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1

Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a 14C of 0-5 pmC, a 13C near -5, and contain high concentrations (20-50 mmoll) of CO2(aq); but are otherwise dilute (specific CONDUCTANCE100-300 Scm) with low pH values...

2

Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Evans, Et Al., 2002) Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans, Et Al.,...

3

Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo Aluminium KK Jump to:Springs)2012)Lessons

4

Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo Aluminium KK Jump

5

RESEARCH Open Access Quantifying and understanding carbon storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH Open Access Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within: The carbon stored in vegetation varies across tropical landscapes due to a complex mix of climatic: We produce a map of carbon storage across the watershed of the Tanzanian Eastern Arc Mountains (33

6

8. Discussion This thesis has quantified the ecosystem carbon stocks of the Nhambita  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

destructive to woody biomass: aboveground carbon stocks can only be330 maintained under high intensity fires200 8. Discussion This thesis has quantified the ecosystem carbon stocks of the Nhambita area findings of this thesis and discuss some of the implications for 1) modelling the carbon cycle of miombo

7

QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density between the 2003 and 2009 did not affect the biomass estimates. Overall, LiDAR data coupled with field reference data offer a powerful method for calculating pools and changes in aboveground carbon in forested systems. The results of our study suggest that multitemporal LiDAR-based approaches are likely to be useful for high quality estimates of aboveground carbon change in conifer forest systems.

Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fire is the primary terrestrial ecosystem disturbance agent on a global scale. It affects carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon to atmosphere directly and immediately from biomass burning (i.e., fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (i.e., fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment about the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire direct and indirect effects. This study is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with NCAR community land model CLM4.5 as the model platform. Results show that fire decreases net carbon gain of the global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 average across the 20th century, as a results of fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Fire generally decreases the average carbon gains of terrestrial ecosystems in post-fire regions, which are significant over tropical savannas and part of forests in North America and the east of Asia. The general decrease of carbon gains in post-fire regions is because fire direct and indirect effects have similar spatial patterns and the former (to decrease carbon gain) is generally stronger. Moreover, the effect of fire on net carbon balance significantly declines prior to ~1970 with trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire indirect effect and increases afterward with trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire direct effect.

Li, Fang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Levis, Samuel

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

Assessment of Exploitable Geothermal Resources Using Magmatic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

parameter in the magmatic transfer method. The method of magmatic heat transfer (Smith and Shaw, 1975; Sanyal et al., 2002) was applied in the main volcanic complexes of the...

10

Magmatic "Quantum-Like" Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum computation has suggested, among others, the consideration of "non-quantum" systems which in certain respects may behave "quantum-like". Here, what algebraically appears to be the most general possible known setup, namely, of {\\it magmas} is used in order to construct "quantum-like" systems. The resulting magmatic composition of systems has as a well known particular case the tensor products.

Elemer E Rosinger

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

John G. Hinchey Ke iko H. Hattori Magmatic mineralization and hydrothermal enrichment of the High Grade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE John G. Hinchey � Ke´ iko H. Hattori Magmatic mineralization and hydrothermal enrichment; millerite + siegenite ± chalcopyrite ± pyrite co-existing with hornblende + plagioclase ± quartz ± carbonate, and pyrite ± chalcopyrite with chlorite + actinolite ± albite ± quartz ± carbonate. The ore is high in Pd

12

Rates of tectonic and magmatic processes in the North Cascades continental magmatic arc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continental magmatic arcs are among the most dynamic. geologic systems, and documentation of the magmatic, thermal, and tectonic evolution of arcs is essential for understanding the processes of magma generation, ascent ...

Matzel, Jennifer E. Piontek, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fluid saturation and volatile partitioning between melts and hydrous fluids in crustal magmatic systems: The contribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, experimental results on the solubility and partitioning of H2O, CO2, S, Cl, F and a few other ......................................................................... 2 Keywords: magmatic volatiles, solubility, water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, halogens 2 1 systems: The contribution of experimental measurements and solubility models Don R. Baker1 and Marina

Boyer, Edmond

14

Fluid saturation and volatile partitioning between melts and hydrous fluids in crustal magmatic systems: The contribution of experimental measurements and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, experimental results on the solubility and partitioning of H2O, CO2, S, Cl, F and a few other systems: The contribution of experimental measurements and solubility models Don R. Baker a, , Marina 2012 Keywords: Magmatic volatiles Solubility Water Carbon dioxide Sulfur Halogens This work reviews

Long, Bernard

15

Magmatic Geothermal Play Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point,ECO Auger11.Spain: Energy ResourcesMagmatic

16

arc magmatism isotopic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J. 3 TECTONIC CONTROLS OF GEOCHEMICAL EVOLUTION IN ARC MAGMATISM OF SE ASIA 359Bali, Indonesia, 10 -13 October 1999PACRIM 99 Geosciences Websites Summary: processes operating at...

17

Approaches to Quantify Potential Contaminant Transport in the Lower Carbonate Aquifer from Underground Nuclear Testing at Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada - 12434  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative modeling of the potential for contaminant transport from sources associated with underground nuclear testing at Yucca Flat is an important part of the strategy to develop closure plans for the residual contamination. At Yucca Flat, the most significant groundwater resource that could potentially be impacted is the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA), a regionally extensive aquifer that supplies a significant portion of the water demand at the Nevada National Security Site, formerly the Nevada Test Site. Developing and testing reasonable models of groundwater flow in this aquifer is an important precursor to performing subsequent contaminant transport modeling used to forecast contaminant boundaries at Yucca Flat that are used to identify potential use restriction and regulatory boundaries. A model of groundwater flow in the LCA at Yucca Flat has been developed. Uncertainty in this model, as well as other transport and source uncertainties, is being evaluated as part of the Underground Testing Area closure process. Several alternative flow models of the LCA in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU have been developed. These flow models are used in conjunction with contaminant transport models and source term models and models of contaminant transport from underground nuclear tests conducted in the overlying unsaturated and saturated alluvial and volcanic tuff rocks to evaluate possible contaminant migration in the LCA for the next 1,000 years. Assuming the flow and transport models are found adequate by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, the models will undergo a peer review. If the model is approved by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, it will be used to identify use restriction and regulatory boundaries at the start of the Corrective Action Decision Document Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. These initial boundaries may be revised at the time of the Closure Report phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. (authors)

Andrews, Robert W.; Birdie, Tiraz [Navarro-INTERA LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilborn, Bill; Mukhopadhyay, Bimal [National Nuclear Security Administration/Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Carbon Dioxide and Helium Emissions from a Reservoir of Magmatic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

have confirmed that the tree kills are associated with CO2 concentrations of 30-90% in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 g m2 d1 at the soil surface. Each of the...

19

The Governmentalization of “Lifestyle” and the Biopolitics of Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tim Jackson, “The Carbon Footprint of UK Households 1990-tried to quantify the carbon footprints (or similar metrics)

Lipschutz, Ronnie D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

Keller, G.R. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

Keller, G.R. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Under this statute, the Director of Natural Resources will document and quantify carbon sequestration and greenhouse emissions reductions associated with agricultural practices, management systems,...

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - andean arc magmatism Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia... - genian magmatic arc. Zircon and titanite in four samples from Mashigin Fjord and Matochkin Strait yield U... ). The events at...

24

CV-1b: Magmatic - Intrusive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline Rock -COPPE IncubatorCSU -b: Magmatic -

25

Assimilation of Ultramafic Rock in Subduction-Related Magmatic Arcs Author(s): Peter B. Kelemen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assimilation of Ultramafic Rock in Subduction-Related Magmatic Arcs Author(s): Peter B. Kelemen Source: The Journal of Geology, Vol. 94, No. 6 (Nov., 1986), pp. 829-843 Published by: The University. http://www.jstor.org #12;ASSIMILATION OF ULTRAMAFIC ROCK IN SUBDUCTION-RELATED MAGMATIC ARCS1 PETER B

26

The Behaviour of Base Metals in Arc-Type Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems Insights from Merapi Volcano,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone stratovolcanoes provide important windows on the magmatic-hydrothermal processes at playThe Behaviour of Base Metals in Arc-Type Magmatic- Hydrothermal Systems ­ Insights from Merapi systems include a shallow magmatic reservoir (the porphyry stock), an overlying hydrothermal cell, its

Barnes, Sarah-Jane

27

Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer,...

28

Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation indicator for quantifying wet scavenging. Specifically, nitric acid (HNO3), produced as a by-product of combustion, is highly soluble and removed efficiently from clouds by rain. Regional carbon monoxide (CO

Palmer, Paul

29

ASTEROIDAL GRANITE-LIKE MAGMATISM 4.53 GYR AGO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constraining the timescales for the evolution of planetary bodies in our solar system is essential for a complete understanding of planet-forming processes. However, frequent collisions between planetesimals in the early solar system obscured and destroyed much of the primitive features of the old, first-generation planetary bodies. The presence of differentiated, achondritic clasts in brecciated chondrites and of chondritic fragments in achondritic breccias clearly witness multiple processes such as metamorphism, magmatism, fragmentation, mixing, and reaccretion. Here, we report the results of ion microprobe Pb-Pb dating of a granite-like fragment found in a meteorite, the LL3-6 ordinary chondrite regolith breccia Adzhi-Bogdo. Eight spot analyses of two phosphate grains and other co-genetic phases of the granitoid give a Pb-Pb isochron age of 4.48 {+-} 0.12 billion years (95% confidence) and a model age of 4.53 {+-} 0.03 billion years (1{sigma}), respectively. These ages represent the crystallization age of a parental granite-like magma that is significantly older than those of terrestrial (4.00-4.40 Gyr) and lunar granites (3.88-4.32 Gyr) indicating that the clast in Adzhi-Bogdo is the oldest known granitoid in the solar system. This is the first evidence that granite-like formation is not only a common process on Earth, but also occurred on primitive asteroids in the early solar system 4.53 Gyr ago. Thus, the discovery of granite magmatism recorded in a brecciated meteorite provides an innovative idea within the framework of scenarios for the formation and evolution of planetary bodies and possibly exoplanetary bodies.

Terada, Kentaro [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Bischoff, Addi [Institut fuer Planetologie, Westflische Wilhelms-Universitt Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: terada@sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Magnesium-rich crustal compositions on Mercury: Implications for magmatism from petrologic modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnesium-rich crustal compositions on Mercury: Implications for magmatism from petrologic modeling: Stockstill-Cahill, K. R., T. J. McCoy, L. R. Nittler, S. Z. Weider, and S. A. Hauck II (2012), Magnesium

Hauck II, Steven A.

31

UPb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U­Pb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia-0349 Oslo, Norway Introduction The High Arctic of Scandinavia and Russia consists of a collage

Svensen, Henrik

32

Societal Scale Modeling: Quantifying the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scan 2006­2 Report #12;Why Buildings? 38% 26% 3% Buildings Transport Other 4 Potential Energy Savings: IEA "Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency", (2008) 33% Industry #12;The Goal ­ Carbon - Geothermal heating/cooling - Natural lighting - Photovoltaics #12;Energy Efficiency in Buildings Project

de Weck, Olivier L.

33

Quantifying uncertainty from material inhomogeneity.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most engineering materials are inherently inhomogeneous in their processing, internal structure, properties, and performance. Their properties are therefore statistical rather than deterministic. These inhomogeneities manifest across multiple length and time scales, leading to variabilities, i.e. statistical distributions, that are necessary to accurately describe each stage in the process-structure-properties hierarchy, and are ultimately the primary source of uncertainty in performance of the material and component. When localized events are responsible for component failure, or when component dimensions are on the order of microstructural features, this uncertainty is particularly important. For ultra-high reliability applications, the uncertainty is compounded by a lack of data describing the extremely rare events. Hands-on testing alone cannot supply sufficient data for this purpose. To date, there is no robust or coherent method to quantify this uncertainty so that it can be used in a predictive manner at the component length scale. The research presented in this report begins to address this lack of capability through a systematic study of the effects of microstructure on the strain concentration at a hole. To achieve the strain concentration, small circular holes (approximately 100 {micro}m in diameter) were machined into brass tensile specimens using a femto-second laser. The brass was annealed at 450 C, 600 C, and 800 C to produce three hole-to-grain size ratios of approximately 7, 1, and 1/7. Electron backscatter diffraction experiments were used to guide the construction of digital microstructures for finite element simulations of uniaxial tension. Digital image correlation experiments were used to qualitatively validate the numerical simulations. The simulations were performed iteratively to generate statistics describing the distribution of plastic strain at the hole in varying microstructural environments. In both the experiments and simulations, the deformation behavior was found to depend strongly on the character of the nearby microstructure.

Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Emery, John M.; Brewer, Luke N.; Boyce, Brad Lee

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Carbon Dioxide and Helium Emissions from a Reservoir of Magmatic Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahan DivideCannon (Various) Wind Farm7825Dome

35

A MORB source for low-Ti magmatism in the Semail ophiolite Marguerite Godard , Delphine Bosch, Florence Einaudi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the slight Nb­Ta depletion. Further melting of the Geotimes mantle source and melt­rock interactionA MORB source for low-Ti magmatism in the Semail ophiolite Marguerite Godard , Delphine Bosch and back-arc lavas. Yet, Nd and Pb isotope data support a common mantle source for the two magmatic

Demouchy, Sylvie

36

POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA: EVIDENCE island on the Bering Shelf between Russia andAlaska and was the subject of reconnaissance investigations a syenite pluton at Cape Dezhnev on the Chukotka Peninsula of Russia. These geochemical data are used

Amato, Jeff

37

POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 POTASSIC MAGMATISM ON ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND, ALASKA, AND CAPE DEZHNEV, NORTHEAST RUSSIA: EVIDENCE island on the Bering Shelf between Russia andAlaska and was the subject of reconnaissance investigations a syenite pluton at Cape Dezhnev on the Chukotka Peninsula of Russia. These geo-chemical data are used

Toro, Jaime

38

Control of pore fluid pressure on depth of emplacement of magmatic sills: An experimental approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these results, we consider sills within source rocks of the Neuquén Basin and of the Parana Basin, both in South modelling In sedimentary basins, the emplacement of magmatic sills tends to occur within rock of low America, where overpressure may have resulted from maturation of organic material. © 2010 Elsevier B

Galland, Olivier

39

Mesozoic magmatism and granitic dome in the Wugongshan Massif, Jiangxi province and their genetical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mesozoic magmatism and granitic dome in the Wugongshan Massif, Jiangxi province and their genetical,CNRS - Université d'Orleans, 45067 Orleans 2, France Abstract In SE China, a Mesozoic granitic dome coeval and granitic gneisses, and the E­W-trending Late-Paleozoic­Mesozoic Pingxiang and Anfu basins are located along

Boyer, Edmond

40

Geological Society of America Magmatic-hydrothermal leaching and origin of late to post-tectonic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0E8, Canada ABSTRACT Magmatic-hydrothermal processes produced significant metasomatic near the margins of the granite plu- ton. Later low-temperature hydrothermal processes mobilized silica High-temperature hydrothermal processes have long been recognized within the Adirondack Highlands

Soja, Constance M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Scientific perspectives on MRV: approaches, techniques, and requirements of quantifying GHG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific perspectives on MRV: approaches, techniques, and requirements of quantifying GHG-up inventories - measure changes in stocks or flows of carbon, extrapolate to all ecosystems. ~Bottom-up TBMs to Bedrich Benes, Jason Lambert, Yuyu Zhou #12;INFLUX Background CO2, CH4 WindWind Urban CO2, CH4 Thanks

43

Quantifying avoided emissions from renewable generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the reduced emissions due to renewable power integration and providing increasingly accurate emissions analysis has become more important for policy makers in the age of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and ...

Gomez, Gabriel R. (Gabriel Rodriguez)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Quantifying fit in ice hockey skate boots.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Purpose. This study quantified fit of ice hockey skate boots by measuring the pressure (MP) at the foot/ankle-to-boot interface using three skate sizes. The relationship… (more)

Gheorghiu, Cristian R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Quantifying the parameters of successful agricultural producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary purpose of the study was to quantify the parameters of successful agricultural producers. Through the use of the Financial and Risk Management (FARM) Assistance database, this study evaluated economic measures for row-crop producers...

Kaase, Gregory Herman

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon Composites(T300 & SWB): Crush Resistance, Bend StrengthCARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

47

Advanced geophysical studies of accretion of oceanic lithosphere in Mid-Ocean Ridges characterized by contrasting tectono-magmatic settings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure of the oceanic lithosphere results from magmatic and extensional processes taking place at mid-ocean ridges (MORs). The temporal and spatial scales of the variability of these two processes control the degree ...

Xu, Min, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Magmatic subsidence of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at S revealed through fault restoration of ridge crest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and John Sinton Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, 2525 Correa Road Honolulu. Ryan, W. Jin, M.-H. Cormier, E. Bergmanis, J. Sinton, and S. White, Magmatic subsidence of the East

Carbotte, Suzanne

49

Source contributions to Devonian granite magmatism near the Laurentian border, New Hampshire and Western Maine, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source contributions to Devonian granite magmatism near the Laurentian border, New Hampshire complex, a suite of mainly granitic intrusions in New Hampshire and western Maine, are used to evaluate.56­15.58] and an areally dominant granite [370F2 Ma; eNd (at 370 Ma)=�7.0 to �0.6; initial 207 Pb/204 Pb=15

Solar, Gary S.

50

Carbon Management working with the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: UoR42 Energy centre 82 Appendix C29: UoR43 Fume cupboard control 83 Appendix C30: UoR44 Solar PV achievement towards target 29 5. Carbon Management Plan Financing 32 5.1 Assumptions 32 5.2 Benefits / savings ­ quantified and un-quantified 33 5.3 Additional resources 33 5.4 Financial costs and sources of funding 34 6

Reading, University of

51

Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution First author: Amir Givati The Hebrew January 2004 #12;ABSTRACT: Urban and industrial air pollution has been shown qualitatively to suppress of the ratio of hill/coast precipitation during the 20th century in polluted areas in line with the increasing

Li, Zhanqing

52

Quantifying Energy Savings by Improving Boiler Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dayton, OH ABSTRACT On/off operation and excess combustion air reduce boiler energy efficiency. This paper presents methods to quantify energy savings from switching to modulation control mode and reducing excess air in natural gas fired boilers... the accuracy of the methods. INTRODUCTION In our experience, common opportunities for improving boiler efficiency include switching from on/off to modulation control and reducing excess air. The decision about whether to pursue these opportunities...

Carpenter, K.; Kissock, J. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Effect of permeability on cooling of magmatic intrusion in a goethermal reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transient cooling of magmatic intrusion in a geothermal reservoir due to conduction and convection is studied. The effects of overlying cap rock and different horizontal and vertical permeability of the reservoir are considered. Results are compared to the data from Salton Sea Geothermal Field. It is also observed that multiple layers of convection cells exist when horizontal permeability is much larger than the vertical permeability. The sharp dropoff of surface heat flow observed at Salton Sea Geothermal Field is confirmed by numerical results. Based on these numerical results, it is possible to speculate that the age of the intrusive body is about 8000 to 12,000 years.

Lau, K.H.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Magmatic History Of The East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Based On  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point,ECO Auger11.Spain: Energy ResourcesMagmaticDrill

55

Quantifying capital goods for waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Materials and energy used for the construction of waste incinerators were quantified. • The data was collected from five incineration plants in Scandinavia. • Included were six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. • The capital goods contributed 2–3% compared to the direct emissions impact on GW. - Abstract: Materials and energy used for the construction of modern waste incineration plants were quantified. The data was collected from five incineration plants (72,000–240,000 tonnes per year) built in Scandinavia (Norway, Finland and Denmark) between 2006 and 2012. Concrete for the buildings was the main material used amounting to 19,000–26,000 tonnes per plant. The quantification further included six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. The energy used for the actual on-site construction of the incinerators was in the range 4000–5000 MW h. In terms of the environmental burden of producing the materials used in the construction, steel for the building and the machinery contributed the most. The material and energy used for the construction corresponded to the emission of 7–14 kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted throughout the lifetime of the incineration plant. The assessment showed that, compared to data reported in the literature on direct emissions from the operation of incinerators, the environmental impacts caused by the construction of buildings and machinery (capital goods) could amount to 2–3% with respect to kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted.

Brogaard, L.K., E-mail: lksb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, C. [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Hannemanns Allé 53, DK-2300 Copenhagen S (Denmark); Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

Xiao, Jingfeng

57

Quantifier rank spectrum of L-infinity-omega  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Part A we will study the quantifier rank spectrum of sentences of L!1,!. We will show that there are scattered sentences with models of arbitrarily high but bounded quantifier rank. We will also consider the case of ...

