Sample records for quantifiable emissions targets

  1. Quantifying Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from South Asia Through a Targeted Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Philosophy in Climate Physics and Chemistry Abstract Methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and sulfur in India and are used for measurement- based assessment of emissions. Several features are identified are investigated to better quantify some of the uncertainties associated with this chemical transport model

  2. Quantifying avoided emissions from renewable generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Gabriel R. (Gabriel Rodriguez)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying the reduced emissions due to renewable power integration and providing increasingly accurate emissions analysis has become more important for policy makers in the age of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and ...

  3. Quantifying emissions reductions from New England offshore wind energy resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlinski, Michael Peter

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Access to straightforward yet robust tools to quantify the impact of renewable energy resources on air emissions from fossil fuel power plants is important to governments aiming to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse ...

  4. Quantifying VOC emissions for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Lord, David L.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A very important aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is regulatory compliance. One of the regulatory compliance issues deals with limiting the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted into the atmosphere from brine wastes when they are discharged to brine holding ponds. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set limits on the amount of VOCs that can be discharged to the atmosphere. Several attempts have been made to quantify the VOC emissions associated with the brine ponds going back to the late 1970's. There are potential issues associated with each of these quantification efforts. Two efforts were made to quantify VOC emissions by analyzing VOC content of brine samples obtained from wells. Efforts to measure air concentrations were mentioned in historical reports but no data have been located to confirm these assertions. A modeling effort was also performed to quantify the VOC emissions. More recently in 2011- 2013, additional brine sampling has been performed to update the VOC emissions estimate. An analysis of the statistical confidence in these results is presented here. Arguably, there are uncertainties associated with each of these efforts. The analysis herein indicates that the upper confidence limit in VOC emissions based on recent brine sampling is very close to the 0.42 ton/MMB limit used historically on the project. Refining this estimate would require considerable investment in additional sampling, analysis, and monitoring. An analysis of the VOC emissions at each site suggests that additional discharges could be made and stay within current regulatory limits.

  5. South Africa-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgencyCompany Organization Ecofys Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Website http:www.ecofys.com...

  6. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES satellite sensor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES Figure S1. December-January-Febuary (DJF, top) and June-July-August (JJA, bottom) biogenic3 methanol 1 Figure S4. Regions employed for quantifying terrestrial methanol fluxes (red) and for2

  7. A Study of Scotland's Emission and Energy Targets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeve, Rebecca

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    and technologically achievable, the wide range of barriers and carbon abatement uncertainty of certain policy measures makes meeting all but renewable heat target fairly remote. It was also discussed that although meeting Scotland’s emissions targets would have a...

  8. Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1 sources and sinks of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, John B.

    Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary emission sources and greenhouse gases to climate change. In 1992, the United States signed and ratified and make available...national inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks

  9. Spectral Control of Emission from Tin Doped Targets for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control of emissions from tin doped targets for extremearray (UTA) emission around 13.5 nm from solid density tinand tin doped foam targets. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV)

  10. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Courtney Adam [MIT; Walter-Anthony, Katey [University of Alaska; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

  11. Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 19902009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, John B.

    Executive Summary of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990­2009 1 n emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1 In 1992, the United climate change. This inventory adheres to both (1) a comprehensive and detailed set of methodologies

  12. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qianlai Zhuang

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    During the three-year project period, Purdue University has specifically accomplished the following: revised the existing Methane Dynamics Model (MDM) to consider the effects of changes of atmospheric pressure; applied the methane dynamics model (MDM) to Siberian region to demonstrate that ebullition estimates could increase previous estimates of regional terrestrial CH{sub 4} emissions 3- to 7-fold in Siberia; Conducted an analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006 to show that terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} that increased by 0.6 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH{sub 4}; improved the quantification of CH{sub 4} fluxes in the Arctic with inversion methods; evaluated AIRS CH4 retrieval data with a transport and inversion model and surface flux and aircraft data; to better quantify methane emissions from wetlands, we extended the MDM within a biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to include a large-scale hydrology model, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model; more recently, we developed a single box atmospheric chemistry model involving atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO) and radical hydroxyl (OH) to analyze atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentrations from 1984 to 2008.

