statistics. The authors have found STR loci to provide a rapid, sensitive, and reliable method of DNA typing for parentage testing, forensic identification, and medical diagnostics. Valid statistical analysis is generally simpler than similar analysis of RFLP-VNTR results and provides powerful statistical evidence of the low frequency of random multilocus genotype matching. 54 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Establishing order and linkage of loci on bovine syntenic group U10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Donna Lee

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESTABLISHING ORDER AND LINKAGE OF LOCI ON BOVINE SYNTENIC GROUP U10 A Thesis by DONNA LEE DAY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1992 Major Subject: Genetics ESTABLISHING ORDER AND LINKAGE OF LOCI ON BOVINE SYNTENIC GROUP U10 A Thesis by DONNA LEE DAY Approved as to style and content by: J es E. Womack (Chat f Committee) Loren . Skow (Member) Scott . avis (Chair...

  14. Integrative Analysis of a Cross-Loci Regulation Network Identifies App as a Gene Regulating Insulin Secretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yandell, Brian S.

    Integrative Analysis of a Cross-Loci Regulation Network Identifies App as a Gene Regulating Insulin, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, 5 Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology participated in the regulation of plasma insulin. We developed a novel ranking scheme based on cross- loci

  15. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Abstract:...

  16. Of intent and action : implementing personality traits for storytelling through concept patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Susan S. (Susan Shuchen)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personality traits such as "kind," "aggressive," and "brave" are integral to storytelling because they impart succinct descriptors of character personalities. Authors apply traits to characters, readers infer characters' ...

  17. Characterization of seven new polymorphic microsatellite loci in the brilliant-thighed poison frog Allobates femoralis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringler, Eva

    175 Characterization of seven new polymorphic microsatellite loci in the brilliant-thighed poison novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for the brilliant- thighed poison frog Allobates femoralis by the British Herpetological Society The Neotropical poison frog Allobates femoralis (Dendrobatidae) has a pan

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies three loci associated with melanoma risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania, University of

    Genome-wide association study identifies three loci associated with melanoma risk D Timothy Bishop1-wide association study of melanoma conducted by the GenoMEL consortium based on 317K tagging SNPs for 1 and cutaneous sun sensitivity, well-recognized melanoma risk factors. Common variants within the 9p21 locus have

  19. Localizing multiple X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa loci using multilocus homogeneity tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, J.; Terwilliger, J.D. (New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York (USA)); Bhattacharya, S. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (England)); Chen, J.D.; Denton, J.; Donald, J. (Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick (Australia)); Dubay, C.; Litt, M.; Weleber, R.G. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (USA)); Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, P. (Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)); Fishman, G.A.; Wong, F. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA)); Frey, D.; Maechler, M. (Institute of Medical Genetics, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilocus linkage analysis of 62 family pedigrees with X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) was undertaken to determine the presence of possible multiple disease loci and to reliability estimate their map location. Multilocus homogeneity tests furnish convincing evidence for the presence of two XLRP loci, the likelihood ratio being 6.4 {times} 10{sup 9}:1 in a favor of two versus a single XLRP locus and gave accurate estimates for their map location. In 60-75% of the families, location of an XLRP gene was estimated at 1 centimorgan distal to OTC, and in 25-40% of the families, an XLRP locus was located halfway between DXS14 (p58-1) and DXZ1 (Xcen), with an estimated recombination fraction of 25% between the two XLRP loci. There is also good evidence for third XLRP locus, midway between DXS28 (C7) and DXS164 (pERT87), supported by a likelihood ratio of 293:1 for three versus two XLRP loci.

  20. SAFETY ANALYSIS QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yinhai

    1 TOPIC C2 SAFETY ANALYSIS AND POLICY QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS ON ANGLE-ACCIDENT RISK AT SIGNALIZED-2700 Tel: (206) 543-9639 Fax: (206) 543-5965 Email: nihan@u.washington.edu #12;2 Quantitative Analysis on Angle-Accident Risk at Signalized Intersections Abstract: This paper demonstrates how a new modeling

  1. Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya Katherine L. Baldwin community of Central Kenya, we regressed household offtake rate of both cattle and smallstock against in Kenya. Because pastoralist economies depend almost exclusively upon livestock production, most recent

  2. Trait-based approaches to marine microbial ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Andrew David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to understand how the functional traits of species, biotic interactions, and the environment jointly regulate the community ecology of phytoplankton. In Chapter 2, I examined Continuous Plankton ...

  3. Genetic parameter estimation of mohair production traits in Angora goats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podisi, Baitsi

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzed included fiber diameter (FD; n = 4329), grease fleece weight (FW; n = 7073), body weight (BW; n = 4171) and fertility (FERT; n = 2118). Heritability estimates were obtained for all the traits using REML procedures with a multivariate animal model...

  4. Growth and carcass traits and sire effects on growth and carcass traits in purebred beefmaster cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, James B.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Koch (1974) estimated the heritability of this particular trait to be 50'/o in cattle in general. Newman et al. (1993) estimated the eflects of individual heterosis in later generations of composite cattle to be 19. 97 + 3. 43 cm (P & . 01). Crockett..., and calves tend to weigh about 8'/o of their marketable weight at birth (Kelley 1994). Birth weight is known to be moderately heritable (20-40'/o), and is used by many producers as an indication of calving ease, and as stated by Koch (1974), as a reference...

  5. Genetic diversity at RFLP loci in an Oregon Septoria tritici population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boeger, Jeffrey Michael

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    creating RFLP banding patterns unique to each asexual clone or genotype. No genetic variation was found within pycnidia, but variation was found among pycnidia within lesions, and among lesions on individual leaves. On average, there were 8. 3 allele... closely related individuals, and they may detect many highly polymorphic loci simultaneously thereby allowing unam- biguous identification of individual genotypes (RFLP fingerprinting). RFLPs have become a widely accepted genetic tool, used in mapping...

  6. On Incremental Quantitative Verification for Probabilistic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    . Quantitative verification is an automated method to establish quantitative properties of a system model, non- probabilistic verification, which, in addition to exhaustive exploration of a system modelOn Incremental Quantitative Verification for Probabilistic Systems Marta Kwiatkowska, David Parker

  7. Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal Infrared Imagery Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative...

  8. Microfluidics for optics and quantitative cell biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, James Kyle

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Microfluidics for Optics and6 2. Microfluidics for Quantitative CellTHE DISSERTATION Microfluidics for Optics and Quantitative

  9. Quantitative Risk Management Rudiger Frey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Rüdiger

    Lecture Quantitative Risk Management R¨udiger Frey Universit¨at Leipzig Wintersemester 2010 risk management C. Introduction to Portfolio Credit Derivatives c 2010 (Frey) 1 #12;A. Introduction of counterparties. Measuring and management of credit risk is of high importance for financial institutions

  10. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics Committee Membership Dr. Scott Jackson - committee chair Dr. Peng-Wah Chee Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Horticulture Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

  11. ABBGroup-1-Quantitative analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    of short-circuit current in high- voltage gas circuit breakers Pressure produced by the arc is used©ABBGroup-1- 3-Sep-07 Quantitative analysis of gas circuit breaker physics through direct;©ABBGroup-4- 3-Sep-07 CFD pressure animation #12;©ABBGroup-5- 3-Sep-07 Current interruption phases Sequence

  12. Nondetectability of restriction fragments and independence of DNA fragment sizes within and between loci in RFLP typing of DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Zhong, Y.; Jin, L. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)); Budowle, B. (FBI Academy, Quantico, VA (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors provide experimental evidence showing that, during the restriction-enzyme digestion of DNA samples, some of the HaeIII-digested DNA fragments are small enough to prevent their reliable sizing on a Southern gel. As a result of such nondetectability of DNA fragments, individuals who show a single-band DNA profile at a VNTR locus may not necessarily be true homozygotes. In a population database, when the presence of such nondetectable alleles is ignored, they show that a pseudodependence of alleles within as well as across loci may occur. Using a known statistical method, under the hypothesis of independence of alleles within loci, they derive an efficient estimate of null allele frequency, which may be subsequently used for testing allelic independence within and across loci. The estimates of null allele frequencies, thus derived, are shown to agree with direct experimental data on the frequencies of HaeIII-null alleles. Incorporation of null alleles into the analysis of the forensic VNTR database suggests that the assumptions of allelic independence within and between loci are appropriate. In contrast, a failure to incorporate the occurrence of null alleles would provide a wrong inference regarding the independence of alleles within and between loci. 47 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Computational Molecular Biology Biochem 218 BioMedical Informatics 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alleles. Many have multiple identified genes (*) Gene ABO HLA APOE F5 HBB CCR5 APC PPAR Phenotype Peptic, Nature 2007 Control Population Disease Population SNP chip Thanks to Daniel Newburger #12;A Quantitative Expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) and Thanks to Daniel Newburger cDNA Levels #12;Genome

  14. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of response to aflatoxin and secondary traits in maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Melanie Love

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    traits that traditionally is selected for indirectly. It can greatly reduce harvestable yield. It is affected by morphological traits and environmental conditions, but its genetic components are little understood. This dissertation comprises three studies...

  15. Linkages between leaf traits and productivity in two resource-limited ecosystems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinchilla Soto, Isabel

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaf traits have long been used to classify and characterise species in natural ecosystems. In addition, leaf traits provide important information about plants’ strategies for the use of resources and can be used to improve ...

  16. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; et al

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore »involved in cytokines, including TGF?1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGF?1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  17. A Terminal Velocity on the Landscape: Particle Production near Extra Species Loci in Higher Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diana Battefeld; Thorsten Battefeld

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate particle production near extra species loci (ESL) in a higher dimensional field space and derive a speed limit in moduli space at weak coupling. This terminal velocity is set by the characteristic ESL-separation and the coupling of the extra degrees of freedom to the moduli, but it is independent of the moduli's potential if the dimensionality of the field space is considerably larger than the dimensionality of the loci, D >> d. Once the terminal velocity is approached, particles are produced at a plethora of nearby ESLs, preventing a further increase in speed via their backreaction. It is possible to drive inflation at the terminal velocity, providing a generalization of trapped inflation with attractive features: we find that more than sixty e-folds of inflation for sub-Planckian excursions in field space are possible if ESLs are ubiquitous, without fine tuning of initial conditions and less tuned potentials. We construct a simple, observationally viable model with a slightly red scalar power-spectrum and suppressed gravitational waves; we comment on the presence of additional observational signatures originating from IR-cascading and individual massive particles. We also show that moduli-trapping at an ESL is suppressed for D >> d, hindering dynamical selection of high-symmetry vacua on the landscape based on this mechanism.

  18. Copyright 2004 by the Genetics Society of America Integration and Modularity of Quantitative Trait Locus Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheverud, James M.

    the hypothesized location of the boundary between them. While these results are in agreement with the hypothesis that are internally coherent due to tion of the final structure (Francis-West et al. 1998;strong interconnection among

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Quantitative Risk Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Hydrogen Infrastructure Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Market Transformation...

  20. Ethnic differentiation at VNTR loci, with special reference to forensic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devlin, B.; Risch, N. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allele-rich VNTR loci provide valuable information for forensic inference. Interpretation of this information is complicated by measurement error, which renders discrete alleles difficult to distinguish. Two methods have been used to circumvent this difficulty-i.e, binning methods and direct evaluation of allele frequencies, the latter achieved by modeling the data as a mixture distribution. The authors use this modeling approach to estimate the allele frequency distributions for two loci-D17S79 and D2S44-for black, Caucasian, and Hispanic samples from the Lifecodes and FBI data bases. The databases are differentiated by the restriction enzyme used: PstI (Lifecodes) and HaeIII (FBI). The results show that alleles common in one ethnic group are almost always common in all ethnic groups, and likewise for rare alleles; this pattern holds for both loci. Gene diversity, or heterozygosity, measured as one minus the sum of the squared allele frequencies, is greater for D2S44 than for D17S79, in both data bases. The average gene diversity across ethnic groups when PstI (HaeIII) is used is .918 (.918) for D17S79 and is .985 (.983) for D2S44. The variance in gene diversity among ethnic groups is greater for D17S79 than for D2S44. The number of alleles, like the gene diversity, is greater for D2S44 than for D17S79. The mean numbers of alleles across ethnic groups, estimated from the PstI (HaeIII) data, are 40.25 (41.5) for D 17S79 and 104 (103) for D2S44. The number of alleles is correlated with sample size. The authors use the estimated allele frequency distributions for each ethnic group to explore the effects of unwittingly mixing populations and thereby violating independence assumptions. They show that, even in extreme cases of mixture, the estimated genotype probabilities are good estimates of the true probabilities, contradicting recent claims. 35 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS* Paul Embrechts Department of Mathematics ETH Zurich www.math.ethz.ch/~embrechts #12;QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES Theorems of Quantitative Risk Management · PE's Desert-Island Copula · Example 1: Credit Risk · Example 2

  2. Genomic Diversity at Thirteen Short Tandem Repeat Loci in a Substructured Caste Population, Golla, of Southern Andhra Pradesh, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, B. Mohan; Sun, Guangyun; Luis, Javier Rodriguez; Crawford, Michael H.; Hemam, Natabar Shyam; Deka, Ranjan

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    homogeneous, and strictly endogamous. Blood samples were drawn from 317 individuals from 30 Golla villages. The 13 STR loci analyzed in five standard multiplex polymerase chain reactions were: (1) CSF1R, TH01, and PLA2A; (2) F13A1, CYP19, and LPL; (3) D21S1446...

  3. Ultrasonic evaluation of carcass traits in young Brangus bulls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Gerald Don

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Carcass Traits in Young Brangus Bulls. (May 1996) Gerald Don Hicks, B. S. , Texas AdrM Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. H. R. Cross In Phase I, growth performance and serial ultrasound data were collected and analyzed on 194 Brangus bulls... an inspiration to me. Special thanks to Dr. Dan S. Hale for his Christian &iendship, encouragement and willingness to always take time to listen. Special thanks also to Wendy Schutt for her friendship, editing assistance and motivation she provided...

  4. Rapid Independent Trait Evolution despite a Strong Pleiotropic Genetic Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, Jeffrey K.; Karoly, Keith; Stewart, Christy; Koelling, Vanessa A.; Sahli, Heather F.; Shaw, Frank H.

    2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) flowers provides an ideal natural opportunity to test constraints. The additive genetic correlation is very high and has been estimated with good precision (mean #2; SEM, 0.85#2; ; Conner and Via 1993), using a large nested... constraints on adaptive evolution. Hered- ity 69:73–83. ———. 1993. Patterns of phenotypic and genetic correlations among morphological and life history traits in wild radish, Raphanus ra- phanistrum. Evolution 47:704–711. Conner, J. K. 2002. Genetic mechanisms...

  5. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to â??real-worldâ? materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  6. Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins classifies nanoparticles with different surface properties and size Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins...

  7. Optimization Online - Quantitative Stability Analysis of Stochastic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Zhang

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 3, 2015 ... Quantitative Stability Analysis of Stochastic Quasi-Variational Inequality Problems and Applications. Jie Zhang(zhangjie04212001 ***at*** ...

  8. Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shufeng

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Technical Report Project title: Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics DOE/Office of Science Program Manager Contact: Dr. James Davenport

  9. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Studying Phosphotyrosine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In this review, we outline the recent advances in analytical methodologies for enrichment, identification, and accurate quantitation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and...

  10. affects life-history traits: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are affected by natural selection Affect the overall "program" of the organism Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 1 Life history traits are affected by...

  11. Stellar loci III: Photometric metallicities for half million FGK stars of Stripe 82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Haibo; Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Chen, Bingqiu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a method to estimate photometric metallicities by simultaneously fitting the dereddened colors u-g, g-r, r-i and i-z from the SDSS with those predicted by the metallicity-dependent stellar loci. The method is tested with a spectroscopic sample of main-sequence stars in Stripe 82 selected from the SDSS DR9 and three open clusters. With 1 per cent photometry, the method is capable of delivering photometric metallicities precise to about 0.05, 0.12, and 0.18 dex at metallicities of 0.0, -1.0, and -2.0, respectively, comparable to the precision achievable with low-resolution spectroscopy at a signal-to-noise ratio of 10. We apply this method to the re-calibrated Stripe 82 catalog and derive metallicities for about 0.5 million stars of colors 0.3 < g-i < 1.6 mag and distances between 0.3 -- 18 kpc. Potential systematics in the metallicities thus derived, due to the contamination of giants and binaries, are investigated. Photometric distances are also calculated. About 91, 72, and 53 per cent of th...

  12. Scoring and mapping bovine anchor loci and screening polymorphic markers for horns and coat color in a Bos indicus X Bos taurus cross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenneman, Rick Alan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chromosomes or syntenic groups, 12 markers are assigned to linkage groups, and 19 are unassigned and unlinked markers. In order to more efficiently assign the markers under development to chromosomes, additional anchor loci were scored and tested...

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Linking multiple-level tree traits with biomass accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    ORIGINAL PAPER Linking multiple-level tree traits with biomass accumulation in native tree species, at the individual scale, links between biomass accumulation and multiple-level tree traits: biomass parti- tioning and Mohren 1995; Kraenzel et al. 2003). However, in some cases, poor adaptation of exotic species to climate

  14. acute ethanol withdrawal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acute ethanol withdrawal First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Quantitative trait loci...

  15. Elucidating and Mapping Heat Tolerance in Wild Tetraploid Wheat (Triticum turgidum L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohamed Badry Mohamed

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Component PWR Pedigree Wide Regression LD Linkage Disequilibrium AA Association Analysis viii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... ....................................... 9 Metabolic adaptation to heat stress ............................................... 11 Quantitative trait loci (QTL) and their importance for breeding .... 14 Simple sequence repeats (SSR) and their importance for breeding 15 Linkage map...

  16. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis of Lysophosphatidic Acid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stimulation. The approach combines trypsin-catalyzed 16O18O labeling plus 16O18O-methanol esterification labeling for quantitation, a macro- Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity...

  17. A quantitative, parametric model of musical tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farbood, Morwaread Mary

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a quantitative, parametric model for describing musical tension. While the phenomenon of tension is evident to listeners, it is difficult to formalize due to its subjective and multi-dimensional nature. ...

  18. Report on Solar Pool Heating Quantitative Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Synapse Infusion Group, Inc. (Westlake Village, California)

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the results of a quantitative research study undertaken to better understand the marketplace for solar pool-heating systems from the perspective of residential pool owners.

  19. Quantitative nondestructive testing using Infrared Thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manohar, Arun

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    steady, and selective heating scenarios. Infrared Physics &heating thermography and lock-in ther- mography to quantitative nondestructive evaluations. Infraredheating is very difficult to achieve in a practical scenario. The Infrared

  20. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human...

  1. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Abstract: The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the...

  2. perspective: Causes and consequences of range size variation: the influence of traits, speciation, and extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vamosi, Steven M.; Vamosi, Jana C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    traits and/or species richness predicted extinction risk inrange size and species richness on extinction risk, and 13–M.R. (2009) Extinction risks of Amazonian plant species.

  3. The Relationship between Personality Traits and Coachability in Female College Softball Athletes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Favor, Judy

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    traits to group processes and productivity in work teams (Barrick, Stewart, Neubert, & Mount, 1998; Bell, 2007; Peeters, Tuijl, Rutte, & Reymen, 2006). This study will add to the sport literature by 5 examining the relationship between personality...

  4. The use of ultrasonic techniques in estimating carcass traits in live beef animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wideman, Donald

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE USE OF ULTRASONIC TECHNIQUES IN ESTIMATING CARCASS TRAITS IN LIVE BEEF ANIMALS A Thesis By DONALD WIDEMAN Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Te~s in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1963 Major Subject: Animal Breeding THE USE OF ULTRASONIC TECHNIQUES IN ESTIMATING CARCASS TRAITS IN LIVE BEEF ANIMALS A Thesis By DONALD WIDEMAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ ) (Head...

  5. Topics in Quantitative Risk Management Paul Embrechts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    Topics in Quantitative Risk Management Paul Embrechts ETH-Z¨urich 1. Basel II and its risk management consequences 2. An overview of credit risk models 3. Modelling extremes: use and limitations 4@math.ethz.ch Homepage: http://www.math.ethz.ch/embrechts #12;Lecture 1: Basel II and its risk management consequences

  6. Quantitative multiplex detection of pathogen biomarkers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Swanson, Basil I; Martinez, Jennifer; Grace, Wynne K

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention addresses the simultaneous detection and quantitative measurement of multiple biomolecules, e.g., pathogen biomarkers through either a sandwich assay approach or a lipid insertion approach. The invention can further employ a multichannel, structure with multi-sensor elements per channel.

  7. Quantitative Methods of Policy Analysis Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    ENVS 5120 Quantitative Methods of Policy Analysis Spring 2013 Lecture: M/W 5:00-6:15pm Class. Some of these practical skill sets include: basic research design, cost-benefit analysis, risk and skill sets that are commonly used in the professional world of policymaking and policy analysis. Some

  8. Understanding Quantitative Wave-Particle Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabish Qureshi

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The complementary character of wave and particle natures of quantum objects (or quantons) was pointed out by Niels Bohr. This wave-particle duality, in the context of the two-slit experiment, is now quantitatively understood in terms of a duality relation. A very simple and intuitive derivation of the duality relation is presented, which should be understandable to a new student.

  9. On Quantitative Software Verification Marta Kwiatkowska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for establish- ing quantitative properties of a system model, such as the probability of battery power dropping concentrated on methods for analysing qualitative properties of system models. Many pro- grams, however to analyse system models in several application domains, including security and network protocols. However

  10. Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

  11. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K.; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Hu, Jian Z.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (Al T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brønsted acid sites. As the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about Al T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual Al atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the Al absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different Al-distributions. A preference of Al for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in the HBEA150 sample has been determined from a combination of these methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  12. Page 1 of 11 INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON QUANTITATIVE FINANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    Page 1 of 11 4th INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON QUANTITATIVE FINANCE December 22nd to 25th , 2012 at IIT a four (4) days International Workshop on Quantitative Finance at IIT Kanpur, Kanpur, INDIA from 22nd December to 25th December 2012. Information about the Quantitative Finance Workshop The 4th International

  13. Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management lih@math.wsu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Haijun Li lih@math.wsu.edu Department of Mathematics Washington State University Week 3 Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Week 3 1 / 26 #12;Outline Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Week 3 2 / 26 #12;Purposes of Accurate Risk Assessment

  14. MATH 576: Quantitative Risk Management (3 credits) Instructor: Haijun Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    MATH 576: Quantitative Risk Management (3 credits) Instructor: Haijun Li Office Locations: Neill: Quantitative Risk Management, Ch 1~7, Princeton University Press, New Jersey Course Purpose This course/computational methods in quantitative risk management. Concepts and methods covered in this course can be applied

  15. Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management lih@math.wsu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    1 Factor Models 2 Principal Component Analysis Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management WeekMath 576: Quantitative Risk Management Haijun Li lih@math.wsu.edu Department of Mathematics Washington State University Week 6 Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Week 6 1 / 24 #12;Outline

  16. Quantitative Models for Operational Risk: Extremes, Dependence and Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    risk data lend themselves easily to a full quantitative analysis. For example, legal risk defiesQuantitative Models for Operational Risk: Extremes, Dependence and Aggregation V. Chavez, the financial industry is looking for qualitative approaches to and quantitative models for operational risk

  17. Quantitative Verification: Models, Techniques and Tools Marta Kwiatkowska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    verification is an analogous technique for establishing quantitative properties of a system modelQuantitative Verification: Models, Techniques and Tools Marta Kwiatkowska Oxford University of the state-transition graph of the model and is therefore more powerful than test- ing. Quantitative

  18. Teacher trait anxiety, student evaluation apprehension and teacher expectancy for student performance: a possible arousal effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinnan, James Shepherd

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . If this is so, negative expectancy could serve as a "non relaxer" or energizer. Given this possibility, if the results of this experiment were re-examined with low expectancy seen as an "energizer" and high expectancy as a "relaxer" and it is additionally... assumed that low teacher trait anxiety is a "relaxer" and high teacher trait anxiety is an "energizer"; the high scores do in fact occur under medium arousal (that is, "energizer"/"relaxer" condition and vice versa) rather than excessively high...

  19. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  20. Quantitative WDS analysis using electron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa; Tawancy, Hani M. [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Mohammed, Abdul-Rashid I. [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jaroudi, Said S. [Saudi Aramco, P.O. Box 65, Tanajib 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Abbas, Nureddin M. [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the procedure for conducting quantitative elemental analysis by ZAF correction method using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) in an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) is elaborated. Analysis of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system formed on a Ni-based single crystal superalloy is presented as an example to illustrate the analysis of samples consisting of a large number of major and minor elements. The analysis was performed by known standards and measured peak-to-background intensity ratios. The procedure for using separate set of acquisition conditions for major and minor element analysis is explained and its importance is stressed.

  1. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  2. Category:Quantitative Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual ModelListsPolitical ActionQuantitative

  3. A Trait Specific Model of GM Crop Adoption among U.S. Corn Farmers in the Upper Midwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    to already existing seeds. This makes genetically modified (GM) seeds different from standard technological and change the characteristics of plants by giving them the ability to add specific and unique traits. In this case GM seeds involve adding specific traits into a plant in a manner similar to how a food company

  4. Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) Mapping of Transpiration Efficiency Related to Pre-flower Drought Tolerance in Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heraganahally Kapanigowda, Mohankumar

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing need to improve crop water-use efficiency (WUE) (ratio of whole-plant biomass to cumulative transpiration) due to decreased water availability and increased food and energy demands throughout the world. The objective...

  5. Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis: a cross-sectional single-centre experience with bone histomorphometry and quantitative computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacchetta, Justine; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Gilsanz, Vicente; Gales, Barbara; Pereira, Renata C; Salusky, Isidro B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and quantitative computed tomography. Pediatric Rheumatologyand quantitative computed tomography Justine Bacchetta 1 ,by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and their

  6. Genetic and physical mapping of the Treacher Collins syndrome locus with respect to loci in the chromosome 5q3 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang; Coss, C.; Taylor, E. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Lovett, M. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)); Yamaoka, L.H.; Speer, M.C. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Cadle, R.; Hall, B. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)); Brown, K. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)) (and others)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant, craniofacial developmental disorder, and its locus (TCOF1) has been mapped to chromosome 5q3. To refine the location of the gene within this region, linkage analysis was performed among the TCOF1 locus and 12 loci (IL9, FGFA, GRL, D5S207, D5S210, D5S376, CSF1R, SPARC, D5S119, D5S209, D5S527, FGFR4) in 13 Treacher Collins syndrome families. The highest maximum lod score was obtained between loci TCOF1 and D5S210 (Z = 10.52; [theta] = 0.02 [+-] 0.07). The best order, IL9-GRL-D5S207/D5S210-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119, and genetic distances among these loci were determined in the 40 CEPH families by multipoint linkage analysis. YAC clones were used to establish the order of loci, centromere-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5S207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-telomere. By combining known physical mapping data with ours, the order of chromosome 5q3 markers is centomere-IL9-FGFA-5[prime]GRL3[prime]-D5s207-D5S210-D5S376-CSF1R-SPARC-D5S119-D5S209-FGFR4-telomere. Based on this order, haplotype analysis suggests that the TCOF1 locus resides distal CSF1R and proximal to SPARC within a region less than 1 Mb in size. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Diallel analysis and heritability estimates of fiber traits for ELS, Gossypium hirsutum L., progeny.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Gregory L.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . Due to a significant GxY interaction for all F1 fiber traits, data were reported by years. Experimental ELS lines showed positive GCA effects for fiber length, strength, and length uniformity, while the majority of commercial lines showed negative...

  8. A general integrative model for scaling plant growth, carbon flux, and functional trait spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerkhoff, Andrew J.

    Carthy1 & Charles A. Price1 Linking functional traits to plant growth is critical for scaling attri- butes and biomass flux within and across plants is needed. Building on foundational work on relative growth rate4 are ultimately governed by the isometric scaling4,5,20,21 of whole-plant net biomass growth rate, d

  9. Heterosis and heterosis retention for reproductive and maternal traits in Brahman - British crossbred cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kelli Loren

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Reproductive, maternal, and weight traits were analyzed for Angus (A), Brahman (B), and Hereford (H) straightbred cows; F1 and F2 BA and BH cows; and 3/8 B 5/8 A first (Bn) and second (Bn2) generation cows in Central ...

  10. Evaluation of carcass traits of F? calves sired by Bos indicus bulls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, Cody Allen

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The carcass traits of 229 F[] steers sired by 15 Brahman bulls and 1 Nellore bull and out of Angus and Hereford dams were evaluated. The first calves were born in the Spring of 1994 and the last calves were born in the Spring of 1998. Of the steers...

  11. How invader traits interact with resident communities and resource availability to determine invasion success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Nick

    149 How invader traits interact with resident communities and resource availability to determine for limited resources is considered a key factor controlling invasion success. Resource availability can be viewed in either the long or short-term. Long-term availability depends on the baseline nutrient

  12. Genetic variation of hydraulic and wood anatomical traits in hybrid poplar and trembling aspen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacke, Uwe

    Genetic variation of hydraulic and wood anatomical traits in hybrid poplar and trembling aspen November 2010 New Phytologist (2011) 190: 150­160 doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03594.x Key words: aspen forestry systems and breeding programs often include either native aspen or hybrid poplar clones

  13. GUIDELINES FOR RESEARCHERS ON COMPLIANCE REGULATIONS FOR EXPERIMENTAL PLANTS WITH NOVEL TRAITS (PNTs) IN CANADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    (PNTs) IN CANADA Agricultural research using recombinant DNA technologies, mutagenesis, hybridization in Canada and researchers must be aware of the processes in place to prevent accidental release project involving plants with novel traits (PNTs). REGULATION OF PNTs IN CANADA The regulation

  14. The Values of Immigrant Students on Citizenship as a Trait of Character Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obamehinti, Feyi

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine the values of immigrant students on citizenship as a trait of character education in accordance to Texas Education Code 29.906 in a high school setting. The study examined the perception of immigrant students...