Ackerman, Nathaniel Leedom

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison Williams, Barbara Atkinson, Karina Garbesi and Francis savings. Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings

59

The Mount Perkins block, northwestern Arizona: An exposed cross section of an evolving, preextensional to synextensional magmatic system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,  Daniel L. Feuerbach, 1 Mark K. Reagan, 1 Rodney V. Metcalf, 2 Phil Gans, 3 and J. D. Walker 4 Abstract. The steeply tilted Mount Perkins block, northwestern Arizona, exposes a cross section of a magmatic system that evolved through the onset...

Faulds, James E.; Feuerbach, Daniel L.; Reagan, Mark K.; Metcalf, Rodney V.; Gans, Phil; Walker, J. Douglas

1995-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

Quantifying the Performance of Quantum Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the properties of error correcting codes for noise models in the presence of asymmetries and/or correlations by means of the entanglement fidelity and the code entropy. First, we consider a dephasing Markovian memory channel and characterize the performance of both a repetition code and an error avoiding code in terms of the entanglement fidelity. We also consider the concatenation of such codes and show that it is especially advantageous in the regime of partial correlations. Finally, we characterize the effectiveness of the codes and their concatenation by means of the code entropy and find, in particular, that the effort required for recovering such codes decreases when the error probability decreases and the memory parameter increases. Second, we consider both symmetric and asymmetric depolarizing noisy quantum memory channels and perform quantum error correction via the five qubit stabilizer code. We characterize this code by means of the entanglement fidelity and the code entropy as function of the asymmetric error probabilities and the degree of memory. Specifically, we uncover that while the asymmetry in the depolarizing errors does not affect the entanglement fidelity of the five qubit code, it becomes a relevant feature when the code entropy is used as a performance quantifier.

C. Cafaro; S. L'Innocente; C. Lupo; S. Mancini

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Carbon Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Capture Pre-Combustion Post-Combustion CO2 Compression Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Program Plan Capture Handbook Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from...

62

Impact of European Emissions Trading System (EU-ETS) on carbon emissions and investment decisions in the power sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This masters thesis assesses the impact of a emissions trading on short-term carbon abatement and investment decisions in the power sector. Environmental benefits from carbon abatement due to emissions trading are quantified ...

Feilhauer, Stephan M. (Stephan Marvin)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The nature of transition from adakitic to non-adakitic magmatism in a slab window setting: A synthesis from the eastern Pontides, NE Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The eastern Pontides orogenic belt provides a window into continental arc magmatism in the Alpine–Himalayan belt. The late Mesozoic–Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of this belt remains controversial. Here we focus on the ...

Eyuboglu, Yener

64

Nepheline syenites and related magmatic fluids in the Ditr u Alkaline Massif, Transylvania, Romania Andrs Fall *, Robert J. Bodnar and Csaba Szab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nepheline syenites and related magmatic fluids in the Ditr u Alkaline Massif, Transylvania, Romania Carpathians, in Romania, and is a Mesozoic alkaline igneous complex formed during an extensional phase

Bodnar, Robert J.

65

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

66

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps: Study Area the North Sea C. B National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Offshore wind resources are quantified from satellite synthetic site at Horns Rev is given based on satellite SAR observa- tions.The comparison of offshore satellite

Pryor, Sara C.

68

Project No.: 003893 (GOCE) Quantifying the Climate Impact of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project No.: 003893 (GOCE) QUANTIFY Quantifying the Climate Impact of Global and European Transport Systems INTEGRATED PROJECT SIXTH FRAMEWORK PROGRAMME SUB-PRIORITY 1.1.6.3 Global Change and Ecosystems (biofuel and biomass burning). A compilation of the non-transport emissions has been made available

Haak, Hein

69

Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

QUANTIFYING THE CONVERGENCE TIME OF DISTRIBUTED DESIGN PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTIFYING THE CONVERGENCE TIME OF DISTRIBUTED DESIGN PROCESSES Erich Devendorf Research Engineer design processes. In distributed design, large systems are decomposed into smaller, coupled design individual objectives. The number of iterations required to reach equilibrium solutions in distributed design

Lewis, Kemper E.

71

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources Anupama Kowli and George in the electricity industry. In particular, there is a new class of consumers, called demand response resources (DRRs

Gross, George

72

Quantifying emissions reductions from New England offshore wind energy resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Access to straightforward yet robust tools to quantify the impact of renewable energy resources on air emissions from fossil fuel power plants is important to governments aiming to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse ...

Berlinski, Michael Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Carbon Corrosion in PEM Fuel Cell Dead-Ended Anode Jixin Chen,*,z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Corrosion in PEM Fuel Cell Dead-Ended Anode Operations Jixin Chen,*,z Jason B. Siegel on the electrode carbon corrosion of the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. A reduced order isothermal model. This model explains, and can be used to quantify, the carbon corrosion behavior dur- ing DEA operation

Stefanopoulou, Anna

74

Coupled Carbon/Water Fluxes in Complex Terrain, Water-Limited Forests Investigators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupled Carbon/Water Fluxes in Complex Terrain, Water-Limited Forests Investigators: Karen Humes of quantifying the magnitude, timing, distribution and coupling of carbon and water fluxes in mountainous forestlands. This includes one segment of the continuum of carbon and water flow from the "forest to the sea

Walden, Von P.

75

Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests Jeffrey Q. Chambers,1 * Jeremy I carbon sink is an increase in disturbance frequency and intensity (4), which transfers bio- mass from and lower biomass stocks (5). Here, we quantify hurricane Katrina's carbon impact on Gulf Coast forests

Chambers, Jeff

76

Soil Organic Carbon Degradation, Barrow, 2013-2014  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset provides information about soil organic carbon decomposition in Barrow soil incubation studies. The soil cores were collected from low-center polygon (Area A) and were incubated in the laboratory at different temperatures for up to 60 days. Transformations of soil organic carbon were characterized by UV and FT-IR, and small organic acids in water-soluble carbons were quantified by ion chromatography during the incubation

Baohua Gu; Ziming Yang

77

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also… (more)

Fredriksson, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Quantifying the potential impact of energy efficiency and low carbon policies for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

district heating generation and distribution. Improvements considered are (1) increased plant efficiency (2) reduction of thermal losses

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer Total Organic Carbon Analyzer The carbon analyzer is used to analyze total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), total organic carbon (TOC), purgeable...

82

Carbon cycling, fire and phenology in a tropical savanna woodland in Nhambita, Mozambique   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the savanna woodlands of Southern Africa, locally know as miombo, carbon cycling is poorly quantified and many of the key processes remain obscure. For example, seasonal constraints on productivity and leaf display ...

Ryan, Casey Merlin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

An issue of permanence: assessing the effectiveness of temporary carbon storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we present a method to quantify the effectiveness of carbon mitigation options taking into account the "permanence" of the emissions reduction. While the issue of permanence is most commonly associated with ...

Herzog, Howard J.

84

Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI Quantifying Uncertainties Associated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI Quantifying Uncertainties Associated with Reservoir Simulation Solutions, Inc. SPE 102492 #12;2 Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI SPE 102492 Outline Reservoir Simulation Uncertainty, Using Surrogate Reservoir Model #12;3 Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI SPE 102492 Sources

Mohaghegh, Shahab

85

SHORT COMMUNICATION Quantifying the effects of individual and environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT COMMUNICATION Quantifying the effects of individual and environmental variability in fish ABSTRACT The effect of environmental variability on fish recruitment is analysed using simple linear growth in recruited fish, and in the mean observed growth rate of the overall population. These conclu- sions

James, Alex

86

Quantifying the Impact of Daylight Saving Clock Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the Impact of Daylight Saving Clock Changes on Energy Consumption Simon I. Hill of Daylight Saving Clock Changes on Energy Consumption Simon I. Hill, Frédéric Desobry and Yu-Foong Chong May DST Daylight Saving Time EIA Energy Information Administration GDP Gross Domestic Product GMT

Hill, Simon I.

87

QUANTIFYING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND THE HEAT IT GENERATES Dana Longcope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in many aspects of coronal activity including the general process of coronal heating. Magnetic of that structure. Key words: Magnetic reconnection. 1. INTRODUCTION Models for heating the solar coronaQUANTIFYING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND THE HEAT IT GENERATES Dana Longcope Department of Physics

Longcope, Dana

88

Contributed Paper Using Changes in Agricultural Utility to Quantify  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contributed Paper Using Changes in Agricultural Utility to Quantify Future Climate-Induced Risk to Conservation LYNDON D. ESTES, LYDIE-LINE PAROZ, BETHANY A. BRADLEY,§ JONATHAN M.H. GREEN, DAVID G. HOLE to be mediated through changes in the agricultural utility of land. As farmers adapt their practices to changing

Bradley, Bethany

89

Dynamically Quantifying and Improving the Reliability of Distributed Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamically Quantifying and Improving the Reliability of Distributed Storage Systems Rekha Bachwani-scale storage systems can be significantly improved by using bet- ter reliability metrics and more efficient on a distributed storage system based on erasure codes. We find that MinI improves relia- bility significantly

Bianchini, Ricardo

90

The Need for SPIRIT DEMs to Quantify Antarctic Ice Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appropriate mask ­ SPIRIT has the data and could produce the necessary DEMs #12;Conclusions · Antarctic iceThe Need for SPIRIT DEMs to Quantify Antarctic Ice Sheet Discharge Robert Bindschadler NASA & UMBC #12;Antarctic Ice Sheet Discharge · 33 largest, most active basins account for 840 Gt/a (Rignot

Berthier, Etienne

91

On Computing Belief Change Operations using Quantified Boolean Formulas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Computing Science Simon Fraser University Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5A 1S6 jim@cs.sfu.ca Torsten Schaub Institut an approach to belief revision and belief contraction can be ax- iomatised by means of quantified Boolean revision, contraction, update, and merging. For both the general approach and for specific operators, we

Tompits, Hans

92

Quantifying Security in Hybrid Cellular Markus Jakobsson1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Security in Hybrid Cellular Networks Markus Jakobsson1 and Liu Yang2 1 School and recipients to provide auditing information. Our scheme is an exten- sion of [6], where the authors addressed be expected from the use of this approach. For one thing, the energy consumption of the mobile device can

93

Quantifying global marine isoprene fluxes using MODIS chlorophyll observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, with considerable spatial and temporal variability, resulting in a global annual total of 0.1 Tg C/yr. Air vegetation [Guenther et al., 1995], with the tropics responsible for most of the global annual total ($500 TgQuantifying global marine isoprene fluxes using MODIS chlorophyll observations Paul I. Palmer

Palmer, Paul

94

Expressing Default Abduction Problems as Quantified Boolean Formulas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Expressing Default Abduction Problems as Quantified Boolean Formulas Hans Tompits Institut f@kr.tuwien.ac.at Abduction is the process of finding explanations for observed phenomena in accord to known laws about, we deal with a model for abduction in which the domain knowledge is represented in terms of a default

Tompits, Hans

95

Quantifying the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines Stephen Rosea , Paulina Jaramilloa,1. Turbine tower buckling has been observed in typhoons, but no offshore wind turbines have yet been built be destroyed by hurricanes in an offshore wind farm. We apply this model to estimate the risk to offshore wind

Jaramillo, Paulina

96

NCSEC'07 Plano, TX Risk-Based Quantifiable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cost, usage, quality, defect, performance, etc. "80:20" rule or Pareto's principle. Units: component (UBST) Other focused quality assurance · UBST = OP-guided testing Capture user/usage information UsageNCSEC'07 Plano, TX Risk-Based Quantifiable Quality Improvement Jeff Tian (tian

Tian, Jeff

97

STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute of the validity of this analysis." -- Emil Gumbel #12;3 Outline (1) Introduction (2) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Classical Approach (3) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Modern Approach (4) Extreme

Katz, Richard

98

DOE: Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes research to Quantify the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. This 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. Methods are described for valuation and planning of pumped storage and conventional hydropower. The project team conducted plant case studies, electric system modeling, market analysis, cost data gathering, and evaluations of operating strategies and constraints. Five other reports detailing these research results are available a project website, www.epri.com/hydrogrid. With increasing deployment of wind and solar renewable generation, many owners, operators, and developers of hydropower have recognized the opportunity to provide more flexibility and ancillary services to the electric grid. To quantify value of services, this study focused on the Western Electric Coordinating Council region. A security-constrained, unit commitment and economic dispatch model was used to quantify the role of hydropower for several future energy scenarios up to 2020. This hourly production simulation considered transmission requirements to deliver energy, including future expansion plans. Both energy and ancillary service values were considered. Addressing specifically the quantification of pumped storage value, no single value stream dominated predicted plant contributions in various energy futures. Modeling confirmed that service value depends greatly on location and on competition with other available grid support resources. In this summary, ten different value streams related to hydropower are described. These fell into three categories; operational improvements, new technologies, and electricity market opportunities. Of these ten, the study was able to quantify a monetary value in six by applying both present day and future scenarios for operating the electric grid. This study confirmed that hydropower resources across the United States contribute significantly to operation of the grid in terms of energy, capacity, and ancillary services. Many potential improvements to existing hydropower plants were found to be cost-effective. Pumped storage is the most likely form of large new hydro asset expansions in the U.S. however, justifying investments in new pumped storage plants remains very challenging with current electricity market economics. Even over a wide range of possible energy futures, up to 2020, no energy future was found to bring quantifiable revenues sufficient to cover estimated costs of plant construction. Value streams not quantified in this study may provide a different cost-benefit balance and an economic tipping point for hydro. Future studies are essential in the quest to quantify the full potential value. Additional research should consider the value of services provided by advanced storage hydropower and pumped storage at smaller time steps for integration of variable renewable resources, and should include all possible value streams such as capacity value and portfolio benefits i.e.; reducing cycling on traditional generation.

None

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Carbon Fiber  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

None

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the three-year project period, Purdue University has specifically accomplished the following: revised the existing Methane Dynamics Model (MDM) to consider the effects of changes of atmospheric pressure; applied the methane dynamics model (MDM) to Siberian region to demonstrate that ebullition estimates could increase previous estimates of regional terrestrial CH{sub 4} emissions 3- to 7-fold in Siberia; Conducted an analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006 to show that terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} that increased by 0.6 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH{sub 4}; improved the quantification of CH{sub 4} fluxes in the Arctic with inversion methods; evaluated AIRS CH4 retrieval data with a transport and inversion model and surface flux and aircraft data; to better quantify methane emissions from wetlands, we extended the MDM within a biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to include a large-scale hydrology model, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model; more recently, we developed a single box atmospheric chemistry model involving atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO) and radical hydroxyl (OH) to analyze atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentrations from 1984 to 2008.

Qianlai Zhuang

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

Schlosser, Courtney Adam [MIT; Walter-Anthony, Katey [University of Alaska; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

104

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Carbon supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

Delnick, F.M.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Carbon microtubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

107

New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health, Co- benefits of Carbon Standards: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for Existing-by-state changes in harmful air pollution, it is the first study to quantify and map the co-benefits of power plant

Mohan, Chilukuri K.

108

Carbon Storage Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership MSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana State University MVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring,...

109

Carbon Taxes: A Review of Experience and Policy Design Considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

State and local governments in the United States are evaluating a wide range of policies to reduce carbon emissions, including, in some instances, carbon taxes, which have existed internationally for nearly 20 years. This report reviews existing carbon tax policies both internationally and in the United States. It also analyzes carbon policy design and effectiveness. Design considerations include which sectors to tax, where to set the tax rate, how to use tax revenues, what the impact will be on consumers, and how to ensure emissions reduction goals are achieved. Emission reductions that are due to carbon taxes can be difficult to measure, though some jurisdictions have quantified reductions in overall emissions and other jurisdictions have examined impacts that are due to programs funded by carbon tax revenues.

Sumner, J.; Bird, L.; Smith, H.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Quantifying VOC emissions for the strategic petroleum reserve.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A very important aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is regulatory compliance. One of the regulatory compliance issues deals with limiting the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted into the atmosphere from brine wastes when they are discharged to brine holding ponds. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set limits on the amount of VOCs that can be discharged to the atmosphere. Several attempts have been made to quantify the VOC emissions associated with the brine ponds going back to the late 1970's. There are potential issues associated with each of these quantification efforts. Two efforts were made to quantify VOC emissions by analyzing VOC content of brine samples obtained from wells. Efforts to measure air concentrations were mentioned in historical reports but no data have been located to confirm these assertions. A modeling effort was also performed to quantify the VOC emissions. More recently in 2011- 2013, additional brine sampling has been performed to update the VOC emissions estimate. An analysis of the statistical confidence in these results is presented here. Arguably, there are uncertainties associated with each of these efforts. The analysis herein indicates that the upper confidence limit in VOC emissions based on recent brine sampling is very close to the 0.42 ton/MMB limit used historically on the project. Refining this estimate would require considerable investment in additional sampling, analysis, and monitoring. An analysis of the VOC emissions at each site suggests that additional discharges could be made and stay within current regulatory limits.

Knowlton, Robert G.; Lord, David L.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This PowerPoint slide deck was originally presented at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review by Paul Denholm and Mark Mehos of NREL on April 23, 2013. Entitled "Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage," the presenters seek to answer the question, "What is the addition of TES to a CSP plant actually worth?" Ultimately they conclude that CSP with TES can actually complement other variable generation sources including solar PV and act as an enabling technology to achieve higher overall penetration of renewable energy.

112

Quantifying Uncertainty in Computer Predictions | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedlesAdvancedJanuaryNETL-2010/????QualityQuality atQuantifying

113

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

114

Quantifying uncertainty in LCA-modelling of waste management systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainty in LCA-modelling of waste management is significant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model, scenario and parameter uncertainties contribute. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential procedure for quantifying uncertainty is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application of procedure is illustrated by a case-study. - Abstract: Uncertainty analysis in LCA studies has been subject to major progress over the last years. In the context of waste management, various methods have been implemented but a systematic method for uncertainty analysis of waste-LCA studies is lacking. The objective of this paper is (1) to present the sources of uncertainty specifically inherent to waste-LCA studies, (2) to select and apply several methods for uncertainty analysis and (3) to develop a general framework for quantitative uncertainty assessment of LCA of waste management systems. The suggested method is a sequence of four steps combining the selected methods: (Step 1) a sensitivity analysis evaluating the sensitivities of the results with respect to the input uncertainties, (Step 2) an uncertainty propagation providing appropriate tools for representing uncertainties and calculating the overall uncertainty of the model results, (Step 3) an uncertainty contribution analysis quantifying the contribution of each parameter uncertainty to the final uncertainty and (Step 4) as a new approach, a combined sensitivity analysis providing a visualisation of the shift in the ranking of different options due to variations of selected key parameters. This tiered approach optimises the resources available to LCA practitioners by only propagating the most influential uncertainties.

Clavreul, Julie, E-mail: julc@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Guyonnet, Dominique [BRGM, ENAG BRGM-School, BP 6009, 3 Avenue C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

Jackson, M.R. Jr.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate equivalents for the EBIS sample processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and not a safety hazard. During the summer of 1999, emissions from local waste-incinerators added 14C-CO2 established in 2000 at each of the four sites shown above. Time-zero sampling of organic and mineral horizons and TVA) demonstrate the potential for ecosystem of carbon recycling (S. Trumbore). Objectives 1. Quantify

117

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

Weiblen, George D

118

Quantifier elimination for approximate Beals-Kartashova factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The only known constructive factorization algorithm for linear partial differential operators (LPDOs) is Beals-Kartashova (BK) factorization \\cite{bk2005}. One of the most interesting features of BK-factorization: at the beginning all the first-order factors are constructed and afterwards the factorization condition(s) should be checked. This leads to the important application area - namely, numerical simulations which could be simplified substantially if instead of computation with one LPDE of order $n$ we will be able to proceed computations with $n$ LPDEs all of order 1. In numerical simulations it is not necessary to fulfill factorization conditions exactly but with some given accuracy, which we call approximate factorization. The idea of the present paper is to look into the feasibility of solving problems of this kind using quantifier elinination by cylindrical algebraic decomposition.

Elena Kartashova; Scott McCallum

2007-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Local Dimension: a method to quantify the Cosmic Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is now well accepted that the galaxies are distributed in filaments, sheets and clusters all of which form an interconnected network known as the Cosmic Web. It is a big challenge to quantify the shapes of the interconnected structural elements that form this network. Tools like the Minkowski functionals which use global properties, though well suited for an isolated object like a single sheet or filament, are not suited for an interconnected network of such objects. We consider the Local Dimension $D$, defined through $N(R)=A R^D$, where $N(R)$ is the galaxy number count within a sphere of comoving radius $R$ centered on a particular galaxy, as a tool to locally quantify the shape in the neigbourhood of different galaxies along the Cosmic Web. We expect $D \\sim 1,2$ and 3 for a galaxy located in a filament, sheet and cluster respectively. Using LCDM N-body simulations we find that it is possible to determine $D$ through a power law fit to $N(R)$ across the length-scales 2 to $10 {\\rm Mpc}$ for $\\sim 33 %$ of the galaxies. We have visually identified the filaments and sheets corresponding to many of the galaxies with $D \\sim 1$ and 2 respectively. In several other situations the structure responsible for the $D$ value could not be visually identified, either due to its being tenuous or due to other dominating structures in the vicinity. We also show that the global distribution of the $D$ values can be used to visualize and interpret how the different structural elements are woven into the Cosmic Web.