  13. Quantifying Regional Economic Impacts of CO2 Intensity Targets in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address rising energy use and CO2 emissions, China’s leadership has enacted energy and CO2 intensity

  14. The impact of traffic emissions on atmospheric ozone and OH: results from QUANTIFY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel con- sumption and emissions, J. Geophys. Res. , 112,AERO2K Global Aviation Emissions Inventories for 2002 andJ. , v. , and Lauer, A. : Emissions from inter- national

  15. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Wang Jiaxiang [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  16. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEFRA), 2005a. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. London: DEFRA.Energy/GHG Tax Emissions trading Target Setting Penaltiesthe European Union Emissions Trading Scheme and a lack of

  17. Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

  18. become more important as countries agree to emission reduction targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    : immediate stabilization of carbon dioxide emissions, regulation of air pollution that balances removal

  19. Quantifying emissions of greenhouse gases from South Asia through a targeted measurement campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Anita Lakshmi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH 4 ), nitrous oxide (N20) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) are powerful greenhouse gases with global budgets that are well-known but regional distributions that are not adequately constrained for the purposes of ...

  20. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Affairs (DEFRA), 2005. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. http://targets through the UK Emissions Trading Scheme. 6 Table 1is to be adjusted for emissions trading. The reports must be

  1. Potential for meeting the EU new passenger car CO? emissions targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Kandarp

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, the European Parliament agreed to limit the CO2 emissions from new passenger cars sold in the European Union to an average of 130g/km by 2015. Further, a probable longer-term CO2 emissions target of 95g/km is ...

  2. Consumption-Based Adjustment of China's Emissions-Intensity Targets: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China's Twelfth Five-Year Plan (2011­2015) aims to achieve a national carbon intensity reduction of 17's provinces is complicated by the fact that more than half of China's national carbon emissions are embodiedConsumption-Based Adjustment of China's Emissions-Intensity Targets: An Analysis of its Potential

  3. Combustion Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag"DepartmentToward Targets of EfficientModel

  4. Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imamoglu, Atac

    LETTERS Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C Malte Meinshausen1. Frame6,7 & Myles R. Allen7 More than 100 countries have adopted a global warming limit of 2 6C or below levels in 2050 are robust indicators of the probability that twenty-first century warming will not exceed

  5. Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters. M the emission yield of anionic clusters increases much faster with n than expected from simple proportionality. Accordingly, the most intense emission is observed for Au7 - : under Au9 + impact the Au7 - yield per incident

  6. Quantifying the Heating Sources for Mid-infrared Dust Emissions in Galaxies: The Case of M 81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Nanyao; Boselli, A; Baes, M; Wu., H; Madden, S C; De Looze, I; Rémy-Ruyer, A; Boquien, M; Wilson, C D; Galametz, M; Lam, M I; Cooray, A; Spinoglio, L; Zhao, Y

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the newly available SPIRE images at 250 and 500 micron from Herschel Space Observatory, we study quantitative correlations over a sub-kpc scale among three distinct emission components in the interstellar medium of the nearby spiral galaxy M 81 (NGC 3031): (a) $I_{8}$ or $I_{24}$, the surface brightness of the mid-infrared emission observed in the Spitzer IRAC 8 or MIPS 24 micron band, with $I_8$ and $I_{24}$ being dominated by the emissions from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs) of dust, respectively; (b) $I_{500}$, that of the cold dust continuum emission in the Herschel SPIRE 500 micron band, dominated by the emission from large dust grains heated by evolved stars, and (c) $I_{{\\rm H}\\alpha}$, a nominal surface brightness of the H$\\alpha$ line emission, from gas ionized by newly formed massive stars. The results from our correlation study, free from any assumption on or modeling of dust emissivity law or dust temperatures, present solid evidence for significant heati...