  15. The Use of Traits-Based Assessment to Estimate Effects of Hydropower Projects on Fish Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Use of Traits-Based Assessment to Estimate Effects of Hydropower Projects on Fish Populations Background Safe downstream passage of fish at conventional hydropower projects affects not only migratory fish species for testing, assess impacts of new hydropower development, and develop mitigation measures

  16. Trait similarity, shared ancestry and the structure of neighbourhood interactions in a subtropical wet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uriarte, Maria

    -exclusive mechanisms ranging from entirely deterministic to stochastic have been proposed to explain the high number traits to quantify the relative efficacy of functional similarity and shared ancestry in describing 1971) and limited dispersal coupled with demo- graphic stochasticity (Hubbell 2001). The outcome

  17. Xylem traits mediate a trade-off between resistance to freezethaw-induced embolism and photosynthetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sack, Lawren

    to vascular transport caused by freeze­thaw-induced embolism. · Freeze­thaw-induced loss in hydraulic embolized following freeze­thaw events (Hacke & Sperry, 2001). Such a loss of water transport can reduceXylem traits mediate a trade-off between resistance to freeze­thaw-induced embolism

  18. Species traits predict the effects of disturbance and productivity on diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Nick

    that ­ alone or in concert ­ increasing disturbance intensity or frequency, or decreasing productivity, reducedLETTER SpeciesÕ traits predict the effects of disturbance and productivity on diversity Nick M, University of Colorado, UCB 334, Boulder CO 80309, USA. Abstract Disturbance is an important factor

  19. A Database of Lotic Invertebrate Traits for North By Nicole K. M. Vieira, N. LeRoy Poff, Daren M. Carlisle, Stephen R. Moulton II, Marci L. Koski,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    A Database of Lotic Invertebrate Traits for North America By Nicole K. M. Vieira, N. LeRoy Poff, Boris C., 2006, A database of lotic invertebrate traits for North America: U.S. Geological Survey Data ........................................................................................................................................3 Selecting traits for the database

  20. CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November 6 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavuz, Deniz

    CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 1 CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November straightness. Using #12;CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 2 the advanced output control-processing. Major features of the versions Version 1.3 Beta2 (newest): The primary change in CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2

  1. Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-PhaseGlyoxal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal, and 2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) with Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal,...

  2. amplicon quantitative pcr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Guidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments Jim F this process we present the Minimum Information for...

  3. analysis quantitative chemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deals, including the following: ENERGY: Chemical engineers work in all aspects of the energy industry developing Firestone, Jeremy 6 Conservation biology Quantitative analysis...

  4. Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Using Cysteinyl Peptide Enrichment Quantitative Site-specific Reactivity Profiling of S-Nitrosylation in Mouse Skeletal...

  5. Quantitative multi-modal NDT data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heideklang, René; Shokouhi, Parisa [Division 8.5, BAM Fed. Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A single NDT technique is often not adequate to provide assessments about the integrity of test objects with the required coverage or accuracy. In such situations, it is often resorted to multi-modal testing, where complementary and overlapping information from different NDT techniques are combined for a more comprehensive evaluation. Multi-modal material and defect characterization is an interesting task which involves several diverse fields of research, including signal and image processing, statistics and data mining. The fusion of different modalities may improve quantitative nondestructive evaluation by effectively exploiting the augmented set of multi-sensor information about the material. It is the redundant information in particular, whose quantification is expected to lead to increased reliability and robustness of the inspection results. There are different systematic approaches to data fusion, each with its specific advantages and drawbacks. In our contribution, these will be discussed in the context of nondestructive materials testing. A practical study adopting a high-level scheme for the fusion of Eddy Current, GMR and Thermography measurements on a reference metallic specimen with built-in grooves will be presented. Results show that fusion is able to outperform the best single sensor regarding detection specificity, while retaining the same level of sensitivity.

  6. Hydrogen quantitative risk assessment workshop proceedings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groth, Katrina M.; Harris, Aaron P.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) Toolkit Introduction Workshop was held at Energetics on June 11-12. The workshop was co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and HySafe, the International Association for Hydrogen Safety. The objective of the workshop was twofold: (1) Present a hydrogen-specific methodology and toolkit (currently under development) for conducting QRA to support the development of codes and standards and safety assessments of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and fueling stations, and (2) Obtain feedback on the needs of early-stage users (hydrogen as well as potential leveraging for Compressed Natural Gas [CNG], and Liquefied Natural Gas [LNG]) and set priorities for %E2%80%9CVersion 1%E2%80%9D of the toolkit in the context of the commercial evolution of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). The workshop consisted of an introduction and three technical sessions: Risk Informed Development and Approach; CNG/LNG Applications; and Introduction of a Hydrogen Specific QRA Toolkit.

  7. Statistics and Quantitative Risk Management for Banking and In-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    Statistics and Quantitative Risk Management for Banking and In- surance Paul Embrechts Risk practice Abstract As an emerging field of applied research, Quantitative Risk Management (QRM) poses a lot management. Topics treated include the use of risk measures in regulation, including their statistical

  8. Application of Evidential Networks in quantitative analysis of railway accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Application of Evidential Networks in quantitative analysis of railway accidents Felipe Aguirre1 during the qualitative or quantitative evaluation of risk. Several new techniques for HRA were invented. As a consequence, safety engineers try to take into account this factor in risk assessment. However, human

  9. Climate policy and competitiveness: Policy guidance and quantitative evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate policy and competitiveness: Policy guidance and quantitative evidence Jared C. Carbone NicholasRivers July 2014 Abstract When considering adoption of a domestic climate change policy survey the literature on the quantitative impacts of unilateral climate change policy derived from

  10. A general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    A general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics Geoffrey B. Westa , Brian J for review October 1, 2008) We present the first part of a quantitative theory for the structure and dynamics to predict numerous structural and dynamical properties of idealized forests. allometry size spectra metaboic

  11. System and method for leveraging human physiological traits to control microprocessor frequency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shye, Alex; Pan, Yan; Scholbrock, Benjamin; Miller, J. Scott; Memik, Gokhan; Dinda, Peter A; Dick, Robert P

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for leveraging physiological traits to control microprocessor frequency are disclosed. In some embodiments, the system and method may optimize, for example, a particular processor-based architecture based on, for example, end user satisfaction. In some embodiments, the system and method may determine, for example, whether their users are satisfied to provide higher efficiency, improved reliability, reduced power consumption, increased security, and a better user experience. The system and method may use, for example, biometric input devices to provide information about a user's physiological traits to a computer system. Biometric input devices may include, for example, one or more of the following: an eye tracker, a galvanic skin response sensor, and/or a force sensor.

  12. Population genomics of Populus trichocarpa identifies signatures of selection and adaptive trait associations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Luke M [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Rodgers-Melnick, Eli [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Brunner, Amy M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Schackwitz, Wendy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Difazio, Stephen P. [West Virginia University, Morgantown

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest trees are dominant components of terrestrial ecosystems that have global ecological and economic importance. Despite distributions that span wide environmental gradients, many tree populations are locally adapted, and mechanisms underlying this adaptation are poorly understood. Here we use a combination of whole-genome selection scans and association analyses of 544 Populus trichocarpa trees to reveal genomic bases of adaptive variation across a wide latitudinal range. Three hundred ninety-seven genomic regions showed evidence of recent positive and/or divergent selection and enrichment for associations with adaptive traits that also displayed patterns consistent with natural selection. These regions also provide unexpected insights into the evolutionary dynamics of duplicated genes and their roles in adaptive trait variation.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of response to aflatoxin and secondary traits in maize 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Melanie Love

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    GENOTYPIC AND PHENOTYPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF RESPONSE TO AFLATOXIN AND SECONDARY TRAITS IN MAIZE A Dissertation by MELANIE LOVE EDWARDS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by MELANIE LOVE EDWARDS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Javier F. Betr?n Committee Members...

  14. Heterosis and Heterosis Retention for Reproductive and Maternal Traits in Nellore-Angus Crossbred Cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obeidat, Mohammad Diya Talal Hamed

    2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    HETEROSIS AND HETEROSIS RETENTION FOR REPRODUCTIVE AND MATERNAL TRAITS IN NELLORE-ANGUS CROSSBRED COWS A Dissertation by MOHAMMAD DIYA TALAL HAMED OBEIDAT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Subject: Animal Breeding Copyright 2013 Mohammad Diya Talal Hamed Obeidat ii ABSTRACT Calving rate, weaning rate, birth weight, weaning weight, and ADG from 1997 to 2011 were investigated in Angus, Nellore, F1 Nellore-Angus, first generation 3...

  15. Evaluation of Early Measures of Body Composition as Related to Beef Carcass Traits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maulsby, Richard Paul.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , there were no differences in fat th ickness or intramuscular fat at the ultrasound scan sessions or in these carcass traits due to ribeye area category. The same trend for iv quality grade classification was not seen across both groups of cattle however... and select quality grade levels Group 1 (TAMU) cattle ?????????.32 6 Summary statistics for Group 2 (BBU) choice and select quality grade classes. ????????????????????????????..33 7 Summary of change in scan sessions for carcass...

  16. Effects of Trait Behavioral Approach and Inhibition Sensitivity on Behavioral Aggression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravens, Laura Christine

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Eddie Harmon-Jones Committee Members, Brandon Schmeichel Jeff Ackerman Head of Department, Ludy Benjamin May 2011 Major Subject: Psychology iii ABSTRACT... Effects of Trait Behavioral Approach and Inhibition Sensitivity on Behavioral Aggression. (May 2011) Laura Christine Gravens, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Eddie Harmon-Jones Behavioral approach sensitivity (BAS) has...

  17. The use of Sorghum propinquum to enhance agronomic traits in Sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooten, David Rudolph

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: William L. Rooney (Chair of Committee 3. Cr ighton Miller, 3r. (Member) C. Wayne Smith (Member) Mark A. Hussey (Head of Department) December 2001 Major Subject...: Plant Breeding ABSTRACT The Use of Sorghum propinquum to Enhance Agronomic Traits in Sorghum. (December 2001) David Rudolph Wooten, Jr, , B, S. Texas ASM University; B. S. Texas ASM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. William L. Rooney...

  18. Quantitative estimation in Health Impact Assessment: Opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatia, Rajiv, E-mail: rajiv.bhatia@sfdph.or [San Francisco Department of Public Health, CA (United States); Seto, Edmund [University of California at Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) considers multiple effects on health of policies, programs, plans and projects and thus requires the use of diverse analytic tools and sources of evidence. Quantitative estimation has desirable properties for the purpose of HIA but adequate tools for quantification exist currently for a limited number of health impacts and decision settings; furthermore, quantitative estimation generates thorny questions about the precision of estimates and the validity of methodological assumptions. In the United States, HIA has only recently emerged as an independent practice apart from integrated EIA, and this article aims to synthesize the experience with quantitative health effects estimation within that practice. We use examples identified through a scan of available identified instances of quantitative estimation in the U.S. practice experience to illustrate methods applied in different policy settings along with their strengths and limitations. We then discuss opportunity areas and practical considerations for the use of quantitative estimation in HIA.

  19. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  20. Method of quantitating dsDNA

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stark, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Kuske, Cheryl R. (Los Alamos, NM); Mullen, Kenneth I. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for quantitating dsDNA in an aqueous sample solution containing an unknown amount of dsDNA. A first aqueous test solution containing a known amount of a fluorescent dye-dsDNA complex and at least one fluorescence-attenutating contaminant is prepared. The fluorescence intensity of the test solution is measured. The first test solution is diluted by a known amount to provide a second test solution having a known concentration of dsDNA. The fluorescence intensity of the second test solution is measured. Additional diluted test solutions are similarly prepared until a sufficiently dilute test solution having a known amount of dsDNA is prepared that has a fluorescence intensity that is not attenuated upon further dilution. The value of the maximum absorbance of this solution between 200-900 nanometers (nm), referred to herein as the threshold absorbance, is measured. A sample solution having an unknown amount of dsDNA and an absorbance identical to that of the sufficiently dilute test solution at the same chosen wavelength is prepared. Dye is then added to the sample solution to form the fluorescent dye-dsDNA-complex, after which the fluorescence intensity of the sample solution is measured and the quantity of dsDNA in the sample solution is determined. Once the threshold absorbance of a sample solution obtained from a particular environment has been determined, any similarly prepared sample solution taken from a similar environment and having the same value for the threshold absorbance can be quantified for dsDNA by adding a large excess of dye to the sample solution and measuring its fluorescence intensity.

  1. Did bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) from the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas undergo a genetic bottleneck? A test using nuclear microsatellite loci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Devra Denise

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for microsatellite loci used in analysis of Balaena mysticetus. Locus Label Repeat Sequence T a (?C) k o Size Range (bp) TV7 a 6-FAM (CA) 12 59 15 147 ? 193 TV11 b HEX (TG) 14 59 5 239 ? 247 TV13 b FAM (TG) 13 66 7 295 ? 309 TV14 b HEX (TG) 16 52 8 93 ? 107... CITED AMOS, B., C. SCHL?TTERER, AND D. TAUTZ. 1993. Social structure of pilot whales revealed by analytical DNA profiling. Science 260:670-672. BEARDMORE, J. A. 1983. Extinction, survival, and genetic variation. Pp. 125-163 in Genetics...

  2. Topics in measurement error and missing data problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    reasons. In this research, the impact of missing genotypes is investigated for high resolution combined linkage and association mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL). We assume that the genotype data are missing completely at random (MCAR). Two... and asymptotic properties. In the genetics study, a new method is proposed to account for the missing genotype in a combined linkage and association study. We have concluded that this method does not improve power but it will provide better type I error rates...

  3. Quantitative molecular graphics what is it? -use of molecular graphics at quantitative level employing high-quality pictures of molecules in various views (orthographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Quantitative molecular graphics ­ what is it? -use of molecular graphics at quantitative level by using quantitative molecular graphics (34) and a priori QSAR (54- 60).2 A STUDY OF HIV-1 PROTEASE-INHIBITOR INTERMOLECULAR INTERACTIONS BY USING QUANTITATIVE MOLECULAR GRAPHICS AND A PRIORI QSAR Rudolf Kiralj and Márcia M

  4. A quantitative analysis of baroclinic instability in extratropical cyclogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, David Arthur

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the participating potential vorticity (PV) anomalies, thereby allowing a complete quantitative estimation of the contribution made by cyclogenetic mechanisms such as Bi to cyclone growth. In all three episodes examined, it is found that baroclinic amplification...

  5. Quantitative tumor heterogeneity assessment on a nuclear population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative tumor heterogeneity assessment on a nuclear population basis Anne-Sofie Wessel score in this area was performed. 110 of the 226 TMA cores were scored by a pathologist. The automatic

  6. Development of quantitative tools for assessment of cerebellar dysfunction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Aditi

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two tools for the quantitative assessment of cerebellar dysfunction are developed and explored. One is based on a battery of laptop tests desgined for clinical use. Extensive analysis of one of the tests using a speed/accuracy ...

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass...

  8. Midwest Quantitative Biology Conference Mission Point Resort, Mackinac Island, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midwest Quantitative Biology Conference Mission Point Resort, Mackinac Island, Michigan September Exchange Method for the Free Energy of Conformational Fluctuations Michigan State University 3:05-3:30 Role

  9. Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative Model-Based Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative Model-Based Tracking Christian K¨ohler, 1- bilize basic signal processing and pattern recognition processes like the reliable extraction of some

  10. Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative ModelBased Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative Model­Based Tracking Christian KË? ohler, 1­ bilize basic signal processing and pattern recognition processes like the reliable extraction of some

  11. Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the active site SUMMARY Extensive structural studies of enzymes have revealed that biological catalysis occurs within substantial electrostatic field heterogeneity, widely differing sensitivities of discrete probes to a set

  12. Bridging boolean and quantitative synthesis using smoothed proof search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Swarat

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new technique for parameter synthesis under boolean and quantitative objectives. The input to the technique is a "sketch" --- a program with missing numerical parameters --- and a probabilistic assumption about ...

  13. Quantitative NDA Measurements of Advanced Reprocessing Product Materials Containing U, NP, PU, and AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard, Braden

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4...

  14. Challenges in the Modeling and Quantitative Analysis of Safety-Critical Automotive Systems!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leue, Stefan

    ! Probabilistic FMEA! Probabilistic Analysis of System Architectures! ! Conclusion! 3! #12;ISO 26262: Road! ,,identify Failures"! - Qualitative FMEA! ! - Qualitative Fault Tree Analysis! ! - Event Tree Analysis! Quantitative Methods! ,,predict frequency of failures"! - Quantitative FMEA! ! - Quantitative Fault Tree

  15. QTL and Candidate Genes for Growth Traits in Pinus Taeda L

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire G. Williams

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reason for the project is to find the genetic factors which control growth at ages closer to commercial harvest (also known as QTL detection). To date, efforts to find genetic factors which control growth have been limited to seedlings. Because tree breeders want to find molecular markers which are linked to traits of direct economic value, finding linkage to factors controlling older-tree growth is more critical than seedling growth. Our current research interest includes both absolute height at ages 10-13 years but also growth trajectory or the rate of growth from seedling to half-rotation.

  16. A microfluidic platform for high-throughput multiplexed protein quantitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volpetti, Francesca; Maerkl, Sebastian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a high-throughput microfluidic platform capable of quantitating up to 384 biomarkers in 4 distinct samples by immunoassay. The microfluidic device contains 384 unit cells, which can be individually programmed with pairs of capture and detection antibody. Samples are quantitated in each unit cell by four independent MITOMI detection areas, allowing four samples to be analyzed in parallel for a total of 1,536 assays per device. We show that the device can be pre-assembled and stored for weeks at elevated temperature and we performed proof-of-concept experiments simultaneously quantitating IL-6, IL-1\\b{eta}, TNF-{\\alpha}, PSA, and GFP. Finally, we show that the platform can be used to identify functional antibody combinations by screening 64 antibody combinations requiring up to 384 unique assays per device.

  17. A Quantitative Analysis of Pricing Behavior In California's Wholesale Electricity Market During Summer 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Kahn, Edward

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A Quantitative Analysis of Pricing Behavior In California's Wholesale Electricity Market During Summer 2000...

  18. Quantitative adhesion data for electroless nickel deposited on various substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper includes a review of the literature on quantitative adhesion of electroless nickel coatings and then presents recent ring shear quantitative data for the electroless nickel deposited on a variety of substrates. Procedures for obtaining good adhesion between electroless nickel coatings and a variety of aluminum alloys (1100, 2024, 5083, 6061 and 7075), beryllium-copper, 4340 steel, HP 9-4-20 steel, and U-0.75 Ti are outlined. In addition, data are presented on a procedure for activating electroless nickel for subsequent coating with electrodeposited nickel. 6 tables.

  19. Quantitative adhesion data for electroless nickel deposited on various substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the literature on quantitative adhesion of electroless nickel coatings is given and recent ring shear quantitative data for the electroless nickel deposited on a variety of substrates are presented. Procedures for obtaining good adhesion between electroless nickel coatings and a variety of aluminum alloys (1100, 2024, 5083, 6061 and 7075), beryllium-copper, 4340 steel and HP 9-4-20 steel are outlined. In addition, data are presented on a procedure for activating electroless nickel for subsequent coating with electrodeposited nickel.

  20. Genomics Populations for Characterization of Economically Important Traits Structured populations of beef cattle with extensive phenotypic records for economical-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genomics Populations for Characterization of Economically Important Traits Structured populations efficiency and carcass merit, are a critical need in the post-genome sequencing era. Coupled with the availability of the 7.5x assembly of the bovine genome sequence and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP

  1. Genetic Diversity in Cultivated CommonBean: II. Marker-Based Analysis of Morphological and AgronomicTraits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gepts, Paul

    , seed, and phenology traits, as well as reaction to four important diseases and an insect pest, obtained from field evaluations at three locations in Colombia during the 1987-1988 cropping season, were Program, Int. Ctr. for Tropical Agric. (CIAT), Apartado aereo 6713, Call, Colombia; and P. Gepts, Dep

  2. Phenotypic Data Collection and Sample Preparation for Genomics of Wood Formation and Cellulosic Biomass Traits in Sunflower: Ames, IA location.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marek, Laura F.

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Three fields were planted in Ames in 2010, two association mapping fields, N3 and A, and a recombinant inbred line field, N13. Phenotype data and images were transferred to UGA to support genetic and genomic analyses of woody biomass-related traits.

  3. Self-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at Radu Calinescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    , performance and operating cost (e.g., energy consumption) of software. These techniques include model checkingSelf-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at runtime Radu Calinescu Department 1: The world and the machine. [19, 30]. In contrast, several mathematically-based modelling

  4. Self-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at Radu Calinescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , performance and operating cost (e.g., energy consumption) of software. These techniques include model checkingSelf-adaptive software needs quantitative verification at runtime Radu Calinescu Department"#.&*#.+$ Figure 1: The world and the machine. [19, 30]. In contrast, several mathematically-based modelling

  5. Quantitative analysis of SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide total column measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laat, Jos de

    , SCIAMACHY CO total column retrievals are of sufficient quality to provide useful new information]. Ground-based FTIR measurements provide high quality total column measurements but have very limitedQuantitative analysis of SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide total column measurements A. T. J. de Laat,1,2 A

  6. Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management lih@math.wsu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    , that a bomb had gone off in the White House, and the S&P Index lose $136 billion in a matter of four minutes, 2004) Financial markets are ecological systems in which various agents ("species") compete frequency trading). Haijun Li Math 576: Quantitative Risk Management Week 1 6 / 26 #12;Ecology of Agent

  7. Quantitative Analysis of the Full Bitcoin Transaction Graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative Analysis of the Full Bitcoin Transaction Graph Dorit Ron and Adi Shamir Department.ron,adi.shamir}@weizmann.ac.il Abstract. The Bitcoin scheme is a rare example of a large scale global payment system in which all and how they spend their bitcoins, the balance of bitcoins they keep in their accounts, and how they move

  8. Quantitative Imaging of Corrosion in Plates by Eddy Current Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santosa, Fadil

    Quantitative Imaging of Corrosion in Plates by Eddy Current Methods Bruno Luong \\Lambda and Fadil the problem of determining material loss due to cor­ rosion in a plate. Eddy current data are collected on one the relationship between eddy current loop impedance change with the loss profile. In this context, we show

  9. Original article Quantitative review of ruminal and total tract digestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Quantitative review of ruminal and total tract digestion of mixed diet organic reviewed using a data base involving 157 papers. The ruminal digestion (mean ± SE%) of organic matter, cell), respectively and the proportion of each component digested in the rumen in relation to total tract

  10. The Fifth European Conference on Symbolic and Quantitative Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Anthony

    ecsqaru99 The Fifth European Conference on Symbolic and Quantitative Approaches to Reasoning and applications of formalisms. The main European forum for the subject is the European Conference on Symbolic the previous ECSQARU conference proceedings. In addition, a special issue of the Knowledge En­ gineering Review

  11. Implications of Power Control in Wireless Networks: A Quantitative Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthy, Srikanth

    Implications of Power Control in Wireless Networks: A Quantitative Study Ioannis Broustis, Jakob of power control in wireless networks can lead to two con- flicting effects. An increase- posite effects. Our primary goal in this work is to understand the implications of power control

  12. ORIGINAL RESEARCH Open Access Acquisition setting optimization and quantitative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    studies with the Inveon microPET-CT system Nadège Anizan1* , Thomas Carlier1 , Cecilia Hindorf1 was the Inveon PET/CT system dedicated to small animal imaging. Methods: The noise equivalent count rate [NECR. Keywords: small animal imaging, PET/CT, iodine-124, quantitative imaging Background Small animal imaging

  13. Quantitative verification of ab initio self-consistent laser theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, A. Douglas

    ­1564 (1998). 6. O. Painter, R. K. Lee, A. Scherer, A. Yariv, J. D. O'Brien, P. D. Dapkus, and I. Kim, "TwoQuantitative verification of ab initio self-consistent laser theory Li Ge,1 Robert J. Tandy,1 A¨ureci, A. D. Stone, and B. Collier, "Self-consistent multimode lasing theory for complex or random lasing

  14. FRA-MOWGS2MKT-049 Quantitative (Credit) Portfolio Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulmek, Markus

    FRA-MOWGS2MKT-049 Quantitative (Credit) Portfolio Management Topics in Banking and Finance 24 Mai Concepts of (Credit) Portfolio Management 2. Definition of Risk Appetite 3. Portfolio Optimization Contents management models Passive Defensive Reactive Active Traditional banking Portfolio modelling & analysis Ex

  15. Structured Language for Specifications of Quantitative Requirements Mario Dal Cin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fey, Dietmar

    are derived from risk measures. Then, the analysis gives useful information to improve system performance and to reduce risk. However, as computer-based analysis deals with more complex system behavior a rigorousStructured Language for Specifications of Quantitative Requirements Mario Dal Cin University

  16. QUANTITATIVE SONOGRAPHIC PROSTATE CANCER CHARACTERIZTION A Thesis Presented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huston, Dryver R.

    QUANTITATIVE SONOGRAPHIC PROSTATE CANCER CHARACTERIZTION A Thesis Presented by Zhi He are at risk for developing prostate cancer, and as a man ages, his risk of developing prostate cancer acquiring the ultrasound data, the specimen is sectioned for histological analysis at 2 mm intervals

  17. Quantitative selection of hedge funds using data envelopment analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Quantitative selection of hedge funds using data envelopment analysis Huyen Nguyen-Thi-Thanh First Envelopment Analysis (DEA) could be a good tool to evaluate fund performance, especially the performance of hedge funds as it can incorporate multiple risk-return attributes characterizing hedge fund's non normal

  18. The significance of nucleotides within DNA codons: a quantitative approach.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra Hernández, Alejandro

    The significance of nucleotides within DNA codons: a quantitative approach. Alejandro Guerra amino acids coded by triplets of nucleotides (codons) in the Genetic Code, ap- pears to depend on the nucleotide position within a codon, as well as its physico-chemical features. Although differ- ent orders

  19. Speeding Up SMT-Based Quantitative Program Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshia, Sanjit A.

    Speeding Up SMT-Based Quantitative Program Analysis Daniel J. Fremont and Sanjit A. Seshia-free program. These problems can be solved using a combi- nation of path enumeration, SMT solving, and model present a formalization and satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) based solution to a family

  20. Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Bayesian Model Averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    February 24, 2006 1J. McLean Sloughter is Graduate Research Assistant, Adrian E. Raftery is BlumsteinProbabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Bayesian Model Averaging J. McLean Sloughter, Adrian E. Raftery and Tilmann Gneiting 1 Department of Statistics, University of Washington

  1. Application of Quantitative Fluorescence and Absorption-Edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Application of Quantitative Fluorescence and Absorption-Edge Computed Microtomography to Image, Chicago, Illinois 60637 This paper shows that synchrotron-based fluorescence and absorption-edge computed, which had a well-correlated metal coating. Absorption-edge CMT showed the three-dimensional distribution

  2. Direct and quantitative photothermal absorption spectroscopy of individual particulates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Eon Han, Sang; Burg, Brian R.; Chen, Gang, E-mail: gchen2@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Zheng, Ruiting [Key Laboratory of Radiation Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Radiation Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Shen, Sheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic structures can exhibit significant absorption enhancement when an object's length scale is comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light. This property has enabled photonic structures to be an integral component in many applications such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photothermal therapy. To characterize this enhancement at the single particulate level, conventional methods have consisted of indirect or qualitative approaches which are often limited to certain sample types. To overcome these limitations, we used a bilayer cantilever to directly and quantitatively measure the spectral absorption efficiency of a single silicon microwire in the visible wavelength range. We demonstrate an absorption enhancement on a per unit volume basis compared to a thin film, which shows good agreement with Mie theory calculations. This approach offers a quantitative approach for broadband absorption measurements on a wide range of photonic structures of different geometric and material compositions.

  3. Review of progress in quantitative NDE. [Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet is composed of abstracts from papers submitted at a meeting on quantitative NDE. A multitude of topics are discussed including analysis of composite materials, NMR uses, x-ray instruments and techniques, manufacturing uses, neural networks, eddy currents, stress measurements, magnetic materials, adhesive bonds, signal processing, NDE of mechanical structures, tomography,defect sizing, NDE of plastics and ceramics, new techniques, optical and electromagnetic techniques, and nonlinear techniques. (GHH)

  4. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  5. Quantitative and qualitative productivity in nominal brainstorming groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selivanoff, Sophia G

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . A. , Lorna Linda University Chair of Committee: Dr. Charles Samuelson This research investigated the effects of evaluation apprehension and social comparison feedback on the quantitative and qualitative productivity of brainstorming. Both... with these characteristics. However, this study goes one step further and uses truly nominal groups in order to isolate the effects of evaluation apprehension and social comparison feedback. One hundred three undergraduate students were used to investigate the following...

  6. A familial {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} 3;9 translocation with cryptic 8q insertion leading to deletion and duplication of 9p23 loci in siblings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagstaff, J.; Hemann, M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A child with phenotypic features of the 9p{sup {minus}} syndrome, including metopic craniosynostosis, small ears, abdominal wall defect, and mental retardation, as well as hypopigmentation, was found to have a cytogenetically balanced 3;9 translocation, with breakpoints at 3p11 and 9p23, inherited from his phenotypically normal father. Molecular analysis showed heterozygous deletion of the TYRP (tyrosinase-related protein) locus, as well as loci D9S157, D9S274, D9S268, and D9S267, in the child but in neither parent. FISH analysis of the proband`s father indicated that loci deleted in his son, including TYRP, were present on neither the der(3) nor the der(9) translocation products but had been inserted into the long arm of chromosome 8. Therefore, the apparent deletion of these loci in the proband was the result of meiotic segregation of the father`s 3;9 translocation chromosomes together with his normal chromosome 8 (not bearing the insertion from 9p23). Neither the deletion of these 9p23 loci from the translocation chromosomes nor their insertion into 8q was detectable by standard chromosome banding techniques. The proband`s sister exhibited speech delay, mild facial dysmorphism, and renal malformation, and her karyotype was 46,XX. Molecular analysis showed that she had inherited normal chromosomes 3 and 9, as well as the chromosome 8 with the insertion of 9p23 material, from her father. This analysis illustrates a new mechanism to explain cases in which an apparently balanced translocation has been transmitted from a normal parent to a child with a phenotypic abnormality: submicroscopic deletion of material from the translocation breakpoint and insertion into a third chromosome in the balanced parent, with meiotic segregation leading to loss of the inserted material in the child. 36 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Quantitative Network Signal Combinations Downstream of TCR Activation Can Predict IL-2 Production Response1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative Network Signal Combinations Downstream of TCR Activation Can Predict IL-2 Production of intense ongoing study, but understanding how the consequent downstream signaling networks integrate hypothesized that a quantitative combination of key downstream network signals across multiple pathways must

  8. OHS certification and legal compliance management in France: a quantitative survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OHS certification and legal compliance management in France: a quantitative survey Thomas the principal results. Keywords: Occupational health and safety, quantitative survey, management of legal, Sophia Antipolis, France b PREVENTEO, Le Cannet, France Abstract: Management of legal compliance

  9. Quantitative Finance, Vol. 12, No. 1, January 2012, 1114 Financial engineering at Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Quantitative Finance, Vol. 12, No. 1, January 2012, 11­14 Financial engineering at Columbia of quantitative finance, including derivative securi- ties, risk management, portfolio optimization, trading. Photographs by Mark Broadie. Quantitative Finance ISSN 1469­7688 print/ISSN 1469­7696 online ß 2012 Taylor

  10. A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    A Mathematical Programming Model for Optimal Layout Considering Quantitative Risk Analysis Nancy of plant layout with safety considerations. The model considers a quantitative risk analysis to take safety aims at providing a more elaborate analysis of risk sources by considering a complete quantitative risk

  11. Quantitative evaluation of turbidity in coastal waters from Lansat imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bright, Jon Branson

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 1977 ABSTRACT Quantitative Evaluation of Turbi. dity in Coastal Waters From Landsat Image y (December 1977) Jon Branson Bright, B. S. , Texas AhII Dniversity Directed by: Dr. Wesley P. James The purpose of this research program... that turbi tlity did not always give the same values of suspended solid' as did other methods. NcCluney (13) found nine definitions of turbidity in a search of the literature and classified them into two & roups& those based on compari. son wi. th si...