Prakash Sarkar; Somnath Bharadwaj

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse, and Zhu, Zhiliang, 2010, Public review draft; A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the Management ofThe Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries.Carbon accounting and carbon footprint - more than just

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Quantifying the Thermal Behavior of Slags (TRP 9903)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful operation of a continuous caster is based upon control of heat transfer in the mold. The mold slag is a key component in the success of continuous casting; however, the phenomena that occur in the gap between the shell and the mold are largely unknown as until recently there have been no techniques that allowed visualization and quantification of the solidification behavior of liquid slags. This has lead to slag design being an empirical science or art. Recently a new experimental technique, called Double Hot Thermocouple Technique (DHTT), was developed at Carnegie Mellon University that allowed the solidification behavior of a slag to be observed and quantified under conditions that simulate the thermal conditions that occur in steelmaking environments. This technique allows ladle, tundish and mold slags to be characterized under extreme conditions including those found between the mold wall and the growing shell of a continuous caster. Thus, a program is initiated, under this grant, to quantify and describe the phenomena that occur during the solidification of a slag in a steel mill environment. This will allow slag design to become an engineering science rather than an empirical exercise. The project deliverables were as follows: (1) The further development of a tool that will have broad use in the quantification of slag melting and solidification behavior; and (2) The development of a set of meaningful design criteria for slag application in steel mill environments. The project was broken down into a number of objectives: (a) Develop a systematic understanding of the effect of cooling rate on slag solidification; (b) Develop a systematic understanding on the effect of slag chemistry changes on slag solidification behavior; (c) Develop a method to characterize slag melting; (d) Develop an understanding of the role of the environment on slag solidification and melting; (e) Develop the ability to understand slag solidification under the conditions that occur in a continuous caster; (f) Develop an ability to predict the solidification behavior of slags; and (g) Develop the criteria for optimization of slags in steelmaking environments where they are under thermal gradients.

Alan W. Cramb

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Photophysics of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

Samsonidze, Georgii G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

125

Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pierce, Lori J., E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for quantifying optical properties of the human lens. The present invention includes the application of fiberoptic, OMA-based instrumentation as an in vivo diagnostic tool for the human ocular lens. Rapid, noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the optical characteristics of a lens using very modest levels of exciting light are described. Typically, the backscatter and fluorescence spectra (from about 300- to 900-nm) elicited by each of several exciting wavelengths (from about 300- to 600-nm) are collected within a few seconds. The resulting optical signature of individual lenses is then used to assess the overall optical quality of the lens by comparing the results with a database of similar measurements obtained from a reference set of normal human lenses having various ages. Several metrics have been identified which gauge the optical quality of a given lens relative to the norm for the subject`s chronological age. These metrics may also serve to document accelerated optical aging and/or as early indicators of cataract or other disease processes. 8 figs.

Loree, T.R.; Bigio, I.J.; Zuclich, J.A.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Strobl, K.

1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens. The present invention includes the application of fiberoptic, OMA-based instrumentation as an in vivo diagnostic tool for the human ocular lens. Rapid, noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the optical characteristics of a lens using very modest levels of exciting light are described. Typically, the backscatter and fluorescence spectra (from about 300- to 900-nm) elicited by each of several exciting wavelengths (from about 300- to 600-nm) are collected within a few seconds. The resulting optical signature of individual lenses is then used to assess the overall optical quality of the lens by comparing the results with a database of similar measurements obtained from a reference set of normal human lenses having various ages. Several metrics have been identified which gauge the optical quality of a given lens relative to the norm for the subject's chronological age. These metrics may also serve to document accelerated optical aging and/or as early indicators of cataract or other disease processes.

Loree, deceased, Thomas R. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Bigio, Irving J. (Los Alamos, NM); Zuclich, Joseph A. (San Antonio, TX); Shimada, Tsutomu (Los Alamos, NM); Strobl, Karlheinz (Fiskdale, MA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Quantifying 3D Reconnection in Fragmented Current Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is growing evidence that when magnetic reconnection occurs in high Lundquist number plasmas such as in the Solar Corona or the Earth's Magnetosphere it does so within a fragmented, rather than a smooth current layer. Within the extent of these fragmented current regions the associated magnetic flux transfer and energy release occurs simultaneously in many different places. This investigation focusses on how best to quantify the rate at which reconnection occurs in such layers. An analytical theory is developed which describes the manner in which new connections form within fragmented current layers in the absence of magnetic nulls. It is shown that the collective rate at which new connections form can be characterized by two measures; a total rate which measures the true rate at which new connections are formed and a net rate which measures the net change of connection associated with the largest value of the integral of $E_{\\|}$ through all of the non-ideal regions. Two simple analytical models are pre...

Wyper, Peter F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Quantified Traveler: Using personal travel data to promote sustainable transport behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a goal to reduce my carbon footprint. I value the bene?ts toof their transportation carbon footprint, and that (b) thea goal to reduce their carbon footprint, a clear summary of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

132

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

133

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Smit, Berend

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Woodland Carbon Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

138

Quantifying Improvement in NDE Techniques for Inspecting Nickel-base Alloys in an International Cooperative Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we describe an atlas that is being created in an international program for use by participants in quantifying NDE effectiveness for varying crack parameters.

Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Anderson, Michael T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality quantified Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Current Research Projects Summary: , to quantify the effect of transboundary pollution on air quality. Ozone trends and interannual variability... Research's Community...

140

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Exploring Empowerment as a Basis for Quantifying Sustainability Jan T. Kim and Daniel Polani  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] for an example), or tonnes of carbon dioxide, used in carbon footprints. From an Artificial Life perspective, e.g. the carbon footprint approach obviously applies only to aerobic systems that consume carbon shown to reflect intuitively attractive states in various scenarios, effective sensorimotor loops

Polani, Daniel

142

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metallic nanotubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carbon2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical and ElectronicStructure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical andElectronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .Photophysics in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A General Methodology for Evaluation of Carbon Sequestration Activities and Carbon Credits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general methodology was developed for evaluation of carbon sequestration technologies. In this document, we provide a method that is quantitative, but is structured to give qualitative comparisons despite changes in detailed method parameters, i.e., it does not matter what ''grade'' a sequestration technology gets but a ''better'' technology should receive a better grade. To meet these objectives, we developed and elaborate on the following concepts: (1) All resources used in a sequestration activity should be reviewed by estimating the amount of greenhouse gas emissions for which they historically are responsible. We have done this by introducing a quantifier we term Full-Cycle Carbon Emissions, which is tied to the resource. (2) The future fate of sequestered carbon should be included in technology evaluations. We have addressed this by introducing a variable called Time-adjusted Value of Carbon Sequestration to weigh potential future releases of carbon, escaping the sequestered form. (3) The Figure of Merit of a sequestration technology should address the entire life-cycle of an activity. The figures of merit we have developed relate the investment made (carbon release during the construction phase) to the life-time sequestration capacity of the activity. To account for carbon flows that occur during different times of an activity we incorporate the Time Value of Carbon Flows. The methodology we have developed can be expanded to include financial, social, and long-term environmental aspects of a sequestration technology implementation. It does not rely on global atmospheric modeling efforts but is consistent with these efforts and could be combined with them.

Klasson, KT

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

An Index-Based Approach to Assessing Recalcitrance and Soil Carbon Sequestration Potential of Engineered Black Carbons (Biochars)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R{sub 50}, for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R{sub 50} is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R{sub 50}, with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R{sub 50} and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R{sub 50} is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R{sub 50} {>=} 0.70), Class B (0.50 {<=} R{sub 50} < 0.70) or Class C (R{sub 50} < 0.50) recalcitrance/carbon sequestration classes. Class A and Class C biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, while Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R{sub 50}, to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

Harvey, Omar R.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E.; Herbert, Bruce

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

Quantifying Technology Infusion and Policy Impact on Low Earth Orbit Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Technology Infusion and Policy Impact on Low Earth Orbit Communication Satellite Students #12;2 #12;Quantifying Technology Infusion and Policy Impact on Low Earth Orbit Communication-Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics and Technology and Policy Program Abstract Technology infusion

147

Design Life Level: Quantifying risk in a changing climate Holger Rootzen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design Life Level: Quantifying risk in a changing climate Holger Rootzen1 and Richard W. Katz2 of return levels and return periods have been standard and important tools for engineering design. However, whether local or global. In this paper, we propose a refined concept, Design Life Level, which quantifies

Katz, Richard

148

SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER, and Architectural Engineering 2006 #12;ii This thesis entitled: Sources and Effects of Mining-Related and Natural Acid Rock Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison County, Colorado

Ryan, Joe

149

A QUANTIFIER ELIMINATION FOR THE THEORY OF P-ADIC NUMBERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A QUANTIFIER ELIMINATION FOR THE THEORY OF P-ADIC NUMBERS Lavinia Egidi Abstract. This paper presents a detailed analysis of a quantifier elimi- nation algorithm for the first order theory of p-adic numbers based on a p-adic analogue of the cylindric algebraic decomposition. It is believed

Egidi, Lavinia

150

Characterization of wound monitoring systems used to quantify and locate plutonium contamination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When an accident involving the possibility of a plutonium contaminated wound occurs, the contamination is often quantified using sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and high purity germanium (HPGe) detection systems. The NaI(Tl) system is used to quantify...

Dimmerling, Paul James

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Quantifying the Equilibrium and Irreversibility Properties of the Nucleotide Substitution Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the Equilibrium and Irreversibility Properties of the Nucleotide Substitution Process and Irreversibility Properties of the Nucleotide Substitution Process ­ p.1 #12;A Crash Course in Molecular Evolution AGTCCCTTT Quantifying the Equilibrium and Irreversibility Properties of the Nucleotide Substitution Process

Spang, Rainer

152

Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems with Variable Resources Electric Energy System #12;#12;Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems benefits correspond to a real-world power system, as we use actual data on demand-response and wind

153

Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon...

155

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Australian terrestrial carbon budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

158

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh Bren hall 3422, suh Week 1: Introduction to carbon footprint and carbon account - Background: carbon awareness, major out a report or a web site about carbon footprint results of a product or of a company. Write a two

California at Santa Barbara, University of

162

Big Sky Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

(Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

163

This reference list is organized by metadata section. The reference lists for the various volcanic areas include both references cited in the text and other relevant references.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, M.A., 2002, Tracing and quantifying magmatic carbon discharge in cold groundwatersLessons learned.E., Galloway, D.L., Colvard, E.M., Sorey, M.L., and Mariner, R.H., 2001, Time- variation of hydrothermal.R., 1994, Hydrothermal systems of the Cascade Range, north-central Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey

164

Intro to Carbon Sequestration  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

165

Intro to Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and reactivity of supercritical CO{sub 2} in coal-bearing strata is unknown, and potential exists for supercritical conditions to develop below a depth of 2,480 feet following abandonment of the coalbed methane fields. High-pressure adsorption isotherms confirm that coal sorbs approximately twice as much CO{sub 2} as CH{sub 4} and approximately four times as much CO{sub 2} as N{sub 2}. Analysis of isotherm data reveals that the sorption performance of each gas can vary by a factor of two depending on rank and ash content. Gas content data exhibit extreme vertical and lateral variability that is the product of a complex burial history involving an early phase of thermogenic gas generation and an ongoing stage of late biogenic gas generation. Production characteristics of coalbed methane wells are helpful for identifying areas that are candidates for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Many geologic and engineering factors, including well construction, well spacing, and regional structure influence well performance. Close fault spacing limits areas where five-spot patterns may be developed for enhanced gas recovery, but large structural panels lacking normal faults are in several gas fields and can be given priority as areas to demonstrate and commercialize carbon sequestration technology in coalbed methane reservoirs.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Roundtable (CAPR) GEO Forest Monitoring SymposiumGEO Forest Monitoring)Amazon Initiative Consortium (IA) #12;Carbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Carbon for Poverty Reduction

168

International Experiences with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse-Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Group on Social Costs of Carbon, United States2010. Appendix 15A. Social Cost of Carbon for Regulatory

Williams, Christopher

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Oxygen as a control on seafloor biological communities and their roles in sedimentary carbon cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen as a control on seafloor biological communities and their roles in sedimentary carbon experiments were conducted at sites spanning the steep oxygen, organic matter, and biological community gradients across the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone, in order to quantify the role that fauna play

170

Formation of Carbon Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessing Reservoir Depositional Environments to Develop and Quantify Improvements in CO2 Storage Efficiency: A Reservoir Simulation Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storage potential and fluid movement within formations are dependent on the unique hydraulic characteristics of their respective depositional environments. Storage efficiency (E) quantifies the potential for storage in a geologic depositional environment and is used to assess basinal or regional CO2 storage resources. Current estimates of storage resources are calculated using common E ranges by lithology and not by depositional environment. The objectives of this project are to quantify E ranges and identify E enhancement strategies for different depositional environments via reservoir simulation studies. The depositional environments considered include deltaic, shelf clastic, shelf carbonate, fluvial deltaic, strandplain, reef, fluvial and alluvial, and turbidite. Strategies considered for enhancing E include CO2 injection via vertical, horizontal, and deviated wells, selective completions, water production, and multi-well injection. Conceptual geologic and geocellular models of the depositional environments were developed based on data from Illinois Basin oil fields and gas storage sites. The geologic and geocellular models were generalized for use in other US sedimentary basins. An important aspect of this work is the development of conceptual geologic and geocellular models that reflect the uniqueness of each depositional environment. Different injection well completions methods were simulated to investigate methods of enhancing E in the presence of geologic heterogeneity specific to a depositional environment. Modeling scenarios included horizontal wells (length, orientation, and inclination), selective and dynamic completions, water production, and multiwell injection. A Geologic Storage Efficiency Calculator (GSECalc) was developed to calculate E from reservoir simulation output. Estimated E values were normalized to diminish their dependency on fluid relative permeability. Classifying depositional environments according to normalized baseline E ranges ranks fluvial deltaic and turbidite highest and shelf carbonate lowest. The estimated average normalized baseline E of turbidite, and shelf carbonate depositional environments are 42.5% and 13.1%, with corresponding standard deviations of 11.3%, and 3.10%, respectively. Simulations of different plume management techniques suggest that the horizontal well, multi-well injection with brine production from blanket vertical producers are the most efficient E enhancement strategies in seven of eight depositional environments; for the fluvial deltaic depositional environment, vertical well with blanket completions is the most efficient. This study estimates normalized baseline E ranges for eight depositional environments, which can be used to assess the CO2 storage resource of candidate formations. This study also improves the general understanding of depositional environment’s influence on E. The lessons learned and results obtained from this study can be extrapolated to formations in other US basins with formations of similar depositional environments, which should be used to further refine regional and national storage resource estimates in future editions of the Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas of the United States. Further study could consider the economic feasibility of the E enhancement strategies identified here.

Okwen, Roland; Frailey, Scott; Leetaru, Hannes; Moulton, Sandy

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Quantifying stock-price response to demand fluctuations Vasiliki Plerou,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying stock-price response to demand fluctuations Vasiliki Plerou,1 Parameswaran Gopikrishnan, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 2 Department of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 Received 2 July 2001; revised manuscript received 13 May 2002

Stanley, H. Eugene

173

A framework for quantifying complexity and understanding its sources : application to tow large-scale systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The motivation for this work is to quantify the complexity of complex systems and to understand its sources. To study complexity, we develop a theoretical framework where the complex system of interest is embedded in a ...

Martin, Pierre-Alain J. Y

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Deciding Quantifier-Free Presburger Formulas Using Parameterized Solution Sanjit A. Seshia Randal E. Bryant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Randal E. Bryant Computer Science Department Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA Sanjit.Seshia, Randy.Bryantˇ @cs.cmu.edu Abstract Given a formula ˘ in quantifier

Bryant, Randal E.

175

Quantifying and managing the risk of information security breaches participants in a supply chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical integration between companies can result in an increased risk of information security breaches. This thesis proposes a methodology for quantifying information security risk to a supply chain participant. Given a ...

Bellefeuille, Cynthia Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean margins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean-deltaic lateral slopes in perialpine, fjord-type Lake Lucerne (Central Switzerland); (ii) their control

Gilli, Adrian

177

Quantifying plasticity-independent creep compliance and relaxation of viscoelastoplastic materials under contact loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we quantify the time-dependent mechanical properties of a linear viscoelastoplastic material under contact loading. For contact load relaxation, we showed that the relaxation modulus can be measured independently of ...

Vandamme, Matthieu

178

A New Analytical Method to Quantify Residual Fluid Cleanup in Hydraulic Fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydraulic fracturing fluid has always been a major issue, and is believed to drastically undermine the performance of hydraulically fractured wells. Several attempts have been made to quantify the damage associated with residual fluid, with varying level...

Zarrin, Tahira

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Carbon in detonations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review three principal results from a five year study of carbon and its properties in detonations and discuss the implications of these results to the behavior of explosives. We first present a new determination of the carbon melt line from release wave velocity measurements in the shocked state. We then outline a colloidal theory of carbon clustering which from diffusion limited coagulation predicts a slow energy release rate for the carbon chemistry. Finally, we show the results from the examination of recovered soot. Here we see support for the colloid theory and find the diamond phase of carbon. The main theme of this paper is that the carbon in detonation products is in the form of a colloidal suspension of carbon clusters which grow through diffusion limited collisions. Even the final state is not bulk graphite or diamond, but is a collection of small, less than 100 /angstrom/A, diamond and graphitic clusters. 23 refs., 4 figs.

Johnson, J.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Gas-solid carbonation of Ca(OH)2 and CaO particles under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions by using a thermogravimetric analyzer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Gas-solid carbonation of Ca(OH)2 and CaO particles under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions Gas Control 11, 3 (2012) 172-180" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijggc.2012.08.009 #12;2 Abstract The gas, quantify the gas-solid carbonation extent and the carbonation kinetics of Ca(OH)2 and CaO; and secondly

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions – through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels – to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Carbon dioxide sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets and Renewable Energy 4 Report Introduction 5 Product Types 5 A. Carbon Offsets 5 B. Certified Emission Reductions (CERs. Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets and Renewable Energy

Hoffman, Andrew J.

185

Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions Dana S. Balser D. Anish Roshi (Raman (Agnes Scott College) #12;Carbon RRLs Carbon Radio Recombination Lines (RRLs) NGC 2024 (Orion B) IC 1795 (W3) Palmer et al. (1967) #12;Carbon RRLs Photodissociation Regions (PDRs) Hollenbach & Tielens (1997

Balser, Dana S.

186

Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

187

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert1 on climate can be characterized by a single statistic, called Cumulative Carbon. This is the aggregate amount of carbon emitted in the form of carbon dioxide by activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation

Pierrehumbert, Raymond

188

Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

189

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

Carbon Fiber SMC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

110,000 ACC capital) in 2008 * 54,000 for 2009 Partners * Continental Structural Plastic (CSP), a Tier One supplier * Discounted compounding and molding * Zoltek, a carbon...

193

Activated Carbon Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

Activated Carbon Injection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

195

EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Bhringer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Böhringer Jared C. Carbone Thomas F. Rutherford Revised: August 2013 Abstract Embodied carbon tariffs tax the direct and indirect carbon emissions embodied in trade -- an idea popularized by countries seeking to extend the reach of domestic carbon regu- lations. We

196

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is the injection of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} into deep geologic formations where the CO{sub 2} is intended to remain indefinitely. If successfully implemented, geologic carbon sequestration will have little or no impact on terrestrial ecosystems aside from the mitigation of climate change. However, failure of a geologic carbon sequestration site, such as large-scale leakage of CO{sub 2} into a potable groundwater aquifer, could cause impacts that would require costly remediation measures. Governments are attempting to develop regulations for permitting geologic carbon sequestration sites to ensure their safety and effectiveness. At present, these regulations focus largely on decreasing the probability of failure. In this paper we propose that regulations for the siting of early geologic carbon sequestration projects should emphasize limiting the consequences of failure because consequences are easier to quantify than failure probability.

Price, P.N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Reversing Climate Change: Using Carbon Technology to Offset Carbon Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reversing Climate Change: Using Carbon Technology to Offset Carbon Emissions Climate change is real not only emitting less greenhouse gas (GHG), but actually sources of negative carbon. We then present two

198

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Y. Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the ManagementJ. van Houtum. 2011. E?ect of carbon emission regulations onStreamlined Enterprise Carbon Footprinting. Environmental

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Structural integrity assessment of carbon and low-alloy steel pressure vessels using a simplified fracture mechanics procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a simplified fracture analysis procedure which was developed by Pellini to quantify fracture critical-crack sizes and crack-arrest temperatures of carbon and low-alloy steel pressure vessels. Fracture analysis diagrams have been developed using the simplified analysis procedure for various grades of carbon and low-alloy steels used in the construction of ASME, Section VIII, Division 1 pressure vessels. Structural integrity assessments have been conducted from the analysis diagrams.