  7. Comparative study of radiation emission without and with target in a 2.2 kJ plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair, E-mail: mzubairkhan-um76@yahoo.com [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia and Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation emission in a 2.2 kJ Mather-type dense plasma focus device is investigated using a five channel BPX65 PIN diode spectrometer. Estimated X-ray associated with the hollow anode without and with target in Argon gas medium is compared. At optimum conditions, the radiation emission from the system is found to be strongly influenced with target in hollow anode and the filling gas pressure. The maximum X-ray yield in 4? sr was obtained in case of hollow anode in argon gas medium with target 'Lead' due to interaction of electron beam. Results indicated that an appropriate design of hollow anode with target could enhance the radiation emission by more intense interaction of expected electron beam with target. The outcomes are helpful in designing a plasma focus with enhanced X-ray radiation with improved shot to shot reproducibility in plasma focus device.

  8. The only way to achieve low carbon emission targets is to substantially reduce the energy used in buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    reduce the energy used in buildings. Adding `renewables' electricity generation to a building is very11 KTA@Bath Challenge The only way to achieve low carbon emission targets is to substantially costly compared with designing a building that performs well in the first place, but to do this needs

  9. Ion microtomography and particle-induced x-ray emission analysis of direct drive inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Micro Analytical Research Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide submicron-scale characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace-element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Rayleigh--Taylor instabilities. We obtain 1% total electron density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching 2 {mu}m. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few parts per million. We present examples of ICF target characterization by IMT and PIXE in order to demonstrate their potential impact in assessing target fabrication processes.

  10. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  11. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  12. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Aaron K., E-mail: aarontownsend@utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Webber, Michael E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  13. Forward-backward emission of target evaporated evaporated fragments at high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi Zhang; Tian-Li Ma; Dong-Hai Zhang

    2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The multiplicity distribution, multiplicity moment, scaled variance, entropy and reduced entropy of target evaporated fragment emitted in forward and backward hemispheres in 12 A GeV $^{4}$He, 3.7 A GeV $^{16}$O, 60 A GeV $^{16}$O, 1.7 A GeV $^{84}$Kr and 10.7 A GeV $^{197}$Au induced emulsion heavy targets (AgBr) interactions are investigated. It is found that the multiplicity distribution of target evaporated fragments emitted in forward and backward hemispheres can be fitted by a Gaussian distribution. The multiplicity moments of target evaporated particles emitted in forward and backward hemispheres increase with the order of the moment {\\em q}, and second-order multiplicity moment is energy independent over the entire energy for all the interactions in the forward and backward hemisphere respectively. The scaled variance, a direct measure of multiplicity fluctuations, is close to one for all the interactions which may be said that there is a feeble correlation among the produced particles. The entropy of target evaporated fragments emitted in forward and backward hemispheres are the same within experimental errors, respectively.

  14. Secondary electron emission and the bifurcation of the heat flux to the targets in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Wonjae; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I. [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of secondary electron emission (SEE) from plasma facing components in fusion devices can result in a strong localization of the heat flux from plasma to the wall and subsequent wall erosion. Usually, the impact of the SEE is considered assuming the Maxwellian distribution of the electrons coming to the surface. As a result, the SEE coefficient only depends on the temperature of primary electrons. However, the tail of primary electron distribution function in the scrape off layer (SOL) of fusion devices can be far from Maxwellian due to preferential loss of fast electrons. Consequently, it is shown that the SEE coefficient will depend on the wall potential and multiple solutions can be possible corresponding to different regimes of plasma flow to the wall: with and without SEE effects. This effect can cause two-slope electron temperature profiles in the SOL, which are often seen in experiments.

  15. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric trains, low emission vehicles, energy-efficient textile manufacturing equipment, solar power systems,

  16. Consumption-Based Adjustment of China's Emissions-Intensity Targets: An Analysis of its Potential Economic Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springmann, M.