  12. Evaluation of respirator fit training by quantitative fit testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chute, Daniel Otis

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrument to Obtain Informed Consent APPENDIX B Health Screening Form V11 v111 ix 3 4 5 6 8 12 14 15 17 17 30 33 50 56 61 62 TA8LE OF CONTENTS (continued) APPENDIX C Resp1 rator Quantitative Fit Test Record APPENDIX D Resp1rator Tra... Test Session Grou Subject Ex erimental log PF Control Combined lo PF 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 2. 016 2. 715 2. 789 1. 468 2. 168 3. 783 2. 836 3. 129 2. 378 2. 685 2. 328 1. 925 2. 132 1. 740 2. 446 . 36. 538...

  13. Quantitative phylogenetic assessment of microbial communities indiverse environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Mering, C.; Hugenholtz, P.; Raes, J.; Tringe, S.G.; Doerks,T.; Jensen, L.J.; Ward, N.; Bork, P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The taxonomic composition of environmental communities is an important indicator of their ecology and function. Here, we use a set of protein-coding marker genes, extracted from large-scale environmental shotgun sequencing data, to provide a more direct, quantitative and accurate picture of community composition than traditional rRNA-based approaches using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By mapping marker genes from four diverse environmental data sets onto a reference species phylogeny, we show that certain communities evolve faster than others, determine preferred habitats for entire microbial clades, and provide evidence that such habitat preferences are often remarkably stable over time.

  14. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The OH- and O3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven pressures at each temperature.

  15. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Viergever, Max A. [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ?17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 76%–103% (SPECT-fMC). Furthermore, SPECT-fMC recovered whole-body activities were most accurate (A{sup est}= 1.06 × A ? 5.90 MBq, R{sup 2}= 0.97) and SPECT-fMC tumor absorbed doses were significantly higher than with SPECT-DSW (p = 0.031) and SPECT-ppMC+DSW (p = 0.031).Conclusions: The quantitative accuracy of {sup 166}Ho SPECT is improved by Monte Carlo-based modeling of the image degrading factors. Consequently, the proposed reconstruction method enables accurate estimation of the radiation absorbed dose in clinical practice.

  16. Automated simulation of areal bone mineral density assessment in the distal radius from high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burghardt, A. J.; Kazakia, G. J.; Link, T. M.; Majumdar, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative computed tomography A. J. Burghardt & G. J.2017–2024 Micro-computed tomography has become an importantperipheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is a

  17. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, A., E-mail: arun-nair-in@yahoo.com; Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V. [Optics Laboratory, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001 (India)] [Optics Laboratory, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001 (India); Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W. [Institut für Technische Optik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 9, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Institut für Technische Optik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 9, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Dubey, S. K. [Siemens Technology and Services Pvt. Ltd, Corporate Technology—Research and Technology Centre, Bangalore 560100 (India)] [Siemens Technology and Services Pvt. Ltd, Corporate Technology—Research and Technology Centre, Bangalore 560100 (India); Javidi, B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U-4157, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2157 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U-4157, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2157 (United States)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  18. A quantitative method for measuring the quality of history matches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, T.S. [Kerr-McGee Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Knapp, R.M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    History matching can be an efficient tool for reservoir characterization. A {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} history matching job can generate reliable reservoir parameters. However, reservoir engineers are often frustrated when they try to select a {open_quotes}better{close_quotes} match from a series of history matching runs. Without a quantitative measurement, it is always difficult to tell the difference between a {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} and a {open_quotes}better{close_quotes} matches. For this reason, we need a quantitative method for testing the quality of matches. This paper presents a method for such a purpose. The method uses three statistical indices to (1) test shape conformity, (2) examine bias errors, and (3) measure magnitude of deviation. The shape conformity test insures that the shape of a simulated curve matches that of a historical curve. Examining bias errors assures that model reservoir parameters have been calibrated to that of a real reservoir. Measuring the magnitude of deviation assures that the difference between the model and the real reservoir parameters is minimized. The method was first tested on a hypothetical model and then applied to published field studies. The results showed that the method can efficiently measure the quality of matches. It also showed that the method can serve as a diagnostic tool for calibrating reservoir parameters during history matching.

  19. Theoretical Sensitivity Analysis for Quantitative Operational Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kato, Takashi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study an asymptotic behaviour of the difference between value-at-risks VaR(L) and VaR(L+S) for heavy-tailed random variables L and S as an application to sensitivity analysis of quantitative operational risk management in the framework of an advanced measurement approach (AMA) of Basel II. We have different types of results according to the magnitude relationship of thickness of tails of L and S. Especially if the tail of S is enough thinner than the one of L, then VaR(L + S) - VaR(L) is asymptotically equivalent to an expected loss of S when L and S are independent. We also give some generalized results without the assumption of independence.

  20. Quantitative analysis of forest island pattern in selected Ohio landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.W.; Burgess, R.L.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively describe the various aspects of regional distribution patterns of forest islands and relate those patterns to other landscape features. Several maps showing the forest cover of various counties in Ohio were selected as representative examples of forest patterns to be quantified. Ten thousand hectare study areas (landscapes) were delineated on each map. A total of 15 landscapes representing a wide variety of forest island patterns was chosen. Data were converted into a series of continuous variables which contained information pertinent to the sizes, shape, numbers, and spacing of woodlots within a landscape. The continuous variables were used in a factor analysis to describe the variation among landscapes in terms of forest island pattern. The results showed that forest island patterns are related to topography and other environmental features correlated with topography.

  1. Quantitative Methods for Comparing Different HVAC Control Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aswani, Anil; Taneja, Jay; Krioukov, Andrew; Culler, David; Tomlin, Claire

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally comparing the energy usage and comfort characteristics of different controllers in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is difficult because variations in weather and occupancy conditions preclude the possibility of establishing equivalent experimental conditions across the order of hours, days, and weeks. This paper is concerned with defining quantitative metrics of energy usage and occupant comfort, which can be computed and compared in a rigorous manner that is capable of determining whether differences between controllers are statistically significant in the presence of such environmental fluctuations. Experimental case studies are presented that compare two alternative controllers (a schedule controller and a hybrid system learning-based model predictive controller) to the default controller in a building-wide HVAC system. Lastly, we discuss how our proposed methodology may also be able to quantify the efficiency of other building automation systems.

  2. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Quantitative dynamic modeling of transcriptional networks of embryonic stem cells using integrated framework of Pareto optimality and energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Marco A., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs) are pluripotent and thus are considered the "cell type of choice". ESCs exhibit several phenotypic traits (e.g., proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, necrosis, etc.) and when differentiated ...

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsJennifer B....

  5. 11.220 Quantitative Reasoning and Statistical Method for Planning I, Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zegras, P. Christopher

    This course develops logical, empirically based arguments using statistical techniques and analytic methods. It covers elementary statistics, probability, and other types of quantitative reasoning useful for description, ...

  6. GINI COEFFICIENTS, SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS, AND MARKOV CHAINS: QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR ANA-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GINI COEFFICIENTS, SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS, AND MARKOV CHAINS: QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR ANA- LYZING Management Project No.: 538 Title of Project: Gini Coefficients, social network analysis and Markov Chains

  7. Quantitative Financial Analysis of Alternative Energy Efficiency Shareholder Incentive Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

    2008-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising energy prices and climate change are central issues in the debate about our nation's energy policy. Many are demanding increased energy efficiency as a way to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower the total cost of electricity and energy services for consumers and businesses. Yet, as the National Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) pointed out, many utilities continue to shy away from seriously expanding their energy efficiency program offerings because they claim there is insufficient profit-motivation, or even a financial disincentive, when compared to supply-side investments. With the recent introduction of Duke Energy's Save-a-Watt incentive mechanism and ongoing discussions about decoupling, regulators and policymakers are now faced with an expanded and diverse landscape of financial incentive mechanisms, Determining the 'right' way forward to promote deep and sustainable demand side resource programs is challenging. Due to the renaissance that energy efficiency is currently experiencing, many want to better understand the tradeoffs in stakeholder benefits between these alternative incentive structures before aggressively embarking on a path for which course corrections can be time-consuming and costly. Using a prototypical Southwest utility and a publicly available financial model, we show how various stakeholders (e.g. shareholders, ratepayers, etc.) are affected by these different types of shareholder incentive mechanisms under varying assumptions about program portfolios. This quantitative analysis compares the financial consequences associated with a wide range of alternative incentive structures. The results will help regulators and policymakers better understand the financial implications of DSR program incentive regulation.

  8. Quantitative Methods for Comparing Different Polyline Stream Network Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson; Daniel P. Ames; Ping Yang

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two techniques for exploring relative horizontal accuracy of complex linear spatial features are described and sample source code (pseudo code) is presented for this purpose. The first technique, relative sinuosity, is presented as a measure of the complexity or detail of a polyline network in comparison to a reference network. We term the second technique longitudinal root mean squared error (LRMSE) and present it as a means for quantitatively assessing the horizontal variance between two polyline data sets representing digitized (reference) and derived stream and river networks. Both relative sinuosity and LRMSE are shown to be suitable measures of horizontal stream network accuracy for assessing quality and variation in linear features. Both techniques have been used in two recent investigations involving extracting of hydrographic features from LiDAR elevation data. One confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE, when using LiDAR-derived DEMs. The other demonstrated a new method of delineating stream channels directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM, showing that the direct delineation from LiDAR point clouds yielded an excellent and much better match, as indicated by the LRMSE.

  9. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, and which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  10. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T. J., E-mail: t.j.mitchell@dur.ac.uk; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and Biophysical Sciences Institute, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  11. Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    1 Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment S Institut Telecom - Telecom Bretagne, Brest, F-29200 France. Abstract. In Positron Emission Tomography (PET-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do

  12. Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu of fuel cell energy in cloud computing, yet it is unclear what and how much benefit it may bring. This paper, for the first time, attempts to quantitatively examine the benefits brought by fuel cell

  13. Quantitative Depth Recovery from Time-Varying Optical Flow in a Kalman Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    Quantitative Depth Recovery from Time-Varying Optical Flow in a Kalman Filter Framework John Barron Julich, 52425 Julich, Germany h.spies@fz-juelich.de Abstract. We present a Kalman lter framework, Depth from Optical Flow, Kalman Filter, 3D Camera Motion, Quantitative Error Analysis 1 Introduction We

  14. Guidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    this process we present the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR ExperimentsGuidelines for Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Digital PCR Experiments Jim F Vandesompele,6 Carl T. Wittwer,12 and Stephen A. Bustin13 There is growing interest in digital PCR (dPCR) be

  15. 1 Copyright 2014 by ASME SEMI-QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF ADJACENT TRACK ACCIDENTS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    1 Copyright © 2014 by ASME SEMI-QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT OF ADJACENT TRACK ACCIDENTS ON SHARED risk analysis is developed to investigate various factors affecting train accident rate, intrusion rate and provides a basis for future quantitative risk analyses and risk mitigation implementations. NOMENCLATURE

  16. Four dimensional visualization of highly transient fuel sprays by microsecond quantitative x-ray tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    -resolved quantitative fuel distribution allowed a realistic numerical fluid dynamic simulation with initial conditions- timal for probing the fuel, a blend of a calibration fluid and a cerium-containing fuel additiveFour dimensional visualization of highly transient fuel sprays by microsecond quantitative x

  17. Quantitative analysis of infrared contrast enhancement algorithms Seth Weith-Glushko1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    , and quantitatively evaluate infrared contrast enhancement algorithms for use in a real-time long-wave infrared imageQuantitative analysis of infrared contrast enhancement algorithms Seth Weith-Glushko1 and Carl range imagery output from current sensors are compressed in a pleasing way for display on lower dynamic

  18. Detection and Quantitation of -2-Microglobulin Glycosylated End Products in Human Serum by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    32, Columbia, Maryland 21044 -2-Microglobulin ( 2M) is a major protein component found in the amyloidDetection and Quantitation of -2-Microglobulin Glycosylated End Products in Human Serum by Matrix as a quantitative tool. -2-Microglobulin ( 2M) is a globular protein with 99 amino acids and is usually located

  19. The Quantitative Assessment of Risk Caused By Fire and Explosion in Chemical Process Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Quantitative Assessment of Risk Caused By Fire and Explosion in Chemical Process Industry Farid by the domino effect are the most destructive accidents related to industrial plants. Fire and explosion; Quantitative risk assessment; Explosions; Fires; Storage areas. 1. Introduction The accidents caused

  20. Extensions and evaluations of a general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Extensions and evaluations of a general quantitative theory of forest structure and dynamics Brian of a quantitative theory for the structure and dynamics of forests under demographic and resource steady state distribution competitive thinning Understanding the key forces that shape the structure, function, and dynamics

  1. Costs of mating competition limit male lifetime breeding success in polygynous mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukas, Dieter; Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ., Dobson, F. S. 2003 The relative importance of life?history variables to population Page 15 of 25 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 growth rate in mammals: Cole’s prediction revisited. Am. Nat. 161... . Slate, J., Visscher, P. M., MacGregor, S., Stevens, D., Tate, M. L., & Pemberton, J. M. 2002 A genome scan for quantitative trait loci in a wild population of red deer (Cervus elaphus). Genetics 162(4), 1863-1873. S95. Schubert, G., Vigilant, L., Boesch...

  2. On the Quantitative Impact of the Schechter-Valle Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Duerr; Manfred Lindner; Alexander Merle

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the Schechter-Valle (Black Box) theorem quantitatively by considering the most general Lorentz invariant Lagrangian consisting of point-like operators for neutrinoless double beta decay. It is well known that the Black Box operators induce Majorana neutrino masses at four-loop level. This warrants the statement that an observation of neutrinoless double beta decay guarantees the Majorana nature of neutrinos. We calculate these radiatively generated masses and find that they are many orders of magnitude smaller than the observed neutrino masses and splittings. Thus, some lepton number violating New Physics (which may at tree-level not be related to neutrino masses) may induce Black Box operators which can explain an observed rate of neutrinoless double beta decay. Although these operators guarantee finite Majorana neutrino masses, the smallness of the Black Box contributions implies that other neutrino mass terms (Dirac or Majorana) must exist. If neutrino masses have a significant Majorana contribution then this will become the dominant part of the Black Box operator. However, neutrinos might also be predominantly Dirac particles, while other lepton number violating New Physics dominates neutrinoless double beta decay. Translating an observed rate of neutrinoless double beta decay into neutrino masses would then be completely misleading. Although the principal statement of the Schechter-Valle theorem remains valid, we conclude that the Black Box diagram itself generates radiatively only mass terms which are many orders of magnitude too small to explain neutrino masses. Therefore, other operators must give the leading contributions to neutrino masses, which could be of Dirac or Majorana nature.

  3. Le TRAIT De la lettre la figure, Vol. 1, ds. B. Bonhomme, M. Symington, S. Ballestra-Puech, L'Harmattan, 217-231, mai 2007.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Le TRAIT De la lettre à la figure, Vol. 1, éds. B. Bonhomme, M. Symington, S. Ballestra-Puech, L'Harmattan. Bonhomme, M. Symington, S. Ballestra-Puech, L'Harmattan, 217-231, mai 2007. 2 Feuilleter le catalogue de l

  4. Designer Sorghum Combining the High Digestibility and Waxy Grain Traits of Sorghum for Improved Nutrition Bioethanol Beer Feed and Food Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jampala, Babitha

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ) was integrated with the Waxy trait in sorghum. The Waxy (WX) sorghums have starch completely in the form of amylopectin. The effect of endosperm type on ethanol yield and fermentation efficiencies was studied among HD, WX and HD-WX lines. The HD-WX lines...

  5. A familial {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} 3;9 translocation with cryptic 8q insertion leading to deletion and duplication of 9p23 loci in siblings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagstaff, J.; Hemann, M. [Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Families in which a balanced translocation has been transmitted from a normal parent to a child with a phenotypic abnormality have been a longstanding puzzle for human geneticists. A child with phenotypic features of the 9p- syndrome, including metopic craniosynostosis, small ears, abdominal wall defect, and mental retardation, was found to have a cytogenetically balanced 3;9 translocation, with breakpoints at 3p11 and 9p23, inherited from his normal father. He also exhibited marked hypopigmentation of hair and skin. Analysis with a cDNA probe from the TYRP1 (tyrosinase-related protein 1) gene in 9p23 showed heterozygous deletion in the child but in neither parent. This submicroscopic deletion also included loci D9S157, D9S274, D9S268, and D9S267. FISH analysis of the proband`s father indicated the 9p23 loci deleted in his son were present on neither the der(3) nor the der(9) translocation product, but had been inserted into the long arm of chromosome 8. Therefore, the apparent deletion of these loci in the proband was the result of meiotic segregation of the father`s 3;9 translocation chromosomes together with his normal chromosome 8. Neither the deletion from the translocation chromosomes nor the insertion into 8q was detectable by standard chromosome banding techniques. The proband`s sister exhibited speech delay, mild facial dysmorphism, and renal malformation, and her karyotype was 46,XX. Molecular analysis of this sister showed 3 copies of 9p23 sequences, indicating that she had inherited normal chromosomes 3 and 9 from her father as well as the chromosome 8 with the insertion from 9p23. This analysis illustrates a new mechanism to explain cases of phenotypic discordance in familial balanced translocations: submicroscopic deletion of material from the translocation breakpoint and insertion into a third chromosome in the balanced parent, with meiotic segregation leading to loss of the inserted material in the child.

  6. Quantitative analysis of silicate certified reference materials by LA-ICPMS with and without an internal standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    August 2008 DOI: 10.1039/b801807n Quantitative analysis of silicate minerals by laser ablation Quantitative analysis of silicates by laser ablation inductively- coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA

  7. Theory and simulation of colloids near interfaces: quantitative mapping of interaction potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Mingqing

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of dense colloidal fluids near surfaces can now be probed in great detail with experimental techniques like video and confocal microscopy. In fact we are approaching a point where quantitative comparisons of experiments with particle...

  8. The Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Quantitatively Map Mixing and Temperature in Microfluidic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Emmelyn M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been employed to quantitatively and spatially map the fluid composition and temperature within microfluidic systems. A molecular probe with a ...

  9. Combined confocal Raman and quantitative phase microscopy system for biomedical diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jeon Woong

    We have developed a novel multimodal microscopy system that incorporates confocal Raman, confocal reflectance, and quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) into a single imaging entity. Confocal Raman microscopy provides detailed ...

  10. Quantitative performance-based evaluation of a procedure for flexible design concept generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardin, Michel-Alexandre, 1979-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an experimental methodology for objective and quantitative design procedure evaluation based on anticipated lifecycle performance of design concepts, and a procedure for flexible design concept generation. ...

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Environmental Data and Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Quantitative Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Environmental Data and Models Volume 1 ........................................6 1.3 Is A Probabilistic Analysis Necessary? ................................................................8 1.4 Previous Work in Probabilistic Risk Assessment

  12. Quantitative Selection and Design of Model Generation Architectures for On-Orbit Autonomous Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assembly Swati Mohan, David W. Miller March 2010 SSL # 3-10 #12;#12;Quantitative Selection and Design SSL # 3-10 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by Swati Mohan submitted

  13. Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of the solar interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study, is to a significant extent based on tomographic methods developed in geophysics. The proposed time-lapse seismic methods developed in petroleum geophysics offer the next

  14. RECONSTRUCTING CLIMATE ON THE GREAT PLAINS FROM BURIED SOILS: A QUANTITATIVE APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zung, Ashley B.

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Plains, U.S.A. lack quantitative paleoclimatic data for the late Quaternary largely because two common sources of paleoclimatic data, tree ring and pollen records, are rare in the region. Sequences of buried ...

  15. Automated Quantitative Analysis of Capnogram Shape for COPD–Normal and COPD–CHF Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieloszyk, Rebecca J.

    We develop an approach to quantitative analysis of carbon dioxide concentration in exhaled breath, recorded as a function of time by capnography. The generated waveform – or capnogram – is currently used in clinical practice ...

  16. Qualitative and Quantitative Management Tools Used by Financial Officers in Public Research Universities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trexler, Grant 1961-

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    /or hypotheses (Hanacek, 2010). Quantitative tools may include activity based costing, cost-benefit analysis, trend analysis, responsibility centered management, ratio analysis, strengths-weaknesses-opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis, data mining...

  17. A quantitative assessment of nuclear weapons proliferation risk utilizing probabilistic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sentell, Dennis Shannon, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative quantitative assessment is made of the nuclear weapons proliferation risk between various nuclear reactor/fuel cycle concepts using a probabilistic method. The work presented details quantified proliferation ...

  18. Single molecule quantitation and sequencing of rare translocations using microfluidic nested digital PCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuga, Joe; Zeng, Yong; Novak, Richard; Lan, Qing; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Li, Laiyu; Hubbard, Alan; Zhang, Luoping; Mathies, Richard A.; Smith, Martyn T.

    2013-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    of individual tumors. Here, we report the development and application of a bead-based hemi-nested microfluidic droplet digital PCR (dPCR) technology to achieve ‘quantitative’ measurement and single-molecule sequencing of somatically acquired carcinogenic...

  19. Revised process for work zone decision-making based on quantitative performance measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Thomas Wayne

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Work zones create one of the most challenging environments for drivers. Implementing work zones on urban freeways creates many issues, especially with respect to mobility. Decisions made regarding the work zone should be informed by quantitative...

  20. Atomic Force Microscopy of Photosystem II and Its Unit Cell Clustering Quantitatively Delineate the Mesoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geissler, Phillip

    the Mesoscale Variability in Arabidopsis Thylakoids Bibiana Onoa1 , Anna R. Schneider2 , Matthew D. Brooks3 Quantitatively Delineate the Mesoscale Variability in Arabidopsis Thylakoids. PLoS ONE 9(7): e101470. doi:10

  1. Quantitative genetic analysis of growth and survival in Penaeus vannamei versus temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Tomas Kutz, Alvaro J

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two 8-week laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate quantitative genetic aspects of growth and survival in juveniles of the marine shrimp Penaeus vannamei versus temperature. Experiment I involved 4,486 progeny ...

  2. Surfactant Diffusion into Lysozyme Crystal Matrices Investigated by Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    the infusion of lysozyme crystals with pyrene-based fluorescent surfactants by quantitative fluorescence × 10-10 to 30 × 10-10 cm2 /s, depending on the type and size of the surfactant. The slow infusion

  3. Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis on High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis Care Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA Abstract. Regional assessment of lung disease specific to different lung regions on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) datasets. We present

  4. The Impact of Age on Quantitative Infrared Pupillometry in Healthy Children 1-18 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jacob

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IMPACT OF AGE ON QUANTITATIVE INFRARED PUPILLOMETRY IN HEALTHY CHILDREN 1-18 YEARS BY JACOB TYLER BROWN PharmD, Creighton University School of Pharmacy, 2010 Submitted to the graduate degree program in Clinical Research... thesis: THE IMPACT OF AGE ON QUANTITATIVE INFRARED PUPILLOMETRY IN HEALTHY CHILDREN 1-18 YEARS _________________________________________ Chairperson Theresa I. Shireman, RPh, PhD Date approved: April 8, 2014...

  5. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  6. A quantitative model to predict the cost of quality nonconformance in the construction industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opara, Ethelbert Okechukwu

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE COST OF QUALITY NONCONFORMANCE IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY A Thesis by ETHELBERT OKECHUKWU OPARA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Construction Management A QUANTITATIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE COST OF QUALITY NONCONFORMANCE IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY A Thesis by ETHELBERT OKECHUKWU OPARA Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  7. A quantitative application of the thermoelectric method for measuring water uptake by cotton plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naghshineh-Pour, Bahman

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE APPLICATION OF THE THERMOELECTRIC METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER UPTAKE BY COTTON PLANTS A, Thesis by BAHMAN NAGHSHINEH-POUR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in part al fulfillment of the requirements... for thc degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1965 Major-Subject: Soil Physics A QUANTITATIVE APPLICATION 'OF THE THERMOELECTRIC METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER UPTAKE BY COTTON PLANTS A Thesis by BAHMAN NAGHSHINEH:POUR Approved as to style and content...

  8. Validating the use of qualitative ratings of static wrist postures relative to quantitative measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohac, Melanie Dawn

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VALIDATING THE USE OF QUALITATIVE RATINGS OF STATIC WRIST POSTURES RELATIVE TO QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by MELANIE DAWN BOHAC Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2000 Major Subject: Safety Engineering VALIDATING THE USE OF QUALITATIVE RATINGS OF STATIC WRIST POSTURES RELATIVE TO QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by MELANIE DAWN BOHAC Submitted to Texas...

  9. A quantitative determination of the conditions for hot cracking during welding for aluminum alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steenbergen, James Everett

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF THE CONDITIONS FOR HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by JAMES EVERETT STEENBERGEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1969 Major Subject: Materials Engineering A QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF THE CONDITIONS FOR HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by JAMES EVERETT STEENBERGEN (Chairman of Committee) ( ead...

  10. A quantitative determination of the conditions for hot cracking during welding for aluminum alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steenbergen, James Everett

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF THE CONDITIONS FOR HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by JAMES EVERETT STEENBERGEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1969 Major Subject: Materials Engineering A QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF THE CONDITIONS FOR HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by JAMES EVERETT STEENBERGEN (Chairman of Committee) ( ead...

  11. Can autistic traits present in the normal population determine social communication abilities? An investigation into correlations between AQ score and performance in communication tasks testing audience design and lexical alignment. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baring, Rosalind M B

    2009-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explored the concept of the Autistic Spectrum (Wing (1988)), and the theory that autistic traits of varying severity can be identified and measured in the general population using Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, ...

  12. Identification and genetic characterization of maize cell wall variation for improved biorefinery feedstock characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, Markus [UC Berkeley] [UC Berkeley; Hake, Sarah [USDA Albany] [USDA Albany

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this program are to 1) characterize novel maize mutants with altered cell walls for enhanced biorefinery characteristics and 2) find quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to biorefinery characteristics by taking advantage of the genetic diversity of maize. As a result a novel non-transgenic maize plant (cal1) has been identified, whose stover (leaves and stalk) contain more glucan in their walls leading to a higher saccharification yield, when subjected to a standard enzymatic digestion cocktail. Stacking this trait with altered lignin mutants yielded evene higher saccharification yields. Cal-1 mutants do not show a loss of kernel and or biomass yield when grown in the field . Hence, cal1 biomass provides an excellent feedstock for the biofuel industry.

  13. Evaluation of sire differences in postweaning growth traits and carcass characteristics, and the use of ultrasound measurements as predictors of observed carcass values in purebreed beefmaster steers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Lawrence Andrew

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resulting from the Brahman x British cross improves production and growth traits, the Brahman influence has been shown to negatively affect carcass quality, especially tenderness (Koch et al. , 1982; Crouse et al. , 1989; Johnson et al. , 1990). Crouse et... slaughtered with less days on feed than steers from continental breeds. And in 1982, Koch et al. reported that Brahman crossbred steers had heavier final weights than those from Angus, Hereford, Pinzgauer, Tarentaise, and Sahiwal sires when fed to a time...

  14. Identifying root traits among MAR and non-MAR cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. cultivars that relate to performance under limited moisture conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Charles Garland

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the squaring stage of a glass front box experiment and in the flowering and boll setting stage of a greenhouse experiment. An index was used to indicate a drought susceptible or resistant response by the cultivar. In both experiments, iv differences were... weight. This suggests that as shoot growth was reduced, excess photosynthates were translocated to the roots, resulting in continued root growth. The single most important and consistent trait associated with drought susceptibility in the two...

  15. Genome resequencing in Populus: Revealing large-scale genome variation and implications on specialized-trait genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muchero, Wellington [ORNL] [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL] [ORNL; Priya, Ranjan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University, Morgantown] [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, Populus ranks among a few plant species with a complete genome sequence and other highly developed genomic resources. With the first genome sequence among all tree species, Populus has been adopted as a suitable model organism for genomic studies in trees. However, far from being just a model species, Populus is a key renewable economic resource that plays a significant role in providing raw materials for the biofuel and pulp and paper industries. Therefore, aside from leading frontiers of basic tree molecular biology and ecological research, Populus leads frontiers in addressing global economic challenges related to fuel and fiber production. The latter fact suggests that research aimed at improving quality and quantity of Populus as a raw material will likely drive the pursuit of more targeted and deeper research in order to unlock the economic potential tied in molecular biology processes that drive this tree species. Advances in genome sequence-driven technologies, such as resequencing individual genotypes, which in turn facilitates large scale SNP discovery and identification of large scale polymorphisms are key determinants of future success in these initiatives. In this treatise we discuss implications of genome sequence-enable technologies on Populus genomic and genetic studies of complex and specialized-traits.

  16. Insight into trade-off between wood decay and parasitism from the genome of a fungal forest pathogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Ake; Aerts, Andrea; Asiegbu, Fred; Belbahri, Lassaad; Bouzid, Ourdia; Broberg, Anders; Canback, Bjorn; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Cullen, Dan; Dalman, Kerstin; Deflorio, Giuliana; van Diepen, Linda T. A.; Dunand, Christophe; Duplessis, Sebastien; Durling, Mikael; Gonthier, Paolo; Grimwood, Jane; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar; Hansson, David; Henrissat, Bernard; Hietala, Ari; Himmelstrand, Kajsa; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Hogberg, Nils; James, Timothy Y.; Karlsson, Magnus; Kohler, Annegret; Lucas, Susan; Lunden, Karl; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Park, Jongsun; Raffaello, Tommaso; Rouze, Pierre; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Solheim, Halvor; Stahlberg, Jerry; Velez, Heriberto; de Vries, Ronald P.; Wiebenga, Ad; Woodward, Steve; Yakovlev, Igor; Garbelotto, Matteo; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Stenlid, Jan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parasitism and saprotrophic wood decay are two fungal strategies fundamental for succession and nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. An opportunity to assess the trade-off between these strategies is provided by the forest pathogen and wood decayer Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato. We report the annotated genome sequence and transcript profiling, as well as the quantitative trait loci mapping, of one member of the species complex: H. irregulare. Quantitative trait loci critical for pathogenicity, and rich in transposable elements, orphan and secreted genes, were identified. A wide range of cellulose-degrading enzymes are expressed during wood decay. By contrast, pathogenic interaction between H. irregulare and pine engages fewer carbohydrate-active enzymes, but involves an increase in pectinolytic enzymes, transcription modules for oxidative stress and secondary metabolite production. Our results show a trade-off in terms of constrained carbohydrate decomposition and membrane transport capacity during interaction with living hosts. Our findings establish that saprotrophic wood decay and necrotrophic parasitism involve two distinct, yet overlapping, processes.