Rana, M.D. (Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Efficient Scheme of Experimental Quantifying non-Markovianity in High-Dimension Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The non-Markovianity is a prominent concept of the dynamics of the open quantum systems, which is of fundamental importance in quantum mechanics and quantum information. Despite of lots of efforts, the experimentally measuring of non-Markovianity of an open system is still limited to very small systems. Presently, it is still impossible to experimentally quantify the non-Markovianity of high dimension systems with the widely used Breuer-Laine-Piilo (BLP) trace distance measure. In this paper, we propose a method, combining experimental measurements and numerical calculations, that allow quantifying the non-Markovianity of a $N$ dimension system only scaled as $N^2$, successfully avoid the exponential scaling with the dimension of the open system in the current method. After the benchmark with a two-dimension open system, we demonstrate the method in quantifying the non-Markovanity of a high dimension open quantum random walk system.

S. -J. Dong; B. -H. Liu; Y. -N. Sun; Y. -J. Han; G. -C. Guo; Lixin He

2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pearce, D. 2003. The Social Cost Of Carbon And Its PolicyR.S.J. 2008. The Social Cost of Carbon: Trends, Outliers and

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from reservoir rock formation. - Task 2: Carbonation study of minerals. - Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock...

203

Carbon monoxide absorbing liquid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present disclosure is directed to a carbon monoxide absorbing liquid containing a cuprous ion, hydrochloric acid and titanum trichloride. Titanium trichloride is effective in increasing the carbon monoxide absorption quantity. Furthermore, titanium trichloride remarkably increases the oxygen resistance. Therefore, this absorbing liquid can be used continuously and for a long time.

Arikawa, Y.; Horigome, S.; Kanehori, K.; Katsumoto, M.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

Fly ash carbon passivation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

205

Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. Avouris, in Carbon Nanotubes M. S. Dresselhaus, P.Physics of Carbon Nanotubes S. V. Rotkin, S. Subramoney,Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Philip G. Collins 1 and

Collins, Philip G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

207

Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. Avouris, in Carbon Nanotubes M. S. Dresselhaus, P.in Applied Physics of Carbon Nanotubes S. V. Rotkin, S.Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Philip G. Collins

Collins, Philip G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Quantifying exchange coupling in f-ion pairs using the diamagnetic substitution method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the challenges in the chemistry of actinide and lanthanide (f-ion) is quantifying exchange coupling between f-ions. While qualitative information about exchange coupling may be readily obtained using the diamagnetic substitution approach, obtaining quantitative information is much more difficult. This article describes how exchange coupling may be quantified using the susceptibility of a magnetically isolated analog, as in the diamagnetic substitution approach, along with the anisotropy of the ground state as determined by EPR spectroscopy. Several examples are used to illustrate and test this approach.

Lukens, Wayne W.; Walter, Marc D.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Research of a boundary condition quantifiable correction method in the assembly homogenization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods and codes currently used in assembly homogenization calculation mostly adopt the reflection boundary conditions. The influences of real boundary conditions on the assembly homogenized parameters were analyzed. They were summarized into four quantifiable effects, and then the mathematical expressions could be got by linearization hypothesis. Through the calculation of a test model, it had been found that the result was close to transport calculation result when considering four boundary quantifiable effects. This method would greatly improve the precision of a core design code which using the assembly homogenization methods, but without much increase of the computing time. (authors)

Peng, L. H.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhao, J. [Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, 100084 (China); Li, W. H. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Shenzhen, 518026 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pacific Northwest rangeland carbon sequestration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This paper models the supply curve of carbon sequestration on Pacific Northwest rangelands. Rangeland managers have the ability to sequester carbon in agricultural soils by… (more)

Wiggins, Seth T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA: REPORT TO THE LEGISLATURE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) studies that we used, including Cameron Downey

212

Random vs realistic amorphous carbon models for high resolution microscopy and electron diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous carbon and amorphous materials in general are of particular importance for high resolution electron microscopy, either for bulk materials, generally covered with an amorphous layer when prepared by ion milling techniques, or for nanoscale objects deposited on amorphous substrates. In order to quantify the information of the high resolution images at the atomic scale, a structural modeling of the sample is necessary prior to the calculation of the electron wave function propagation. It is thus essential to be able to reproduce the carbon structure as close as possible to the real one. The approach we propose here is to simulate a realistic carbon from an energetic model based on the tight-binding approximation in order to reproduce the important structural properties of amorphous carbon. At first, we compare this carbon with the carbon obtained by randomly generating the carbon atom positions. In both cases, we discuss the limit thickness of the phase object approximation. In a second step, we show the influence of both carbons models on (i) the contrast of Cu, Ag, and Au single atoms deposited on carbon and (ii) the determination of the long-range order parameter in CoPt bimetallic nanoalloys.

Ricolleau, C., E-mail: Christian.Ricolleau@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Alloyeau, D. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Phénomčnes Quantiques, CNRS-UMR 7162, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, Case 7021, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Le Bouar, Y.; Amara, H.; Landon-Cardinal, O. [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures, UMR CNRS/Onera, 29, avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Châtillon (France)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY Thomas E create major problems that will require major mitigation efforts. #12;SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally industry believe it could constrain the penetration of gridconnected PV. The U.S. Department of Energy

Perez, Richard R.

214

Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete statistical description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete Chernobyl after the 1986 disaster and find three new results: i the histogram of fluctuations is well.60. x, 02.50.Fz, 05.45.Tp, 87.66.Na I. INTRODUCTION Chernobyl's No. 4 reactor was completely destroyed

Stanley, H. Eugene

215

Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete statistical description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete fluctuations measured near Chernobyl after the 1986 disaster and find three new results: #i# the histogram patterns. PACS number#s#: 89.60.#x, 02.50.Fz, 05.45.Tp, 87.66.Na I. INTRODUCTION Chernobyl's No. 4 reactor

Shlyakhter, Ilya

216

Quantifying the Benefits of Resource Multiplexing in On-Demand Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Massachusetts Amherst San Jose, CA {abhishek,shenoy}@cs.umass.edu goyalp@us.ibm.com ABSTRACT On-demand dataQuantifying the Benefits of Resource Multiplexing in On-Demand Data Centers Abhishek Chandra centers host multiple applications on server farms by dynamically provisioning resources in response

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

217

Quantifying the Benefits of Resource Multiplexing in OnDemand Data Centers #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Massachusetts Amherst San Jose, CA {abhishek,shenoy}@cs.umass.edu goyalp@us.ibm.com ABSTRACT On­demand dataQuantifying the Benefits of Resource Multiplexing in On­Demand Data Centers # Abhishek Chandra centers host multiple applications on server farms by dynamically provisioning resources in response

Chandra, Abhishek

218

Quantifying Performance Benefits of Overlap using MPI-2 in a Seismic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Work ICS '10 #12;AWM-ODC - Seismic Modeling · The 3D volume representing the ground area is decomposed into 3D rectangular sub-grids · Each processor performs stress and velocity calculations, each elementQuantifying Performance Benefits of Overlap using MPI-2 in a Seismic Modeling Application Sreeram

Panda, Dhabaleswar K.

219

Quantifying Performance Benefits of Overlap using MPI-2 in a Seismic Modeling Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

motion simulation code based on a parallel finite difference solution of the 3-D velocity- stress waveQuantifying Performance Benefits of Overlap using MPI-2 in a Seismic Modeling Application Sreeram and Engineering 2 Ohio Supercomputer Center The Ohio State University Columbus, OH, USA 43212 Columbus, OH, USA

Panda, Dhabaleswar K.

220

Evaluating Energy Policy: Quantifying Air Pollution and Health Co-Benefits Tammy M Thompson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating Energy Policy: Quantifying Air Pollution and Health Co-Benefits Tammy M Thompson Noelle Energy Policy Scenarios Criteria Pollution Emissions Changes Impacts on Air Quality and Human Health Energy Policy Scenarios Criteria Pollution Impacts on Air Quality one realm can have profound impacts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A STOCHASTIC PROGRAMMING APPROACH TO QUANTIFYING EFFECTS OF CONTINGENCIES ON LOCATIONAL MARGINAL PRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on varia- tions of Locational Marginal Prices (LMPs) in restruc- tured power markets. The process: Locational marginal prices (LMPs), Un- certainty, Power system security, Optimization meth- ods, StochasticA STOCHASTIC PROGRAMMING APPROACH TO QUANTIFYING EFFECTS OF CONTINGENCIES ON LOCATIONAL MARGINAL

Stankoviæ, Aleksandar

222

RAPID COMMUNICATION Quantifying the quality of femtosecond laser ablation of graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAPID COMMUNICATION Quantifying the quality of femtosecond laser ablation of graphene Ramazan Sahin abla- tion quality and ablation size is experimentally studied on graphene-coated silicon Introduction Graphene micro- and nano-structures are considered potential building blocks for future opto

Simsek, Ergun

223

The Power of Friction: Quantifying the ``Goodness'' of Frictional Grasps \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Power of Friction: Quantifying the ``Goodness'' of Frictional Grasps \\Lambda Marek Teichmann of fingers, coefficient of friction and the the goodness of a grasp. In particular, we give a general framework for defining a grasp metric that takes friction into account. Our approach rectifies a flaw

Mishra, Bud

224

A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were calculated using peat ages calibrated to the sidereal time scale and burial depths a polynomial that relates the peat age to the position of sea-level at that time in the past. The "sea

Kulp, Mark

225

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE-BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER EROSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE- BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER change and intensification have resulted in accelerated rates of soil erosion in many areas of the world quantification of accelerated soil erosion. Ecological site soil erosion Variation in the simulated erosion rates

226

Spatial differences and temporal changes in illicit drug use in Europe quantified by wastewater analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial differences and temporal changes in illicit drug use in Europe quantified by wastewater of Chemistry, University of Athens, Athens, Greece21 *Co-first authors. ABSTRACT Aims To perform wastewater population. Design Analyses of raw wastewater over a 1-week period in 2012 and 2013. Setting and Participants

Wehrli, Bernhard

227

FORMAL PROOFS IN REAL ALGEBRAIC GEOMETRY: FROM ORDERED FIELDS TO QUANTIFIER ELIMINATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but is imposed by our choice to base this work on an abstract structure. Then we formalized a proof of quantifier Microsoft Research Joint Centre, e-mail address: Assia.Mahboubi@inria.fr Abstract. This paper describes a formalization of discrete real closed fields in the Coq proof assistant. This abstract structure captures

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Advanced Unbounded CTL Model Checking Based on AIGs, BDD Sweeping, And Quantifier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gates and inverters Simple data structure Every Boolean function can be represented by an AIG 5 Florian Networks of 2-input and gates and inverters Simple data structure Every Boolean function can be representedAdvanced Unbounded CTL Model Checking Based on AIGs, BDD Sweeping, And Quantifier Scheduling

Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

229

Using the Wild Bootstrap to Quantify Uncertainty in DTI Brandon Whitcher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the Wild Bootstrap to Quantify Uncertainty in DTI Brandon Whitcher David S. Tuch Jonathan J; confidence interval; fiber orientation; fractional anisotropy Running head. The wild bootstrap in DTI 1 #12. In contrast to the regular bootstrap, the wild bootstrap method can be applied to such protocols in which

Whitcher, Brandon

230

Generating Determiners and Quantifiers in Hebrew Yael Dahan Netzer and Michael Elhadad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Multi­lingual generation now appears as the ``next frontier'' in generation research: it is often easierGenerating Determiners and Quantifiers in Hebrew Yael Dahan Netzer and Michael Elhadad Ben Gurion---elhadad)@cs.bgu.ac.il Abstract This paper presents the part of HUGG, a generation grammar for Hebrew, that deals with determiners

Elhadad, Michael

231

Generating Determiners and Quantifiers in Hebrew Yael Dahan Netzer and Michael Elhadad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], [9]. Multi-lingual generation now appears as the "next frontier" in generation re* *search Generating Determiners and Quantifiers in Hebrew Yael Dahan|elhadad)@cs.bgu.ac.il Abstract This paper presents a specific part of HUGG, a generation grammar for He* *brew

Elhadad, Michael

232

Edinburgh Research Explorer Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edinburgh Research Explorer Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD diagrams the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD diagrams with Bio-PEPA'. in Proceedings of COMPMOD 2009. ETPCS to publication record in Edinburgh Research Explorer Published In: Proceedings of COMPMOD 2009 General rights

Millar, Andrew J.

233

The impact of local geochemical variability on quantifying hillslope soil production and chemical weathering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the physical and chemical processes of soil production and erosion and revisit three granitic study areas on the hillslope-scale physical and chemical soil production and erosion processes. To explain why understandingThe impact of local geochemical variability on quantifying hillslope soil production and chemical

Heimsath, Arjun M.

234

Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu a policy that encourages healthy behaviors (such as covering your cough and using hand sanitizers) at four coughs, minimizing contact with potential fomites) at major tourist locations. We use a synthetic

Swarup, Samarth

235

Identifying and quantifying nonconservative energy production/destruction terms in hydrostatic Boussinesq primitive equation models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying and quantifying nonconservative energy production/destruction terms in hydrostatic Boussinesq primitive equation models R´emi Tailleux Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley/destruction terms in the local total energy balance equation in numerical ocean general circulation models (OGCMs

Tailleux, Remi

236

Quantifying the differential contributions of deep groundwater to streamflow in nested basins, using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-solute, deep groundwater and a low-solute, soil-water. The mixing model indicated 69% ± 10% deep groundwater-member mixing, hydrological pathway, interbasin groundwater flow INTRODUCTION Knowledge of hydrological pathwaysQuantifying the differential contributions of deep groundwater to streamflow in nested basins

Chappell, Nick A

237

Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind S.C. Pryor1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds S.C. Pryor1,2 , R, Bloomington, IN47405, USA. Tel: 1-812-855-5155. Fax: 1-812-855-1661 Email: spryor@indiana.edu 2 Dept. of Wind an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because in principle they also offer

238

Risk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to generate 20% of its electricity from wind. Developers are actively planning offshore wind farms along the URisk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore Wind of Energy has estimated that over 50 GW of offshore wind power will be required for the United States

Jaramillo, Paulina

239

Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas isotopes by groundwater (or oil) degassing. Other natural gas fields may have been produced in-situ or migrated as a free expert academics from across the CDT and also experienced oil and gas industry professionals

Henderson, Gideon

240

Exploring and quantifying the `co-variability' of the extremes corresponding to different climate components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploring and quantifying the `co-variability' of the extremes corresponding to different climate to the fact that there might be moisture-temperature feedback that has further implications on the extremes. Having said, we aim to study how extreme precipitation and temperature co-vary and are determined

Miami, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Atmospheric Chemistry, Carbon Cycle, and Climate (AC4): Observational Constraints on Sources and Sinks of Aerosols and Greenhouse Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gas extraction can also inform future energy choices. In FY 2014, Atmospheric Chemistry, Carbon Cycle anthropogenic-biogenic emission intense regions 3. Deposition processes controlling atmospheric concentrations of aerosols and greenhouse gases Projects that quantify sources and sinks via new measurements and/or modeling

242

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert* Abstract statistic, called cumulative carbon. This statistic is the aggregate amount ofcarbon emitted in theform such activitiespersist.In thispaper the conceptis usedto addressthe question offair allocation of carbon emissions

Pierrehumbert, Raymond

243

International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10) 15 - 17th Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) about two decades ago, research related to its of Materials and Process Engineering Kanpur Chapter hosted the `International Conference on Carbon

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

244

Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration Robert B. Jackson,1 * Esteban G. Farley,1 David C. le Maitre,5 Bruce A. McCarl,6 Brian C. Murray7 Carbon sequestration strategies plantations feature prominently among tools for carbon sequestration (1­8). Plantations typi- cally combine

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

245

IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

advanced carbon-carbon composites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: CARBON-CARBON...

247

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fibers, carbon nanotubes, and carbon capsule structures canand multi-walled nanotubes and carbon fiber, and occurs withMulti- walled carbon nanotubes”, Carbon, v.43, pp.2608-2617,

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO); Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager)

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

Extrasolar Carbon Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest that some extrasolar planets planets and low-mass white dwarf planets are especially good candidate members of this new class of planets, but these objects could also conceivably form around stars like the Sun. This planet-formation pathway requires only a factor of two local enhancement of the protoplanetary disk's C/O ratio above solar, a condition that pileups of carbonaceous grains may create in ordinary protoplanetary disks. Hot, Neptune-mass carbon planets should show a significant paucity of water vapor in their spectra compared to hot planets with solar abundances. Cooler, less massive carbon planets may show hydrocarbon-rich spectra and tar-covered surfaces. The high sublimation temperatures of diamond, SiC, and other carbon compounds could protect these planets from carbon depletion at high temperatures.

Marc J. Kuchner; S. Seager

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

250

ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO) [ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO; Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager) [ATK, Program Manager

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

251

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealth’s utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

252

Activated carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

255

Research Summary Carbon Additionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of much/reporting additionality rules. Technological Application of specific technology. Term Abatement arises within a specified

256

4, 1367, 2007 Modelling carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon overconsumption and extracellular POC formation M. Schartau et carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon M. Schartau1 , A Correspondence to: M. Schartau (markus.schartau@gkss.de) 13 #12;BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

257

Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

Fan, Hongyou

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

258

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

259

Carbon dioxide removal process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for separating carbon dioxide from gas, especially natural gas, that also contains C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons. The invention uses two or three membrane separation steps, optionally in conjunction with cooling/condensation under pressure, to yield a lighter, sweeter product natural gas stream, and/or a carbon dioxide stream of reinjection quality and/or a natural gas liquids (NGL) stream.

Baker, Richard W.; Da Costa, Andre R.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

260

Lead carbonate scintillator materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 şC, 27 şC, and 32 şC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: soil carbon sequestration; carbon budget;of an energy efficient carbon sequestration mechanism, asin the later section on carbon sequestration. In atmospheric

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalinventory of black carbon emissions. Atmos. Environ. 1993,commonly studied form of carbon emissions. Black carbon (BC)

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Method and apparatus for detecting the presence and thickness of carbon and oxide layers on EUV reflective surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The characteristics of radiation that is reflected from carbon deposits and oxidation formations on highly reflective surfaces such as Mo/Si mirrors can be quantified and employed to detect and measure the presence of such impurities on optics. Specifically, it has been shown that carbon deposits on a Mo/Si multilayer mirror decreases the intensity of reflected HeNe laser (632.8 nm) light. In contrast, oxide layers formed on the mirror should cause an increase in HeNe power reflection. Both static measurements and real-time monitoring of carbon and oxide surface impurities on optical elements in lithography tools should be achievable.

Malinowski, Michael E.

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

265

Carbon based prosthetic devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Multiple metrics for quantifying the intensity of water consumption of energy production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussion of the environmental implications of worldwide energy demand is currently dominated by the effects of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) emissions on global climate. At the regional scale, however, water resource ...

Spang, E S

267

Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were incorporated onto the surface of epoxy carbon fiber composites, as proposed fire shieldsStudy of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites Qiang Wu, Wei Zhu, Chuck Zhang *, Zhiyong Liang, Ben Wang Department

Das, Suman

268

Net carbon uptake has increased through warming-induced changes in temperate forest phenology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The timing of phenological events exerts a strong control over ecosystem function and leads to multiple feedbacks to the climate system1. Phenology is inherently sensitive to temperature (though the exact sensitivity is disputed2) and recent warming is reported to have led to earlier spring, later autumn3,4 and increased vegetation activity5,6. Such greening could be expected to enhance ecosystem carbon uptake7,8, though reports also suggest decreased uptake for boreal forests4,9. Here we assess changes in phenology of temperate forests over the eastern US during the past two decades, and quantify the resulting changes in forest carbon storage. We combine long-term ground observations of phenology, satellite indices, and ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide flux measurements, along with 18 terrestrial biosphere models. We observe a strong trend of earlier spring and later autumn. In contrast to previous suggestions4,9 we show that carbon uptake through photosynthesis increased considerably more than carbon release through respiration for both an earlier spring and later autumn. The terrestrial biosphere models tested misrepresent the temperature sensitivity of phenology, and thus the effect on carbon uptake. Our analysis of the temperature-phenology-carbon coupling suggests a current and possible future enhancement of forest carbon uptake due to changes in phenology. This constitutes a negative feedback to climate change, and is serving to slow the rate of warming.