    China’s Twelfth Five-Year Plan (2011–2015) aims to achieve a national carbon intensity reduction of 17% through differentiated targets at the provincial level. Allocating the national target among China’s provinces is ...

  17. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuels used in the refinery sector were also collected fromof the emissions from the refinery sector are included incommitment of 44% and the refinery and food sectors

  18. Ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis direct drive of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Hornady, R.S. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Melbourne Univ. (Australia). Micro Analytical Research Centre)

    1991-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide micro-characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Taylor-Rayleigh instabilities. We obtain 1% density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching two microns. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few ppm. We present examples of IMT and PIXE analyses performed on several ICF targets.

  19. Locked into Copenhagen pledges - Implications of short-term emission targets for the cost and feasibility of long-term climate goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riahi, Keywan; Kriegler, Elmar; Johnson, Nils; Bertram, Christoph; den Elzen, Michel; Eom, Jiyong; Schaeffer, Michiel; Edmonds, James A.; Isaac, Morna; Krey, Volker; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Mejean, Aurelie; McCollum, David; Mima, Silvana; Turton, Hal; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wada, Kenichi; Bosetti, Valentina; Capros, Pantelis; Criqui, Patrick; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kainuma, M.; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the AMPERE intermodeling comparison with focus on the implications of near-term policies for the costs and attainability of long-term climate objectives. Ten modeling teams participated in the project to explore the consequences of global emissions following the proposed policy stringency of the national pledges from the Copenhagen Accord and Cancún Agreements to 2030. Specific features compared to earlier assessments are the explicit consideration of near-term 2030 emissions targets as well as the systematic sensitivity analysis for the availability and potential of mitigation technologies. Our estimates show that a 2030 mitigation effort comparable to the pledges would result in a further "lock-in" of the energy system into fossil fuels and thus impede the required energy transformation to reach low greenhouse-gas stabilization levels (450ppm CO2e). Major implications include significant increases in mitigation costs, increased risk that low stabilization targets become unattainable, and reduced chances of staying below the proposed temperature change target of 2C. With respect to technologies, we find that following the pledge pathways to 2030 would narrow policy choices, and increases the risks that some currently optional technologies, such as nuclear or carbon capture and storage (CCS), will become "a must" by 2030.

  20. Project No.: 003893 (GOCE) Quantifying the Climate Impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Project No.: 003893 (GOCE) QUANTIFY Quantifying the Climate Impact of Global and European Transport Systems INTEGRATED PROJECT SIXTH FRAMEWORK PROGRAMME SUB-PRIORITY 1.1.6.3 Global Change and Ecosystems (biofuel and biomass burning). A compilation of the non-transport emissions has been made available

  1. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schleich (2006). EU Emissions Trading: an Early Analysis of2002). Comparing Emission Trading with Absolute and Relativein the European Emissions Trading System: a Commentary.

  2. Quantifying capital goods for waste incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogaard, L.K., E-mail: lksb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Riber, C. [Ramboll, Consulting Engineers, Hannemanns Allé 53, DK-2300 Copenhagen S (Denmark); Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Materials and energy used for the construction of waste incinerators were quantified. • The data was collected from five incineration plants in Scandinavia. • Included were six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. • The capital goods contributed 2–3% compared to the direct emissions impact on GW. - Abstract: Materials and energy used for the construction of modern waste incineration plants were quantified. The data was collected from five incineration plants (72,000–240,000 tonnes per year) built in Scandinavia (Norway, Finland and Denmark) between 2006 and 2012. Concrete for the buildings was the main material used amounting to 19,000–26,000 tonnes per plant. The quantification further included six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. The energy used for the actual on-site construction of the incinerators was in the range 4000–5000 MW h. In terms of the environmental burden of producing the materials used in the construction, steel for the building and the machinery contributed the most. The material and energy used for the construction corresponded to the emission of 7–14 kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted throughout the lifetime of the incineration plant. The assessment showed that, compared to data reported in the literature on direct emissions from the operation of incinerators, the environmental impacts caused by the construction of buildings and machinery (capital goods) could amount to 2–3% with respect to kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted.