  17. Advances in quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging by mode-synthesizing atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitry, P.; Bourillot, E.; Plassard, C.; Lacroute, Y.; Lesniewska, E. [ICB, UMR CNRS 6303 CNRS-University of Bourgogne, Dijon F-21078 (France); Tetard, L. [Nanoscience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on advances toward quantitative non-destructive nanoscale subsurface investigation of a nanofabricated sample based on mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy with heterodyne detection, addressing the need to correlate the role of actuation frequencies of the probe f{sub p} and the sample f{sub s} with depth resolution for 3D tomography reconstruction. Here, by developing a simple model and validating the approach experimentally through the study of the nanofabricated calibration depth samples consisting of buried metallic patterns, we demonstrate avenues for quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging. Our findings enable the reconstruction of the sample depth profile and allow high fidelity resolution of the buried nanostructures. Non-destructive quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging offers great promise in the study of the structures and properties of complex systems at the nanoscale.

  18. Predicting the impacts of climate change on animal distributions: the importance of local adaptation and species' traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HELLMANN, J. J.; LOBO, N. F.

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The geographic range limits of many species are strongly affected by climate and are expected to change under global warming. For species that are able to track changing climate over broad geographic areas, we expect to see shifts in species distributions toward the poles and away from the equator. A number of ecological and evolutionary factors, however, could restrict this shifting or redistribution under climate change. These factors include restricted habitat availability, restricted capacity for or barriers to movement, or reduced abundance of colonists due the perturbation effect of climate change. This research project examined the last of these constraints - that climate change could perturb local conditions to which populations are adapted, reducing the likelihood that a species will shift its distribution by diminishing the number of potential colonists. In the most extreme cases, species ranges could collapse over a broad geographic area with no poleward migration and an increased risk of species extinction. Changes in individual species ranges are the processes that drive larger phenomena such as changes in land cover, ecosystem type, and even changes in carbon cycling. For example, consider the poleward range shift and population outbreaks of the mountain pine beetle that has decimated millions of acres of Douglas fir trees in the western US and Canada. Standing dead trees cause forest fires and release vast quantities of carbon to the atmosphere. The beetle likely shifted its range because it is not locally adapted across its range, and it appears to be limited by winter low temperatures that have steadily increased in the last decades. To understand range and abundance changes like the pine beetle, we must reveal the extent of adaptive variation across species ranges - and the physiological basis of that adaptation - to know if other species will change as readily as the pine beetle. Ecologists tend to assume that range shifts are the dominant response of species to climate change, but our experiments suggest that other processes may act in some species that reduce the likelihood of geographic range change. In the first part of our DOE grant (ending 2008) we argued that the process of local adaptation of populations within a species range, followed by climatic changes that occur too quickly for adaptive evolution, is an underappreciated mechanism by which climate change could affect biodiversity. When this process acts, species ranges may not shift readily toward the poles, slowing the rate of species and biome change. To test this claim, we performed an experiment comparing core and peripheral populations in a series of field observations, translocation experiments, and genetic analyses. The papers in Appendix A were generated from 2005-2008 funding. In the second part of the DOE grant (ending 2011) we studied which traits promote population differentiation and local adaptation by building genomic resources for our study species and using these resources to reveal differences in gene expression in peripheral and core populations. The papers in Appendix B were generated from 2008-2011 funding. This work was pursued with two butterfly species that have contrasting life history traits (body size and resource specialization) and occupy a common ecosystem and a latitudinal range. These species enabled us to test the following hypotheses using a single phylogenetic group.

  19. Complete Quantitative online Analysis of Methanol Electrooxidation Prod-ucts via Electron Impact and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    1 Complete Quantitative online Analysis of Methanol Electrooxidation Prod- ucts via Electron Impact for application in energy re- lated electrocatalysis is demonstrated using continuous methanol oxidation over

  20. December 17, 2008 Robert Almgren / Encyclopedia of Quantitative Finance Execution Costs 1 Execution Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almgren, Robert F.

    December 17, 2008 Robert Almgren / Encyclopedia of Quantitative Finance Execution Costs 1 Execution Costs Execution costs are the difference in value between an ideal trade and what was actually done. The execution cost of a single completed trade is typically the difference between the final average trade price

  1. Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Enable Quantitative Tracking of Nanoscale Changes in Thickness and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutcher, John

    Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Enable Quantitative Tracking of Nanoscale Changes: To date, detailed studies of the thickness of coatings using surface plasmon resonance have been limited a significant improvement to surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) that allows this sensitive technique

  2. Revision of Specification Automata under Quantitative Preferences Kangjin Kim and Georgios Fainekos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainekos, Georgios E.

    as well. In [4], [5], we studied the theoretical foundations of the specification automata revisionRevision of Specification Automata under Quantitative Preferences Kangjin Kim and Georgios Fainekos Abstract-- We study the problem of revising specifications with preferences for automata based control

  3. FUZZY VERSUS HARD HIDDEN MARKOV CHAINS SEGMENTATION FOR VOLUME DETERMINATION AND QUANTITATION IN NOISY PET IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN NOISY PET IMAGES M. Hatt1 , N. Boussion1 , Member IEEE, F. Lamare1 , Student Member IEEE, C. Collet2 , F-conducteurs (PHASE), ULP, Strasbourg, France. ABSTRACT Accurate volume contouring in PET is crucial for quantitation for automatic lesion volume delineation that permit noise modelling and have not previously been applied to PET

  4. Fuzzy hidden Markov chains segmentation for volume determination and quantitation in PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Fuzzy hidden Markov chains segmentation for volume determination and quantitation in PET M. Hatt1;52(12):3467-91" DOI : 10.1088/0031-9155/52/12/010 #12;2 ABSTRACT Accurate volume of interest (VOI) estimation in PET is concerned. inserm-00150348,version1-6Apr2009 #12;3 1. Introduction Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has

  5. IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    i IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES.2.2 Multiple Neuropharmacological Measures from a single PET scan ................. 4 1.2.2.1 Dual ...................................................................................... 5 1.2.3 Reduction of inter-scanner PET image variability

  6. Quantitative Study of the Value of Research Libraries: A Foundation for the Evaluation of Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative Study of the Value of Research Libraries: A Foundation for the Evaluation of Digital Libraries Paul B. Kantor and Tefko Saracevic LIS and Rutgers Distributed Laboratory for Digital Libraries, tefko}@diglib.rutgers.edu Abstract In anticipation of the explosive growth of digital libraries

  7. Reduced xenon diffusion for quantitative lung studythe role of SF6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Reduced xenon diffusion for quantitative lung studyÐthe role of SF6 Ross W. Mair,1 * Dominik, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), on 129 Xe NMR and diffusion. We found that the contribution of SF6 to 129 Xe T1 relaxation in a 1:1 xenon/oxygen mixture is negligible up to 2 bar of SF6 at standard temperature

  8. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 Preliminary Determination: Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Xie, YuLong; Hart, Reid; Goel, Supriya

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a preliminary quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010.

  9. Learning Quantitative Knowledge for Multiagent Coordination David Jensen, Michael Atighetchi, Regis Vincent, Victor Lesser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    of these interrelation- ships can help coordinate agents | preventing con- icts and exploiting bene cial relationships among ac- tions. We explore three interlocking methods that learn quantitative knowledge of such non. Introduction A major challenge of designing e ective multiagent sys- tems is managing non-local e ects

  10. Learning Quantitative Knowledge for Multiagent Coordination David Jensen, Michael Atighetchi, R egis Vincent, Victor Lesser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    of these interrelation- ships can help coordinate agents | preventing con- icts and exploiting bene cial relationships among ac- tions. We explore three interlocking methods that learn quantitative knowledge of such non. Introduction A major challenge of designing e ective multiagent sys- tems is managing non-local e ects

  11. BE 508: Quantitative Studies of Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems Spring Semester, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    1 BE 508: Quantitative Studies of Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems Spring Semester, 2013 of the respiratory system (1 lecture) (Bates, Ch 1) 2. Measurement of respiratory function (2 lectures) (Bates, Ch 2 mechanics (1 lecture) (Bates, Ch 5) 4. Inverse modeling of respiratory mechanics, part 1 (2 lectures) (Bates

  12. QUANTITATIVE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF HYBRID COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADES BY ENERGY BASED ACOUSTIC EMISSION SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    QUANTITATIVE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF HYBRID COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADES BY ENERGY BASED ACOUSTIC in the wind turbine blade. It was tried to apply a new source location method, which has a developed algorithm assessment, source location, wind turbine blade, hybrid composites INTRODUCTION Structural health management

  13. Annual Logging Symposium, June 3-6, 2007 QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF RELATIVE DIP ANGLE AND BED -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    SPWLA 48th Annual Logging Symposium, June 3-6, 2007 1 QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF RELATIVE DIP ANGLE; Chevron Energy Technology Company Copyright 2007, held jointly by the Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts (SPWLA) and the submitting authors. This paper was prepared for presentation at the SPWLA

  14. Towards a Quantitative Evaluation of Geospatial Metadata Quality in the Context of Semantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards a Quantitative Evaluation of Geospatial Metadata Quality in the Context of Semantic to facilitate the reuse of geospatial data in a distributed and heterogeneous environment. In this process, the provided geospatial metadata that are appropriate for the intended use may be incomplete or not appropriate

  15. State-of-the-art Tools and Techniques for Quantitative Modeling and Analysis of Embedded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Alexandre

    1 State-of-the-art Tools and Techniques for Quantitative Modeling and Analysis of Embedded Systems¶AalborgCNRS VerimagINRIA/IRISA §Saarland University ¶Embedded Systems Institute and Radboud University Abstract and stochastic aspects. Then, we will overview the BIP framework for modular design and code generation. Finally

  16. Evaluating maintenance policies by quantitative modeling and analysis Enrico Zio1,2,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Evaluating maintenance policies by quantitative modeling and analysis Enrico Zio1,2,* , Michele concerning the stochastic crack growth of a generic mechanical component subject to fatigue degradation. It is shown that modeling and analysis provide information useful for setting a maintenance policy. 1

  17. between the nucleus and cytoplasm occurs through large macromolecular structures, the nuclear pores. Quantitative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbes, Douglass

    the cytoplasm. Together these are assem- bled at points of fusion between the inner and outer nuclear membranes363 between the nucleus and cytoplasm occurs through large macromolecular structures, the nuclear pores. Quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy has estimated the mass of a nuclear pore

  18. UV Resonance Raman-Selective Amide Vibrational Enhancement: Quantitative Methodology for Determining Protein Secondary Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    UV Resonance Raman-Selective Amide Vibrational Enhancement: Quantitative Methodology secondary structures, using UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) excited with a 206.5-nm CW laser changes in secondary structure in the protein, such as R-helix melting, while changes in the aromatic

  19. Ultrasonic backscatter coefficient quantitative estimates from Chinese hamster ovary cell pellet biophantoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Ultrasonic backscatter coefficient quantitative estimates from Chinese hamster ovary cell pellet August 2010; accepted 6 August 2010 A cell pellet biophantom technique is introduced, and applied verification purposes. BSC estimates from CHO cell pellet biophantoms of known number density were performed

  20. A quantitative model of trading and price formation in financial markets Marcus G. Daniels,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A quantitative model of trading and price formation in financial markets Marcus G. Daniels,1 J is the standard measure of financial risk, and the spread and price impact functions, which are the main determinants of transaction cost. Guided by dimensional analysis, simulation, and mean field theory, we find

  1. A quantitative analysis of health, safety and environment policy in France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A quantitative analysis of health, safety and environment policy in France Thomas Audiffrena , Jean-Marc Rallob , Franck Guarnieria , Christophe Martina a Mines ParisTech, Center for Research on Risks was introduced in France to regulate the role of occupational risk prevention specialists (OHS professionals

  2. Quantitative predictions of tokamak energy confinement from first-principles simulations with kinetic effects*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammett, Greg

    Quantitative predictions of tokamak energy confinement from first-principles simulations Jersey 08543 (Received 14 November 1994; accepted 2 March 1995) A first-principles model of anomalous data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. This model is based

  3. Quantitative Predictions of Tokamak Energy Confinement from FirstPrinciples Simulations with Kinetic Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammett, Greg

    Quantitative Predictions of Tokamak Energy Confinement from First­Principles Simulations 451, Princeton, NJ, 08543 Abstract A first­principles model of anomalous thermal transport based Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. This model is based on nonlinear gyrofluid

  4. Quantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    for stream-dwelling salmonids: guidelines for habitat restoration. Province of British Columbia, MinistryQuantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids: Guidelines For Habitat Restoration by E.R. Keeley and P.A. Slaney Watershed Restoration Project Report No. 4

  5. QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES ON THE HYDROGEN GROUND STATE ENERGY IN NON-RELATIVISTIC QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES ON THE HYDROGEN GROUND STATE ENERGY IN NON-RELATIVISTIC QED J.-M. BARBAROUX for the hydrogen ground state energy in the Pauli-Fierz model up to the order O(5 log -1), where denotes). As a consequence, we prove that the ground state energy is not a real analytic function of , and verify

  6. Teaching Energy Balance using Round Numbers: A Quantitative Approach to the Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    Teaching Energy Balance using Round Numbers: A Quantitative Approach to the Greenhouse Effect, 2003 Abstract The idea of energy balance used to explain the greenhouse effect and global warming and astronomy curricula. The idea of energy balance is used to explain the greenhouse effect and global warming

  7. Quantitative Finance To apear Efficient Factor GARCH Models and Factor-DCC Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jegelka, Stefanie

    Quantitative Finance To apear Efficient Factor GARCH Models and Factor-DCC Models Kun Zhang KZHANG of Hong Kong Hong Kong Abstract We reveal that in the estimation of univariate GARCH or multivariate generalized or- thogonal GARCH (GO-GARCH) models, maximizing the likelihood is equivalent to making

  8. Quantitative analyses of damp-heat-induced degradation in transparent conducting oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    Quantitative analyses of damp-heat-induced degradation in transparent conducting oxides Jae Ik Kim online 9 January 2014 Keywords: Transparent conducting oxides Al-doped ZnO Damp-heat test Photovoltaics oxides is essential for actual applications in photovoltaic devices or displays requiring long

  9. A Quantitative Analysis of Disk Drive Power Management in Portable Computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Tom

    A Quantitative Analysis of Disk Drive Power Management in Portable Computers Kester Li, Roger Kumpf Abstract With the advent and subsequent popularity of portable computers, power management of system half of the potential benefit of spinning down a disk. 1 Introduction Power management has become

  10. Quantitative analysis of Cenozoic palynofloras from Patagonia, southern South America Mirta E. Quattrocchioa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Quantitative analysis of Cenozoic palynofloras from Patagonia, southern South America Mirta E­Late Miocene palynological data from Patagonia supports several major stages of vegetation. These stages, Podocarpaceae, Proteaceae) in Patagonia is consistent with the global cooling trend during the Late Eocene

  11. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  12. Quantitative concentration measurements of creatinine dissolved in water and urine using Raman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Andrew J.

    to the lack of suitable materials with refractive indices lower that of water (n 1.33). Recently, howeverQuantitative concentration measurements of creatinine dissolved in water and urine using Raman in water and in urine. At short integration times, where shot noise is most troublesome, the enhanced

  13. Substrate Hydroxylation in Methane Monooxygenase: Quantitative Modeling via Mixed Quantum Mechanics/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherman, Benjamin F.

    at an atomic level of detail.4-7 In particular, the use of ab initio quantum chemical methods based on densitySubstrate Hydroxylation in Methane Monooxygenase: Quantitative Modeling via Mixed Quantum Mechanics with mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, the hydroxylation of methane

  14. Characterization of Phosphorylation-and RNA-Dependent UPF1 Interactors by Quantitative Proteomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mühlemann, Oliver

    Characterization of Phosphorylation- and RNA-Dependent UPF1 Interactors by Quantitative Proteomics-frameshift 1 (UPF1) is an ATP-dependent RNA helicase and phosphoprotein implicated in several biological proteomics UPF1 interactors. We used this approach to distinguish between RNA-mediated and protein

  15. Quantitative electron holographic tomography for the 3D characterisation of semiconductor device structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Quantitative electron holographic tomography for the 3D characterisation of semiconductor device tomography Silicon devices Device characterisation a b s t r a c t Electron tomography and electron rights reserved. 1. Introduction Dopant profiling of semiconductor devices using off-axis electron

  16. A Simulink Hybrid Heart Model for Quantitative Verification of Cardiac Pacemakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    A Simulink Hybrid Heart Model for Quantitative Verification of Cardiac Pacemakers Taolue Chen Mereacre Department of Computer Science University of Oxford, UK ABSTRACT We develop a novel hybrid heart. The heart model is formulated at the level of cardiac cells, can be adapted to patient data, and incorpo

  17. A quantitative method to evaluate microbial electrolysis cell effectiveness for energy recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wastewater treatment Energy consumption Coulombic efficiency a b s t r a c t Microbial electrolysis cellsA quantitative method to evaluate microbial electrolysis cell effectiveness for energy recovery, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 28 March 2013 Received in revised form 26 July

  18. 1529-6466/00/0049-0007$10.00 Quantitative Speciation of Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1529-6466/00/0049-0007$10.00 Quantitative Speciation of Heavy Metals in Soils and Sediments sites, and the major consequence in terms of contamination by heavy metals are areas of wasteland the activities of humans (Smedley and Kinniburgh 2002). Pollution of ground and surface waters, and hence

  19. Quantitative Computed Tomography Analysis of Local Chemotherapy in Liver Tissue After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    Quantitative Computed Tomography Analysis of Local Chemotherapy in Liver Tissue After; controlled release drug delivery; radiofrequency ablation; computed tomography. © AUR, 2004 Acad Radiol 2004, MS, David L. Wilson, PhD, John R. Haaga, MD, Jinming Gao, PhD Rationale and Objectives. Computed

  20. 5th International ACI Conference, Cancun, Mexico, December 10-13, 2002 Quantitative Infrared Thermography for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    Thermography for Quality Control of Concrete Structures Strengthened with FRP Composites Monica A. Starnes applied to a concrete substrate. The aim is to assess the potential for quantitative infrared thermography thermography, nondestructive testing 1 #12;Monica A. Starnes is a graduate student in civil engineering

  1. On the importance of minding ones Ps and Ts: metamorphic processes and quantitative petrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    On the importance of minding oneÕs Ps and Ts: metamorphic processes and quantitative petrology M. BROWN,1 R. W. WHITE2 AND M. SANDIFORD3 1 Laboratory for Crustal Petrology, Department of Geology phase equilibria studies. However, RogerÕs contributions to metamorphic petrology go well beyond

  2. OPPORTUNITY: QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH PROFESSIONALS (PhD & Post-Doc levels) Location: Chicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    mathematical & statistical techniques to complex data intensive problems Good programming skills (e.g. C/C++) with experience with one or more statistical packages (e.g. R/Matlab) and exposure to one or more scripting excellence. Opportunities are available in a variety of teams including Quantitative Trading, Statistical

  3. Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    1 Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis of how, Andrew J. Dougill and Piers M. Forster August 2010 Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Working Paper No. 29 #12;2 The Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) was established

  4. Satellite perspective of aerosol intercontinental transport: From qualitative tracking to quantitative characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Mian

    to quantitative characterization Hongbin Yu a,b, , Lorraine A. Remer c , Ralph A. Kahn b , Mian Chin b , Yan Zhang-mail addresses: Hongbin.Yu@nasa.gov, Hongbin.Yu@gmail.com (H. Yu). 0169-8095/$ ­ see front matter © 2013 Elsevier

  5. AN INSTRUMENTALIST APPROACH TO VALIDATION: A QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF A NOVEL COAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    AN INSTRUMENTALIST APPROACH TO VALIDATION: A QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF A NOVEL COAL GASIFICATION at the mathematical model. The novel coal gasification model, which utilizes the direct quadrature method of moments in the larger context of validation and uncertainty quantification, and applied to the Arches coal gasification

  6. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    to produce a synthetic and objective map of recent mud flows covering a 640 · 700 km2 area, which representsORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Quantitative mapping of active mud volcanism at the western Mediterranean model for the origin for Mediterranean Ridge mud volcanism. Image analysis techniques are used

  7. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  8. Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Quantitative Analysis of Heterogeneity in the Current Epidemiological on sele- nium and lung cancer and identify sources of heterogeneity among studies. When all studies were.30). Overall, these results suggest that selenium may have some protective effect against lung cancer

  9. QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI-URBAN COMMUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    i QUANTITATIVE MICROBIAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A PERI transfer station and the households who helped me in getting food waste samples. It should thing in my life with this little effort. #12;iii Abstract The growth of municipal solid waste

  10. Quantitative Tools for Dissection of Hydrogen-Producing Metabolic Networks-Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Dismukes, G.Charles.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    During this project we have pioneered the development of integrated experimental-computational technologies for the quantitative dissection of metabolism in hydrogen and biofuel producing microorganisms (i.e. C. acetobutylicum and various cyanobacteria species). The application of these new methodologies resulted in many significant advances in the understanding of the metabolic networks and metabolism of these organisms, and has provided new strategies to enhance their hydrogen or biofuel producing capabilities. As an example, using mass spectrometry, isotope tracers, and quantitative flux-modeling we mapped the metabolic network structure in C. acetobutylicum. This resulted in a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of central carbon metabolism that could not have been obtained using genomic data alone. We discovered that biofuel production in this bacterium, which only occurs during stationary phase, requires a global remodeling of central metabolism (involving large changes in metabolite concentrations and fluxes) that has the effect of redirecting resources (carbon and reducing power) from biomass production into solvent production. This new holistic, quantitative understanding of metabolism is now being used as the basis for metabolic engineering strategies to improve solvent production in this bacterium. In another example, making use of newly developed technologies for monitoring hydrogen and NAD(P)H levels in vivo, we dissected the metabolic pathways for photobiological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. This investigation led to the identification of multiple targets for improving hydrogen production. Importantly, the quantitative tools and approaches that we have developed are broadly applicable and we are now using them to investigate other important biofuel producers, such as cellulolytic bacteria.

  11. Quantitative Mapping of Structured Polymeric Systems Using Singular Value Decomposition Analysis of Soft X-ray Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Quantitative Mapping of Structured Polymeric Systems Using Singular Value Decomposition Analysis of Soft X-ray Images I. N. Koprinarov, A. P. Hitchcock,* C. T. McCrory, and R. F. Childs Department of this system. The sample was studied fully hydrated in order to perform the quantitative mapping when

  12. Calibration of Quantitative PCR Assays A. M. I. Roberts, C. M. Theobald, and M. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theobald, Chris

    Calibration of Quantitative PCR Assays A. M. I. Roberts, C. M. Theobald, and M. McNeil Quantitative, such calibration models are usually unrealistic since they ignore the various sources of varia- tion associated associated with predictions based on the calibration model are to be well estimated. In this article, we

  13. Mineralogy and particle size of bed sediments 173 Chapter 7 -Quantitative Mineralogy and Particle-Size Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mineralogy and particle size of bed sediments 173 Chapter 7 - Quantitative Mineralogy and Particle to assess particle-size distribution and mineralogical composition. Changes in particle- size distribution-ray diffraction, and their quantitative mineralogy was determined with a recently-developed computer program

  14. Analysis on the Go: Quantitation of Drugs of Abuse in Dried Urine with Digital Microfluidics and Miniature Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Analysis on the Go: Quantitation of Drugs of Abuse in Dried Urine with Digital Microfluidics the development of a method coupling microfluidics and a miniature mass spectrometer, applied to quantitation of drugs of abuse in urine. A custom digital microfluidic system was designed to deliver droplets

  15. beamer-tu-logo Introduction The full abstraction problem for PCF Quantitative models The resource calculus Conclusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    beamer-tu-logo Introduction The full abstraction problem for PCF Quantitative models The resource Preuves, Programmes et Systèmes Université Paris Diderot #12;beamer-tu-logo Introduction The full The full abstraction problem for PCF 3 Quantitative models 4 The resource calculus 5 Conclusion #12;beamer-tu-logo

  16. QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALOONING MODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAO,LL; SNYDER,PB; LEONARD,AW; OIKAWA,T; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; FERRON,JR; GROEBNER,RJ; HORTON,LD; KAMADA,Y; MURAKAMI,M; SAARELMA,S; STJOHN,HE; TURNBULL,AD; WILSON,HR

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A271 QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALOONING MODES. Several testable features of the working model of edge localized modes (ELMs) as intermediate toroidal mode number peeling-ballooning modes are evaluated quantitatively using DIII-D and JT-60U experimental data and the ELITE MHD stability code. These include the hypothesis that ELM sizes are related to the radial widths of the unstable MHD modes, the unstable modes have a strong ballooning character localized in the outboard bad curvature region, and ELM size generally becomes smaller at high edge collisionality. ELMs are triggered when the growth rates of the unstable MHD modes become significantly large. These testable features are consistent with many ELM observations in DIII-D and JT-60U discharges.

  17. Quantitative microscopic spectral fluorescence measurement of crude oil, bitumen, kerogen, and coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Rullkoetter, J.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten samples each of black shale (kerogen and bitumen fractions) from Lias epsilon, coal from Western Canada and nine crude oil and condensate samples from Alaska and northern Germany have been studied using quantitative microscopic spectral fluorescence. The parameters used are lambda/sub max/, red/green quotient (Q), and alteration of fluorescence emission intensity under UV excitation. Using the same parameters, the data show that kerogen and crude oil have opposite maturation trends. Autochthonous bitumens include both kerogen and crude oil characters. Immature, biodegraded, or normal crude oil of different maturity can be characterized using these parameters. Quantitative spectral fluorescence microscopy yields more accurate maturation parameters for the Type I and II kerogens than vitrinite reflectance because the fluorescence of liptinites are used (i.e., the main oil-generating macerals). This method may become the most suitable inexpensive scanning technique for the characterization of crude oil, condensate, and autochthonous/allochthonous source rock bitumens.

  18. Low-frequency quantitative ultrasound imaging of cell death in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J. [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Papanicolau, Naum; Tadayyon, Hadi [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Lee, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Zubovits, Judit [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Sadeghian, Alireza [Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Computer Science, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Karshafian, Raffi [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Giles, Anoja [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Imaging Research – Physical Science, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Kolios, Michael C. [Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Currently, no clinical imaging modality is used routinely to assess tumor response to cancer therapies within hours to days of the delivery of treatment. Here, the authors demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency to quantitatively detect changes in tumors in response to cancer therapies using preclinical mouse models.Methods: Conventional low-frequency and corresponding high-frequency ultrasound (ranging from 4 to 28 MHz) were used along with quantitative spectroscopic and signal envelope statistical analyses on data obtained from xenograft tumors treated with chemotherapy, x-ray radiation, as well as a novel vascular targeting microbubble therapy.Results: Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers indicated significant changes in cell-death associated parameters in responsive tumors. Specifically changes in the midband fit, spectral slope, and 0-MHz intercept biomarkers were investigated for different types of treatment and demonstrated cell-death related changes. The midband fit and 0-MHz intercept biomarker derived from low-frequency data demonstrated increases ranging approximately from 0 to 6 dBr and 0 to 8 dBr, respectively, depending on treatments administrated. These data paralleled results observed for high-frequency ultrasound data. Statistical analysis of ultrasound signal envelope was performed as an alternative method to obtain histogram-based biomarkers and provided confirmatory results. Histological analysis of tumor specimens indicated up to 61% cell death present in the tumors depending on treatments administered, consistent with quantitative ultrasound findings indicating cell death. Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers demonstrated a good correlation with histological morphological findings indicative of cell death (r{sup 2}= 0.71, 0.82; p < 0.001).Conclusions: In summary, the results provide preclinical evidence, for the first time, that quantitative ultrasound used at a clinically relevant frequency, in addition to high-frequency ultrasound, can detect tissue changes associated with cell death in vivo in response to cancer treatments.

  19. The Determinants of Internal Migration in a Developing Country: Quantitative Evidence for Indonesia, 1930-200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Lottum, J; Marks, D

    1   The determinants of internal migration in a developing country: quantitative evidence for Indonesia, 1930-2000 J. van Lottuma* and D. Marksb a Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure, Geography Department... : Internal Migration; Indonesia; Gravity Model; Policy; Development JEL codes: J61; J68; N15; O15 Abstract This study specifies and estimates a gravity model for inter-provincial migration in Indonesia. Using panel data for Indonesia’s 26 provinces...

  20. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Torres, Mylin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Andic, Fundagul [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Haoyang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen Zhengjia [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sun, Xiaoyan [Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  1. Changes in protein expression in maturing equine testis: a quantitative DIGE analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roper-Foo, Pilar

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    in -80 o C while awaiting mass spectrometric analysis. LC/MS/MS analysis and database search Nanospray LC/MS/MS was performed on an LCQ DecaXP 3D Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (ThermoFinnigan, San Jose, CA). Extracted peptides were concentrated... CHANGES IN PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN MATURING EQUINE TESTIS: A QUANTITATIVE DIGE ANALYSIS Major: Genetics April 2009 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  2. Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, John T. (Los Alamos, NM); Kunz, Walter E. (Santa Fe, NM); Atencio, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify .sup.233 U, .sup.235 U and .sup.239 Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as .sup.240 Pu, .sup.244 Cm and .sup.252 Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter .sup.241 Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether "permanent" low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

  3. Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of generic transuranic wastes from nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Atencio, J.D.

    1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of passive and active neutron measurements which yields quantitative information about the isotopic composition of transuranic wastes from nuclear power or weapons material manufacture reactors is described. From the measurement of prompt and delayed neutron emission and the incidence of two coincidentally emitted neutrons from induced fission of fissile material in the sample, one can quantify /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu isotopes in waste samples. Passive coincidence counting, including neutron multiplicity measurement and determination of the overall passive neutron flux additionally enables the separate quantitative evaluation of spontaneous fission isotopes such as /sup 240/Pu, /sup 244/Cm and /sup 252/Cf, and the spontaneous alpha particle emitter /sup 241/Am. These seven isotopes are the most important constituents of wastes from nuclear power reactors and once the mass of each isotope present is determined by the apparatus and method of the instant invention, the overall alpha particle activity can be determined to better than 1 nCi/g from known radioactivity data. Therefore, in addition to the quantitative analysis of the waste sample useful for later reclamation purposes, the alpha particle activity can be determined to decide whether permanent low-level burial is appropriate for the waste sample.

  4. The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

  5. COHOMOLOGY SUPPORT LOCI FOR LOCAL SYSTEMS AND ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    flat bundle corresponding to an irreducible representation, then V is a stable vector .... constructs a harmonic map, and in the other a Hermitian-Einstein metric

  6. Infrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth profilometry, and scanning imaging of deep subsurface electronic defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    - sorption of the incident beam and nonradiative heating. The PCR theory is presented as infrared depthInfrared photocarrier radiometry of semiconductors: Physical principles, quantitative depth May 2003 Laser-induced infrared photocarrier radiometry PCR is introduced theoretically

  7. Population sub-structure and patterns of quantitative variation among the Gollas of Southern Andhra Pradesh, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, B. Mohan; Pfeffer, Alexa; Crawford, Michael H.; Langstieh, Banrida T.