Keenan, Trevor [Harvard University] [Harvard University; Gray, Josh [Boston University] [Boston University; Friedl, Mark [Boston University] [Boston University; Toomey, Michael [Harvard University] [Harvard University; Bohrer, Gil [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University; Hollinger, David [USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station] [USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station; Munger, J. William [Harvard University] [Harvard University; OKeefe, John [Harvard Forest (Harvard University), Massachusetts] [Harvard Forest (Harvard University), Massachusetts; Hans, Schmid [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany; Wing, Ian [Boston University] [Boston University; Yang, Bai [ORNL] [ORNL; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University] [Harvard University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

WESTCARB Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

270

Electronic Supplemental Information (ESI) Quantifying mRNA Levels Across a Histological Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic Supplemental Information (ESI) for Quantifying mRNA Levels Across a Histological Section washes were performed using 20 µL of wash #13 and 12.5 µL of wash #14 buffers. AgPath-ID one-step RT was inverted, incubated, centrifuged, and washed as described. AgPath-ID one-step RT-PCR mix was prepared

Shapiro, Benjamin

271

Quantifying the Effect of Intraocular Pressure on the Anterior/Posterior Cornea via FD-OCT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the designation as HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW An Honors Fellows Thesis by OSCAR CARRASCO-ZEVALLOS QUANTIFIYING THE EFFECT OF INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE ON THE ANTERIOR/POSTERIOR CORNEA VIA FD-OCT Approved by... for the designation as HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW An Honors Fellows Thesis by OSCAR CARRASCO-ZEVALLOS iii ABSTRACT Quantifying the Effect of Intraocular Pressure on the Anterior/Posterior Cornea via FD- OCT. (April 2011) Oscar Carrasco...

Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

272

Quantifying breakage parameters of fragile archaeological components to determine the feasibility of site burial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1968) ~ The Cahokia site, located in the broad alluvial plain, east of St. Louis, within the Mississippi River Valley known as the American Bottom, is without a doubt 35 the largest prehistoric site in North America north of central Mexico (Fowler...QUANTIFYING BREAKAGE PARAMETERS OF FRAGILE ARCHAEOLOGICAL COMPONENTS TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF SITE BURIAL A Thesis by Forest Paul Rushmore III Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment...

Rushmore, Forest Paul

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

276

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b , Peng Gong c t The level of air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago was quantified using a dry deposition model. The result showed that a total of 1675 kg of air pollutants was removed by 19.8 ha of green roofs in one year

Yu, Qian

280

Quantifying electron-phonon coupling in CdTe12xSex nanocrystals via coherent phonon manipulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying electron-phonon coupling in CdTe12xSex nanocrystals via coherent phonon manipulation B to manipulate coherent phonon excitation and quantify the strength of electron-phonon coupling in CdTe1Ă?xSex nanocrystals (NCs). Raman active CdSe and CdTe longitudinal optical phonon (LO) modes are excited and probed

Xu, Xianfan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

1948 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 4, NO. 4, JULY 2005 Quantifying the Power Loss When Transmit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the ideal case, we quantify the power loss due to the finite-rate constraint across the entire SNR range. Index Terms--Finite-rate feedback, multi-antenna systems, power loss, transmit beamforming. I1948 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 4, NO. 4, JULY 2005 Quantifying the Power

Giannakis, Georgios

282

National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 11-12, 2005 1 Quantifying Savings From Improved Boiler Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy savings from switching to modulation control mode and reducing excess air in natural gas firedNational Industrial Energy Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 11-12, 2005 1 Quantifying/off operation and excess combustion air reduce boiler energy efficiency. This paper presents methods to quantify

Kissock, Kelly

283

Quantifying oxygen diffusion in ZnO nanobelt Jin Liu, Puxian Gao, Wenjie Mai, Changshi Lao, and Zhong L. Wanga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying oxygen diffusion in ZnO nanobelt Jin Liu, Puxian Gao, Wenjie Mai, Changshi Lao A method is presented for quantifying oxygen diffusion behavior in a nanodevice fabricated using individual for several days, oxygen in air diffused into the nanobelt and significantly changed the conductivity

Wang, Zhong L.

284

ammonium carbonates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

285

a537 carbon steel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

286

americium carbonates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

287

affecting carbon tetrachloride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

288

Electrochemical implications of defects in carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Hollow Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . 4.3.2.1 IncreasingThe electrochemistry of carbon nanotubes. Journal of Thethe sidewalls of carbon nanotubes. Journal of the American

Hoefer, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A cell nanoinjector based on carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

based on carbon nanotubes Xing Chen *|| , Andras Kis †|| ,that uses carbon nanotubes to deliver cargo into cells. Astrength (2, 3), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are ideal nanoscale

Chen, Xing; Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through single carbon nanotubes G. Chai Apollo Technologies,aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTsuse of fiber coated carbon nanotubes makes the handling of

Chai, G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exciton binding energies in carbon nanotubes from two-photonExciton binding energies in carbon nanotubes from two-photonoptical transition energies of carbon nanotubes: the role of

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National REDD+ Carbon Accounting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Participatory Carbon...

293

Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. , 2005, IPCC: Carbon Capture and Storage: Technical05CH11231. INTRODUCTION Carbon capture and storage (CCS)Development Mechanism CCS: Carbon Capture and Storage C02e:

Hoversten, Shanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of  American household carbon footprint. ” Ecological and  limitations) of carbon footprint estimates toward of the art in carbon footprint analyses for California, 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

On carbon footprints and growing energy use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On carbon footprints and growing energy use Curtis M.reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organizationhis own organization's carbon footprint and answers this

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Carbon Nanotubes: Bearing Stress Like Never Before  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hart, A.J. (2013). Carbon Nanotubes: Present and Futureproduction of carbon nanotubes, and can be used to producesynthesized properly, and carbon nanotubes are no exception.

Limaye, Aditya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Electrochemical implications of defects in carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters. Fullerenes, Nanotubes and Carbon Nanostructures,in Hollow Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . 4.3.2.1 Increasingmigration in graphite and carbon nanotubes. Chemical Physics

Hoefer, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Nanoelectromechanical Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Nanotubes on the2.4 Static Deformation of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . .3.2 Field Emission from Carbon Nanotubes: Electrostatics

Aleman, Benjamin Jose

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Defects and Disorder in Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perebeinos, V. (2008) Carbon Nanotubes 111 423. Bachilo, S.M. & Mceuen, P. L. (2008) Carbon Nanotubes 111 Biro, L. P. ,sectional structure of carbon nanotubes. Fullerenes '96.

Collins, Philip G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport through single carbon nanotubes G. Chai Apolloaligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTsuse of fiber coated carbon nanotubes makes the handling of

Chai, G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

past two decades. Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) -- also referred to as carbon capture, utilization and sequestration -- is a process that captures carbon dioxide...

302

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

around Surface-Attached Carbon Nanotubes. Ind. Eng. Chem.the flexural rigidity of carbon nanotube ensembles. AppliedNanotechnology in Carbon Materials. Acta Metallurgica, 1997.

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation RyanEnergy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation Ryanand/or site-attributable carbon emissions at commercial and

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Carbon-particle generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, A.J.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

Formation of rare earth carbonates using supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a process for the rapid, high yield conversion of select rare earth oxides or hydroxides, to their corresponding carbonates by contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Yanagihara, Naohisa (Zacopan, MX); Dyke, James T. (Santa Fe, NM); Vemulapalli, Krishna (Tuscon, AZ)

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

Development of carbon-carbon composites from solvent extracted pitch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several methods used to fabricate carbon-carbon composites. One used extensively in the fabrication of aerospace components such as rocket nozzles and reentry vehicle nosetips, as well as commercial components for furnace fixturing and glass manufacturing, is the densification of a woven preform with molten pitch, and the subsequent conversion of the pitch to graphite through heat treatment. Two types of pitch are used in this process; coal tar pitch and petroleum pitch. The objective of this program was to determine if a pitch produced by the direct extraction of coal could be used as a substitute for these pitches in the fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. The program involved comparing solvent extracted pitch with currently accepted pitches and rigidizing a carbon-carbon preform with solvent extracted pitch for comparison with carbon-carbon fabricated with currently available pitch.

NONE

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

SoftTemplated Mesoporous CarbonCarbon Nanotube Composites for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mesoporous Carbon-Carbon Nanotube Composites for High Performance Lithium-ion Batteries Dr. B. K. Guo, Dr. X. Q. Wang, Dr. P. F. Fulvio , Dr. S. M. Mahurin, Dr. X.-G. Sun,...

308

Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

Structural response of oxidation resistant carbon-carbon composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: zden O. Ochoa (Chair of Committee) Tho . o k (Member) Paul . Roschke (Member) J. A. Caton (Head of Department) December l996 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ABSTRACT... Structural Response of Oxidation Resistant Carbon-carbon Composites. (December 1996) Timothy Harold Ashley, B. S. , Texas ARM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ozden O. Ochoa Since carbon-carbon composites maintain their strength at high...

Ashley, Timothy Harold

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to bond with composite matrix material. It is important that a carbon fiber manufacturing cost model manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able associated with both the manufacture of carbon fibers themselves as well as their composites. Traditional

311

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION EFFORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION examines biological carbon sequestration using a grassland restoration as a model system. Chapter 1 for biological carbon sequestration. In this analysis, we found that significantly greater soil carbon

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

312

Carbon nanotubes: synthesis and functionalization   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions were then used as the basis of several comparative CVD experiments showing that the quality of nanotubes and the yield of carbon depended on the availability of carbon to react. The availability could be controlled by the varying concentration...

Andrews, Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion irradiation of carbon nanotubes is a tool that can be used to achieve modification of the structure. Irradiation stability of carbon nanotubes was studied by ion and electron bombardment of the samples. Different ion species at various energies...

Aitkaliyeva, Assel

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

Rushfeldt, Scott I

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Carbon Footprint Calculator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

316

Carbon smackdown: wind warriors  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Carbon smackdown: wind warriors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 Primary Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Selected US Chemical Subsectors in 1994 ...............................................................................................................16 Table 2.7 1999 Energy Consumption and Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) in the U.S. Cement Efficiency Technologies and Measures in Cement Industry.................22 Table 2.9 Energy Consumption

Delaware, University of

319

Carbon-Fuelled Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whether due to changes in policy or consumption of available fossil fuels, alternative sources of energy will be required, especially given the rising global energy demand. However, one of the main factors limiting the widespread utilization of renewable energy, such as wind, solar, wave or geothermal, is our ability to store energy. Storage of energy from carbon-neutral sources, such as electricity from solar or wind, can be accomplished through many routes. One approach is to store energy in the form of chemical bonds, as fuels. The conversion of low-energy compounds, such as water and carbon dioxide, to higher energy molecules, such as hydrogen or carbon-based fuels, enables the storage of carbon-neutral energy on a very large scale. The authorąs work in this area is supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Appel, Aaron M.

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Carbon smackdown: smart windows  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

August 3, 2010 Berkeley Lab talk: In the fourth of five Carbon Smackdown matches, Berkeley Lab researchers Delia Milliron of the Materials Sciences Division and Stephen Selkowitz of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division talk about their work on energy-saving smart windows.

Delia Milliron

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

14 April 2001 tmospheric carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions is through increased carbon sequestration into forests. In a large-scale assessment, Birdsey- ing carbon sequestration in southern forests. Carbon sequestration via southern pine forests may policy commitments. Keywords: carbon sequestration; southern pine forests ABSTRACT MEETING GLOBAL POLICY

Teskey, Robert O.

322

QUANTIFYING HYDROMETEOR ADVECTION AND THE VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF CLOUD FRACTION OVER THE SGP CART SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single column model (SCM) is, in essence, an isolated grid column of a general circulation model (GCM). Hence, SCMs have rather demanding input data requirements, but do not suffer from problems associated with balance of a GCM. Among the initial conditions that must be used to describe the initial state of the SCM column are the vertical profile of the horizontal wind components and the vertical profiles of cloud water and ice. In addition, the large-scale divergence and advective tendencies of cloud water and ice must be supplied as external parameters. Finally, the liquid and ice cloud amount as a function of height within the SCM column are required for model evaluation. The scale of the SCM column over which the initial conditions, external parameters, and model evaluation fields must apply is relatively large ({approximately}300 km). To quantify atmospheric structure on this scale, the ARM SGP CART site is located within the NOAA wind profiler network and has boundary and extended measurement facilities in an area compatible with the scale requirements of SCMs. Over an area this size, however, there is often rich mesoscale structure. This mesoscale variability creates a sampling problem that can thwart even the most sophisticated attempts to quantify the initial conditions and external parameters, and to evaluate model performance. There are two approaches that can be used to quantify the time varying quantities required for SCMs: objective analysis and data assimilation. The latter relies on products produced for operational forecasting, while the former involves methods that can be used to combine measurements from various sources to produce synoptic descriptions of the large-scale dynamical and thermodynamic fields. Since data assimilation from operational models introduces the uncertainty of the parameterizations used in the models, most of the focus in the SCM effort has been on developing objective analysis techniques.

MILLER,M.; VERLINDE,J.

1998-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

Quantifying the Operational Benefits of Conventional and Advanced Pumped Storage Hydro on Reliability and Efficiency: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pumped storage hydro (PSH) plants have significant potential to provide reliability and efficiency benefits in future electric power systems with high penetrations of variable generation. New PSH technologies, such as adjustable-speed PSH, have been introduced that can also present further benefits. This paper demonstrates and quantifies some of the reliability and efficiency benefits afforded by PSH plants by utilizing the Flexible Energy Scheduling Tool for the Integration of Variable generation (FESTIV), an integrated power system operations tool that evaluates both reliability and production costs.

Krad, I.; Ela, E.; Koritarov, V.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Quantifying the Cosmic Web in the New Era of Redshift Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two main strategies have been implemented in mapping the local universe: whole-sky 'shallow' surveys and 'deep' surveys over limited parts of the sky. The two approaches complement each other in studying cosmography and statistical properties of the Universe. We summarise some results on the power spectrum of fluctuations and Wiener reconstruction of the density field from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) of 230,000 redshifts. We then discuss future challenges in quantifying the web of cosmic structure in the on-going redshift surveys.

Ofer Lahav

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

Carbon Nanotubes for Data Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Nanotubes for Data Processing Joerg Appenzeller, T. J. Watson Research Center, IBM Research.2 Electronic Structure of Graphene 4 2.3 Electronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes 4 2.4 Transport Properties 6 2.5 Contacts 9 3 Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes 10 3.1 Synthetic Methods 10 3.2 Growth Mechanisms 12

Joselevich, Ernesto

327

Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

Wei, G.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION L.C. Castro, D.L. John, and D.L. Pulfrey Department A simple, non-equilibrium model is used to evaluate the likely DC performance of carbon nanotube field and transcon- ductance close to the low-quantum-capacitance limit. Keywords: Carbon nanotubes, field

Pulfrey, David L.

329

4, 99123, 2007 Amazon carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, suggested much larger estimates for tropical forest carbon sequestration in the Ama- zon BasinBGD 4, 99­123, 2007 Amazon carbon balanc J. Lloyd et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences An airborne regional carbon balance

Boyer, Edmond

330

Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development National Renewable Energy Laboratory logo The National...

331

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

*** How PAN based Carbon Fibers are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*** How PAN based Carbon Fibers are Manufactured *** How Carbon Fiber Material Properties are Achieved *** Carbon Fiber Markets/Applications CarbonFiber AerospaceEngineeringGuestLecture: Friday as a Business Development Manager for Amoco's carbon fiber business unit (manufacturers of T-300 carbon fiber

Hu, Hui

333

6, 34193463, 2006 Black carbon or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing carbonaceous;ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

334

CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

Su, Xiao

335

Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance regimes: A general theoretical model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large scale terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. We developed a model (REGIME) to quantify ecosystem carbon storage capacities (E[x]) under varying disturbance regimes with an analytical solution E[x] = U {center_dot} {tau}{sub E} {center_dot} {lambda}{lambda} + s {tau} 1, where U is ecosystem carbon influx, {tau}{sub E} is ecosystem carbon residence time, and {tau}{sub 1} is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance interval ({lambda}) and the mean disturbance severity (s). It is a Michaelis-Menten-type equation illustrating the saturation of carbon content with mean disturbance interval. This model analytically integrates the deterministic ecosystem carbon processes with stochastic disturbance events to reveal a general pattern of terrestrial carbon dynamics at large scales. The model allows us to get a sense of the sensitivity of ecosystems to future environmental changes just by a few calculations. According to the REGIME model, for example, approximately 1.8 Pg C will be lost in the high-latitude regions of North America (>45{sup o} N) if fire disturbance intensity increases around 5.7 time the current intensity to the end of the twenty-first century, which will require around 12% increases in net primary productivity (NPP) to maintain stable carbon stocks. If the residence time decreased 10% at the same time additional 12.5% increases in NPP are required to keep current C stocks. The REGIME model also lays the foundation for analytically modeling the interactions between deterministic biogeochemical processes and stochastic disturbance events.

Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Weile [NASA Ames Research Center; Wang, Han [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Hastings, Alan [University of California, Davis; Schimel, David [NEON Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

337

Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

EB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Carbon-Carbon composites (C/C) are materials frequently used in industrial applications such as planeEB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITE UNDER TRIBOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS 1, homogenization, carbon ABSTRACT Thermo mechanical properties of Carbon-Carbon composite (C/C) allow them

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

339

Electrochimica Acta 52 (2007) 39653975 Elucidating differences between carbon paper and carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of them are carbon-fiber-based porous materials: carbon paper is non-woven, while carbon cloth is wovenElectrochimica Acta 52 (2007) 3965­3975 Elucidating differences between carbon paper and carbon the performance differences between carbon paper (CP) and carbon cloth (CC). Three-dimensional simulations, based

340

Carbon Cycle Discussion After the warm-up quiz, discuss the carbon cycle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Cycle Discussion After the warm-up quiz, discuss the carbon cycle. Carbon is one is without carbon. Where else is carbon on our Earth? In rocks, living organisms, the atmosphere, oceans Does carbon stay in one place? What processes include moving carbon? Introduce residence time: How long does

Carrington, Emily

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

FUJITA,E.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

Carbon taxes and India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India`s rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) {open_quotes}Grandfathered emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) {open_quotes}Equal per capita emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions.

Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Shukla, P.R. [Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA/ESRL. Mauna Loa Carbon Dioxide Annual Mean Data.H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalanalysis of black carbon in soils. Global Biogeochem. Cycle.

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B v + B d ) C T = Total carbon B v = biomass contained indevelopment through carbon sequestration: experiences in2000) Rural livelihoods and carbon management, IIED Natural

Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Risk-Based Comparison of Carbon Capture Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe an integrated probabilistic risk assessment methodological framework and a decision-support tool suite for implementing systematic comparisons of competing carbon capture technologies. Culminating from a collaborative effort among national laboratories under the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI), the risk assessment framework and the decision-support tool suite encapsulate three interconnected probabilistic modeling and simulation components. The technology readiness level (TRL) assessment component identifies specific scientific and engineering targets required by each readiness level and applies probabilistic estimation techniques to calculate the likelihood of graded as well as nonlinear advancement in technology maturity. The technical risk assessment component focuses on identifying and quantifying risk contributors, especially stochastic distributions for significant risk contributors, performing scenario-based risk analysis, and integrating with carbon capture process model simulations and optimization. The financial risk component estimates the long-term return on investment based on energy retail pricing, production cost, operating and power replacement cost, plan construction and retrofit expenses, and potential tax relief, expressed probabilistically as the net present value distributions over various forecast horizons.

Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Jones, Edward

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Quantifying non-Markovianity of continuous-variable Gaussian dynamical maps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a non-Markovianity measure for continuous-variable open quantum systems based on the idea put forward in H.-P. Breuer et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 210401 (2009);], that is, by quantifying the flow of information from the environment back to the open system. Instead of the trace distance we use here the fidelity to assess distinguishability of quantum states. We employ our measure to evaluate non-Markovianity of two paradigmatic Gaussian channels: the purely damping channel and the quantum Brownian motion channel with Ohmic environment. We consider different classes of Gaussian states and look for pairs of states maximizing the backflow of information. For coherent states we find simple analytical solutions, whereas for squeezed states we provide both exact numerical and approximate analytical solutions in the weak coupling limit.

Vasile, Ruggero; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Piilo, Jyrki [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turun yliopisto (Finland); SUPA, EPS/Physics, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH144AS (United Kingdom) and Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turun yliopisto (Finland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy) and CNISM, UdR Milano Statale, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turun yliopisto (Finland)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

A New Approach to Quantify Level 2 SPAR Models in SAPHIRE 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (USNRC) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Level 2 models for U.S. commercial nuclear power plants has historically used a partitioning approach for plant damage state (PDS) binning and model quantification since late 1990s [1]. While this approach has the advantage to be able to identify the details of the severe accident sequences with one or more individual PDS vector characters, the Level 2 model quantification process is tedious and error-prone with multiple steps involved. A new approach to quantify Level 2 SPAR models was recently developed and implemented in the latest SAPHIRE Version 8 [2]. The new approach removes the partition rules and greatly simplifies the quantification process.

Zhegang Ma; John Schroeder; Curtis Smith; Ted Wood; Martin Sattison

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Quantifying microbubble clustering in turbulent flow from single-point measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-point hot-wire measurements in the bulk of a turbulent channel have been performed in order to detect and quantify the phenomenon of preferential bubble accumulation. We show that statistical analysis of the bubble-probe colliding-times series can give a robust method for investigation of clustering in the bulk regions of a turbulent flow where, due to the opacity of the flow, no imaging technique can be employed. We demonstrate that micro-bubbles (radius R_0 ~ 0.1 mm) in a developed turbulent flow, where the Kolmogorov length-scale is, eta ~ R_0, display preferential concentration in small scale structures with a typical statistical signature ranging from the dissipative range, O(eta), up to the low inertial range, O(100 eta). A comparison with Eulerian-Lagrangian numeri- cal simulations is also presented to further support our proposed way to characterize clustering from temporal time series at a fixed position.

Enrico Calzavarini; Thomas H. van den Berg; Federico Toschi; Detlef Lohse

2008-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

349

Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to ``wick`` into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy. 1 fig.

Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Moorhead, A.J.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to "wick" into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McMillan, April D. (Knoxville, TN); Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

DePaolo, Don [Director, LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

chemistrybutchercarbonationmechanism.pdf More Documents & Publications Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces Innovative...

354

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for  Geologic  Carbon  Sequestration. ”   International  of  Energy.  “Carbon  Sequestration  Atlas  of  the  Water  Extracted  from  Carbon  Sequestration  Projects."  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Carbonate fuel cell anodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process is described for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

Donado, R.A.; Hrdina, K.E.; Remick, R.J.

1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

Carbonate fuel cell anodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

Donado, Rafael A. (Chicago, IL); Hrdina, Kenneth E. (Glenview, IL); Remick, Robert J. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

RMOTC - Testing - Carbon Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001Data setsSTWAClarke Turner,Carbon

358

Capturing carbon | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N-Capture of Carbon Dioxide

359

Carbon Capture FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N-Capture of CarbonLangmuircarbon

360

ARM - Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformationbudapest Comments? We would love to heartotdngovInstrumentswrf-chem Comments?CampaignCarbon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 20154:04-21-2014 (866) 448 - DEPOMeetingIndustriesCarbon

362

Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in 2011 to accelerate the development and deployment of new, lower cost carbon fiber composite materials. The Consortium draws on the broad experience that the Oak Ridge National...

363

Carbon-assisted flyer plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser driven flyer plate utilizing an optical fiber connected to a laser. The end of the optical fiber has a layer of carbon and a metal layer deposited onto it. The carbon layer provides the laser induced plasma which is superior to the plasma produced from most metals. The carbon layer plasma is capable of providing a flatter flyer plate, converting more of the laser energy to driving plasma, promoting a higher flyer plate acceleration, and providing a more uniform pulse behind the plate. In another embodiment, the laser is in optical communication with a substrate onto which a layer of carbon and a layer of metal have been deposited.

Stahl, David B. (Los Alamos, NM); Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heat in a combustion process while producing a concentrated CO 2 stream to facilitate carbon capture. Chemical looping research efforts can be categorized as: modeling tool...

365

Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

Leonard, F. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

Rodosta, Traci

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

Rodosta, Traci

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

368

Self-assembling functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-walled carbon nanotubes Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arescale synthesis of carbon nanotubes." Nature, Vol.358, 220-Ropes of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes." Science, Vol.273(5274),

Gao, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Abstract: In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host...

370

Carbon/Ternary Alloy/Carbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CarbonTernary AlloyCarbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical Data Storage Medium to Potentially Replace Magnetic Tape. CarbonTernary AlloyCarbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an...

371

University of Aberdeen Carbon Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Aberdeen is committed to reducing its carbon footprint and to playing its part in limiting the worstUniversity of Aberdeen Carbon Management Plan Higher Education Carbon Management Programme working with Page 1 The University of Aberdeen Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan (CMP

Levi, Ran

372

International Experiences with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse-Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examine air pollution (and other pollutant) control policypolicies to control non-GHG air pollutants. These studiesair pollutant emission reduction and ancillary carbon benefits of SO 2 control

Williams, Christopher

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250şC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

374

Pyrolytic carbon electrodes Lithographically Defined Porous Carbon Electrodes**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the intrinsic material properties of carbon, functionalized films can be produced through chemical modification fabrication method capable of producing large area (%100 s cm2 ) submicrometer porous carbon films. In our methodology. The palladium-modified electrodes exhibit a catalytic response for methanol oxidation

New Mexico, University of

375

Carbon dioxide and climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

46 (2009-6) Nucleation of a single-walled carbon nanotube inside a carbon nanotube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the metal-carbide. Key Words : Molecular Dynamics, Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube, Growth Mechanism, Carbon functions of carbon atoms and metal atoms in the metal carbide cluster #12;,10) Carbon (11,11) Carbon (15,6) Carbon (10,10) Metal (11,11) Metal (15,6) Metal Fig. 4 Density distribution

Maruyama, Shigeo

378

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao promising carbon uptake results and is a viable option for carbonation curing. Carbon sequestration increase in Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions over the past five decades, specific ways to reduce

Barthelat, Francois

379

University of Glasgow Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan working with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon vision 11 2.3 Strategic themes 12 Targets and objectives 13 3 Emissions Baseline and Projections. Professor Anton Muscatelli, Principal Foreword from the Carbon Trust Cutting carbon emissions as partUniversity of Glasgow Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan working with Page 1 Carbon

Mottram, Nigel

380

Innovative use of adhesive interface characteristics to nondestructively quantify the strength of bonded joints.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in structural adhesives have permitted engineers to contemplate the use of bonded joints in areas that have long been dominated by mechanical fasteners and welds. Although strength, modulus, and toughness have been improved in modern adhesives, the typical concerns with using these polymers still exist. These include concerns over long-term durability and an inability to quantify bond strength (i.e., identify weak bonds) in adhesive joints. Bond deterioration in aging structures and bond strength in original construction are now critical issues that require more than simple flaw detection. Whether the structure involves metallic or composite materials, it is necessary to extend inspections beyond the detection of disbond flaws to include an assessment of the strength of the bond. Use of advanced nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods to measure the mechanical properties of a bonded joint and associated correlations with post-inspection failure tests have provided some clues regarding the key parameters involved in assessing bond strength. Recent advances in ultrasonic- and thermographic-based inspection methods have shown promise for measuring such properties. Specialized noise reduction and signal enhancement schemes have allowed thermographic interrogations to image the subtle differences between bond lines of various strengths. Similarly, specialized ultrasonic (UT) inspection techniques, including laser UT, guided waves, UT spectroscopy, and resonance methods, can be coupled with unique signal analysis algorithms to accurately characterize the properties of weak interfacial bonds. The generation of sufficient energy input levels to derive bond strength variations, the production of sufficient technique sensitivity to measure such minor response variations, and the difficulty in manufacturing repeatable weak bond specimens are all issues that exacerbate these investigations. The key to evaluating the bond strength lies in the ability to exploit the critical characteristics of weak bonds such as nonlinear responses, poor transmission of shear waves, and changes in response to stiffness-based interrogations. This paper will present several ongoing efforts that have identified promising methods for quantifying bond strength and discuss some completed studies that provide a foundation for further evolution in weak bond assessments.

Roach, Dennis Patrick; Duvall, Randy L.; Rackow, Kirk A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ASSESSMENT OF BUILDING LIFECYLE CARBON EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even though the Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies (CC & ST) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology initiated carbon emission research in late 1990s (CSI, 2013), carbon emissions has only become a hot topic in the last decade...

Kwok, George

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Carbon Dioxide Reduction Through Urban Forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Retrieval Terms: urban forestry, carbon dioxide, sequestration, avoided energy The Authors E. Gregory McCarbon Dioxide Reduction Through Urban Forestry: Guidelines for Professional and Volunteer Tree; Simpson, James R. 1999. Carbon dioxide reduction through urban forestry

Standiford, Richard B.

383

Carbon Fiber Composite Cellular A Dissertation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Fiber Composite Cellular Structures ____________________________________ A Dissertation and honeycombs. However, for weight sensitive, ambient temperature applications, carbon fiber composites have emerged as a promising material due to its high specific strength and low density. Carbon fiber reinforced

Wadley, Haydn

384

Carbon Nanotubes: Bearing Stress Like Never Before  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A.J. (2013). Carbon Nanotubes: Present and Future CommercialP.M. (2008). Carbon Nanotubes. A. Jorio, G. Dresselhaus, &V.N. (2004). Carbon Nanotubes: properties and application.

Limaye, Aditya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Defects and Disorder in Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perebeinos, V. (2008) Carbon Nanotubes 111 423. Bachilo, S.P. L. (2008) Carbon Nanotubes 111 Biro, L. P. , Khanh, N.structure of carbon nanotubes. Fullerenes '96. Oxford, UK.

Collins, Philip G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A synthesis of carbon in international trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Peters, G. P. : Carbon Footprint of Nations: A Global,analysis for na- tional carbon footprint accounting, Eco.study of the UK’s carbon footprint, Eco. Syst. Res. , 22,

Peters, G. P; Davis, S. J; Andrew, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Carbon Nanotubes: Bearing Stress Like Never Before  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the mechanical properties of carbon nanotube– polymercomposites. Carbon, 44. 1624 – 1652 doi: 10.1016/j.R.H. , & Hart, A.J. (2013). Carbon Nanotubes: Present and

Limaye, Aditya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Who Pays a Price on Carbon?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a per-capita basis a carbon price is much more regressiveadverse distributional effects of a carbon emissions policy.Distributional incidence · Carbon tax · Tradable permits Q52

Grainger, Corbett A.; Kolstad, Charles D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Climate policy and dependence on traded carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of human development and carbon emissions embodied in trade03.html) Lo A Y 2012 Carbon emissions trading in Chinagoal is to regulate carbon emissions, then, because only a

Andrew, Robbie M; Davis, Steven J; Peters, Glen P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Probabilistic Approach to Quantifying the Contribution of Variable Generation and Transmission to System Reliability: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing electrical load served by variable generation (VG), such as wind and solar energy, in the United States and many other countries has stimulated an interesting line of research to better quantify the capacity value of these resources. Methods applied traditionally to thermal units based on their average outage rates do not apply to VG because of their uncertain and non-dispatchable nature. The North American Electric Reliability Corporation's Integration of Variable Generation Task Force recently released a report that highlighted the need to develop and benchmark underlying loss-of-load expectation and related metrics that reasonably and fairly calculate the contribution to planning reserves, or capacity value, of solar and wind power. As the fraction of generation coming from VG becomes more significant, their estimated capacity value will have a larger impact on system planning. In this paper, we provide a method to include VG in traditional probabilistic-based adequacy methods. This method has been implemented in the Renewable Energy Probabilistic Resource Assessment tool developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Through an example based on the U.S. Western Interconnection, this method is applied to assess the effect that transmission can have on resource adequacy. We also analyze the interactions between available transmission and capacity value for VG.

Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Empirical and physics based mathematical models of uranium hydride decomposition kinetics with quantified uncertainties.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal particle beds have recently become a major technique for hydrogen storage. In order to extract hydrogen from such beds, it is crucial to understand the decomposition kinetics of the metal hydride. We are interested in obtaining a a better understanding of the uranium hydride (UH3) decomposition kinetics. We first developed an empirical model by fitting data compiled from different experimental studies in the literature and quantified the uncertainty resulting from the scattered data. We found that the decomposition time range predicted by the obtained kinetics was in a good agreement with published experimental results. Secondly, we developed a physics based mathematical model to simulate the rate of hydrogen diffusion in a hydride particle during the decomposition. We used this model to simulate the decomposition of the particles for temperatures ranging from 300K to 1000K while propagating parametric uncertainty and evaluated the kinetics from the results. We compared the kinetics parameters derived from the empirical and physics based models and found that the uncertainty in the kinetics predicted by the physics based model covers the scattered experimental data. Finally, we used the physics-based kinetics parameters to simulate the effects of boundary resistances and powder morphological changes during decomposition in a continuum level model. We found that the species change within the bed occurring during the decomposition accelerates the hydrogen flow by increasing the bed permeability, while the pressure buildup and the thermal barrier forming at the wall significantly impede the hydrogen extraction.

Salloum, Maher N.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Quantifying the Effect of the Principal-Agent Problem on USResidential Energy Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Energy Agency (IEA) initiated andcoordinated this project to investigate the effects of market failures inthe end-use of energy that may isolate some markets or portions thereoffrom energy price signals in five member countries. Quantifying theamount of energy associated with market failures helps to demonstrate thesignificance of energy efficiency policies beyond price signals. In thisreport we investigate the magnitude of the principal-agent (PA) problemaffecting four of the major energy end uses in the U.S. residentialsector: refrigeration, water heating, space heating, and lighting. Usingdata from the American Housing Survey, we develop a novel approach toclassifying households into a PA matrix for each end use. End use energyvalues differentiated by housing unit type from the Residential EnergyConsumption Survey were used to estimate the final and primary energy useassociated with the PA problem. We find that the 2003 associated siteenergy use from these four end uses totaled over 3,400 trillion Btu,equal to 35 percent of the site energy consumed by the residentialsector.

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant

2006-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to investigate dispersion as a method of quantifying geological characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity in order to enhance crude oil recovery. The dispersion of flow of a reservoir rock (dispersion coefficient and dispersivity) was identified as one of the physical properties of a reservoir rock by measuring the mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. A rock was 100% saturated with a resident fluid and displaced by a miscible fluid of equal viscosity and equal density. Some specific experiments were performed with unequal densities. Produced fluid was analyzed by refractometer, nuclear reaction, electrical conductivity and X-ray scan. Several physical and flow characteristics were measured on the sand rock sample in order to establish correlations with the measured dispersion property. Absolute permeability, effective porosity, relative permeability, capillary pressure, the heterogeneity factor and electrical conductivity were used to better understand the flow system. Linear, transverse, 2-D and 3-D dispersions were measured and used to characterize the rock heterogeneity of the flow system. A new system of measuring dispersion was developed using a gas displacing gas system in a porous medium. An attempt was also made to determine the dispersion property of an actual reservoir from present day well log data on a producing well. 275 refs., 102 figs., 17 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Synergy Between Total Scattering and Advanced Simulation Techniques: Quantifying Geopolymer Gel Evolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the ever increasing demands for technologically advanced structural materials, together with emerging environmental consciousness due to climate change, geopolymer cement is fast becoming a viable alternative to traditional cements due to proven mechanical engineering characteristics and the reduction in CO2 emitted (approximately 80% less CO2 emitted compared to ordinary Portland cement). Nevertheless, much remains unknown regarding the kinetics of the molecular changes responsible for nanostructural evolution during the geopolymerization process. Here, in-situ total scattering measurements in the form of X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to quantify the extent of reaction of metakaolin/slag alkali-activated geopolymer binders, including the effects of various activators (alkali hydroxide/silicate) on the kinetics of the geopolymerization reaction. Restricting quantification of the kinetics to the initial ten hours of reaction does not enable elucidation of the true extent of the reaction, but using X-ray PDF data obtained after 128 days of reaction enables more accurate determination of the initial extent of reaction. The synergies between the in-situ X-ray PDF data and simulations conducted by multiscale density functional theory-based coarse-grained Monte Carlo analysis are outlined, particularly with regard to the potential for the X-ray data to provide a time scale for kinetic analysis of the extent of reaction obtained from the multiscale simulation methodology.

White, Claire [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bloomer, Breaunnah E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Provis, John L. [The University of Melbourne; Henson, Neil J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Page, Katharine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Quantify uncertain emergency search techniques (QUEST) -- Theory and user`s guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As recent world events show, criminal and terrorist access to nuclear materials is a growing national concern. The national laboratories are taking the lead in developing technologies to counter these potential threats to the national security. Sandia National laboratories, with support from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Bechtel Nevada, Remote Sensing Laboratory, has developed QUEST (a model to Quantify Uncertain Emergency Search Techniques), to enhance the performance of organizations in the search for lost or stolen nuclear material. In addition, QUEST supports a wide range of other applications, such as environmental monitoring, nuclear facilities inspections, and searcher training. QUEST simulates the search for nuclear materials and calculates detector response for various source types and locations. The probability of detecting a radioactive source during a search is a function of many different variables, including source type, search location and structure geometry (including shielding), search dynamics (path and speed), and detector type and size. Through calculation of dynamic detector response, QUEST makes possible quantitative comparisons of various sensor technologies and search patterns. The QUEST model can be used as a tool to examine the impact of new detector technologies, explore alternative search concepts, and provide interactive search/inspector training.

Johnson, M.M.; Goldsby, M.E.; Plantenga, T.D.; Porter, T.L.; West, T.H.; Wilcox, W.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Systems Studies Dept.; Hensley, W.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Nuclear Chemistry Section

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

QUEST: A model to quantify uncertain emergency search techniques, theory and application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As recent world events show, criminal and terrorist access to nuclear materials is a growing national concern. The national laboratories are taking the lead in developing technologies to counter these potential threats to our national security. Sandia National Laboratories, with support from Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the Remote Sensing Laboratory, has developed QUEST (a model to Quantify Uncertain Emergency Search Techniques), to enhance the performance of organizations in the search for lost or stolen nuclear material. In addition, QUEST supports a wide range of other applications, such as environmental monitoring, nuclear facilities inspections, and searcher training. QUEST simulates the search for nuclear materials and calculates detector response fro various source types and locations. The probability of detecting a radioactive source during a search is a function of many different variables. Through calculation of dynamic detector response, QUEST makes possible quantitative comparisons of various sensor technologies and search patterns. The QUEST model can be used to examine the impact of new detector technologies, explore alternative search concepts, and provide interactive search/inspector training.

Johnson, M.M.; Goldsby, M.E.; Plantenga, T.D.; Wilcox, W.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Hensley, W.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Method for producing carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Perry, William L. (Jemez Springs, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

398

Process for making hollow carbon spheres  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hollow carbon sphere having a carbon shell and an inner core is disclosed. The hollow carbon sphere has a total volume that is equal to a volume of the carbon shell plus an inner free volume within the carbon shell. The inner free volume is at least 25% of the total volume. In some instances, a nominal diameter of the hollow carbon sphere is between 10 and 180 nanometers.

Luhrs, Claudia C.; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N.; Knapp, Angela Michelle

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Long-term soil warming and Carbon Cycle Feedbacks to the Climate System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the proposed research was to quantify and explain the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem. The research was done at an established soil warming experiment at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts – Barre Woods site established in 2001. In the field, a series of plant and soil measurements were made to quantify changes in C storage in the ecosystem and to provide insights into the possible relationships between C-storage changes and nitrogen (N) cycling changes in the warmed plots. Field measurements included: 1) annual woody increment; 2) litterfall; 3) carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface; 4) root biomass and respiration; 5) microbial biomass; and 6) net N mineralization and net nitrification rates. This research was designed to increase our understanding of how global warming will affect the capacity of temperate forest ecosystems to store C. The work explored how soil warming changes the interactions between the C and N cycles, and how these changes affect land-atmosphere feedbacks. This core research question framed the project – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem? A second critical question was addressed in this research – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5{degrees}C soil temperature increase on nitrogen (N) cycling in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem?

Melillo, Jerry M.

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Graphene: Materially Better Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene, a single atom–thick plane of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, has captivated the attention of physicists, materials scientists, and engineers alike over the five years following its experimental isolation. Graphene is a fundamentally new type of electronic material whose electrons are strictly confined to a two-dimensional plane and exhibit properties akin to those of ultrarelativistic particles. Graphene's two-dimensional form suggests compatibility with conventional wafer processing technology. Extraordinary physical properties, including exceedingly high charge carrier mobility, current-carrying capacity, mechanical strength, and thermal conductivity, make it an enticing candidate for new electronic technologies both within and beyond complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). Immediate graphene applications include high-speed analog electronics and highly conductive, flexible, transparent thin films for displays and optoelectronics. Currently, much graphene research is focused on generating and tuning a bandgap and on novel device structures that exploit graphene's extraordinary electrical, optical, and mechanical properties.

Fuhrer, M. S.; Lau, C. N.; MacDonald, A. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

402

Carbon Fiber Pilot Plant and Research Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentationname Carbon Fiber Facilities Materials Carbon Fiber Research Facility Type Production Fiber Types Tow Size Tensioning Line...

403

Electrochemical implications of defects in carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducting polymer hybrid supercapacitors. Journal of Thestudies of carbon-carbon supercapacitors. Journal of TheHigh-voltage asymmetric supercapacitors operating in aqueous

Hoefer, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Metal supported carbon nanostructures for hydrogen storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon nanocones are the fifth equilibrium structure of carbon, first synthesized in 1997. They have been selected for investigating hydrogen storage capacity, because initial temperature… (more)

Matelloni, Paolo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF Working with CFTF HFIR MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Home | User Facilities | CFTF CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility SHARE Oak...