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Population substructure and biological differentiation was studied among the Golla, a pastoral caste living in the southern areas of Andhra Pradesh (AP) in India, using 11 anthropometric measurements and 20 quantitative ...

  8. The interaction of THz phonon-polariton waves with microstructures observed using quantitative, phase-sensitive imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werley, Christopher Alan

    We apply newly developed, phase-sensitive imaging to enable sharply focused visualization of terahertz waves in electro-optic media. This approach allows quantitative characterization of THz waves as they interact with ...

  9. Abstracts of papers presented at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on quantitative Biology: DNA and chromosomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitles DNA & Chromosomes. The meeting was held June 2--June 9, 1993 at Cold Spring Harbor, New York.

  10. A quantitative evaluation of effective shale content and its influence on electrical resistivity and permeability of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Parayath Eravi Bhaskara

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVE SHALE CONTENT AND ITS INFLUENCE ON ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AND PERMEABILITY OF RESERVOIR ROCKS A Thesis By PARAYATH E. B. MENON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial... fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, f965 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVE SHALE CONTENT AND ITS INFLUENCE ON ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AND PERMEABILITY OF RESERVOIR ROCKS...

  11. Improved Protein Arrays for Quantitative Systems Analysis of the Dynamics of Signaling Pathway Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YANG, CHIN-RANG [NHLBI, NIH] [NHLBI, NIH

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Astronauts and workers in nuclear plants who repeatedly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR, <10 cGy) are likely to incur specific changes in signal transduction and gene expression in various tissues of their body. Remarkable advances in high throughput genomics and proteomics technologies enable researchers to broaden their focus from examining single gene/protein kinetics to better understanding global gene/protein expression profiling and biological pathway analyses, namely Systems Biology. An ultimate goal of systems biology is to develop dynamic mathematical models of interacting biological systems capable of simulating living systems in a computer. This Glue Grant is to complement Dr. Boothman’s existing DOE grant (No. DE-FG02-06ER64186) entitled “The IGF1/IGF-1R-MAPK-Secretory Clusterin (sCLU) Pathway: Mediator of a Low Dose IR-Inducible Bystander Effect” to develop sensitive and quantitative proteomic technology that suitable for low dose radiobiology researches. An improved version of quantitative protein array platform utilizing linear Quantum dot signaling for systematically measuring protein levels and phosphorylation states for systems biology modeling is presented. The signals are amplified by a confocal laser Quantum dot scanner resulting in ~1000-fold more sensitivity than traditional Western blots and show the good linearity that is impossible for the signals of HRP-amplification. Therefore this improved protein array technology is suitable to detect weak responses of low dose radiation. Software is developed to facilitate the quantitative readout of signaling network activities. Kinetics of EGFRvIII mutant signaling was analyzed to quantify cross-talks between EGFR and other signaling pathways.

  12. Apparatus and method for quantitative determination of materials contained in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radziemski, L.J.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for near real-time in-situ monitoring of particulates and vapors contained in fluids are described. Initial filtration of a known volume of the fluid sample is combined with laser-induced dielectric breakdown spectroscopy of the filter employed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information with high sensitivity. Application of the invention to monitoring of beryllium, beryllium oxide, or other beryllium-alloy dusts is shown. Significant shortening of analysis time is achieved from the usual chemical techniques of analysis.

  13. Apparatus and method for quantitative determination of materials contained in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radziemski, Leon J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for near real-time in-situ monitoring of particulates and vapors contained in fluids. Initial filtration of a known volume of the fluid sample is combined with laser-induced dielectric breakdown spectroscopy of the filter employed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information with high sensitivity. Application of the invention to monitoring of beryllium, beryllium oxide, or other beryllium-alloy dusts is demonstrated. Significant shortening of analysis time is achieved from those of the usual chemical techniques of analysis.

  14. Comprehensive, Quantitative Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepinski, James

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A Quantitative Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (QFMEA) was developed to conduct comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and sequestration or use in deep saline aquifers, enhanced oil recovery operations, or enhanced coal bed methane operations. The model identifies and characterizes potential risks; identifies the likely failure modes, causes, effects and methods of detection; lists possible risk prevention and risk mitigation steps; estimates potential damage recovery costs, mitigation costs and costs savings resulting from mitigation; and ranks (prioritizes) risks according to the probability of failure, the severity of failure, the difficulty of early failure detection and the potential for fatalities. The QFMEA model generates the necessary information needed for effective project risk management. Diverse project information can be integrated into a concise, common format that allows comprehensive, quantitative analysis, by a cross-functional team of experts, to determine: What can possibly go wrong? How much will damage recovery cost? How can it be prevented or mitigated? What is the cost savings or benefit of prevention or mitigation? Which risks should be given highest priority for resolution? The QFMEA model can be tailored to specific projects and is applicable to new projects as well as mature projects. The model can be revised and updated as new information comes available. It accepts input from multiple sources, such as literature searches, site characterization, field data, computer simulations, analogues, process influence diagrams, probability density functions, financial analysis models, cost factors, and heuristic best practices manuals, and converts the information into a standardized format in an Excel spreadsheet. Process influence diagrams, geologic models, financial models, cost factors and an insurance schedule were developed to support the QFMEA model. Comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments were conducted on three (3) sites using the QFMEA model: (1) SACROC Northern Platform CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Permian Basin, Scurry County, TX, (2) Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-ECBM Site in the San Juan Basin, San Juan County, NM, and (3) Farnsworth Unit CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Anadarko Basin, Ochiltree County, TX. The sites were sufficiently different from each other to test the robustness of the QFMEA model.

  15. Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

  16. Quantitative analysis of reptation of partially extended DNA in sub-30 nm nanoslits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Jia-Wei; Taloni, Alessandro; Chen, Yeng-Long; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed reptation of single DNA molecules in fused silica nanoslits of sub-30 nm height. The reptation behavior and the effect of confinement are quantitatively characterized using orientation correlation and transverse fluctuation analysis. We show tube-like polymer motion arises for a tense polymer under strong quasi-2D confinement and interaction with surface- passivating polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules in nanoslits, while etching- induced device surface roughness, chip bonding materials and DNA-intercalated dye-surface interaction, play minor roles. These findings have strong implications for the effect of surface modification in nanofluidic systems with potential applications for single molecule DNA analysis.

  17. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of locally advanced breast cancer by estimation of its scatterer properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadayyon, Hadi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory, E-mail: Gregory.Czarnota@sunnybrook.ca [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada) [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1P5 (Canada); Wirtzfeld, Lauren [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Wright, Frances C. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Division of Surgical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Tumor grading is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis and currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, the authors investigate quantitative ultrasound parameters in locally advanced breast cancers that can potentially separate tumors from normal breast tissue and differentiate tumor grades. Methods: Ultrasound images and radiofrequency data from 42 locally advanced breast cancer patients were acquired and analyzed. Parameters related to the linear regression of the power spectrum—midband fit, slope, and 0-MHz-intercept—were determined from breast tumors and normal breast tissues. Mean scatterer spacing was estimated from the spectral autocorrelation, and the effective scatterer diameter and effective acoustic concentration were estimated from the Gaussian form factor. Parametric maps of each quantitative ultrasound parameter were constructed from the gated radiofrequency segments in tumor and normal tissue regions of interest. In addition to the mean values of the parametric maps, higher order statistical features, computed from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were also determined and used for characterization. Finally, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses were performed using combinations of quantitative ultrasound parameters to classify breast tissues. Results: Quantitative ultrasound parameters were found to be statistically different between tumor and normal tissue (p < 0.05). The combination of effective acoustic concentration and mean scatterer spacing could separate tumor from normal tissue with 82% accuracy, while the addition of effective scatterer diameter to the combination did not provide significant improvement (83% accuracy). Furthermore, the two advanced parameters, including effective scatterer diameter and mean scatterer spacing, were found to be statistically differentiating among grade I, II, and III tumors (p = 0.014 for scatterer spacing, p = 0.035 for effective scatterer diameter). The separation of the tumor grades further improved when the textural features of the effective scatterer diameter parametric map were combined with the mean value of the map (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Overall, the binary classification results (tumor versus normal tissue) were more promising than tumor grade assessment. Combinations of advanced parameters can further improve the separation of tumors from normal tissue compared to the use of linear regression parameters. While the linear regression parameters were sufficient for characterizing breast tumors and normal breast tissues, advanced parameters and their textural features were required to better characterize tumor subtypes.

  18. Uranium Isotopic and Quantitative Analysis Using a Mechanically-Cooled HPGe Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, portable high-resolution spectroscopy system based on a high-purity germanium detector cooled with a miniature Stirling-cycle cooler, ORTEC trans-SPEC, has recently become commercially available. The use of a long-life mechanical cooling system eliminates the need for liquid nitrogen. The purpose of this study was to determine the applicability of this new instrument for isotopic and quantitative analyses of uranium samples. The results of the performance of the trans-SPEC with the combination of PC-FRAM and ISOTOPIC software packages are described in this paper. An optimal set of analysis parameters for uranium measurements is proposed.

  19. A quantitative comparison of sRNA-based and protein-based gene regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankaj Mehta; Sidhartha Goyal; Ned S. Wingreen

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Small, non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) play important roles as genetic regulators in prokaryotes. sRNAs act post-transcriptionally via complementary pairing with target mRNAs to regulate protein expression. We use a quantitative approach to compare and contrast sRNAs with conventional transcription factors (TFs) to better understand the advantages of each form of regulation. In particular, we calculate the steady-state behavior, noise properties, frequency-dependent gain (amplification), and dynamical response to large input signals of both forms of regulation. While the mean steady-state behavior of sRNA-regulated proteins exhibits a distinctive tunable threshold-linear behavior, our analysis shows that transcriptional bursting leads to significantly higher intrinsic noise in sRNA-based regulation than in TF-based regulation in a large range of expression levels and limits the ability of sRNAs to perform quantitative signaling. Nonetheless, we find that sRNAs are better than TFs at filtering noise in input signals. Additionally, we find that sRNAs allow cells to respond rapidly to large changes in input signals. These features suggest a niche for sRNAs in allowing cells to transition quickly yet reliably between distinct states. This functional niche is consistent with the widespread appearance of sRNAs in stress-response and quasi-developmental networks in prokaryotes.

  20. The current use of studies on promoters and cocarcinogens in quantitative risk assessment. Environ. Health Perspect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Stara; D. Mukerjee; R. Mcgaughy; T P. Durkint; M. L. Dourson

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the priority pollutants discussed in EPA's Ambient Water Quality Criteria documents have been reported to have promotion or cocarcinogenic activity. For example, phenol appears to have tumor-promoting activity in mice when repeatedly applied after initiation with either 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) or benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Similarly, it has been reported that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent promoter of liver tumors as well as a cocarcinogen. However, in developing guidelines to derive ambient water quality criteria, it became apparent that satisfactory approaches had not been developed for using promotion/cocarcinogen data in human health risk estimation, nor were available promotion and/or cocarcinogen data on individual chemicals strong enough to permit a defensible quantitative risk estimation, if such approaches had existed. For this reason, the criteria derived for pollutants with reported promotion/cocarcinogenic activities were based on approaches for carcinogenic (e.g., TCDD), toxic (e.g., fluoranthene) or organoleptic effects (e.g., 2,4-dichlorophenol). Nonetheless, with advances in studies on both the biological mechanisms and dose/response patterns of promoters and cocarcinogens, it may be possible to develop a scientifically valid quantitative approach to use this type of data for derivation of ambient water quality criteria or other risk assessments. Some progress toward this goal and the problems associated with this effort are discussed.

  1. Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined Fuchs–Sondheimer surface scattering model and Mayadas–Shatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p?=?0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R?=?0.26.

  2. Quantitative Electrochemical Measurements using in situ ec-S/TEM Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Sacci, Robert L [ORNL] [ORNL; Brown, Gilbert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL] [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL] [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL] [ORNL; Gardiner, Daniel [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC] [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC; Walden II, Franklin S [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC] [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC; Damiano, John [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC] [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC; Nackashi, David P. [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC] [Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insight into dynamic electrochemical processes can be obtained with in situ ec-S/TEM, which utilizes microfluidic electrochemical cells to characterize electrochemical processes with S/TEM imaging, diffraction or spectroscopy. The microfluidic electrochemical cell is composed of microfabricated devices with glassy carbon and platinum microband electrodes in a three-electrode cell configuration. To establish the validity of this method for quantitative in situ electrochemistry research, cyclic voltammetry, choronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed using a standard one electron transfer redox couple using a [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- based electrolyte. Established relationships of the electrode geometry and microfluidic conditions were fitted with cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometic measurements of analyte diffusion coefficients and was found to agree with well-accepted values that are on the order of 10-5 cm2 s-1. Influence of the electron beam on electrochemical measurements was found to be negligible during CV scans where the current profile varied only within a few nA with the electron beam on and off which is well within the hysteresis between multiple CV scans. The combination of experimental results provides a validation that quantitative electrochemistry experiments can be performed with these small-scale microfluidic electrochemical cells provided that accurate geometrical electrode configurations, diffusion boundary layers and microfluidic conditions are accounted for.

  3. Quantitative Reflectance Spectra of Solid Powders as a Function of Particle Size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Ertel, Alyssa B.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently developed vetted methods for obtaining quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra using a commercial integrating sphere. In this paper, the effects of particle size on the spectral properties are analyzed for several samples such as ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and sodium sulfate as well as one organic compound, lactose. We prepared multiple size fractions for each sample and confirmed the mean sizes using optical microscopy. Most species displayed a wide range of spectral behavior depending on the mean particle size. General trends of reflectance vs. particle size are observed such as increased albedo for smaller particles: for most wavelengths, the reflectivity drops with increased size, sometimes displaying a factor of 4 or more drop in reflectivity along with a loss of spectral contrast. In the longwave infrared, several species with symmetric anions or cations exhibited reststrahlen features whose amplitude was nearly invariant with particle size, at least for intermediate- and large-sized sample fractions; that is, > ~150 microns. Trends of other types of bands (Christiansen minima, transparency features) are also investigated as well as quantitative analysis of the observed relationship between reflectance vs. particle diameter.

  4. Databases applicable to quantitative hazard/risk assessment-Towards a predictive systems toxicology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, Michael [ILS, Inc., P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)], E-mail: mwaters@ils-inc.com; Jackson, Marcus [ILS, Inc., P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Workshop on The Power of Aggregated Toxicity Data addressed the requirement for distributed databases to support quantitative hazard and risk assessment. The authors have conceived and constructed with federal support several databases that have been used in hazard identification and risk assessment. The first of these databases, the EPA Gene-Tox Database was developed for the EPA Office of Toxic Substances by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and is currently hosted by the National Library of Medicine. This public resource is based on the collaborative evaluation, by government, academia, and industry, of short-term tests for the detection of mutagens and presumptive carcinogens. The two-phased evaluation process resulted in more than 50 peer-reviewed publications on test system performance and a qualitative database on thousands of chemicals. Subsequently, the graphic and quantitative EPA/IARC Genetic Activity Profile (GAP) Database was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). A chemical database driven by consideration of the lowest effective dose, GAP has served IARC for many years in support of hazard classification of potential human carcinogens. The Toxicological Activity Profile (TAP) prototype database was patterned after GAP and utilized acute, subchronic, and chronic data from the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards. TAP demonstrated the flexibility of the GAP format for air toxics, water pollutants and other environmental agents. The GAP format was also applied to developmental toxicants and was modified to represent quantitative results from the rodent carcinogen bioassay. More recently, the authors have constructed: 1) the NIEHS Genetic Alterations in Cancer (GAC) Database which quantifies specific mutations found in cancers induced by environmental agents, and 2) the NIEHS Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) Knowledgebase that integrates genomic and other biological data including dose-response studies in toxicology and pathology. Each of the public databases has been discussed in prior publications. They will be briefly described in the present report from the perspective of aggregating datasets to augment the data and information contained within them.

  5. DanteR: an extensible R-based tool for quantitative analysis of -omics data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taverner, Thomas; Karpievitch, Yuliya; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Brown, Joseph N.; Dabney, Alan R.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivation: The size and complex nature of LC-MS proteomics data sets motivates development of specialized software for statistical data analysis and exploration. We present DanteR, a graphical R package that features extensive statistical and diagnostic functions for quantitative proteomics data analysis, including normalization, imputation, hypothesis testing, interactive visualization and peptide-to-protein rollup. More importantly, users can easily extend the existing functionality by including their own algorithms under the Add-On tab. Availability: DanteR and its associated user guide are available for download at http://omics.pnl.gov/software/. For Windows, a single click automatically installs DanteR along with the R programming environment. For Linux and Mac OS X, users must first install R and then follow instructions on the DanteR web site for package installation.

  6. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 Determination of Energy Savings: Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Wang, Weimin; Hart, Philip R.; Zhang, Jian; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would result in improved energy efficiency in commercial buildings. The final analysis considered each of the 110 addenda to Standard 90.1-2010 that were included in Standard 90.1-2013. PNNL reviewed all addenda included by ASHRAE in creating Standard 90.1-2013 from Standard 90.1-2010, and considered their combined impact on a suite of prototype building models across all U.S. climate zones. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE’s final determination. However, out of the 110 total addenda, 30 were identified as having a measureable and quantifiable impact.

  7. Quantitative comparison of fuel spray images obtained using ultrafast coherent and incoherent double-pulsed illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purwar, Harsh; Idlahcen, Saïd; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Ménard, Thibault

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantitative comparison between the high-pressure fuel spray images obtained experimentally using classical imaging with coherent and incoherent ultrafast illuminations recorded using a compatible CMOS camera. The ultrafast, incoherent illumination source was extracted from the supercontinuum generated by tightly focusing the femtosecond laser pulses in water. The average velocity maps computed using time-correlated image-pairs and spray edge complexity computed using the average curvature scale space maps are compared for the spray images obtained with the two illumination techniques and also for the numerically simulated spray using the coupled volume of fluid and level set method for interface tracking (direct numerical simulation or DNS). The spray images obtained with supercontinuum-derived, incoherent, ultrafast illumination are clearer, since the artifacts arising due to laser speckles and multiple diffraction effects are largely reduced and show a better correlation with the DNS results.

  8. Quantitative similarity analysis of small-break loss-of-coolant accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosek, A.; Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B. [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Jozef Stefan Inst.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Classifications of small-break loss-of-coolant accidents based on objective quantitative similarity analysis are proposed. Accident scenarios were simulated in a two-loop pressurized water reactor plant with the RELAP5/MOD3.1 computer code for break sizes ranging from 1.27 cm (0.5 in.) to 15.2 cm (6 in.), with different availability of auxiliary feedwater system or reactor coolant pump trip delay. Similarities between different accident simulations were evaluated by comparing relevant time-dependent parameters with fast Fourier transform and correlation methods. Quantification of similarity between accident simulations could eventually lead to further development of the Code Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty methodology.

  9. Shotgun Approach for Quantitative Imaging of Phospholipids Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Laskin, Julia

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been extensively used for determining spatial distributions of molecules in biological samples, and there is increasing interest in using MSI for quantification. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, or nano-DESI, is an ambient MSI technique where a solvent is used for localized extraction of molecules followed by nanoelectrospray ionization. Doping the nano-DESI solvent with carefully selected standards enables online quantification during MSI experiments. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate this quantification approach can be extended to provide shotgun-like quantification of phospholipids in thin brain tissue sections. Specifically, two phosphatidylcholine (PC) standards were added to the nano-DESI solvent for simultaneous imaging and quantification of 22 PC species observed in nano-DESI MSI. Furthermore, by combining the quantitative data obtained in the individual pixels, we demonstrate quantification of these PC species in seven different regions of a rat brain tissue section.

  10. Effects of Sugars on Lipid Bilayers during Dehydration ? SAXS/WAXS Measurements and Quantitative Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenne, Thomas; Garvey, Christopher J.; Koster, Karen L.; Bryant, Gary; (ANSTO); (USD); (RMIT)

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an X-ray scattering study of the effects of dehydration on the bilayer and chain-chain repeat spacings of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers in the presence of sugars. The presence of sugars has no effect on the average spacing between the phospholipid chains in either the fluid or gel phase. Using this finding, we establish that for low sugar concentrations only a small amount of sugar exclusion occurs. Under these conditions, the effects of sugars on the membrane transition temperatures can be explained quantitatively by the reduction in hydration repulsion between bilayers due to the presence of the sugars. Specific bonding of sugars to lipid headgroups is not required to explain this effect.

  11. Learning quantitative sequence-function relationships from high-throughput biological data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwal, Gurinder S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the transcriptional regulatory code, as well as other types of information encoded within biomolecular sequences, will require learning biophysical models of sequence-function relationships from high-throughput data. Controlling and characterizing the noise in such experiments, however, is notoriously difficult. The unpredictability of such noise creates problems for standard likelihood-based methods in statistical learning, which require that the quantitative form of experimental noise be known precisely. However, when this unpredictability is properly accounted for, important theoretical aspects of statistical learning which remain hidden in standard treatments are revealed. Specifically, one finds a close relationship between the standard inference method, based on likelihood, and an alternative inference method based on mutual information. Here we review and extend this relationship. We also describe its implications for learning sequence-function relationships from real biological data. Fin...

  12. Quantitative Cyber Risk Reduction Estimation Methodology for a Small Scada Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles A. McQueen; Wayne F. Boyer; Mark A. Flynn; George A. Beitel

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new methodology for obtaining a quick quantitative measurement of the risk reduction achieved when a control system is modified with the intent to improve cyber security defense against external attackers. The proposed methodology employs a directed graph called a compromise graph, where the nodes represent stages of a potential attack and the edges represent the expected time-to-compromise for differing attacker skill levels. Time-to-compromise is modeled as a function of known vulnerabilities and attacker skill level. The methodology was used to calculate risk reduction estimates for a specific SCADA system and for a specific set of control system security remedial actions. Despite an 86% reduction in the total number of vulnerabilities, the estimated time-to-compromise was increased only by about 3 to 30% depending on target and attacker skill level.

  13. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  14. A Quantitative Non-radial Oscillation Model for the Subpulses in PSR B0943+10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Rosen; J. Christopher Clemens

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze time series measurements of PSR B0943+10 and fit them with a non-radial oscillation model. The model we apply was first developed for total intensity measurements in an earlier paper, and expanded to encompass linear polarization in a companion paper to this one. We use PSR B0943+10 for the initial tests of our model because it has a simple geometry, it has been exhaustively studied in the literature, and its behavior is well-documented. As prelude to quantitative fitting, we have reanalyzed previously published archival data of PSR B0943+10 and uncovered subtle but significant behavior that is difficult to explain in the framework of the drifting spark model. Our fits of a non-radial oscillation model are able to successfully reproduce the observed behavior in this pulsar.

  15. On quantitative analysis of interband recombination dynamics: Theory and application to bulk ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettieri, S. [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)] [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Capello, V.; Santamaria, L. [Physics Department, University of Naples “Federico II,” Via Cintia I-80126 Napoli (Italy)] [Physics Department, University of Naples “Federico II,” Via Cintia I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Maddalena, P. [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy) [Institute for Superconductors, Oxides and Innovative Materials, National Research Council (CNR-SPIN), U.O.S. Napoli, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Physics Department, University of Naples “Federico II,” Via Cintia I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The issue of the quantitative analysis of time-resolved photoluminescence experiments is addressed by developing and describing two approaches for determination of unimolecular lifetime, bimolecular recombination coefficient, and equilibrium free-carrier concentration, based on a quite general second-order expression of the electron-hole recombination rate. Application to the case of band-edge emission of ZnO single crystals is reported, evidencing the signature of sub-nanosecond second-order recombination dynamics for optical transitions close to the interband excitation edge. The resulting findings are in good agreement with the model prediction and further confirm the presence, formerly evidenced in literature by non-optical methods, of near-surface conductive layers in ZnO crystals with sheet charge densities of about 3–5×10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2}.

  16. Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a PWR control rod ejection accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasichnyk, I.; Perin, Y.; Velkov, K. [Gesellschaft flier Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit - GRS mbH, Boltzmannstasse 14, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the results of the quantitative Uncertainty and Sensitivity (U/S) Analysis of a Rod Ejection Accident (REA) which is simulated by the coupled system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX applying the GRS tool for U/S analysis SUSA/XSUSA. For the present study, a UOX/MOX mixed core loading based on a generic PWR is modeled. A control rod ejection is calculated for two reactor states: Hot Zero Power (HZP) and 30% of nominal power. The worst cases for the rod ejection are determined by steady-state neutronic simulations taking into account the maximum reactivity insertion in the system and the power peaking factor. For the U/S analysis 378 uncertain parameters are identified and quantified (thermal-hydraulic initial and boundary conditions, input parameters and variations of the two-group cross sections). Results for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are presented for safety important global and local parameters. (authors)

  18. The Food Crises: A quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent increases in basic food prices are severely impacting vulnerable populations worldwide. Proposed causes such as shortages of grain due to adverse weather, increasing meat consumption in China and India, conversion of corn to ethanol in the US, and investor speculation on commodity markets lead to widely differing implications for policy. A lack of clarity about which factors are responsible reinforces policy inaction. Here, for the first time, we construct a dynamic model that quantitatively agrees with food prices. The results show that the dominant causes of price increases are investor speculation and ethanol conversion. Models that just treat supply and demand are not consistent with the actual price dynamics. The two sharp peaks in 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 are specifically due to investor speculation, while an underlying upward trend is due to increasing demand from ethanol conversion. The model includes investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take ad...

  19. Use of Quantitative Uncertainty Analysis to Support M&VDecisions in ESPCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.; Koehling, Erick; Kumar, Satish

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement and Verification (M&V) is a critical elementof an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) - without M&V, thereisno way to confirm that the projected savings in an ESPC are in factbeing realized. For any given energy conservation measure in an ESPC,there are usually several M&V choices, which will vary in terms ofmeasurement uncertainty, cost, and technical feasibility. Typically,M&V decisions are made almost solely based on engineering judgmentand experience, with little, if any, quantitative uncertainty analysis(QUA). This paper describes the results of a pilot project initiated bythe Department of Energy s Federal Energy Management Program to explorethe use of Monte-Carlo simulation to assess savings uncertainty andthereby augment the M&V decision-making process in ESPCs. The intentwas to use QUA selectively in combination with heuristic knowledge, inorder to obtain quantitative estimates of the savings uncertainty withoutthe burden of a comprehensive "bottoms-up" QUA. This approach was used toanalyze the savings uncertainty in an ESPC for a large federal agency.The QUA was seamlessly integrated into the ESPC development process andthe incremental effort was relatively small with user-friendly tools thatare commercially available. As the case study illustrates, in some casesthe QUA simply confirms intuitive or qualitative information, while inother cases, it provides insight that suggests revisiting the M&Vplan. The case study also showed that M&V decisions should beinformed by the portfolio risk diversification. By providing quantitativeuncertainty information, QUA can effectively augment the M&Vdecision-making process as well as the overall ESPC financialanalysis.

  20. Parameterized algorithms for quantitative differentials in spectrally equivalent medical diagnostic x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okunade, Akintunde Akangbe [Department of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State (Nigeria)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Qualitative and quantitative equivalence of spectra transmitted by two different elemental filters require a good match in terms of shape and size over the entire energy range of 0-150 keV used in medical diagnostic radiology. However, the photoelectric absorptions and Compton scattering involved in the interaction of x rays with matter at these relatively low photon energies differ in a nonuniform manner with energy and atomic number. By careful choice of thicknesses for filter materials with an atomic number between 12 and 39, when compared with aluminum, it is possible to obtain transmitted beams of the same shape (quality) but not of the same size (quantity). In this paper, calculations have been carried out for the matching of the shapes and sizes of beams transmitted through specified thicknesses of aluminium filter and spectrally equivalent thicknesses of other filter materials (different from aluminium) using FORTRAN source codes traceable to the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM), College Park, MD, USA. Parametrized algorithms for the evaluation of quantitative differentials (deficit or surplus) in radiation output (namely, photon fluence, exposure, kerma, energy imparted, absorbed dose, and effective dose) from these transmitted spectrally equivalent beams were developed. These differentials range between 1%, and 4% at 1 mm Al filtration and between 8%, and 25% for filtration of 6 mm Al for different filter materials in comparison with aluminum. Also developed were models for factors for converting measures of photon fluence, exposure-area product, (EAP), and kerma-area product (KAP) to risk related quantities such as energy imparted, absorbed dose, and effective dose from the spectrally equivalent beams. The thicknesses of other filter materials that are spectrally equivalent to given thicknesses of aluminum filter were characterized using polynomial functions. The fact that the use of equivalent spectra in radiological practice can provide means of ranking the differentials in radiographic image quality and stochastic risk is discussed.

  1. Demonstration of lactogenic receptors in rat endocrine pancreases by quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, M.; Scharfmann, R.; Ban, E.; Haour, F.; Postel-Vinay, M.C.; Czernichow, P. (National Institute of Health and Medical Research, Paris (France))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct effect of growth hormone and/or prolactin on the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell has been proposed. This study assessed the presence of human growth hormone (hGH)-binding sites in male adult rat endocrine pancreas via quantitative autoradiography. The binding of 125I-labeled hGH was evaluated by receptor autoradiography on frozen-pancreas cryostat cut sections. The sections were incubated with 125I-hGH (10(-10) M) for 75 min at room temperature, and nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of excess native hGH (5 X 10(-7) M). The specificity of the binding was assessed in competition experiments with bovine GH and ovine prolactin. The autoradiograms were quantified with a computer-assisted image-processing system. The sections were then stained to visualize the endocrine islets. Nondiabetic control and streptozocin (STZ)-injected rats were used. Our results show that (1) there is specific binding of iodinated hGH in small areas of the pancreas, which appear as the Langerhans islets when the autoradiogram and the stained sections are superimposed; (2) the specificity of hGH binding in rat islets is lactogenic; (3) the density of the hGH-binding sites in the endocrine pancreas is estimated at 4.8 fmol/mg protein, with IC50 ranging from 0.98 to 2.50 nM; and (4) binding sites may be present on the beta-cell, because specific binding disappears in STZ-injected rats. In conclusion, by use of a quantitative autoradiographic technique, we provide evidence for the presence of lactogenic receptors on rat beta-cells.

  2. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Cates, M.R.; Franks, L.A.

    1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fission are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for /sup 239/Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  3. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

  4. Time-series analysis of participation in nonresident hunting: the effects of license cost and quantitative fluctuations in supply.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzaccaro, Anthony Peter

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIME -SERIES ANAI, YSIS OI' PARTICIPATION IN NQiIRESI DEN I. ' HUNTING: Tl-;E EFFECTS OI LICENSE COST ANI3 QUANTITATIVE I LUC fUWTIONS IN SVPPI. Y A lil*sis by ANTHONY PETER MAZZACCARO Subrnittc. d to the Gracluate College of Teresa ARM Unic... AND QUANTITATIVE Fl UCTUATIONS IN SUPPLY A Thesis by ANTHONY PETER IvlAZZACCARO Approved as to style and content: (Chairman of Conrrnittee) ead of Department) ( ivl e rnb e g ~. , 8! (Member) +~eg ~+ ABSTRACT Time-Series Analysis of Participation...