406

Speeding Up Zeolite Evaluation for Carbon Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Speeding Up Zeolite Evaluation for Carbon Capture Speeding Up Zeolite Evaluation for Carbon Capture Zeolite.png Schematic of an important class of porous materials known as...

407

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface-Attached Carbon Nanotubes. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. ,Structure of Carbon Nanotubes. Journal of Physical ChemistryP.G. and P. Avouris, Nanotubes for Electronics. Scientific

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Functionalized carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for biosensing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for biosensing applications. Functionalized carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for biosensing applications. Abstract: This review summarizes the recent...

409

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carbon nanotubes by transmission electron energy-lossEnergy Gaps in "Metallic" Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.nanotubes, absorbance increases with increasing light energy

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Case Study: Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Supermarket Refrigeration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Case Study: Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Supermarket Refrigeration Systems Case Study: Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Supermarket Refrigeration Systems This case study documents one...

411

California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative California Low Carbon Fuels Infrastructure Investment Initiative 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

412

Robust carbon monolith having hierarchical porosity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbon monolith includes a robust carbon monolith characterized by a skeleton size of at least 100 nm, and a hierarchical pore structure having macropores and mesopores.

Dai, Sheng; Guiohon, Georges A; Liang, Chengdu

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Robust carbon monolith having hierarchical porosity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carbon monolith includes a robust carbon monolith characterized by a skeleton size of at least 100 nm, and a hierarchical pore structure having macropores and mesopores.

Dai, Sheng; Guiochon, Georges A; Liang, Chengdu

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

UCSF Sustainability Baseline Assessment: Carbon Footprint Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UCSF Sustainability Baseline Assessment: Carbon Footprint Analysis Final Issue Date: March 21, 2010 #12;Carbon Footprint Analysis Background This chapter of the Sustainability Assessment focuses on UCSF

Yamamoto, Keith

416

Who Pays a Price on Carbon?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that a fully auctioned emissions trading program (with aof a carbon tax or emissions trading system (Fullertona carbon tax or emissions trading system may have exemptions

Grainger, Corbett A.; Kolstad, Charles D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Numerical simulation and modeling of carbon nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The discovery of carbon nanotubes has triggered a significant amount of interest. Since then, much research has been done on these new forms of carbon… (more)

Wong, Chee How.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

CHEMICAL MODIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a relatively new allotrope of carbon that possess very unique and exciting physical characteristics. However, much is still unknown regarding their… (more)

Cassity, Kelby Brandan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Economics of geological sequestration and carbon management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this carbon-constrained world, carbon management options for climate change mitigation are becoming increasingly important, especially in China, one of the largest energy consuming and… (more)

Su, Hui, 1976-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN NATURAL AND CREATED WETLANDS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Wetland ecosystems are significant carbon sinks. Their high productivity and presence of water gives them the ability to efficiently sequester carbon in the soil,… (more)

Bernal, Blanca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable support of Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction. Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable...

422

Contraction & Convergence: UK carbon emissions and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the EU's emissions trading scheme will do little to mitigate carbon emissions 4) Aviation growth must emissions. Keywords Contraction & Convergence; aviation; emissions trading; passengers; carbon dioxide #12

Watson, Andrew

423

New Zealand Joins International Carbon Storage Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum today announced that New Zealand has become the newest member of the international carbon storage body.

424

Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

425

Electrical Transport in Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Single wallCarbon nanotubes and graphene are the most popular Carbonin the Normal Metal – Graphene – Superconductor Junctions

Liu, Gang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award August 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A film...

427

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important approach to estimate...

428

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

429

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important approach to estimate the potential of storing carbon dioxide in depleted oil fields...

430

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Fossil-fuel Combustion By-products. Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation...

431

Carbon and carbon monoxide hydrogenation on nickel: support effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of carbon, deposited on nickel catalysts by CO disproportionation, was investigated by temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) for four oxide supports, alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/), silica (SiO/sub 2/), titanium oxide (TiO/sub 2/), and SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was measured by temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) for comparison. The rate of carbon hydrogenation to methane was found to be independent of the support and an average activation energy of 42 kJ/mol was estimated. In contrast, the rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was very sensitive to the catalyst support. Nickel (Ni) supported on TiO/sub 2/ exhibited the highest specific activity, and two distinct sites for methanation were observed on Ni/TiO/sub 2/ and Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The lowest specific activities were observed for Ni/SiO/sub 2/ and Ni/SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. For all catalysts, carbon hydrogenation occurred at a lower temperature than carbon monoxide hydrogenation. For both TPR and TPSR, small amounts of ethane were formed and at a lower temperature than methane. The amount of less-active, ..beta..-carbon observed in TPSR experiments was very small on all catalysts. These results indicate that at high coverages, carbon hydrogenation does not depend on the support, and thus it is not rate-determining for CO hydrogenation in excess hydrogen. The support is also shown to change the specific rate of carbon monoxide methanation; activity differences seen in steady-state experiments are not just due to differences in site densities. 5 figures, 5 tables.

Ozdogan, S.Z.; Gochis, P.D.; Falconer, J.L.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2012)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models, with uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset incorporates commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and is also developing new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. Ultimately, the CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. CCSI is organized into 8 technical elements that fall under two focus areas. The first focus area (Physicochemical Models and Data) addresses the steps necessary to model and simulate the various technologies and processes needed to bring a new Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology into production. The second focus area (Analysis & Software) is developing the software infrastructure to integrate the various components and implement the tools that are needed to make quantifiable decisions regarding the viability of new CCS technologies. CCSI also has an Industry Advisory Board (IAB). By working closely with industry from the inception of the project to identify industrial challenge problems, CCSI ensures that the simulation tools are developed for the carbon capture technologies of most relevance to industry. CCSI is led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and leverages the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories? core strengths in modeling and simulation, bringing together the best capabilities at NETL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The CCSI?s industrial partners provide representation from the power generation industry, equipment manufacturers, technology providers and engineering and construction firms. The CCSI?s academic participants (Carnegie Mellon University, Princeton University, West Virginia University, and Boston University) bring unparalleled expertise in multiphase flow reactors, combustion, process synthesis and optimization, planning and scheduling, and process control techniques for energy processes. During Fiscal Year (FY) 12, CCSI released its first set of computational tools and models. This pre-release, a year ahead of the originally planned first release, is the result of intense industry interest in getting early access to the tools and the phenomenal progress of the CCSI technical team. These initial components of the CCSI Toolset provide new models and computational capabilities that will accelerate the commercial development of carbon capture technologies as well as related technologies, such as those found in the power, refining, chemicals, and gas production industries. The release consists of new tools for process synthesis and optimization to help identify promising concepts more quickly, new physics-based models of potential capture equipment and processes that will reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new systems, a framework to quantify the uncertainty of model predictions, and various enabling tools that provide new capabilities such as creating reduced order models (ROMs) from reacting multiphase flow

Miller, David C; Syamlal, Madhava; Cottrell, Roger; Kress, Joel D; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, S; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V; Zitney, Stephen E; Bhattacharyya, D; Agarwal, Deb; Tong, Charles; Lin, Guang; Dale, Crystal; Engel, Dave; Calafiura, Paolo; Beattie, Keith

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Quantifying microbe?mineral interactions leading to remotely detectable induced polarization signals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to investigate controls on induced polarization responses in porous media. The approach taken in the project was to compare electrical measurements made on mineral surfaces with atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to observations made at the column-scale using traditional spectral induced polarization measurements. In the project we evaluated a number of techniques for investigating the surface properties of materials, including the development of a new AFM measurement protocol that utilizes an external electric field to induce grain-scale polarizations that can be probed using a charged AFM tip. The experiments we performed focused on idealized systems (i.e., glass beads and silica gel) where we could obtain the high degree of control needed to understand how changes in the pore environment, which are determined by biogeochemical controls in the subsurface, affect mechanisms contributing to complex electrical conductivity, i.e., conduction and polarization, responses. The studies we performed can be classified into those affecting the chemical versus physical properties of the grain surface and pore space. Chemical alterations of the surface focused on evaluating how changes in pore fluid pH and ionic composition control surface conduction. These were performed as column flow through experiments where the pore fluid was exchanged in a column of silica gel. Given that silica gel has a high surface area due to internal grain porosity, high-quality data could be obtained where the chemical influences on the surface are clearly apparent and qualitatively consistent with theories of grain (i.e., Stern layer) polarization controlled by electrostatic surface sorption processes (i.e., triple layer theory). Quantitative fitting of the results by existing process-based polarization models (e.g., Leroy et al., 2008) has been less successful, however, due to what we have attributed to differences between existing models developed for spherical grains versus the actual geometry associated with the nano-pores in the silica gel, though other polarization processes, e.g., proton hopping along the surface (Skold et al., 2013), may also be a contributing factor. As an alternative model-independent approach to confirming the link between surface sorption and SIP we initiated a study that will continue (unfunded) beyond the completion of this project to independently measure the accumulation of gamma emitting isotopes on the silica gel during the SIP monitoring experiments. Though our analyses of the project data are ongoing, our preliminary analyses are generally supportive of the grain (Stern layer) polarization theory of SIP. Experiments focused on evaluating the impact of physical modifications of the medium on polarization included etching and biotic and abiotic facilitated precipitation of carbonate and iron oxides to alter the roughness and electrical conductivity of the surfaces. These experiments were performed for both silica gel and glass beads, the latter of which lacked the interior porosity and high surface area of the silica gel. The results appear to be more nuanced that the chemical modifications of the system. In general, however, it was found that deposition of iron oxides and etching had relatively minimal or negative impacts on the polarization response of the medium, whereas carbonate coatings increased the polarization response. These results were generally consistent with changes in surface charge observed via AFM. Abiotic and biotic column flow through experiments demonstrated that precipitation of carbonate within the medium significantly impacted the real and imaginary conductivity over time in a manner generally consistent with the carbonate precipitation as observed from the batch grain coating experiments. Biotic effects were not observed to provide distinctly different signatures, but may have contributed to differences in the rate of changes observed with SIP. AFM was used in a variety of different ways to investigate the grain surfaces throughout the course of the proj

Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Moysey, Stephen; Dean, Delphine

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

Quantifying Microbe-Mineral Interactions Leading to Remotely Detectable Induced Polarization Signals (Final Project Report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to investigate controls on induced polarization responses in porous media. The approach taken in the project was to compare electrical measurements made on mineral surfaces with atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to observations made at the column?scale using traditional spectral induced polarization measurements. In the project we evaluated a number of techniques for investigating the surface properties of materials, including the development of a new AFM measurement protocol that utilizes an external electric field to induce grain?scale polarizations that can be probed using a charged AFM tip. The experiments we performed focused on idealized systems (i.e., glass beads and silica gel) where we could obtain the high degree of control needed to understand how changes in the pore environment, which are determined by biogeochemical controls in the subsurface, affect mechanisms contributing to complex electrical conductivity, i.e., conduction and polarization, responses. The studies we performed can be classified into those affecting the chemical versus physical properties of the grain surface and pore space. Chemical alterations of the surface focused on evaluating how changes in pore fluid pH and ionic composition control surface conduction. These were performed as column flow through experiments where the pore fluid was exchanged in a column of silica gel. Given that silica gel has a high surface area due to internal grain porosity, high?quality data could be obtained where the chemical influences on the surface are clearly apparent and qualitatively consistent with theories of grain (i.e., Stern layer) polarization controlled by electrostatic surface sorption processes (i.e., triple layer theory). Quantitative fitting of the results by existing process?based polarization models (e.g., Leroy et al., 2008) has been less successful, however, due to what we have attributed to differences between existing models developed for spherical grains versus the actual geometry associated with the nano?pores in the silica gel, though other polarization processes, e.g., proton hopping along the surface (Skold et al., 2013), may also be a contributing factor. As an alternative model?independent approach to confirming the link between surface sorption and SIP we initiated a study that will continue (unfunded) beyond the completion of this project to independently measure the accumulation of gamma emitting isotopes on the silica gel during the SIP monitoring experiments. Though our analyses of the project data are ongoing, our preliminary analyses are generally supportive of the grain (Stern layer) polarization theory of SIP. Experiments focused on evaluating the impact of physical modifications of the medium on polarization included etching and biotic and abiotic facilitated precipitation of carbonate and iron oxides to alter the roughness and electrical conductivity of the surfaces. These experiments were performed for both silica gel and glass beads, the latter of which lacked the interior porosity and high surface area of the silica gel. The results appear to be more nuanced that the chemical modifications of the system. In general, however, it was found that deposition of iron oxides and etching had relatively minimal or negative impacts on the polarization response of the medium, whereas carbonate coatings increased the polarization response. These results were generally consistent with changes in surface charge observed via AFM. Abiotic and biotic column flow through experiments demonstrated that precipitation of carbonate within the medium significantly impacted the real and imaginary conductivity over time in a manner generally consistent with the carbonate precipitation as observed from the batch grain coating experiments. Biotic effects were not observed to provide distinctly different signatures, but may have contributed to differences in the rate of changes observed with SIP. AFM was used in a variety of different ways to investigate the grain surfaces throughout the course

Moysey, Stephen [Clemson University] [Clemson University; Dean, Delphine [Clemson University] [Clemson University; Dimitrios, Ntarlagiannis [Rutgers University] [Rutgers University

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Statistical Methods for Quantifying the Effect of the El NioSouthern Oscillation on Wind Power in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Methods for Quantifying the Effect of the El Niño­Southern Oscillation on Wind Power­Southern Oscillation on Wind Power in the Northern Great Plains of the United States Bret R. Harper1, Richard W. Katz2 of the United States. In order to determine if ENSO has similar impacts on wind speed and wind power, we applied

Katz, Richard

436

Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1 sources and sinks of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary emission sources and greenhouse gases to climate change. In 1992, the United States signed and ratified and make available...national inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks

Little, John B.

437

Visualizing and Quantifying Molecular Goodness-of-Fit: Small-probe Contact Dots with Explicit Hydrogen Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visualizing and Quantifying Molecular Goodness-of-Fit: Small-probe Contact Dots with Explicit) for analyzing interaction patterns in the molecules themselves. # 1999 Academic Press Keywords: protein internal, 1711±1733 0022-2836/99/041711±23 $30.00/0 # 1999 Academic Press #12;Introduction Remarkably ordered

Richardson, David

438

Quantifying the effect of metal-rich precipitates on minority carrier diffusion length in multicrystalline silicon using synchrotron-based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the effect of metal-rich precipitates on minority carrier diffusion length diffusion length of individual transition metal species in multicrystalline silicon. SR-XBIC, -XRF, and -XAS correlation between local concentrations of copper and nickel silicide precipitates and a decrease of minority

439

Quantifying Wasted Write Energy in the Memory Hierarchy Charles Shelor, Jim Buchanan, and Krishna Kavi Ron Cytron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Wasted Write Energy in the Memory Hierarchy Charles Shelor, Jim Buchanan, and Krishna. Wasted writes consume energy, consume execution time as memory bandwidth and consume component lifetime of potential energy savings that can be obtained from eliminating wasted writes. If all of the wasted writes

Kavi, Krishna

440

Spatial patterns of warming off Western Australia during the 2011 Ningaloo Nio: Quantifying impacts of remote and local forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial patterns of warming off Western Australia during the 2011 Ningaloo Nińo: Quantifying and Atmosphere Flagship, Floreat, Western Australia, Australia a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 24 occurred in which a marine heat wave led to extreme warming of Western Australia's coastal waters. The sea

Feng, Ming

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are becoming a popular model in behavioral neuroscience. Their behavior is robustly observed and easily quantified,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is robustly observed and easily quantified, with the effects of pharmacological challenges emerging almost and fluoxetine withdrawal in zebrafish. Novel Tank Exposure Test: Observers record endpoints and sessions are also video taped for automated analysis (CleverSys Inc.). Ethanol & Caffeine withdrawal: Ethanol (0

Kalueff, Allan V.

442

bv2epr: A Tool for Polynomially Translating Quantifier-free Bit-Vector Formulas into EPR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bv2epr: A Tool for Polynomially Translating Quantifier-free Bit-Vector Formulas into EPR Gergely Logic (EPR). This allows us to solve QF BV problems using EPR solvers and avoids the exponential growth benchmarks for EPR solvers. 1 Introduction Bit-precise reasoning over bit-vector logics is important for many

Biere, Armin

443

World Conference on Photovoltaic Conversion, Hawaii, May 8-12, 2006 QUANTIFYING THE LIFE-CYCLE ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE 4 th World Conference on Photovoltaic Conversion, Hawaii, May 8-12, 2006 QUANTIFYING THE LIFE-CYCLE ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS AND COMPARISONS WITH OTHER ELECTRICITY-GENERATING TECHNOLOGIES V and Australian studies portrayed photovoltaic systems as causing significant life-cycle environmental and health

444

Journal of Glaciology, Vol. 57, No. 206, 2011 1087 Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores L.G. VAN DER WEL,1 H.J. STREURMAN,1 E. ISAKSSON,2 ABSTRACT. Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measurements

Moore, John

445

QUANTIFYING THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF THE HEATING TIME,1 THE TEMPERATURE AND THE RECOVERY MEDIUM PH ON THE2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTIFYING THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF THE HEATING TIME,1 THE TEMPERATURE AND THE RECOVERY MEDIUM PH of the conditions of the heat treatment: temperature, duration15 and pH of the recovery medium. For a given heating Keywords: Bacillus cereus, heat treatment, lag time, recovery.29 30 1. Introduction31 32 Bacillus cereus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

446

A Double-Deletion Method to Quantifying Incremental Binding Energies in Proteins from Experiment: Example of a Destabilizing Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Double-Deletion Method to Quantifying Incremental Binding Energies in Proteins from Experiment: Example of a Destabilizing Hydrogen Bonding Pair Luis A. Campos,*y Santiago Cuesta-Lo´pez,*z Jon Lo of a specific hydrogen bond in apoflavodoxin to protein stability is investigated by combining theory

Sancho, Javier

447

Gas permeability of carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the aqueous polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and subsequent pyrolysis at 1050 [degree]C. As a result of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell/pore size, and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications such as supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, the permeability of carbon aerogels was calculated from equations based upon Darcy's law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have permeabilities on the order of 10[sup [minus]12] to 10[sup [minus]10] cm[sup 2] over the density range from 0.05--0.44 g/cm[sup 3]. Like many other aerogel properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density, reflecting differences in the average mesopore size. Comparing the results from this study with the permeability of silica aerogels reported by other workers, we found that the permeability of aerogels is governed by a simple universal flow equation. This paper discusses the relationship between permeability, pore size, and density in carbon aerogels.

Kong, F.; LeMay, J.D.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W. (Chemistry and Materials Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Method for fabricating composite carbon foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid partides being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

451

Ex vivo evaluation of a coherent normalization procedure to quantify in vivo finger strontium XRS measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRS) measurements were performed on human cadaver index fingers to measure bone strontium content in the presence of intact overlying soft-tissue. This work assesses the feasibility of applying a normalization procedure including soft-tissue correction of x-ray absorption as a means to quantify an ex vivo bone strontium XRS measurement. Methods: Bone strontium measurements were made using an excitation-detection system incorporating an {sup 125}I x-ray excitation source and an Ortec registered Ametek-AMT Si(Li) detector in 180 deg. backscatter geometry. Spectral processing was accomplished using an in-house nonlinear least-squares Marquardt fitting routine. Bone strontium was quantified using an egs5 Monte Carlo based x-ray soft-tissue correction algorithm in conjunction with the normalization of strontium x-rays to the coherent scatter peaks of 35.5 keV {sup 125}I {gamma}-rays. Results: Comparison of tissue intact and bare bone finger XRS measurement quantification attempts revealed an overall discrepancy of 18.6% that is attributed primarily to the significant contribution of soft-tissue to coherent scatter of 35.5 keV source {gamma}-rays and to a lesser degree, inconsistencies with the simulated tissue correction model. Work toward the beginnings of an experimentally derived tissue correction model, as a means to validate the simulated model, have been reported. Two observations hinted at a systematic inflation of the observed K{beta} peak area. First, strontium concentrations estimated by K{alpha} peak areas were less than the K{beta} peak areas by 28.6% (p < 0.0001) and 10.5% (p < 0.001) for tissue intact and bare bone measurements, respectively. Second, the K{alpha}:K{beta} x-ray average ratios between tissue corrected (3.61 {+-} 0.55) and bare bone predicted (4.4 {+-} 0.4) did not agree (p < 0.0001) and pointed to shortcomings with the current processing treatment of strontium K x-ray peak area extraction. Through finger bone XRS measurements, bone strontium concentration in the Caucasian population was estimated at 95 {+-} 15 {mu}g Sr/g dry bone. Conclusions: The discrepancies observed: between quantification attempts of tissue corrected and bare bone measurements, the inflated estimates of K{beta} relative to K{alpha} peak concentrations and between observed and expected K{alpha}:K{beta} ratios, have indicated that shortcomings with the bone strontium coherent normalization and tissue correction procedure exist. Coherent scatter contribution of soft-tissue overlying bone, tissue correction model limitations, and spectra processing issues are all mentioned as sources of observed discrepancies.

Heirwegh, C. M.; Chettle, D. R.; Pejovic-Milic, A. [Department of Medical Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3, Canada and Department of Medical Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

QUANTIFYING THE CHALLENGES OF DETECTING UNSEEN PLANETARY COMPANIONS WITH TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both ground- and space-based transit observatories are poised to significantly increase the number of known transiting planets and the number of precisely measured transit times. The variation in a planet's transit times may be used to infer the presence of additional planets. Deducing the masses and orbital parameters of such planets from transit time variations (TTVs) alone is a rich and increasingly relevant dynamical problem. In this work, we evaluate the extent of the degeneracies in this process, systematically explore the dependence of TTV signals on several parameters, and provide phase space plots that could aid observers in planning future observations. Our explorations are focused on a likely-to-be prevalent situation: a known transiting short-period Neptune- or Jupiter-sized planet and a suspected external low-mass perturber on a nearly coplanar orbit. Through {approx}10{sup 7} N-body simulations, we demonstrate how TTV signal amplitudes may vary by orders of magnitude due to slight variations in any one orbital parameter (10{sup -3} AU in a semimajor axis, 0.005 in eccentricity, or a few degrees in orbital angles), and quantify the number of consecutive transit observations necessary in order to obtain a reasonable opportunity of characterizing the unseen planet ({approx}>50 observations). Planets in or near period commensurabilities of the form p:q, where p {<=} 20 and q {<=} 3, produce distinct TTV signatures, regardless of whether the planets are actually locked in a mean motion resonance. We distinguish these systems from the secular systems in our explorations. Additionally, we find that computing the autocorrelation function of a TTV signal can provide a useful diagnostic for identifying possible orbits for additional planets and suggest that this method could aid integration of TTV signals in future studies of particular exosystems.

Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B.; Payne, Matthew J., E-mail: veras@astro.ufl.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Quantifying the value of hydropower in the electric grid : role of hydropower in existing markets.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrical power industry is facing the prospect of integrating a significant addition of variable generation technologies in the next several decades, primarily from wind and solar facilities. Overall, transmission and generation reserve levels are decreasing and power system infrastructure in general is aging. To maintain grid reliability modernization and expansion of the power system as well as more optimized use of existing resources will be required. Conventional and pumped storage hydroelectric facilities can provide an increasingly significant contribution to power system reliability by providing energy, capacity and other ancillary services. However, the potential role of hydroelectric power will be affected by another transition that the industry currently experiences - the evolution and expansion of electricity markets. This evolution to market-based acquisition of generation resources and grid management is taking place in a heterogeneous manner. Some North American regions are moving toward full-featured markets while other regions operate without formal markets. Yet other U.S. regions are partially evolved. This report examines the current structure of electric industry acquisition of energy and ancillary services in different regions organized along different structures, reports on the current role of hydroelectric facilities in various regions, and attempts to identify features of market and scheduling areas that either promote or thwart the increased role that hydroelectric power can play in the future. This report is part of a larger effort led by the Electric Power Research Institute with purpose of examining the potential for hydroelectric facilities to play a greater role in balancing the grid in an era of greater penetration of variable renewable energy technologies. Other topics that will be addressed in this larger effort include industry case studies of specific conventional and hydro-electric facilities, systemic operating constraints on hydro-electric resources, and production cost simulations aimed at quantifying the increased role of hydro.

Loose, Verne W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Quantifying the Impact of Single Bit Flips on Floating Point Arithmetic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high-end computing, the collective surface area, smaller fabrication sizes, and increasing density of components have led to an increase in the number of observed bit flips. If mechanisms are not in place to detect them, such flips produce silent errors, i.e. the code returns a result that deviates from the desired solution by more than the allowed tolerance and the discrepancy cannot be distinguished from the standard numerical error associated with the algorithm. These phenomena are believed to occur more frequently in DRAM, but logic gates, arithmetic units, and other circuits are also susceptible to bit flips. Previous work has focused on algorithmic techniques for detecting and correcting bit flips in specific data structures, however, they suffer from lack of generality and often times cannot be implemented in heterogeneous computing environment. Our work takes a novel approach to this problem. We focus on quantifying the impact of a single bit flip on specific floating-point operations. We analyze the error induced by flipping specific bits in the most widely used IEEE floating-point representation in an architecture-agnostic manner, i.e., without requiring proprietary information such as bit flip rates and the vendor-specific circuit designs. We initially study dot products of vectors and demonstrate that not all bit flips create a large error and, more importantly, expected value of the relative magnitude of the error is very sensitive on the bit pattern of the binary representation of the exponent, which strongly depends on scaling. Our results are derived analytically and then verified experimentally with Monte Carlo sampling of random vectors. Furthermore, we consider the natural resilience properties of solvers based on the fixed point iteration and we demonstrate how the resilience of the Jacobi method for linear equations can be significantly improved by rescaling the associated matrix.

Elliott, James J [ORNL; Mueller, Frank [North Carolina State University; Stoyanov, Miroslav K [ORNL; Webster, Clayton G [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Carbon films produced from ionic liquid carbon precursors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for producing a film of porous carbon, the method comprising carbonizing a film of an ionic liquid, wherein the ionic liquid has the general formula (X.sup.+a).sub.x(Y.sup.-b).sub.y, wherein the variables a and b are, independently, non-zero integers, and the subscript variables x and y are, independently, non-zero integers, such that ax=by, and at least one of X.sup.+ and Y.sup.- possesses at least one carbon-nitrogen unsaturated bond. The invention is also directed to a composition comprising a porous carbon film possessing a nitrogen content of at least 10 atom %.

Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Lee, Je Seung

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

456

Carbon dioxide hydrate particles for ocean carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents strategies for producing negatively buoyant CO[subscript 2] hydrate composite particles for ocean carbon sequestration. Our study is based on recent field observations showing that a continuous-jet ...

Chow, A.C.

457

Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the global carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This state-of-the-art volume presents discussions on the global cycle of carbon, the dynamic balance among global atmospheric CO2 sources and sinks. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

Trabalka, J R [ed.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the focus in the life-cycle assessment (LCA) and carbonclosely related to life-cycle assessment (LCA). The existingsupply chains, and on life-cycle assessment (LCA) and carbon

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Developmen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

happen in any modernization process of any economy. Other factors, such as changes in the energy mix or sectoral changes in an economy, can also cause movements in carbon intensity...

460

Measuring supply chain carbon efficiency : a carbon label framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the near term, efficiency improvements represent a key option for reducing the impacts of climate change. The growing awareness of climate change has increased the attention regarding the carbon emissions "embedded" in ...

Craig, Anthony (Anthony J.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Aluminum-carbon composite electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Aluminum-carbon composite electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

Farahmandi, C. Joseph (Auburn, AL); Dispennette, John M. (Auburn, AL)

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

463

Carbon Dioxide: Threat or Opportunity?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

catastrophic long term effects on world climate. An alternative to discharging carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is to find new uses. One possible use is in 'Biofactories'. Biofactories may be achieved by exploiting two new developing technologies: Solar...

McKinney, A. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

The Australian terrestrial carbon budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions from fossil-fuel com- bustion, Biogeosciences, 9,re- gional and national fossil-fuel CO 2 emissions, Carbontimes more carbon in fossil fuels than it emitted by burning

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Method for making carbon films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for treating an organic polymer material, preferably a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer (Saran) to produce a flat sheet of carbon film material having a high surface area ([approx equal]1000 m[sup 2] /g) suitable as an electrode material for super capacitor applications. The method comprises heating a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer film disposed between two spaced apart graphite or ceramic plates to a first temperature of about 160 C for about 14 hours to form a stabilized vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride polymer film, thereafter heating the stabilized film to a second temperature of about 750 C in an inert atmosphere for about one hour to form a carbon film; and finally activating the carbon film to increase the surface area by heating the carbon film in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 750--850 C for between 1--6 hours. 2 figs.

Tan, M.X.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

466

Carbon-assisted flyer plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser driven flyer plate is described utilizing an optical fiber connected to a laser. The end of the optical fiber has a layer of carbon and a metal layer deposited onto it. The carbon layer provides the laser induced plasma which is superior to the plasma produced from most metals. The carbon layer plasma is capable of providing a flatter flyer plate, converting more of the laser energy to driving plasma, promoting a higher flyer plate acceleration, and providing a more uniform pulse behind the plate. In another embodiment, the laser is in optical communication with a substrate onto which a layer of carbon and a layer of metal have been deposited. 2 figures.

Stahl, D.B.; Paisley, D.L.

1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

467

Non-carbon induction furnace  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to an induction furnace for melting and casting highly pure metals and alloys such as uranium and uranium alloys in such a manner as to minimize contamination of the melt by carbon derived from the materials and the environment within the furnace. The subject furnace is constructed of non-carbon materials and is housed within a conventional vacuum chamber. The furnace comprises a ceramic oxide crucible for holding the charge of metal or alloys. The heating of the crucible is achieved by a plasma-sprayed tungsten susceptor surrounding the crucible which, in turn, is heated by an rf induction coil separated from the susceptor by a cylinder of inorganic insulation. The furnace of the present invention is capable of being rapidly cycled from ambient temperatures to about 1650/sup 0/C for effectively melting uranium and uranium alloys without the attendant carbon contamination problems previously encountered when using carbon-bearing furnace materials.

Holcombe, C.E.; Masters, D.R.; Pfeiler, W.A.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

468

Carbon dynamics in arctic vegetation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the Arctic land surface and the global climate system. A large amount of organic carbon (C) is currently stored in Arctic soils; if ...

Street, Lorna Elizabeth

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

469

Reducing carbon dioxide to products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

Emerging Applications of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of their unique electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted great attention in recent years. A diverse array of methods has been developed to modify CNTs and to assemble them ...

Schnorr, Jan Markus

471

Increasing carbon nanotube forest density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The outstanding mechanical, electrical, thermal, and morphological properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) open up exciting potential applications in a wide range of fields. One such application is replacing the ...

McCarthy, Alexander P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors P.I. Name: Dave Warren Presenter: Dr. Amit K. Naskar Oak Ridge National Laboratory 05162012 Project ID LM004 This presentation does not...

473

CARBON DIOXIDE AND OUR OCEAN LEGACY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a biologist at the California State Univer- sity San Marcos, with expertise in the effects of carbon dioxideCARBON DIOXIDE AND OUR OCEAN LEGACY G Carbon Dioxide: Our Role The United States is the single. Every day the average American adds about 118 pounds of carbon dioxide to the atmos- phere, due largely

474

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

support in a precision farming context. Keywords: Carbon balances, carbon sequestration, decompositionCarbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model

475

Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes 1 1.1 Introduction

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

476

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon nanotube ceramic matrix composites. Acta Materialia,ceramic matrix material. These fiber reinforced composites

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

6 Monthly Report on MMU Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monthly Report on MMU Carbon Management Plan #12;2009/10 Emissions MMU Carbon Footprint Trajectory Project Footprint MMU Actual Carbon Footprint Projects that Reduced the 2009/10 CO2 Footprint #12;2010/11 Emissions6 Monthly Report on MMU Carbon Management Plan June 2011 let's make a sustainable planet #12

478

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in carbon nanotube ceramic matrix composites. Actapolymeric, metallic, or ceramic matrix material. These fiber

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Explaining the Price of Voluntary Carbon Offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and Sustainable Development, Stanford Univer- sity. Figure 1: Histogram of carbon offset prices (

Conte, Marc N.; Kotchen, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Carbon nanotube composites P. J. F. Harris*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon nanotube composites P. J. F. Harris* Carbon nanotubes are molecular-scale tubes of graphitic. There is currently great interest in exploiting these properties by incorporating carbon nanotubes into some form/ceramic and nanotube/metal composites. This review outlines the properties of carbon nanotubes and describes

Harris, Peter J F

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quantifying magmatic carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East of England #12;Low Carbon Innovation Centre Report for EEDA Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective 20/04/2009 ii Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East

Everest, Graham R

482

Purification and Processing of Graphitic Carbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxidation of Petroleum Asphaltenes. Liq. Fuels Tech. 1985,fibers, 2, petroleum asphaltenes, 4 carbon xerogels, 5

Worsley, Kimberly Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Rapid oxidation/stabilization technique for carbon foams, carbon fibers and C/C composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An enhanced method for the post processing, i.e. oxidation or stabilization, of carbon materials including, but not limited to, carbon foams, carbon fibers, dense carbon-carbon composites, carbon/ceramic and carbon/metal composites, which method requires relatively very short and more effective such processing steps. The introduction of an "oxygen spill over catalyst" into the carbon precursor by blending with the carbon starting material or exposure of the carbon precursor to such a material supplies required oxygen at the atomic level and permits oxidation/stabilization of carbon materials in a fraction of the time and with a fraction of the energy normally required to accomplish such carbon processing steps. Carbon based foams, solids, composites and fiber products made utilizing this method are also described.

Tan, Seng; Tan, Cher-Dip

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

484

Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

485

Lithographically defined microporous carbon structures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lithographic method is used to fabricate porous carbon structures that can provide electrochemical electrodes having high surface area with uniform and controllable dimensions, providing enormous flexibility to tailor the electrodes toward specific applications. Metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of the porous carbon electrodes exhibit ultra small dimensions with uniform size distribution. The resulting electrodes are rugged, electrically conductive and show excellent electrochemical behavior.

Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Polsky, Ronen; Brozik, Susan M.; Wheeler, David R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

486

Activated carbon to the rescue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

Sen, S. [Calgon Carbon Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Quantify Water Extraction by TBP/Dodecane via Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to quantify the interfacial transport of water into the most prevalent nuclear reprocessing solvent extractant mixture, namely tri-butyl- phosphate (TBP) and dodecane, via massively parallel molecular dynamics simulations on the most powerful machines available for open research. Specifically, we will accomplish this objective by evolving the water/TBP/dodecane system up to 1 ms elapsed time, and validate the simulation results by direct comparison with experimentally measured water solubility in the organic phase. The significance of this effort is to demonstrate for the first time that the combination of emerging simulation tools and state-of-the-art supercomputers can provide quantitative information on par to experimental measurements for solvent extraction systems of relevance to the nuclear fuel cycle. Results: Initially, the isolated single component, and single phase systems were studied followed by the two-phase, multicomponent counterpart. Specifically, the systems we studied were: pure TBP; pure n-dodecane; TBP/n-dodecane mixture; and the complete extraction system: water-TBP/n-dodecane two phase system to gain deep insight into the water extraction process. We have completely achieved our goal of simulating the molecular extraction of water molecules into the TBP/n-dodecane mixture up to the saturation point, and obtained favorable comparison with experimental data. Many insights into fundamental molecular level processes and physics were obtained from the process. Most importantly, we found that the dipole moment of the extracting agent is crucially important in affecting the interface roughness and the extraction rate of water molecules into the organic phase. In addition, we have identified shortcomings in the existing OPLS-AA force field potential for long-chain alkanes. The significance of this force field is that it is supposed to be optimized for molecular liquid simulations. We found that it failed for dodecane and/or longer chains for this particular solvent extraction application. We have proposed a simple way to circumvent the artificial crystallization of the chains at ambient temperature.

Khomami, Bamin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cui, Shengting [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Felker, Kevin [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

488

Mar., 1955 GASIFICATIONOF CARBONRODSWITH CARBONDIOXIDE 241 GASIFICATION OF CARBON RODS WITH CARBON DIOXIDE1*2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar., 1955 GASIFICATIONOF CARBONRODSWITH CARBONDIOXIDE 241 GASIFICATION OF CARBON RODS WITH CARBON commercial carbons and their gasification rates with carbon dioxide at a series of temperatures between 900. No general correlation between these properties and the carbon gasification rates was found. Introduction

489

Monitoring Forest Carbon Sequestration with Remote Sensing and Carbon Cycle Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

America, forest carbon sinks are be- lieved to offset a significant proportion of carbon emis- sionsMonitoring Forest Carbon Sequestration with Remote Sensing and Carbon Cycle Modeling DAVID P University Corvallis, Oregon 97331-5752, USA ABSTRACT / Sources and sinks of carbon associated with forests

Lefsky, Michael

490

PERGAMON Carbon 39 (2001) 369373 Effect of carbon fiber grade on the electrical behavior of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERGAMON Carbon 39 (2001) 369­373 Effect of carbon fiber grade on the electrical behavior of carbon 2000 Abstract Electrical conduction in cement reinforced by short carbon fibers below the percolation is decreased by increasing the fiber crystallinity, but is increased by using intercalated fibers. The carbon

Chung, Deborah D.L.

491

Improved fracture toughness of carbon fiber composite functionalized with multi walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved fracture toughness of carbon fiber composite functionalized with multi walled carbon August 2008 A B S T R A C T Woven carbon fiber (CF) laminae are functionalized in situ with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to test the hypothesis that growing CNTs on CF (i.e., carbon fiber bundles or tow) would

Bennett, Gisele

492

Structural annealing of carbon coated aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by chem- ical vapor infiltration (CVI) of carbon source gases into fiber preforms. While CVI of carbon fasteners [1]. While the above applications are currently filled by traditional carbon fiber C/ C compositesStructural annealing of carbon coated aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets Shaghayegh Faraji

Zhu, Yuntian T.

493

Endohedral Carbon Chains in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes R. K. Vadapalli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Endohedral Carbon Chains in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes R. K. Vadapalli and J. W. Mintmire of endohedral linear carbon chains. In these calculations, all-carbon nanowire structures were constructed by inserting cumulenic linear carbon chains inside the semiconducting (7,3) and metallic (7,4) single

Mintmire, John W.

494

Protein carbon content evolves in response to carbon availability and may influence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protein carbon content evolves in response to carbon availability and may influence the fate that ancestral yeast strains preferentially express proteins with low carbon content during carbon limitation, relative to strains selected in the laboratory under carbon limitation. The likely reason

Wagner, Andreas

495

A quenchable superhard carbon phase synthesized by cold compression of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quenchable superhard carbon phase synthesized by cold compression of carbon nanotubes Zhongwu) A quenchable superhard high-pressure carbon phase was synthe- sized by cold compression of carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were placed in a diamond anvil cell, and x-ray diffraction measure- ments were conducted

Downs, Robert T.

496

Fabrication of activated carbon fibers/carbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical drying  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fabrication of activated carbon fibers/carbon aerogels composites by gelation and supercritical August 2003) Activated carbon fiber/carbon aerogel (ACF/CA) composites were fabricated by gelling. The ACFs can reinforce the related carbon aerogels when they originally have low mass density and are weak

Liu, Jie

497

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b , Y.F. Zheng a , C.S. Lee a , N was used to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a hot-®lament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system in the formation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT)s. The CNTs synthesized from carbon monoxide validate

Zheng, Yufeng

498

Mechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice analog samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be produced via radiolysis of carbon monoxide ices.5 Indeed, the effects of ionizing radiation on pure carbonMechanistical studies on the formation of carbon dioxide in extraterrestrial carbon monoxide ice901220f Binary ice mixtures of two carbon monoxide isotopomers, 13 C16 O and 12 C18 O, were subjected

Kaiser, Ralf I.

499

Carbon sequestration research and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

500

Carbon-enhanced VRLA batteries.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of certain forms of carbon to the negative plate in valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries has been demonstrated to increase the cycle life of such batteries by an order of magnitude or more under high-rate, partial-state-of-charge operation. Such performance will provide a significant impact, and in some cases it will be an enabling feature for applications including hybrid electric vehicles, utility ancillary regulation services, wind farm energy smoothing, and solar photovoltaic energy smoothing. There is a critical need to understnd how the carbon interacts with the negative plate and achieves the aforementioned benefits at a fundamental level. Such an understanding will not only enable the performance of such batteries to be optimzied, but also to explore the feasibility of applying this technology to other battery chemistries. In partnership with the East Penn Manufacturing, Sandia will investigate the electrochemical function of the carbon and possibly identify improvements to its anti-sulfation properties. Shiomi, et al. (1997) discovered that the addition of carbon to the negative active material (NAM) substantially reduced PbSO{sub 4} accumulation in high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling applications. This improved performance with a minimal cost. Cycling applications that were uneconomical for traditional VRLA batteries are viable for the carbon enhanced VRLA. The overall goal of this work is to quantitatively define the role that carbon plays in the electrochemistry of a VRLA battery.

Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.; Shane, Rod (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z