  5. Evaluation of a portable x-ray fluorescence survey meter for the quantitative determination of trace metals in welding fumes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrenbacher, Mary Catherine

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORE~ SURVEY METER FOR TIIE QUANTITATIVE DEPERMINATI(gq OF TRACE METALS IN WELDING FIJvtES A THESIS by MARY CATHERINE FEHRENBACHER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A%M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1984 MAJOR SUBJECI': INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORES~ SURVEY METER FOR THE QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATIGN OF TRACE METALS IN WELDING FIJvtES A THESIS by h...

  6. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III

    1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

  7. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  8. QUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B at IFREMER/CERSAT are used to estimate wind patterns near the Horns Rev wind farm located in the North Sea, Denmark. At this site a large offshore wind farm (80 2MW-turbines) is in operation. The study includes

  9. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  10. 2566 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Quantitative Analysis of Gas Circuit Breaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    --Understanding the dynamic processes governing gas circuit breaker physics is crucial in order to continue to improve short, especially those induced at flow reversal where the gas flow between the arc zone and heating volume changes2566 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Quantitative Analysis of Gas

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Three-Dimensional-Resolved Fiber Architecture in Heterogeneous Skeletal Muscle Tissue Using NMR and Optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Peter

    Quantitative Analysis of Three-Dimensional-Resolved Fiber Architecture in Heterogeneous Skeletal Muscle Tissue Using NMR and Optical Imaging Methods Vitaly J. Napadow,* Qun Chen, Vu Mai, Peter T. C. So Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts ABSTRACT The determination of principal fiber

  12. Quantitative Information-Flow Tracking for C and Related Languages Stephen McCamant and Michael D. Ernst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskov, Barbara

    Quantitative Information-Flow Tracking for C and Related Languages Stephen McCamant and Michael D, and an attacker who initially knows nothing about my password tries to log in using the password i102rjD7 of a variable used in the reply method to determine whether to send a `hit' or a `miss' message (d) Seven

  13. Actuarial science is the quantitative analysis of risk. In addition to mathematics and statistics courses, students in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Actuarial science is the quantitative analysis of risk. In addition to mathematics and statistics. Actuaries help individuals, businesses and society manage risk by evaluating the likelihood of future events's risk tolerance with various risk parameters such as age of the insured, health status, place

  14. About the Impact of Model Risk on Capital Reserves: A Quantitative Analysis. Philip Bertram1, Philipp Sibbertsen and Gerhard Stahl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Stefan

    About the Impact of Model Risk on Capital Reserves: A Quantitative Analysis. Philip Bertram1 the idea of model risk in the environment of internal model building. We define various types of model risk including estimation risk, model risk in distri- bution and model risk in functional form

  15. Assistant Professor in Quantitative Genomics POSITION: This is a 12-month tenure track faculty position with a 80% research and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Assistant Professor in Quantitative Genomics POSITION: This is a 12-month tenure track faculty, statistical genomics, genome-wide analysis, gene-environment interactions, and/or epigenetics of crop plants/statistical genomics to crop plants is expected. UGA offers a vibrant research environment with potential

  16. WORKSHOP ON QUANTITATIVE APPROACHES IN OBJECT-ORIENTED SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (QAOOSE'2003) Evolution of Cyclomatic Complexity in Object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jean-Guy

    7 TH WORKSHOP ON QUANTITATIVE APPROACHES IN OBJECT-ORIENTED SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (QAOOSE'2003) 1-- It is a generally accepted fact that software systems are constructed and gradually refined over a period of time and predictions about further evolution of software systems. Historically, collection of sufficient data to build

  17. Molecular Immunology 44 (2007) 30853091 Epi-allelic Erk1 and Erk2 knockdown series for quantitative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for quantitative analysis of T cell Erk regulation and IL-2 production Lucia Willea,1, Melissa L. Kempb,1, Peter Sandyc, Christina L. Lewisb, Douglas A. Lauffenburgera,b,c, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States b Massachusetts Institute

  18. Chapter 8: Analysis of variance Analysis of variance refers to a linear model approach to analyzing models of a quantitative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    or subordinates. Eden1 speculated that in most quantitative examples of the Pygmalion effect which compared two the Pygmalion effect. Eden conducted an experiment that attempted to more fairly isolate the Pygmalion effect their ability to operate weapons and answer questions about their use. The platoon mean scores are the response

  19. c 1997 by Jay H. Lee, Jin Hoon Choi, and Kwang Soon Lee 1.5 QUANTITIVE PID TUNING METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    c 1997 by Jay H. Lee, Jin Hoon Choi, and Kwang Soon Lee 1.5 QUANTITIVE PID TUNING METHODS Tuning PID parameters is not a trivial task in general. Various tuning methods have been proposed for di Lee Kc Ku Kc = Ku Kc Ku step 4 Calculateand implementPID parametersusing the the Ziegler

  20. Prospects for quantitative computed tomography imaging in the presence of foreign metal bodies using statistical image reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, Joseph A.

    Prospects for quantitative computed tomography imaging in the presence of foreign metal bodies September 2002 X-ray computed tomography CT images of patients bearing metal intracavitary applicators of Physicists in Medicine. DOI: 10.1118/1.1509443 Key words: x-ray transmission computed tomography, metal

  1. Quantitative Drug Structure Complex Geometry Relationships in -Lactam Efflux by Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Pump AcrAB-TolC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Quantitative Drug Structure ­ Complex Geometry Relationships in -Lactam Efflux by BacterialAB-TolC pump in E. coli. Two main drug efflux mechanism are shown, one starting in the periplasm, and other of 1-20. Most drugs expose positive, amphiphilic or hydrophobic heads (R or R1) toward predominantly

  2. Quantitative in-cylinder NO-LIF imaging in a realistic gasoline engine with spray-guided direct injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    of engines with gasoline direct injection. Exhaust gas aftertreatment requires storage catalystsQuantitative in-cylinder NO-LIF imaging in a realistic gasoline engine with spray-guided direct fractions in a gasoline engine with spray-guided direct injection using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF

  3. Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head-to-head domain walls using off-axis electron holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    transformations.7 Recent experimental reports confirm these predictions of domain wall movement8Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head-to-head domain walls using off-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 50, NO. 5, MAY 2002 1153 Sampling of Periodic Signals: A Quantitative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Mathews

    : A Quantitative Error Analysis Mathews Jacob, Student Member, IEEE, Thierry Blu, Member, IEEE, and Michael Unser- tute of Technology, Lausanne, Switzerland (e-mail: mathews.jacob@epfl.ch; thierry.blu@epfl.ch; michael, the formula bears a strong resemblance to the error expression of signals in . However, the recipe is dif

  5. Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Bayesian Model Averaging J. MCLEAN SLOUGHTER, ADRIAN E. RAFTERY, TILMANN GNEITING, AND CHRIS FRALEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftery, Adrian

    Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Bayesian Model Averaging J. MCLEAN SLOUGHTER, ADRIAN E. RAFTERY, TILMANN GNEITING, AND CHRIS FRALEY Department of Statistics, University of precipitation (PoP) forecasts using this approach. Bayesian model averaging (BMA) was introduced by Raftery et

  6. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is limited by the kernels available on each scanner.

  7. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 Final Determination Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. The final analysis considered each of the 44 addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007. All 44 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2007 from Standard 90.1-2004 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 15 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE’s final determination. However, out of the 44 addenda, 9 were preliminarily determined to have measureable and quantifiable impact.

  8. Compositions and chemical bonding in ceramics by quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentley, J.; Horton, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); McHargue, C.J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Revcolevschi, A. [Univ. de Paris-Sud, Lab. de Chemie des Solides (France); Tanaka, S.; Davis, R.F. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry was applied to a range of ceramic materials at a spatial resolution of <5 nm. Analysis of Fe L{sub 23} white lines indicated a low-spin state with a charge transfer of {approximately}1.5 electrons/atom onto the Fe atoms implanted into (amorphized) silicon carbide. Gradients of 2 to 5% in the Co:O stoichiometry were measured across 100-nm-thick Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} layers in an oxidized directionally solidified CoO-ZrO{sub 2} eutectic, with the highest O levels near the ZrO{sub 2}. The energy-loss near-edge structures were dramatically different for the two cobalt oxides; those for CO{sub 3}O{sub 4} have been incorrectly ascribed to CoO in the published literature. Kinetically stabilized solid solubility occurred in an AlN-SiC film grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on {alpha}(6H)-SiC, and no detectable interdiffusion occurred in couples of MBE-grown AlN on SiC following annealing at up to 1750C. In diffusion couples of polycrystalline AlN on SiC, interfacial 8H sialon (aluminum oxy-nitride) and pockets of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rich {beta}{prime} sialon in the SiC were detected.

  9. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010 Preliminary Determination Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Rosenberg, Michael I.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a preliminary quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, Standard 90.1-2010, or 2010 edition) would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007(ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, Standard 90.1-2007, or 2007 edition). The preliminary analysis considered each of the 109 addenda to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 that were included in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010. All 109 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2010 from Standard 90.1-2007 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 16 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE’s preliminary determination. However, out of the 109 addenda, 34 were preliminarily determined to have measureable and quantifiable impact.

  10. Quantitative mineralogical composition of complex mineral wastes - Contribution of the Rietveld method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahieux, P.-Y. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Aubert, J.-E., E-mail: aubert@insa-toulouse.f [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Cyr, M.; Coutand, M.; Husson, B. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC (Laboratoire Materiaux et Durabilite des Constructions), 135, Avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is the quantitative determination of the mineral composition of two complex mineral wastes: a sewage sludge ash (SSA) and a municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSWIFA). The mineral compositions were determined by two different methods: the first based on calculation using the qualitative mineralogical composition of the waste combined with physicochemical analyses; the second the Rietveld method, which uses only X-ray diffraction patterns. The results obtained are coherent, showing that it is possible to quantify the mineral compositions of complex mineral waste with such methods. The apparent simplicity of the Rietveld method (due principally to the availability of software packages implementing the method) facilitates its use. However, care should be taken since the crystal structure analysis based on powder diffraction data needs experience and a thorough understanding of crystallography. So the use of another, complementary, method such as the first one used in this study, may sometimes be needed to confirm the results.

  11. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, R.V.

    1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

  12. Highly Quantitative Electrochemical Characterization of Non-Aqueous Electrolytes & Solid Electrolyte Interphases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sergiy V. Sazhin; Kevin L. Gering; Mason K. Harrup; Harry W. Rollins

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods to measure solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) electrochemical properties and SEI formation capability of non-aqueous electrolyte solutions are not adequately addressed in the literature. And yet, there is a strong demand in new electrolyte generations that promote stabilized SEIs and have an influence to resolve safety, calendar life and other limitations of Li-ion batteries. To fill this gap, in situ electrochemical approach with new descriptive criteria for highly quantitative characterization of SEI and electrolytes is proposed. These criteria are: SEI formation capacity, SEI corrosion rate, SEI maintenance rate, and SEI kinetic stability. These criteria are associated with battery parameters like irreversible capacity, self-discharge, shelf-life, power, etc. Therefore, they are especially useful for electrolyte development and standard fast screening, allowing a skillful approach to narrow down the search for the best electrolyte. The characterization protocol also allows retrieving information on interfacial resistance for SEI layers and the electrochemical window of electrolytes, the other important metrics of characterization. The method validation was done on electrolyte blends containing phosphazenes, developed at Idaho National Laboratory, as 1.2M LiPF6 [80 % EC-MEC (2:8) (v/v) + 20% Phosphazene variety] (v/v), which were targeted for safer electrolyte variations.

  13. Quantitative study of mixing in annular and raschig ring filled tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, M. A.

    1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative study of mixing, which utilized the exit age distribution theory, has been completed for bench-scale annular and raschig ring filled tanks, in addition to a pilot-scale annular tank. A study of mixing and fluid flow in a full-scale, single-entry, raschig ring filled tank also was initiated. Results showed the bench-scale raschig ring filled tank approached plug-flow (no mixing) behavior. In a bench-scale annular tank, regardless of whether fluid entered tangentially or nontangentially, the vessel approached continuously stirred tank reactor behavior (perfect mixing). The pilot-scale annular tank approached continuously stirred tank reactor behavior only when tangential entry was used. Mixing in the full-scale raschig ring filled tank he tank did not approach eithr the perfect or the no mixing situations. Instead, the tank had a flow pattern in which solution channeled through a small volume of the tank, leaving the regions outside the channel effectively inactive.

  14. The Power of a Good Idea: Quantitative Modeling of the Spread of Ideas from Epidemiological Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettencourt, L. M. A. (LANL); Cintron-Arias, A. (Cornell University); Kaiser, D. I. (MIT); Castillo-Chavez, C. (Arizona State University)

    2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The population dynamics underlying the diffusion of ideas hold many qualitative similarities to those involved in the spread of infections. In spite of much suggestive evidence this analogy is hardly ever quantified in useful ways. The standard benefit of modeling epidemics is the ability to estimate quantitatively population average parameters, such as interpersonal contact rates, incubation times, duration of infectious periods, etc. In most cases such quantities generalize naturally to the spread of ideas and provide a simple means of quantifying sociological and behavioral patterns. Here we apply several paradigmatic models of epidemics to empirical data on the advent and spread of Feynman diagrams through the theoretical physics communities of the USA, Japan, and the USSR in the period immediately after World War II. This test case has the advantage of having been studied historically in great detail, which allows validation of our results. We estimate the effectiveness of adoption of the idea in the three communities and find values for parameters reflecting both intentional social organization and long lifetimes for the idea. These features are probably general characteristics of the spread of ideas, but not of common epidemics.

  15. Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Robert V. (Tijeras, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

  16. Assessment of the release of atomic Na from a burning black liquor droplet using quantitative PLIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saw, Woei L.; Nathan, Graham J. [Centre for Energy Technology, The Environment Institute, School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Ashman, Peter J.; Alwahabi, Zeyad T. [Centre for Energy Technology, The Environment Institute, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantitative measurement of atomic sodium (Na) release, at high concentration, from a burning black liquor droplet has been demonstrated using a planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique, corrected for fluorescence trapping. The local temperature of the particle was measured to be approximately 1700 C, at a height of 10 mm above a flat flame burner. The PLIF technique was used to assess the temporal release of atomic Na from the combustion of black liquor and compare it with the Na concentration in the remaining smelt. A first-order model was made to provide insight using a simple Plug Flow Reactor model based on the independently measured concentration of residual Na in the smelt as a function of time. This model also required the dilution ratio of the combustion products in the flat flame entrained into the plume gas from the black liquor particle to be estimated. The key findings of these studies are: (i) the peak concentration of atomic Na from the combustion of the black liquor droplets is around 1.4 ppm; (ii) very little atomic Na is present during the drying, devolatilisation or char combustion stages; and (iii) the presence of atomic Na during smelt phase dominates over that from the other combustion stages. (author)

  17. Nuclear microprobe - synchrotron synergy: towards integrated quantitative real-time elemental imaging using PIXE and SCRF.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, C. G.; Etschmann, B. E.; Vogt, S.; Maser, J.; Harland, C. L.; van Achterbergh, E.; Legnini, D.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); CSIRO Exploration and Mining; Australian Synchrotron Research Program, ANSTO

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dynamic Analysis (DA) method, for the projection of quantitative elemental images using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), has been extended for use with energy-dispersive Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) data collected with the X-ray microprobe by making use of similarities and synergy with nuclear microscopy. The broad element sensitivity of PIXE is complemented by the selective nature of SXRF, where the beam energy can be tuned to optimize the sensitivity in a portion of the periodic table. PIXE combined with Proton Induced {gamma}-ray Emission (PIGE) in this study provided images of geological samples of 25 elements, including characteristic X-rays up to the energy of the Nd K lines (37 keV). Maximum sensitivity was achieved for elements around Z {approx} 33 with detection limits of {approx}250 ppb (in 5 h). SXRF using a 16.1 keV photon microbeam provided images of 16 elements, with optimum sensitivity around Z {approx} 35 with detection limits of {approx}70 ppb (in 11 h), an improvement of {approx}2.4 times when corrected for acquisition time.

  18. Multiple-wavelength spectroscopic quantitation of light-absorbing species in scattering media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nathel, Howard (Albany, CA); Cartland, Harry E. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Roe, Jeffery N. (San Ramon, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen concentration measurement system for blood hemoglobin comprises a multiple-wavelength low-coherence optical light source that is coupled by single mode fibers through a splitter and combiner and focused on both a target tissue sample and a reference mirror. Reflections from both the reference mirror and from the depths of the target tissue sample are carried back and mixed to produce interference fringes in the splitter and combiner. The reference mirror is set such that the distance traversed in the reference path is the same as the distance traversed into and back from the target tissue sample at some depth in the sample that will provide light attenuation information that is dependent on the oxygen in blood hemoglobin in the target tissue sample. Two wavelengths of light are used to obtain concentrations. The method can be used to measure total hemoglobin concentration [Hb.sub.deoxy +Hb.sub.oxy ] or total blood volume in tissue and in conjunction with oxygen saturation measurements from pulse oximetry can be used to absolutely quantify oxyhemoglobin [HbO.sub.2 ] in tissue. The apparatus and method provide a general means for absolute quantitation of an absorber dispersed in a highly scattering medium.

  19. Nucleophosmin in the pathogenesis of arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis revealed by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Shuhui [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Wang Yiwen [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hsu Jueliang [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Hongyi [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Wang Chiyun [Graduate Institute of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Shen Potsun [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chiang Chiwu [Graduate Institute of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chuang Jingjing [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 600, Taiwan (China); Tsai Hungwen [Department of Pathology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan 704, Taiwan (China); Gu Powen [Department of Clinical Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chang Fangchih [Instrument Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu Hsiaosheng, E-mail: a713@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chow Nanhaw, E-mail: chownh@mail.ncku.edu.t [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of arsenic (As)-associated carcinogenesis, we performed proteomic analysis on E7 immortalized human uroepithelial cells after treatment with As in vitro. Quantitative proteomics was performed using stable isotope dimethyl labeling coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography peptide separation and mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Among 285 proteins, a total of 26 proteins were upregulated (ratio > 2.0) and 18 proteins were downregulated (ratio < 0.65) by As treatment, which are related to nucleotide binding, lipid metabolism, protein folding, protein biosynthesis, transcription, DNA repair, cell cycle control, and signal transduction. This study reports the potential significance of nucleophosmin (NPM) in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis. NPM was universally expressed in all of uroepithelial cell lines examined, implying that NPM may play a role in human bladder carcinogenesis. Upregulation of NPM tends to be dose- and time-dependent after As treatment. Expression of NPM was associated with cell proliferation, migration and anti-apoptosis. On the contrary, soy isoflavones inhibited the expression of NPM in vitro. The results suggest that NPM may play a role in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis, and soybean-based foods may have potential in the suppression of As/NPM-related tumorigenesis.

  20. Quantitative texture analysis of free-standing electrodeposited Cu- and Ni-line patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantleon, Karen [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet Building 204, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)]. E-mail: pantleon@ipl.dtu.dk; Somers, Marcel A.J. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet Building 204, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-standing line patterns of Cu and Ni were manufactured by applying photo-lithography and subsequent electrodeposition on glass wafers covered with either a polycrystalline Au-layer or an X-ray amorphous Ni-P layer. Several pattern geometries varying in line width, line separation and line length were studied by X-ray diffraction. Quantitative texture analysis revealed that crystallographic texture depends on the type of substrate-layer: while substrate unbiased growth was observed for Cu-lines on amorphous Ni-P, the highly-textured and fine-grained Au-layer strongly favored nucleation of Cu-crystallites of a preferred orientation. For particular pattern geometries, experimental evidence for an epitaxial orientation relation between Cu and Au was found and discussed with respect to various concepts of epitaxial growth. While crystallographic texture of Ni-electrodeposits was independent on the pattern geometry, for Cu-electrodeposits a pronounced pattern dependence of both type and strength of crystallographic texture as well as differences between Cu-lines and non-patterned Cu-films were observed.

  1. Quantitative interpretation of the transition voltages in gold-poly(phenylene) thiol-gold molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)] [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition voltage of three different asymmetric Au/poly(phenylene) thiol/Au molecular junctions in which the central molecule is either benzene thiol, biphenyl thiol, or terphenyl thiol is investigated by first-principles quantum transport simulations. For all the junctions, the calculated transition voltage at positive polarity is in quantitative agreement with the experimental values and shows weak dependence on alterations of the Au-phenyl contact. When compared to the strong coupling at the Au-S contact, which dominates the alignment of various molecular orbitals with respect to the electrode Fermi level, the coupling at the Au-phenyl contact produces only a weak perturbation. Therefore, variations of the Au-phenyl contact can only have a minor influence on the transition voltage. These findings not only provide an explanation to the uniformity in the transition voltages found for ?-conjugated molecules measured with different experimental methods, but also demonstrate the advantage of transition voltage spectroscopy as a tool for determining the positions of molecular levels in molecular devices.

  2. Three-dimensional local structure of photoexcited Cu diimine complex refined by quantitative XANES analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A. V.; Chen, L. X.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Southern Federal Univ.; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural details of [Cu(dmp){sub 2}]{sup +} (dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) at its metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited-state in acetonitrile were extracted using quantitative analysis of Cu K-edge X-ray adsorption near edge structure (XANES). The study combines two techniques: fitting experimental XANES spectra with a multidimensional interpolation approximation, and calculating theoretical XANES spectra with molecular potentials beyond the muffin-tin approximation. The results of the study show that the best fit of the experimental XANES data must include a solvent molecule binding to the Cu with a short Cu-N distance of 2.00 {angstrom}. This confirms that the formation of an exciplex is responsible for the excited-state quenching in coordinating solvents, such as acetonitrile. Moreover, the calculations suggest that the formation of this exciplex state is accompanied by significant rocking distortions of the dmp ligands resulting in a 108{sup o} angle between the N(solvent)-Cu bond and the C{sub 2} symmetry axis of the dmp ligand. This combined approach allows us to extract molecular configurations that would otherwise be missed in a conventional qualitative XANES analysis.

  3. Copyright 2008 by the Genetics Society of America DOI: 10.1534/genetics.108.088427

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yandell, Brian S.

    network. Mapping quan- titative trait loci (QTL) means inferring the genetic architecture (number of genesCopyright Ó 2008 by the Genetics Society of America DOI: 10.1534/genetics.108.088427 Bayesian for correlated traits in the literature. We develop Bayesian multiple-QTL mapping methods for correlated

  4. To be published in In Proceedings of ACM Eye Tracking Research & Applications Symposium, Austin, TX, 2010 Qualitative and Quantitative Scoring and Evaluation of the Eye Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg, Komogortsev - Department of Computer Science, Texas State University

    To be published in In Proceedings of ACM Eye Tracking Research & Applications Symposium, Austin, TX, 2010 Qualitative and Quantitative Scoring and Evaluation of the Eye Movement Classification Algorithms presents a set of qualitative and quantitative scores designed to assess performance of any eye movement

  5. Quantitative evaluation of mask phase defects from through-focus EUV aerial images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mochi, Iacopo; Yamazoe, Kenji; Neureuther, Andrew; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Mask defects inspection and imaging is one of the most important issues for any pattern transfer lithography technology. This is especially true for EUV lithography where the wavelength-specific properties of masks and defects necessitate actinic inspection for a faithful prediction of defect printability and repair performance. In this paper we will present a technique to obtain a quantitative characterization of mask phase defects from EUV aerial images. We apply this technique to measure the aerial image phase of native defects on a blank mask, measured with the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) an EUV zoneplate microscope that operates at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measured phase is compared with predictions made from AFM top-surface measurements of those defects. While amplitude defects are usually easy to recognize and quantify with standard inspection techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), defects or structures that have a phase component can be much more challenging to inspect. A phase defect can originate from the substrate or from any level of the multilayer. In both cases its effect on the reflected field is not directly related to the local topography of the mask surface, but depends on the deformation of the multilayer structure. Using the AIT, we have previously showed that EUV inspection provides a faithful and reliable way to predict the appearance of mask defect on the printed wafer; but to obtain a complete characterization of the defect we need to evaluate quantitatively its phase component. While aerial imaging doesn't provide a direct measurement of the phase of the object, this information is encoded in the through focus evolution of the image intensity distribution. Recently we developed a technique that allows us to extract the complex amplitude of EUV mask defects using two aerial images from different focal planes. The method for the phase reconstruction is derived from the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm, an iterative method that can be used to reconstruct phase and amplitude of an object from the intensity distributions in the image and in the pupil plane. The GS algorithm is equivalent to a two-parameter optimization problem and it needs exactly two constraints to be solved, namely two intensity distributions in different focal planes. In some formulations, adding any other constraint would result in an ill posed problem. On the other hand, the solution's stability and convergence time can both be improved using more information. We modified our complex amplitude reconstruction algorithm to use an arbitrary number of through focus images and we compared its performance with the previous version in terms of convergence speed, robustness and accuracy. We have demonstrated the phase-reconstruction method on native, mask-blank phase defects and compared the results with phase-predictions made from AFM data collected before and after the multilayer deposition. The method and the current results could be extremely useful for improving the modeling and understanding of native phase defects, their detectability, and their printability.

  6. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 Final Determination Quantitative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a final quantitative analysis to assess whether buildings constructed according to the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, Standard 90.1-2010, or 2010 edition) would result in energy savings compared with buildings constructed to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007(ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, Standard 90.1-2007, or 2007 edition). The final analysis considered each of the 109 addenda to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 that were included in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010. All 109 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2010 from Standard 90.1-2007 were reviewed by DOE, and their combined impact on a suite of 16 building prototype models in 15 ASHRAE climate zones was considered. Most addenda were deemed to have little quantifiable impact on building efficiency for the purpose of DOE's final determination. However, out of the 109 addenda, 34 were preliminarily determined to have a measureable and quantifiable impact. A suite of 240 computer energy simulations for building prototypes complying with ASHRAE 90.1-2007 was developed. These prototypes were then modified in accordance with these 34 addenda to create a second suite of corresponding building simulations reflecting the same buildings compliant with Standard 90.1-2010. The building simulations were conducted using the DOE EnergyPlus building simulation software. The resulting energy use from the complete suite of 480 simulation runs was then converted to energy use intensity (EUI, or energy use per unit floor area) metrics (Site EUI, Primary EUI, and energy cost intensity [ECI]) results for each simulation. For each edition of the standard, these EUIs were then aggregated to a national basis for each prototype using weighting factors based on construction floor area developed for each of the 15 U.S. climate zones using commercial construction data. When compared, the resulting weighted EUIs indicated that each of the 16 building prototypes used less energy under Standard 90.1-2010 than under Standard 90.1-2007 on a national basis when considering site energy, primary energy, or energy cost. The EUIs were also aggregated across building types to a national commercial building basis using the same weighting data. On a national basis, the final quantitative analysis estimated a floor-space-weighted national average reduction in new building energy consumption of 18.2 percent for source energy and 18.5 percent when considering site energy. An 18.2 percent savings in energy cost, based on national average commercial energy costs for electricity and natural gas, was also estimated.

  7. Quantitative Prediction of Surface Segregation in Bimetallic Pt-MAlloy Nanoparticles (M=Ni, Re, Mo)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guofeng; Van Hove, Michel A.; Ross, Phil N.; Baskes,Michael I.

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This review addresses the issue of surface segregation inbimetallic alloy nanoparticles, which are relevant to heterogeneouscatalysis, in particular for electro-catalysts of fuel cells. We describeand discuss a theoretical approach to predicting surface segregation insuch nanoparticles by using the Modified Embedded Atom Method and MonteCarlo simulations. In this manner it is possible to systematicallyexplore the behavior of such nanoparticles as a function of componentmetals, composition, and particle size, among other variables. We choseto compare Pt75Ni25, Pt75Re25, and Pt80Mo20 alloys as example systems forthis discussion, due to the importance of Pt in catalytic processes andits high-cost. It is assumed that the equilibrium nanoparticles of thesealloys have a cubo-octahedral shape, the face-centered cubic lattice, andsizes ranging from 2.5 nm to 5.0 nm. By investigating the segregation ofPt atoms to the surfaces of the nanoparticles, we draw the followingconclusions from our simulations at T= 600 K. (1) Pt75Ni25 nanoparticlesform a surface-sandwich structure in which the Pt atoms are stronglyenriched in the outermost and third layers while the Ni atoms areenriched in the second layer. In particular, a nearly pure Pt outermostsurface layer can be achieved in those nanoparticles. (2) EquilibriumPt75Re25 nanoparticles adopt a core-shell structure: a nearly pure Ptshell surrounding a more uniform Pt-Re core. (3) In Pt80Mo20nanoparticles, the facets are fully occupied by Pt atoms, the Mo atomsonly appear at the edges and vertices, and the Pt and Mo atoms arrangethemselves in an alternating sequence along the edges and vertices. Oursimulations quantitatively agree with previous experimental andtheoretical results for the extended surfaces of Pt-Ni, Pt-Re, and Pt-Moalloys. We further discuss the reasons for the different types of surfacesegregation found in the different alloys, and some of theirimplications.

  8. Quantitative study of fluctuation effects by fast lattice Monte Carlo simulations: Compression of grafted homopolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Qiang, E-mail: q.wang@colostate.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1370 (United States)] [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1370 (United States)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using fast lattice Monte Carlo (FLMC) simulations [Q. Wang, Soft Matter 5, 4564 (2009)] and the corresponding lattice self-consistent field (LSCF) calculations, we studied a model system of grafted homopolymers, in both the brush and mushroom regimes, in an explicit solvent compressed by an impenetrable surface. Direct comparisons between FLMC and LSCF results, both of which are based on the same Hamiltonian (thus without any parameter-fitting between them), unambiguously and quantitatively reveal the fluctuations/correlations neglected by the latter. We studied both the structure (including the canonical-ensemble averages of the height and the mean-square end-to-end distances of grafted polymers) and thermodynamics (including the ensemble-averaged reduced energy density and the related internal energy per chain, the differences in the Helmholtz free energy and entropy per chain from the uncompressed state, and the pressure due to compression) of the system. In particular, we generalized the method for calculating pressure in lattice Monte Carlo simulations proposed by Dickman [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 2246 (1987)], and combined it with the Wang-Landau–Optimized Ensemble sampling [S. Trebst, D. A. Huse, and M. Troyer, Phys. Rev. E 70, 046701 (2004)] to efficiently and accurately calculate the free energy difference and the pressure due to compression. While we mainly examined the effects of the degree of compression, the distance between the nearest-neighbor grafting points, the reduced number of chains grafted at each grafting point, and the system fluctuations/correlations in an athermal solvent, the ?-solvent is also considered in some cases.

  9. A quantitative analysis of singular inflation with scalar-tensor and modified gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Nojiri; S. D. Odintsov; V. K. Oikonomou

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a detailed quantitative description of singular inflation. Its close analogy with finite-time future singularity which is associated to dark energy era is described. Calling and classifying the singularities of such inflation as finite-time cosmological singularities we investigate their occurrence, with special emphasis on the Type IV singularity. The study is performed in the context of a general non-canonical scalar-tensor theory. In addition, the impact of finite time singularities on the slow-roll parameters is also investigated. Particularly, we study three cases, in which the singularity occurs during the inflationary era, at the end, and also we study the case that the singularity occurs much more later than inflation ends. Using the obtained slow-roll parameters, for each case, we calculate explicitly the spectral index of primordial curvature perturbations $n_s$, the associated running of the spectral index $a_s$ and of the scalar-to-tensor ratio $r$ and compare the resulting values to the Planck and BICEP2 data. As we demonstrate, in some cases corresponding to the Type IV singularity, there might be the possibility of agreement with the observational data, when the singularity occurs at the end, or after inflation. However, absolute concordance of all observational indices is not achieved. On the contrary, if the singularity occurs during the inflationary era, this is catastrophic for the theory, since the observational indices become divergent. We also show how a Type IV singularity may be consistently accommodated in the Universe's late time evolution. Finally, we investigate which $F(R)$ gravity can generate the Type IV singularity, with special emphasis on the behavior near the finite time singularity.

  10. Quantitative blood flow measurements in the small animal cardiopulmonary system using digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin Mingde; Marshall, Craig T.; Qi, Yi; Johnston, Samuel M.; Badea, Cristian T.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Johnson, G. Allan [Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3823, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3823, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of preclinical rodent models of disease continues to grow because these models help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and provide robust test beds for drug development. Among the major anatomic and physiologic indicators of disease progression and genetic or drug modification of responses are measurements of blood vessel caliber and flow. Moreover, cardiopulmonary blood flow is a critical indicator of gas exchange. Current methods of measuring cardiopulmonary blood flow suffer from some or all of the following limitations--they produce relative values, are limited to global measurements, do not provide vasculature visualization, are not able to measure acute changes, are invasive, or require euthanasia. Methods: In this study, high-spatial and high-temporal resolution x-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to obtain vasculature visualization, quantitative blood flow in absolute metrics (ml/min instead of arbitrary units or velocity), and relative blood volume dynamics from discrete regions of interest on a pixel-by-pixel basis (100x100 {mu}m{sup 2}). Results: A series of calibrations linked the DSA flow measurements to standard physiological measurement using thermodilution and Fick's method for cardiac output (CO), which in eight anesthetized Fischer-344 rats was found to be 37.0{+-}5.1 ml/min. Phantom experiments were conducted to calibrate the radiographic density to vessel thickness, allowing a link of DSA cardiac output measurements to cardiopulmonary blood flow measurements in discrete regions of interest. The scaling factor linking relative DSA cardiac output measurements to the Fick's absolute measurements was found to be 18.90xCO{sub DSA}=CO{sub Fick}. Conclusions: This calibrated DSA approach allows repeated simultaneous visualization of vasculature and measurement of blood flow dynamics on a regional level in the living rat.

  11. A quantitative acoustic emission study on fracture processes in ceramics based on wavelet packet decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ning, J. G.; Chu, L.; Ren, H. L., E-mail: huilanren@bit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We base a quantitative acoustic emission (AE) study on fracture processes in alumina ceramics on wavelet packet decomposition and AE source location. According to the frequency characteristics, as well as energy and ringdown counts of AE, the fracture process is divided into four stages: crack closure, nucleation, development, and critical failure. Each of the AE signals is decomposed by a 2-level wavelet package decomposition into four different (from-low-to-high) frequency bands (AA{sub 2}, AD{sub 2}, DA{sub 2}, and DD{sub 2}). The energy eigenvalues P{sub 0}, P{sub 1}, P{sub 2}, and P{sub 3} corresponding to these four frequency bands are calculated. By analyzing changes in P{sub 0} and P{sub 3} in the four stages, we determine the inverse relationship between AE frequency and the crack source size during ceramic fracture. AE signals with regard to crack nucleation can be expressed when P{sub 0} is less than 5 and P{sub 3} more than 60; whereas AE signals with regard to dangerous crack propagation can be expressed when more than 92% of P{sub 0} is greater than 4, and more than 95% of P{sub 3} is less than 45. Geiger location algorithm is used to locate AE sources and cracks in the sample. The results of this location algorithm are consistent with the positions of fractures in the sample when observed under a scanning electronic microscope; thus the locations of fractures located with Geiger's method can reflect the fracture process. The stage division by location results is in a good agreement with the division based on AE frequency characteristics. We find that both wavelet package decomposition and Geiger's AE source locations are suitable for the identification of the evolutionary process of cracks in alumina ceramics.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Si; Brown, Joseph N.; Tolic, Nikola; Meng, Da; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Haizhen; Zhao, Rui; Moore, Ronald J.; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several notable challenges inherent to fully characterizing the entirety of the human saliva proteome using bottom-up approaches, including polymorphic isoforms, post-translational modifications, unique splice variants, deletions, and truncations. To address these challenges, we have developed a top-down based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach, which cataloged 20 major human salivary proteins with a total of 83 proteoforms, containing a broad range of post-translational modifications. Among these proteins, several previously reported disease biomarker proteins were identified at the intact protein level, such as beta-2 microglobulin (B2M). In addition, intact glycosylated proteoforms of several saliva proteins were also characterized, including intact N-glycosylated protein prolactin inducible protein (PIP) and O-glycosylated acidic protein rich protein (aPRP). These characterized proteoforms constitute an intact saliva proteoform database, which was used for quantitative comparison of intact salivary proteoforms among six healthy individuals. Human parotid (PS) and submandibular/sublingual gland (SMSL) secretion samples (2 ?g of protein each) from six healthy individuals were compared using RPLC coupled with the 12T FTICR mass spectrometer. Significantly different protein and PTM patterns were resolved with high reproducibility between PS and SMSL glands. The results from this study provide further insight into the potential mechanisms of PTM pathways in oral glandular secretion, expanding our knowledge of this complex yet easily accessible fluid. Intact protein LC-MS approach presented herein can potentially be applied for rapid and accurate identification of biomarkers from only a few microliters of human glandular saliva.

  13. A quantitative quantum-chemical analysis tool for the distribution of mechanical force in molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauch, Tim; Dreuw, Andreas, E-mail: dreuw@uni-heidelberg.de [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The promising field of mechanochemistry suffers from a general lack of understanding of the distribution and propagation of force in a stretched molecule, which limits its applicability up to the present day. In this article, we introduce the JEDI (Judgement of Energy DIstribution) analysis, which is the first quantum chemical method that provides a quantitative understanding of the distribution of mechanical stress energy among all degrees of freedom in a molecule. The method is carried out on the basis of static or dynamic calculations under the influence of an external force and makes use of a Hessian matrix in redundant internal coordinates (bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles), so that all relevant degrees of freedom of a molecule are included and mechanochemical processes can be interpreted in a chemically intuitive way. The JEDI method is characterized by its modest computational effort, with the calculation of the Hessian being the rate-determining step, and delivers, except for the harmonic approximation, exact ab initio results. We apply the JEDI analysis to several example molecules in both static quantum chemical calculations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations in which molecules are subject to an external force, thus studying not only the distribution and the propagation of strain in mechanically deformed systems, but also gaining valuable insights into the mechanochemically induced isomerization of trans-3,4-dimethylcyclobutene to trans,trans-2,4-hexadiene. The JEDI analysis can potentially be used in the discussion of sonochemical reactions, molecular motors, mechanophores, and photoswitches as well as in the development of molecular force probes.

  14. THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson,, K. K.; Sanders,, R. W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

  15. The Strategic Environment Assessment bibliographic network: A quantitative literature review analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caschili, Simone, E-mail: s.caschili@ucl.ac.uk [UCL QASER Lab, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); De Montis, Andrea; Ganciu, Amedeo; Ledda, Antonio; Barra, Mario [Dipartimento di Agraria, University of Sassari, viale Italia, 39, 07100 Sassari (Italy)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Academic literature has been continuously growing at such a pace that it can be difficult to follow the progression of scientific achievements; hence, the need to dispose of quantitative knowledge support systems to analyze the literature of a subject. In this article we utilize network analysis tools to build a literature review of scientific documents published in the multidisciplinary field of Strategic Environment Assessment (SEA). The proposed approach helps researchers to build unbiased and comprehensive literature reviews. We collect information on 7662 SEA publications and build the SEA Bibliographic Network (SEABN) employing the basic idea that two publications are interconnected if one cites the other. We apply network analysis at macroscopic (network architecture), mesoscopic (sub graph) and microscopic levels (node) in order to i) verify what network structure characterizes the SEA literature, ii) identify the authors, disciplines and journals that are contributing to the international discussion on SEA, and iii) scrutinize the most cited and important publications in the field. Results show that the SEA is a multidisciplinary subject; the SEABN belongs to the class of real small world networks with a dominance of publications in Environmental studies over a total of 12 scientific sectors. Christopher Wood, Olivia Bina, Matthew Cashmore, and Andrew Jordan are found to be the leading authors while Environmental Impact Assessment Review is by far the scientific journal with the highest number of publications in SEA studies. - Highlights: • We utilize network analysis to analyze scientific documents in the SEA field. • We build the SEA Bibliographic Network (SEABN) of 7662 publications. • We apply network analysis at macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic network levels. • We identify SEABN architecture, relevant publications, authors, subjects and journals.

  16. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A. [Radiology Department, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)] [Radiology Department, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Flowers, Chris I. [Department of Radiology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Drukteinis, Jennifer S. [Department of Radiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  17. Quantitative Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (QPIRT) for Bayesian uncertainty quantification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurko, J. P.; Buongiorno, J. [MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagating parameter uncertainty for a nuclear reactor system code is a challenging problem due to often non-linear system response to the numerous parameters involved and lengthy computational times; issues that compound when a statistical sampling procedure is adopted, since the code must be run many times. The number of parameters sampled must therefore be limited to as few as possible that still accurately characterize the uncertainty in the system response. A Quantitative Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (QPIRT) was developed to accomplish this goal. The QPIRT consists of two steps: a 'Top-Down' step focusing on identifying the dominant physical phenomena controlling the system response, and a 'Bottom-Up' step which focuses on determining the correlations from those key physical phenomena that significantly contribute to the response uncertainty. The Top-Down step evaluates phenomena using the governing equations of the system code at nominal parameter values, providing a 'fast' screening step. The Bottom-Up step then analyzes the correlations and models for the phenomena identified from the Top-Down step to find which parameters to sample. The QPIRT, through the Top-Down and Bottom-Up steps thus provides a systematic approach to determining the limited set of physically relevant parameters that influence the uncertainty of the system response. This strategy was demonstrated through an application to the RELAP5-based analysis of a PWR Total Loss of main Feedwater Flow (TLOFW) accident, also known as feed and bleed' scenario, . Ultimately, this work is the first component in a larger task of building a calibrated uncertainty propagation framework. The QPIRT is an essential piece because the uncertainty of those selected parameters will be calibrated to data from both Separate and Integral Effect Tests (SETs and IETs). Therefore the system response uncertainty will incorporate the knowledge gained from the database of past large IETs. (authors)

  18. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús, E-mail: jesus.silva.rodriguez@sergas.es; Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain) [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Sánchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Víctor [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain)] [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Cortés, Julia; Garrido, Miguel [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia, Spain and Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain)] [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia, Spain and Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Pombar, Miguel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain)] [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Ruibal, Álvaro [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain) [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Fundación Tejerina, 28003, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  19. Contouring Variability of the Penile Bulb on CT Images: Quantitative Assessment Using a Generalized Concordance Index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carillo, Viviana [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Perna, Lucia; Calandra, Mauro [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Gianolini, Stefano [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland)] [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland); Rancati, Tiziana [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Spinelli, Antonello Enrico [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Vavassori, Vittorio [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy); Villa, Sergio [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy) [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Fiorino, Claudio, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Within a multicenter study (DUE-01) focused on the search of predictors of erectile dysfunction and urinary toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer, a dummy run exercise on penile bulb (PB) contouring on computed tomography (CT) images was carried out. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess interobserver contouring variability by the application of the generalized DICE index. Methods and Materials: Fifteen physicians from different Institutes drew the PB on CT images of 10 patients. The spread of DICE values was used to objectively select those observers who significantly disagreed with the others. The analyses were performed with a dedicated module in the VODCA software package. Results: DICE values were found to significantly change among observers and patients. The mean DICE value was 0.67, ranging between 0.43 and 0.80. The statistics of DICE coefficients identified 4 of 15 observers who systematically showed a value below the average (p value range, 0.013 - 0.059): Mean DICE values were 0.62 for the 4 'bad' observers compared to 0.69 of the 11 'good' observers. For all bad observers, the main cause of the disagreement was identified. Average DICE values were significantly worse from the average in 2 of 10 patients (0.60 vs. 0.70, p < 0.05) because of the limited visibility of the PB. Excluding the bad observers and the 'bad' patients,' the mean DICE value increased from 0.67 to 0.70; interobserver variability, expressed in terms of standard deviation of DICE spread, was also reduced. Conclusions: The obtained values of DICE around 0.7 shows an acceptable agreement, considered the small dimension of the PB. Additional strategies to improve this agreement are under consideration and include an additional tutorial of the so-called bad observers with a recontouring procedure, or the recontouring by a single observer of the PB for all patients included in the DUE-01 study.

  20. Quantitative Morphology of Galaxies in the Core of the Coma Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Gutierrez; I. Trujillo; J. A. L. Aguerri; A. W. Graham; N. Caon

    2003-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantitative morphological analysis of 187 galaxies in a region covering the central 0.28 square degrees of the Coma cluster. Structural parameters from the best-fitting Sersic r^{1/n} bulge plus, where appropriate, exponential disc model, are tabulated here. This sample is complete down to a magnitude of R=17 mag. By examining the Edwards et al. (2002) compilation of galaxy redshifts in the direction of Coma, we find that 163 of the 187 galaxies are Coma cluster members, and the rest are foreground and background objects. For the Coma cluster members, we have studied differences in the structural and kinematic properties between early- and late-type galaxies, and between the dwarf and giant galaxies. Analysis of the elliptical galaxies reveals correlations among the structural parameters similar to those previously found in the Virgo and Fornax clusters. Comparing the structural properties of the Coma cluster disc galaxies with disc galaxies in the field, we find evidence for an environmental dependence: the scale lengths of the disc galaxies in Coma are 30% smaller. A kinematical analysis shows marginal differences between the velocity distributions of ellipticals with Sersic index n2 (giants); the dwarf galaxies having a greater (cluster) velocity dispersion. Finally, our analysis of all 421 background galaxies reveals a non-uniform distribution in redshift with contrasts in density ~3, characterized by a void extending from ~10,000 to ~20,000 km s^{-1}, and two dense and extended structures centred at ~20,000 and ~47,000 km s^{-1}.

  1. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

  2. Foundations for quantitative microstructural models to track evolution of the metallurgical state during high purity Nb cavity fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieler, Thomas R [Michigan State University; Wright, Neil T [Michigan State University; Compton, Chris C [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Materials Science SRF Cavity Group of Michigan State University and the National Superconducting Cyclotron has been (and continues to be) to understand quantitatively the effects of process history on functional properties. These relationships were assessed via studies on Nb samples and cavity parts, which had various combinations of forming processes, welding, heat treatments, and surface preparation. A primary focus was on large-grain cavity building strategies. Effects of processing operations and exposure to hydrogen on the thermal conductivity has been identified in single and bi-crystal samples, showing that the thermal conductivity can be altered by a factor of 5 depending on process history. Characterization of single crystal tensile samples show a strong effect of crystal orientation on deformation resistance and shape changes. Large grain half cells were examined to characterize defect content and surface damage effects, which provided quantitative information about the depth damage layers from forming.

  3. Personality Traits and User Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Christopher Ronald

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    LIST OF FIGURES Page Fig. 1. Example Icon Search Screen ......................................................................... 15 Fig. 2. Decision-Making Interface ............................................................................ 16... would have twenty-four static icons to search through and so forth until the last screen would contain one hundred and twenty icons. Fig. 1 illustrates a typical screen with eighty four icons. 15 Fig. 1. Example Icon Search Screen The time...

  4. Autism traits in the RASopathies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dev Disord R: A language and environment for statisticalin R (R: A language and environment for statistical comput-

  5. Development of mass spectrometry based technologies for quantitative cell signaling phosphoproteomics : the epidermal growth factor receptor family as a model system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf Yadlin, Alejandro

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ligand binding to cell surface receptors initiates a cascade of signaling events regulated by dynamic phosphorylation on a multitude of pathway proteins. Quantitative features, including intensity, timing, and duration of ...

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Biological Effects on 18F-FDG Uptake in Tumors: from In-vitro to In-vivo Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sha, Wei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Quantitative 18F-FDG PET and CT Measurements of TumorSolutions, Inc). For PET and CT scanning, the animal wasdesigned for small-animal PET and CT imaging to allow for

  7. Quantitative Assessment of Detection Frequency for the INL Ambient Air Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) air monitoring network was performed using frequency of detection as the performance metric. The INL air monitoring network consists of 37 low-volume air samplers in 31 different locations. Twenty of the samplers are located on INL (onsite) and 17 are located off INL (offsite). Detection frequencies were calculated using both BEA and ESER laboratory minimum detectable activity (MDA) levels. The CALPUFF Lagrangian puff dispersion model, coupled with 1 year of meteorological data, was used to calculate time-integrated concentrations at sampler locations for a 1-hour release of unit activity (1 Ci) for every hour of the year. The unit-activity time-integrated concentration (TICu) values were calculated at all samplers for releases from eight INL facilities. The TICu values were then scaled and integrated for a given release quantity and release duration. All facilities modeled a ground-level release emanating either from the center of the facility or at a point where significant emissions are possible. In addition to ground-level releases, three existing stacks at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, and Material and Fuels Complex were also modeled. Meteorological data from the 35 stations comprising the INL Mesonet network, data from the Idaho Falls Regional airport, upper air data from the Boise airport, and three-dimensional gridded data from the weather research forecasting model were used for modeling. Three representative radionuclides identified as key radionuclides in INL’s annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants evaluations were considered for the frequency of detection analysis: Cs-137 (beta-gamma emitter), Pu-239 (alpha emitter), and Sr-90 (beta emitter). Source-specific release quantities were calculated for each radionuclide, such that the maximum inhalation dose at any publicly accessible sampler or the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants maximum exposed individual location (i.e., Frenchman’s Cabin) was no more than 0.1 mrem yr–1 (i.e., 1% of the 10 mrem yr–1 standard). Detection frequencies were calculated separately for the onsite and offsite monitoring network. As expected, detection frequencies were generally less for the offsite sampling network compared to the onsite network. Overall, the monitoring network is very effective at detecting the potential releases of Cs-137 or Sr-90 from all sources/facilities using either the ESER or BEA MDAs. The network was less effective at detecting releases of Pu-239. Maximum detection frequencies for Pu-239 using ESER MDAs ranged from 27.4 to 100% for onsite samplers and 3 to 80% for offsite samplers. Using BEA MDAs, the maximum detection frequencies for Pu-239 ranged from 2.1 to 100% for onsite samplers and 0 to 5.9% for offsite samplers. The only release that was not detected by any of the samplers under any conditions was a release of Pu-239 from the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center main stack (CPP-708). The methodology described in this report could be used to improve sampler placement and detection frequency, provided clear performance objectives are defined.

  8. Genome anchored QTLs for biomass productivity in Hybrid Populus: Heterosis and detection across Contrasting Environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Sewell, Mitchell [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traits related to biomass production were analyzed for the presence of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in an interspecific F2 population derived from an outbred Populus trichocarpa P. deltoides parental cross. Three years of phenotypic data for stem growth traits (height and diameter) were collected from two parental, two F1 and 339 F2 trees in a clonal trial replicated both within and among two environmentally contrasting sites in the North American Pacific Northwest. A genetic linkage map comprised of 841 SSR, AFLP, and RAPD markers and phenotypic data from 310 progeny were used to identify genomic regions harboring QTL using the Multiple-QTL Model (MQM) package of the statistical program MapQTL 6. A total of twelve QTLs, nine putative and three suggestive, were identified with eight of these being identified at both sites in at least one experiment. Of these, three putative QTL BM-1, BM-2, BM-7, on LGs I, II, and XIV, respectively, were identified in all three years for both height and diameter. Two QTLs BM-2 and BM-7, on LG II and XIV, respectively, exhibited significant evidence of over-dominance in all three years for both traits. Conversely a QTL on BM-6 LG XIII exhibited out-breeding depression in two years for both height and diameter. The remaining nine QTLs showed difference levels of dominance and additive effects. Seven of the nine QTL were successfully anchored and QTL peak positions were estimated for each one on the P. trichocarpa genome assembly using flanking SSR markers with known physical positions positions. QTL BM-7 on LG XIV had been anchored on the genome assembly in a previous study, therefore eight QTLs identified in this study were assigned genome assembly positions. Physical distances encompassed by each QTL regions ranged from 1.3 to 8.8 Mb.

  9. Soil loss and leaching, habitat destruction, land and water demand in energy-crop monoculture: some quantitative limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutschick, V.P.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental impacts of growing biomass for energy, especially for liquid automotive fuels, are potentially large. They are sensitive to the low power production per unit area (high land requirement) and to net energy balances. Initial quantitative estimates were made for impacts per unit power within several classes of impacts, and conversely, for limits to power produced if one avoids worst-class impacts. The following types of biomass energy technologies are considered: ethanol and methanol from grains and residues (temperate zone); jojoba wax (semi-tropical); ethanol from sugar cane and root crops (tropics); and silviculture for methanol via gasification.

  10. Quantitative analysis of heavy metals emission during the combustion and baling of polyvinyl chloride insulated copper wire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickard, David Paul

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ". After a sample has been irradiated, a high resolution semiconductor radiation detector is used to quantitatively count the characteristic decay gammas (y) emitted by these radionuclidcs. The y-ray energies and occurrence rates are then measured... to be detected by a high resolution semiconductor (germanium) radiation detector. To detect the longer lived isotopes of antimony, cadmium, chromium, iron, and zinc, TABLE 4 Masses for Ash Samples Sample ID Mass (mg) 1-B-1 1-B-2 1-B-3 2-B- I 2-B-2 2-B-3...

  11. Label-Free Quantitative LC?MS Proteomics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Normally Aged Human Brains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, Victor P.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Brewer, Heather M.; Karpievitch, Yuliya; Xie, Fang; Clarke, Jennifer; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Nawaz, Zafar; Hokayem, Jimmy E.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2012-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative proteomics analysis of cortical samples of 10 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains versus 10 normally aged brains was performed by following the accurate mass and time tag (AMT) approach with the high resolution LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. More than 1400 proteins were identified and quantitated. A conservative approach of selecting only the consensus results of four normalization methods was suggested and used. A total of 197 proteins were shown to be significantly differentially abundant (p-values <0.05, corrected for multiplicity of testing) in AD versus control brain samples. Thirty-seven of these proteins were reported as differentially abundant or modified in AD in previous proteomics and transcriptomics publications. The rest to the best of our knowledge are new. Mapping of the discovered proteins with bioinformatic tools revealed significant enrichment with differentially abundant proteins of pathways and processes known to be important in AD, including signal transduction, regulation of protein phosphorylation, immune response, cytoskeleton organization, lipid metabolism, energy production, and cell death.

  12. Parsing ERK Activation Reveals Quantitatively Equivalent Contributions From Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and HER2 In Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Orr, Galya; Wells, Alan H.; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    HER2, a member of the EGFR tyrosine kinase family, functions as an accessory EGFR signaling component and alters EGFR trafficking by heterodimerization. HER2 overexpression leads to aberrant cell behavior including enhanced proliferation and motility. Here we apply a combination of computational modeling and quantitative experimental studies of the dynamic interactions between EGFR and HER2, and their downstream activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) to understand this complex signaling system. Using cells expressing different levels of HER2 relative to the EGFR, we can separate relative contributions of EGFR and HER2 to signaling amplitude and duration. Based on our model calculations, we demonstrate that, in contrast with previous suggestions in the literature, the intrinsic capabilities of EGFR and HER2 to activated ERK are quantitatively equivalent . We find that HER2-mediated effects on EGFR dimerization and trafficking are sufficient to explain the detected HER2-mediated amplification of EGF-induced ERK signaling. Our model suggests that transient amplification of ERK activity by HER2 arises predominantly from the 2-to-1 stoichiometry of receptor kinase to bound ligand in EGFR/HER2 heterodimers compared to the 1-to-1 stoichiometry of the EGFR homodimer, but alterations in receptor trafficking, with resultant EGFR sparing, cause the sustained HER2-mediated enhancement of ERK signaling.

  13. Assessment of ERCC1 and XPF Protein Expression Using Quantitative Immunohistochemistry in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Undergoing Curative Intent Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagdis, Amanda [Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Phan, Tien [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Klimowicz, Alexander C. [Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada) [Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Laskin, Janessa J. [Department of Medical Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Medical Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Lau, Harold Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Petrillo, Stephanie K. [Functional Tissue Imaging Unit, Translational Research Laboratory, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)] [Functional Tissue Imaging Unit, Translational Research Laboratory, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Siever, Jodi E. [Department of Biostatistics, Public Health Innovation and Decision Support Population and Public Health, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)] [Department of Biostatistics, Public Health Innovation and Decision Support Population and Public Health, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Thomson, Thomas A. [Department of Pathology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) [Department of Pathology, British Columbia Cancer Agency–Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Magliocco, Anthony M. [Department of Pathology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada) [Department of Pathology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Hao, Desirée, E-mail: Desiree.Hao@albertahealthservices.ab.ca [Department of Medical Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada) [Department of Medical Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate the prognostic/predictive value of ERCC1 and XPF in patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with curative intent. Methods and Materials: ERCC1 and XPF protein expression was evaluated by immunofluorescence combined with automated quantitative analysis (AQUA) using the FL297 and 3F2 antibodies, respectively. ERCC1 and XPF protein expression levels were correlated with clinical outcomes. Results: Patient characteristics were as follows: mean age 52 years (range, 18-85 years), 67% male, 72% Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ?90%, World Health Organization (WHO) type 1/2/3 = 12%/28%/60%, stage III/IV 65%. With a median follow-up time of 50 months (range, 2.9 to 120 months), the 5-year overall survival (OS) was 70.8%. Median standardized nuclear AQUA scores were used as cutpoints for ERCC1 (n=138) and XPF (n=130) protein expression. Agreement between dichotomized ERCC1 and XPF scores was high at 79.4% (kappa = 0.587, P<.001). Neither biomarker predicted locoregional recurrence, DFS, or OS after adjustment for age and KPS, irrespective of stratification by stage, WHO type, or treatment. Conclusions: Neither ERCC1 nor XPF, analyzed by quantitative immunohistochemistry using the FL297 and 3F2 antibodies, was prognostic or predictive in this cohort of NPC patients.

  14. Qualitative vs. quantitative data: Controls on the accuracy of PID field screening in petroleum contamination assessment applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luessen, M.J.; Allex, M.K.; Holzel, F.R. [ATEC Associates Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of photoionization detectors (PIDs) for field screening of soils for volatile organic contaminants has become a standard industry practice. PID screening data is generally utilized as a qualitative basis for selection of samples for laboratory analysis to quantify concentrations of specific contaminants of concern. Both qualitative field screening data and quantitative laboratory analytical data were reviewed for more than 100 hydrogeologic assessment sites in Ohio to evaluate controls on the effectiveness of field screening data. Assessment data evaluated was limited to sites at which the suspected contaminant source was a gasoline underground storage tanks system. In each case, a 10.0 eV (or greater) PID calibrated for benzene was used to screen soils which were analyzed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) by SW 846 method 8020. Controls on field screening which were evaluated for each site included (1) soil classification, (2) soil moisture, (3) weather conditions, (4) background levels, (5) equipment quality, (6) screening methodology, and (7) laboratory QA/QC. Statistical data analysis predictably indicated a general overestimate of total BTEX levels based on field screening (gasoline is approximately 25 weight percent BTEX). However, data locally indicated cases of both significant (i.e., more than an order of magnitude difference) over- and under-estimation of actual BTEX concentrations (i.e., quantitative laboratory data) by field screening data.

  15. A TEM quantitative evaluation of strengthening in an Mg-RE alloy reinforced with SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabibbo, Marcello, E-mail: m.cabibbo@univpm.it; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnesium alloys containing rare earth elements are known to have high specific strength, good creep and corrosion resistance up to 523 K. The addition of SiC ceramic particles strengthens the metal matrix composite resulting in better wear and creep resistance while maintaining good machinability. The role of the reinforcement particles in enhancing strength can be quantitatively evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This paper presents a quantitative evaluation of the different strengthening contributions, determined through TEM inspections, in an SiC Mg-RE composite alloy containing yttrium, neodymium, gadolinium and dysprosium. Compression tests at temperatures ranging between 290 and 573 K were carried out. The microstructure strengthening mechanism was studied for all the compression conditions. Strengthening was compared to the mechanical results and the way the different contributions were combined is also discussed and justified. - Research Highlights: {yields} TEM yield strengthening terms evaluation on a Mg-RE SiC alloy. {yields} The evaluation has been extended to different compression temperature conditions. {yields} Linear and Quadratic sum has been proposed and validated. {yields} Hall-Petch was found to be the most prominent strengthening contributions.

  16. A 34K SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa: design, application to the study of natural populations and transferability to other Populus species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geraldes, Armando [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Hannemann, Jan [University of Victoria, Canada; Grassa, Chris [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Farzaneh, Nima [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Porth, Ilga [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; McKown, Athena [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Skyba, Oleksandr [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Li, Eryang [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mike, Fujita [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Friedmann, Michael [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Wasteneys, Geoffrey [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Guy, Robert [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; El-Kassaby, Yousry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mansfield, Shawn [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Cronk, Quentin [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Ehlting, Juergen [University of Victoria, Canada; Douglas, Carl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Wymore, Ann [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schackwitz, Wendy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Christa [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rokhsar, Daniel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genetic mapping of quantitative traits requires genotypic data for large numbers of markers in many individuals. Despite the declining costs of genotyping by sequencing, for most studies, the use of large SNP genotyping arrays still offers the most cost-effective solution for large-scale targeted genotyping. Here we report on the design and performance of a SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood). This genotyping array was designed with SNPs pre-ascertained in 34 wild accessions covering most of the species range. Due to the rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium in P. trichocarpa we adopted a candidate gene approach to the array design that resulted in the selection of 34,131 SNPs, the majority of which are located in, or within 2 kb, of 3,543 candidate genes. A subset of the SNPs (539) was selected based on patterns of variation among the SNP discovery accessions. We show that more than 95% of the loci produce high quality genotypes and that the genotyping error rate for these is likely below 2%, indicating that high-quality data are generated with this array. We demonstrate that even among small numbers of samples (n=10) from local populations over 84% of loci are polymorphic. We also tested the applicability of the array to other species in the genus and found that due to ascertainment bias the number of polymorphic loci decreases rapidly with genetic distance, with the largest numbers detected in other species in section Tacamahaca (P. balsamifera and P. angustifolia). Finally, we provide evidence for the utility of the array for intraspecific studies of genetic differentiation and for species assignment and the detection of natural hybrids.

  17. Quantitative Chromatographic Determination of Dissolved Elemental Sulfur in the Non-aqueous Electrolyte for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Dong [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Zhang, Xuran [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Hubei (China); Dept. of Chemistry; Li, Chao [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; McKinnon, Meaghan E. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Sadok, Rachel G. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Qu, Deyu [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Hubei (China); Dept. of Chemistry; Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Lee, Hung-Sui [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Qu, Deyang [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast and reliable analytical method is reported for the quantitative determination of dissolved elemental sulfur in non-aqueous electrolytes for Li-S batteries. By using high performance liquid chromatography with a UV detector, the solubility of S in 12 different pure solvents and in 22 different electrolytes was determined. It was found that the solubility of elemental sulfur is dependent on the Lewis basicity, the polarity of solvents and the salt concentration in the electrolytes. In addition, the S content in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S battery was successfully determined by the proposed HPLC/UV method. Thus, the feasibility of the method to the online analysis for a Li-S battery is demonstrated. Interestingly, the S was found super-saturated in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S cell.

  18. Non-linear quantitative structure-activity relationship for adenine derivatives as competitive inhibitors of adenosine deaminase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadat Hayatshahi, Sayyed Hamed [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115/175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) ; Abdolmaleki, Parviz [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115/175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) ]. E-mail: parviz@modares.ac.ir; Safarian, Shahrokh [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Tehran University, P.O. Box: 13155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) ; Khajeh, Khosro [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115/175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Logistic regression and artificial neural networks have been developed as two non-linear models to establish quantitative structure-activity relationships between structural descriptors and biochemical activity of adenosine based competitive inhibitors, toward adenosine deaminase. The training set included 24 compounds with known k {sub i} values. The models were trained to solve two-class problems. Unlike the previous work in which multiple linear regression was used, the highest of positive charge on the molecules was recognized to be in close relation with their inhibition activity, while the electric charge on atom N1 of adenosine was found to be a poor descriptor. Consequently, the previously developed equation was improved and the newly formed one could predict the class of 91.66% of compounds correctly. Also optimized 2-3-1 and 3-4-1 neural networks could increase this rate to 95.83%.

  19. New Measurements and Quantitative Analysis of Electron Backscattering in the Energy Range of Neutron Beta-Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, J W; Filippone, B W; Hoedl, S A; Ito, T M; Plaster, B; Young, A R; Yuan, J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first detailed measurements of electron backscattering from plastic scintillator targets, extending our previous work on beryllium and silicon targets. The scintillator experiment posed several additional experimental challenges associated with charging of the scintillator target, and those challenges are addressed in detail. In addition, we quantitatively compare the energy and angular distributions of this data, and our previous data, with electron transport simulations based on the Geant4 and Penelope Monte Carlo simulation codes. The Penelope simulation is found globally to give a superior description of the data. Such information is crucial for a broad array of weak-interaction physics experiments, where electron backscattering can give rise to the dominant detector-related systematic uncertainty.

  20. New Measurements and Quantitative Analysis of Electron Backscattering in the Energy Range of Neutron Beta-Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Martin; J. Yuan; M. J. Betancourt; B. W. Filippone; S. A. Hoedl; T. M. Ito; B. Plaster; A. R. Young

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first detailed measurements of electron backscattering from plastic scintillator targets, extending our previous work on beryllium and silicon targets. The scintillator experiment posed several additional experimental challenges associated with charging of the scintillator target, and those challenges are addressed in detail. In addition, we quantitatively compare the energy and angular distributions of this data, and our previous data, with electron transport simulations based on the Geant4 and Penelope Monte Carlo simulation codes. The Penelope simulation is found globally to give a superior description of the data. Such information is crucial for a broad array of weak-interaction physics experiments, where electron backscattering can give rise to the dominant detector-related systematic uncertainty.

  1. Quantitative Chromatographic Determination of Dissolved Elemental Sulfur in the Non-aqueous Electrolyte for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Xuran; Li, Chao; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Sadok, Rachel G.; Qu, Deyu; Yu, Xiqian; Lee, Hung-Sui; Qu, Deyang

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast and reliable analytical method is reported for the quantitative determination of dissolved elemental sulfur in non-aqueous electrolytes for Li-S batteries. By using high performance liquid chromatography with a UV detector, the solubility of S in 12 different pure solvents and in 22 different electrolytes was determined. It was found that the solubility of elemental sulfur is dependent on the Lewis basicity, the polarity of solvents and the salt concentration in the electrolytes. In addition, the S content in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S battery was successfully determined by the proposed HPLC/UV method. Thus, the feasibility ofmore »the method to the online analysis for a Li-S battery is demonstrated. Interestingly, the S was found super-saturated in the electrolyte recovered from a discharged Li-S cell.« less

  2. The Quantitation of Sulfur Mustard By-Products, Sulfur-Containing Herbicides, and Organophosphonates in Soil and Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomkins, B.A., Sega, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)], Macnaughton, S.J. [Microbial Insights, Inc., Rockford, TN (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past fifty years, the facilities at Rocky Mountain Arsenal have been used for the manufacturing, bottling, and shipping sulfur- containing herbicides, sulfur mustard, and Sarin. There is a need for analytical methods capable of determining these constituents quickly to determine exactly how specific waste structural materials should be handled, treated, and landfilled.These species are extracted rapidly from heated samples of soil or crushed concrete using acetonitrile at elevated pressure, then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector. Thiodiglycol, the major hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard, must be converted to a silylated derivative prior to quantitation. Detection limits, calculated using two statistically-unbiased protocols, ranged between 2-13 micrograms analyte/g soil or concrete.

  3. UPDATE February 2012 - The Food Crises: Predictive validation of a quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increases in global food prices have led to widespread hunger and social unrest---and an imperative to understand their causes. In a previous paper published in September 2011, we constructed for the first time a dynamic model that quantitatively agreed with food prices. Specifically, the model fit the FAO Food Price Index time series from January 2004 to March 2011, inclusive. The results showed that the dominant causes of price increases during this period were investor speculation and ethanol conversion. The model included investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take advantage of increased expected returns. Here, we extend the food prices model to January 2012, without modifying the model but simply continuing its dynamics. The agreement is still precise, validating both the descriptive and predictive abilities of the analysis. Policy actions are needed to avoid a third speculative bubble that would cause prices to rise above recent peaks by the end of 2012.

  4. Vhf EPR quantitation and speciation of organic sulfur in coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.I. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of free electrons in coals` natural site offers a great attraction for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) analysis to aid in the study of the structure and composition of coal. This direct and non-destructive approach to coal analysis has been hindered by the problem of resolution using the conventional 9.5 GHz EPR spectrometers. In the past few years, we have developed techniques including W-band Very High Frequency EPR spectroscopy as a means of determining the quantity and structure of organic sulfur in native and desulfurized coals. The state of the art 95 GHz (W-band) EPR spectrometer which we have constructed shows a well resolved spectrum including the interaction between unpaired electrons and the heteroatom like sulfur. The spectra also provide quantitative as well as qualitative information regarding different sulfur species. In collaboration with researchers at the University of Kentucky, we are also analyzing the result of desulfurization techniques on the presence of various sulfur species in coal. In the past, we have tried to synthesize various model compounds comparing their W-band spectra with other models, the predictions of theoretical models, and with the W-band spectra of coal specimens. In this quarter, we have been concentrating our efforts on developing a new standard protocol in handling and preparing the coal samples for EPR measurements to provide a quantitative comparison between the EPR spectra of coal in the natural state and desulfurized. Ten coal samples, both native and desulfurized, have been provided to us. These samples have been run in both laboratories. The simulation of coal EPR spectra has been carried out using several mathematical models. EPR results now are being compared with XANES data.

  5. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A., E-mail: chiu.weihsueh@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States); Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) — i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on “augmentation” of weight of evidence — using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards “integration” of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for “expansion” of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual “reorientation” of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  6. Time- and space-resolved quantitative LIF measurements of formaldehyde in a heavy-duty diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donkerbroek, A.J.; van Vliet, A.P.; Klein-Douwel, R.J.H.; Meerts, W.L.; ter Meulen, J.J. [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Applied Physics, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Somers, L.M.T.; Frijters, P.J.M. [Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dam, N.J. [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Applied Physics, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Formaldehyde (CH{sub 2}O) is a characteristic species for the ignition phase of diesel-like fuels. As such, the spatio-temporal distribution of formaldehyde is an informative parameter in the study of the ignition event in internal combustion engines, especially for new combustion modes like homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). This paper presents quantitative data on the CH{sub 2}O distribution around diesel and n-heptane fuel sprays in the combustion chamber of a commercial heavy-duty diesel engine. Excitation of the 4{sub 0}{sup 1} band (355 nm) as well as the 4{sub 0}{sup 1}2{sub 0}{sup 1} band (339 nm) is applied. We use quantitative, spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence, calibrated by means of formalin seeding, to distinguish the contribution from CH{sub 2}O to the signal from those of other species formed early in the combustion. Typically, between 40% and 100% of the fluorescence in the wavelength range considered characteristic for formaldehyde is in fact due to other species, but the latter are also related to the early combustion. Numerical simulation of a homogeneous reactor of n-heptane and air yields concentrations that are in reasonable agreement with the measurements. Formaldehyde starts to be formed at about 2 CA (crank angle degrees) before the rise in main heat release. There appears to be a rather localised CH{sub 2}O formation zone relatively close to the injector, out of which formaldehyde is transported downstream by the fuel jet. Once the hot combustion sets in, formaldehyde quickly disappears. (author)

  7. VHF EPR quantitation and speciation of organic sulfur in coal. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.L.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of free electrons in coals` natural state offers a great attraction for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) analysis to aid in the study of the structure and composition of coal. This direct and non-destructive approach to coal analysis has been hindered by the problem of resolution using the conventional 9.5 GHz EPR spectrometers. In the past few years, the authors have developed techniques including W-band Very High Frequency EPR spectroscopy as a means of determining the quantity and structure of organic sulfur in native and desulfurized coals. The state-of-the-art 95 GHz (W-band) EPR spectrometer which they have constructed shows a well resolved spectrum including the interaction between unpaired electrons and the heteroatom like sulfur. The spectra also provide quantitative as well as qualitative information regarding different sulfur species. In this quarter, the authors have been concentrating their efforts on developing a new standard protocol in handling and preparing the coal samples for EPR measurements to provide a quantitative comparison between the EPR spectra of coal in the natural state and desulfurized. Sixteen new coal samples, both native and desulfurized, have been provided to us as well as to the University of Kentucky for analysis by XANES. These samples have been run in both laboratories. The results from these samples, which were kept in an oxygen-free environment, are compared to those of 10 previous samples, which were air-oxidized. Significant differences in the EPR spectra of air-oxidized and oxygen free samples are noted; results from Kentucky are not yet available. Desulfurized samples show a significant decrease in organic sulfur as measured by the VHF-EPR method.

  8. alder alnus incana: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fixation in the watershed soils and the associated N flux to the lake Hu, Feng Sheng 13 Multivariate analysis of allozymic and quantitative trait variation in Alnus rubra...

  9. a2 mating-type locus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Main Outcome Measures: We analyzed 380 micro- satellite markers and conducted linkage analysis Boyer, Edmond 32 Regression-Based Multivariate Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping...

  10. alder alnus acuminata: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fixation in the watershed soils and the associated N flux to the lake Hu, Feng Sheng 10 Multivariate analysis of allozymic and quantitative trait variation in Alnus rubra...

  11. alder alnus glutinosa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of leaf acclimation for whole plant growth. functional-structural growth Boyer, Edmond 15 Multivariate analysis of allozymic and quantitative trait variation in Alnus rubra...

  12. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Collogue CI, supplement au n 3, Tome 40, mars 1979, page C2-36 QUANTITATIVE MOSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MOSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY R.L. Collins Physios Dept. The University of Texas at Austin, TX., U.S.A. Résumé.- L'analyse quantitative des mesures de spectroscopie Mossbauer, telles que l'obtention du rapport Fe3+ /Fe2+ , est rendue difficile par la différence des valeurs du déplacement quadratique moyen du noyau Mossbauer placé en

  13. Quantitative and Qualitative Determination of Polysulfide Species in the Electrolyte of a Lithium-Sulfur Battery using HPLC ESI/MS with One-Step Derivatization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Dong [Department of Chemistry; University of Massachusetts Boston; Boston MA 02125 USA; Qu, Deyu [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Wuhan (China). Dept. of Chemistry; Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lee, Hung-Sui [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Qu, Deyang [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The polysulfide species dissolved in aprotic solvents can be separated and analyzed by reverse phase (RP) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in tandem with electrospray-mass spectroscopy. The relative distribution of polysulfide species in the electrolyte recovered from Li-S batteries is quantitatively and reliably determined for the first time.

  14. Koon Leai Larry Tan, Paul S. Lambert, Vernon Gayle and Kenneth J. Turner Enabling Quantitative Data Analysis on Cyberinfrastructures and Grids.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Ken

    Analysis on Cyberinfrastructures and Grids. In Gary Olson and Rob Procter, editors, Proc. 3rd International Quantitative Data Analysis on Cyberinfrastructures and Grids Koon Leai Larry Tan1 , Paul Lambert2 , Vernon data storage, data management and data analysis do exist, for example the NESSTAR, IPUMS and LIS

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Solar Technologies For Net-Zero Design Affordable Homes Research Group, School of Architecture, McGill University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Cost per Watt (U.S.) Mono-crystalline - thick modular panels on roof, walls or separate structure 17Quantitative Analysis of Solar Technologies For Net-Zero Design Affordable Homes Research Group PRINCIPLES & RESULTS CONCLUSIONS Photovoltaic (PV) Energy Production Water-Based Solar Thermal Collectors Air

  16. A quantitative method to analyze the quality of EIA information in wind energy development and avian/bat assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Tony, E-mail: tc282@nau.edu [Environmental Science and Policy Program, School of Earth Science and Environmental Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, 602 S Humphreys P.O. Box 5694, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011 (United States); Nielsen, Erik, E-mail: erik.nielsen@nau.edu [Environmental Science and Policy Program, School of Earth Science and Environmental Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, 602 S Humphreys P.O. Box 5694, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011 (United States); Auberle, William, E-mail: william.auberle@nau.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northern Arizona University, 2112 S Huffer Ln P.O. Box 15600, Flagstaff, AZ, 860011 (United States); Solop, Frederic I., E-mail: fred.solop@nau.edu [Political Science Program, Department of Politics and International Affairs, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 15036, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been a tool for decision makers since the enactment of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Since that time, few analyses have been performed to verify the quality of information and content within EIAs. High quality information within assessments is vital in order for decision makers, stake holders, and the public to understand the potential impact of proposed actions on the ecosystem and wildlife species. Low quality information has been a major cause for litigation and economic loss. Since 1999, wind energy development has seen an exponential growth with unknown levels of impact on wildlife species, in particular bird and bat species. The purpose of this article is to: (1) develop, validate, and apply a quantitative index to review avian/bat assessment quality for wind energy EIAs; and (2) assess the trends and status of avian/bat assessment quality in a sample of wind energy EIAs. This research presents the development and testing of the Avian and Bat Assessment Quality Index (ABAQI), a new approach to quantify information quality of ecological assessments within wind energy development EIAs in relation to avian and bat species based on review areas and factors derived from 23 state wind/wildlife siting guidance documents. The ABAQI was tested through a review of 49 publicly available EIA documents and validated by identifying high variation in avian and bat assessments quality for wind energy developments. Of all the reviewed EIAs, 66% failed to provide high levels of preconstruction avian and bat survey information, compared to recommended factors from state guidelines. This suggests the need for greater consistency from recommended guidelines by state, and mandatory compliance by EIA preparers to avoid possible habitat and species loss, wind energy development shut down, and future lawsuits. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed, validated, and applied a quantitative index to review avian/bat assessment quality for wind energy EIAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the trends and status of avian/bat assessment quality in a sample of wind energy EIAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Applied index to 49 EIA documents and identified high variation in assessment quality for wind energy developments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the reviewed EIAs, 66% provided inadequate preconstruction avian and bat survey information.

  17. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frigge, M.L. & Kong, A. Allegro, a new computer program forby using MERLIN46 and ALLEGRO 48 from tag SNPs. We found

  18. Volumes of certain loci of polynomials and their applicatoins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To prove that a polynomial is nonnegative on Rn, one can try to show that it is a sum of squares of polynomials (SOS). The latter problem is now known to be reducible to a semi-definite programming (SDP) computation that is much faster than...

  19. Towards the identification of the loci of adaptive 2 evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardo-Diaz, Carolina; Salazar, Camilo; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    to identify gene regions as well as genes that are responsible for its varia- tion (Stinchcombe & Hoekstra 2007; Nadeau & Jiggins 2010; Slate et al. 2010; Stapley et al. 2010; Martin & Jiggins 2013; Savolainen, Lascoux&Merila 2013;Wray 2013;Dittmar et al. 2014... ; Mackay, Stone & Ayroles 2009; Nadeau & Jiggins 2010; Stapley et al. 2010; Slate 2013) (Table 1). In sticklebacks, for example, pel- vic structures and pigmentation play adaptive roles as defen- sive structures against predation and crypsis, respectively...

  20. autism susceptibility loci: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into an algorithm with clinical variables, independently associated with lung cancer in multivariate analysis, modest discrimination is possible on receiver operator curve...

  1. arthritis susceptibility loci: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into an algorithm with clinical variables, independently associated with lung cancer in multivariate analysis, modest discrimination is possible on receiver operator curve...

  2. Volumes of certain loci of polynomials and their applicatoins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    classical algebraic methods, thus enabling new speed-ups in algebraic optimization. However, exactly how often nonnegative polynomials are in fact sums of squares of polynomials remains an open problem. Blekherman was recently able to show that for degree k...

  3. Quantitative Monitoring for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Using Double-Difference Waveform Inversion with Spatially-Variant Total-Variation Regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Zhigang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double-difference waveform inversion is a promising tool for quantitative monitoring for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The method uses time-lapse seismic data to jointly inverts for reservoir changes. Due to the ill-posedness of waveform inversion, it is a great challenge to obtain reservoir changes accurately and efficiently, particularly when using timelapse seismic reflection data. To improve reconstruction, we develop a spatially-variant total-variation regularization scheme into double-difference waveform inversion to improve the inversion accuracy and robustness. The new regularization scheme employs different regularization parameters in different regions of the model to obtain an optimal regularization in each area. We compare the results obtained using a spatially-variant parameter with those obtained using a constant regularization parameter. Utilizing a spatially-variant regularization scheme, the target monitoring regions are well reconstructed and the image noise is significantly reduced outside the monitoring regions. Our numerical examples demonstrate that the spatially-variant total-variation regularization scheme provides the flexibility to regularize local regions based on the a priori spatial information without increasing computational costs and the computer memory requirement.

  4. Quantifying fungal viability in air and water samples using quantitative PCR after treatment with propidium monoazide (PMA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vesper, Stephen; McKinstry, Craig A.; Hartmann, Chris; Neace, Michelle; Yoder, Stephanie; Vesper, Alex

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described to discriminate between live and dead cells of the infectious fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus, Mucor racemosus, Rhizopus stolonifer and Paecilomyces variotii. To test the method, conidial suspensions were heat inactivated at 85 °C or held at 5 °C (controls) for 1 h. Polycarbonate filters (25 mm diameter, 0.8 ?m pore size) were placed on "welled" slides (14 mm diameter) and the filters treated with either PBS or PMA. Propidium monoazide (PMA), which enters dead cells but not live cells, was incubated with cell suspensions, exposed to blue wavelength light-emitting diodes (LED) to inactivate remaining PMA and secure intercalation of PMAwith DNA of dead cells. Treated cells were extracted and the live and dead cells evaluated with quantitative PCR (QPCR). After heat treatment and DNA modification with PMA, all fungal species tested showed an approximate 100- to 1000-fold difference in cell viability estimated by QPCR analysis which was consistent with estimates of viability based on culturing.

  5. Apparatus and method for qualitative and quantitative measurements of optical properties of turbid media using frequency-domain photon migration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tromberg, B.J.; Tsay, T.T.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Haskell, R.C.

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical measurements of turbid media, that is media characterized by multiple light scattering, is provided through an apparatus and method for exposing a sample to a modulated laser beam. The light beam is modulated at a fundamental frequency and at a plurality of integer harmonics thereof. Modulated light is returned from the sample and preferentially detected at cross frequencies at frequencies slightly higher than the fundamental frequency and at integer harmonics of the same. The received radiance at the beat or cross frequencies is compared against a reference signal to provide a measure of the phase lag of the radiance and modulation ratio relative to a reference beam. The phase and modulation amplitude are then provided as a frequency spectrum by an array processor to which a computer applies a complete curve fit in the case of highly scattering samples or a linear curve fit below a predetermined frequency in the case of highly absorptive samples. The curve fit in any case is determined by the absorption and scattering coefficients together with a concentration of the active substance in the sample. Therefore, the curve fitting to the frequency spectrum can be used both for qualitative and quantitative analysis of substances in the sample even though the sample is highly turbid. 14 figs.

  6. D-Factor: A Quantitative Model of Application Slow-Down in Multi-Resource Shared Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL] [ORNL; Huh, Jae-Seok [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Das, Chita [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scheduling multiple jobs onto a platform enhances system utilization by sharing resources. The benefits from higher resource utilization include reduced cost to construct, operate, and maintain a system, which often include energy consumption. Maximizing these benefits comes at a price - resource contention among jobs increases job completion time. In this paper, we analyze slow-downs of jobs due to contention for multiple resources in a system; referred to as dilation factor. We observe that multiple-resource contention creates non-linear dilation factors of jobs. From this observation, we establish a general quantitative model for dilation factors of jobs in multi-resource systems. A job is characterized by a vector-valued loading statistics and dilation factors of a job set are given by a quadratic function of their loading vectors. We demonstrate how to systematically characterize a job, maintain the data structure to calculate the dilation factor (loading matrix), and calculate the dilation factor of each job. We validate the accuracy of the model with multiple processes running on a native Linux server, virtualized servers, and with multiple MapReduce workloads co-scheduled in a cluster. Evaluation with measured data shows that the D-factor model has an error margin of less than 16%. We also show that the model can be integrated with an existing on-line scheduler to minimize the makespan of workloads.

  7. THE EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLUX FROM 0.1 nm TO 160 {mu}m: QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES FOR PLANETARY STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire, Mark W. [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Sheets, John; Meadows, Victoria S. [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Ribas, Ignasi [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5 parell, 2a pl, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Catling, David C., E-mail: M.Claire@uea.ac.uk [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding changes in the solar flux over geologic time is vital for understanding the evolution of planetary atmospheres because it affects atmospheric escape and chemistry, as well as climate. We describe a numerical parameterization for wavelength-dependent changes to the non-attenuated solar flux appropriate for most times and places in the solar system. We combine data from the Sun and solar analogs to estimate enhanced UV and X-ray fluxes for the young Sun and use standard solar models to estimate changing visible and infrared fluxes. The parameterization, a series of multipliers relative to the modern top of the atmosphere flux at Earth, is valid from 0.1 nm through the infrared, and from 0.6 Gyr through 6.7 Gyr, and is extended from the solar zero-age main sequence to 8.0 Gyr subject to additional uncertainties. The parameterization is applied to a representative modern day flux, providing quantitative estimates of the wavelength dependence of solar flux for paleodates relevant to the evolution of atmospheres in the solar system (or around other G-type stars). We validate the code by Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainties in stellar age and flux, and with comparisons to the solar proxies {kappa}{sup 1} Cet and EK Dra. The model is applied to the computation of photolysis rates on the Archean Earth.

  8. Cancer-associated p53 tetramerization domain mutants: quantitative analysis reveals a low threshold for tumor suppressor inactivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamada, R.; Anderson, C.; Nomura, T.; Sakaguchi, K.

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The tumor suppressor p53, a 393-amino acid transcription factor, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. Its inactivation via the mutation of its gene is a key step in tumor progression, and tetramer formation is critical for p53 post-translational modification and its ability to activate or repress the transcription of target genes vital in inhibiting tumor growth. About 50% of human tumors have TP53 gene mutations; most are missense ones that presumably lower the tumor suppressor activity of p53. In this study, we explored the effects of known tumor-derived missense mutations on the stability and oligomeric structure of p53; our comprehensive, quantitative analyses encompassed the tetramerization domain peptides representing 49 such substitutions in humans. Their effects on tetrameric structure were broad, and the stability of the mutant peptides varied widely ({Delta}T{sub m} = 4.8 {approx} -46.8 C). Because formation of a tetrameric structure is critical for protein-protein interactions, DNA binding, and the post-translational modification of p53, a small destabilization of the tetrameric structure could result in dysfunction of tumor suppressor activity. We suggest that the threshold for loss of tumor suppressor activity in terms of the disruption of the tetrameric structure of p53 could be extremely low. However, other properties of the tetramerization domain, such as electrostatic surface potential and its ability to bind partner proteins, also may be important.

  9. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  10. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, David N. (San Antonio, TX); Kiel, Johnathan L. (San Antonio, TX); Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Stahl, Kurt A. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  11. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA); Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  12. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chun-Mei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of California. Lu et al. : DNA Fiber Mapping page - 35 Lu etal. : DNA Fiber Mapping page - 36 a b c d e f g OV P1 cloneSp6 end T7 end Lu et al. : DNA Fiber Mapping page - 37 a b c

  13. CHEMISTRY 330 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    and evaluation of error, basic chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility product constant equilibria of spectrophotometric analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, methods of separation, gas and liquid chromatography to develop and apply topics discussed in lecture; short quizzes may be used to assess individual learning

  14. Triaxially deformed relativistic point-coupling model for $?$ hypernuclei: a quantitative analysis of hyperon impurity effect on nuclear collective properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. X. Xue; J. M. Yao; K. Hagino; Z. P. Li; H. Mei; Y. Tanimura

    2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The impurity effect of hyperon on atomic nuclei has received a renewed interest in nuclear physics since the first experimental observation of appreciable reduction of $E2$ transition strength in low-lying states of hypernucleus $^{7}_\\Lambda$Li. Many more data on low-lying states of $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei will be measured soon for $sd$-shell nuclei, providing good opportunities to study the $\\Lambda$ impurity effect on nuclear low-energy excitations. We carry out a quantitative analysis of $\\Lambda$ hyperon impurity effect on the low-lying states of $sd$-shell nuclei at the beyond-mean-field level based on a relativistic point-coupling energy density functional (EDF), considering that the $\\Lambda$ hyperon is injected into the lowest positive-parity ($\\Lambda_s$) and negative-parity ($\\Lambda_p$) states. We adopt a triaxially deformed relativistic mean-field (RMF) approach for hypernuclei and calculate the $\\Lambda$ binding energies of hypernuclei as well as the potential energy surfaces (PESs) in $(\\beta, \\gamma)$ deformation plane. We also calculate the PESs for the $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei with good quantum numbers using a microscopic particle rotor model (PRM) with the same relativistic EDF. The triaxially deformed RMF approach is further applied in order to determine the parameters of a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian (5DCH) for the collective excitations of triaxially deformed core nuclei. Taking $^{25,27}_{\\Lambda}$Mg and $^{31}_{\\Lambda}$Si as examples, we analyse the impurity effects of $\\Lambda_s$ and $\\Lambda_p$ on the low-lying states of the core nuclei...

  15. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S. (AMNH)

    2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  16. Quantitative electron density characterization of soft tissue substitute plastic materials using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarapata, A.; Chabior, M.; Zanette, I.; Pfeiffer, F. [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department and Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Cozzini, C.; Sperl, J. I.; Bequé, D. [GE Global Research, 85748 Garching (Germany); Langner, O.; Coman, J. [QRM GmbH, Möhrendorf (Germany); Ruiz-Yaniz, M. [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department and Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between a monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine ("Tetramine") Spiked into Beverages by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Validation by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, J; Hok, S; Alcaraz, A; Koester, C

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, commonly known as tetramine, is a highly neurotoxic rodenticide (human oral LD{sub 50} = 0.1 mg/kg) used in hundreds of deliberate food poisoning events in China. Here we describe a method for quantitation of tetramine spiked into beverages, including milk, juice, tea, cola, and water and cleaned up by C8 solid phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Quantitation by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was based upon fragmentation of m/z 347 to m/z 268. The method was validated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in SIM mode for ions m/z 212, 240, and 360. The limit of quantitation was 0.10 {micro}g/mL by LC/MS/MS versus 0.15 {micro}g/mL for GC/MS. Fortifications of the beverages at 2.5 {micro}g/mL and 0.25 {micro}g/mL were recovered ranging from 73-128% by liquid-liquid extraction for GC/MS analysis, 13-96% by SPE and 10-101% by liquid-liquid extraction for LC/MS/MS analysis.

  18. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property study of complex biological cell walls. A unique feature of this approach is that both microscopes allow the biological samples to be examined in their natural fluid (water) environment.

  19. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rettmann, Maryam E., E-mail: rettmann.maryam@mayo.edu; Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon J.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Robb, Richard A. [Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Kwartowitz, David M. [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)] [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Gunawan, Mia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington D.C. 20057 (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington D.C. 20057 (United States); Johnson, Susan B.; Packer, Douglas L. [Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Dalegrave, Charles [Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology, Cardiology Division Hospital Sao Paulo, Federal University of Sao Paulo, 04024-002 Brazil (Brazil)] [Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology, Cardiology Division Hospital Sao Paulo, Federal University of Sao Paulo, 04024-002 Brazil (Brazil); Kolasa, Mark W. [David Grant Medical Center, Fairfield, California 94535 (United States)] [David Grant Medical Center, Fairfield, California 94535 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved landmark-only registration provided the noise in the surface points is not excessively high. Increased variability on the landmark fiducials resulted in increased registration errors; however, refinement of the initial landmark registration by the surface-based algorithm can compensate for small initial misalignments. The surface-based registration algorithm is quite robust to noise on the surface points and continues to improve landmark registration even at high levels of noise on the surface points. Both the canine and patient studies also demonstrate that combined landmark and surface registration has lower errors than landmark registration alone. Conclusions: In this work, we describe a model for evaluating the impact of noise variability on the input parameters of a registration algorithm in the context of cardiac ablation therapy. The model can be used to predict both registration error as well as assess which inputs have the largest effect on registration accuracy.

  20. Quantitative light and electron microscopic study of cerebellar granule cells and parallel fiber varicosities in adult tottering (tg/tg), leaner (tgla/tgla) and compound heterozygous (tg/tgla) mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Dana B

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1998 Major Subject: Toxicology QUANTITATIVE LIGHT AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDY OF CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS.... Safe (Chair of T cology Faculty) December 1998 Major Subject; Toxicology ABSTRACT Quantitative Light and Electron Microscopic Study of Cerebellar Granule Cells and Parallel Fiber Varicosities in Adult Tottering (rgltg), Leaner (rg izlrg...