  3. High-Grade Glioma Radiation Therapy Target Volumes and Patterns of Failure Obtained From Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDOPA Positron Emission Tomography Delineations From Multiple Observers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosztyla, Robert, E-mail: rkosztyla@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Chan, Elisa K.; Hsu, Fred [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wilson, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Functional Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ma, Roy; Cheung, Arthur [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Zhang, Susan [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Functional Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Benard, Francois [Department of Functional Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy with pretreatment delineations of high-grade gliomas from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) using contours delineated by multiple observers. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas underwent computed tomography (CT), gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT. The image sets (CT, MRI, and PET/CT) were registered, and 5 observers contoured gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using MRI and PET. Consensus contours were obtained by simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Interobserver variability was quantified by the percentage of volume overlap. Recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy were contoured by each observer using CT or MRI. Consensus recurrence contours were obtained with STAPLE. Results: The mean interobserver volume overlap for PET GTVs (42% ± 22%) and MRI GTVs (41% ± 22%) was not significantly different (P=.67). The mean consensus volume was significantly larger for PET GTVs (58.6 ± 52.4 cm{sup 3}) than for MRI GTVs (30.8 ± 26.0 cm{sup 3}, P=.003). More than 95% of the consensus recurrence volume was within the 95% isodose surface for 11 of 12 (92%) cases with recurrent tumor imaging. Ten (91%) of these cases extended beyond the PET GTV, and 9 (82%) were contained within a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV. One recurrence (8%) was located outside the 95% isodose surface. Conclusions: High-grade glioma contours obtained with {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET had similar interobserver agreement to volumes obtained with MRI. Although PET-based consensus target volumes were larger than MRI-based volumes, treatment planning using PET-based volumes may not have yielded better treatment outcomes, given that all but 1 recurrence extended beyond the PET GTV and most were contained by a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: quantifying bottlenecks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quantifying bottlenecks Sandia Participated in AMII to Support American-Made Wind-Turbine Blades On December 3, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Materials...

  5. A Comparison of Amplitude-Based and Phase-Based Positron Emission Tomography Gating Algorithms for Segmentation of Internal Target Volumes of Tumors Subject to Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jani, Shyam S., E-mail: sjani@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Dahlbom, Magnus [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); White, Benjamin M.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Low, Daniel A.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare the accuracy of tumor volume segmentation in amplitude-based and phase-based respiratory gating algorithms in respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: List-mode fluorodeoxyglucose-PET data was acquired for 10 patients with a total of 12 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid tumors and 9 lymph nodes. Additionally, a phantom experiment was performed in which 4 plastic butyrate spheres with inner diameters ranging from 1 to 4 cm were imaged as they underwent 1-dimensional motion based on 2 measured patient breathing trajectories. PET list-mode data were gated into 8 bins using 2 amplitude-based (equal amplitude bins [A1] and equal counts per bin [A2]) and 2 temporal phase-based gating algorithms. Gated images were segmented using a commercially available gradient-based technique and a fixed 40% threshold of maximum uptake. Internal target volumes (ITVs) were generated by taking the union of all 8 contours per gated image. Segmented phantom ITVs were compared with their respective ground-truth ITVs, defined as the volume subtended by the tumor model positions covering 99% of breathing amplitude. Superior-inferior distances between sphere centroids in the end-inhale and end-exhale phases were also calculated. Results: Tumor ITVs from amplitude-based methods were significantly larger than those from temporal-based techniques (P=.002). For lymph nodes, A2 resulted in ITVs that were significantly larger than either of the temporal-based techniques (P<.0323). A1 produced the largest and most accurate ITVs for spheres with diameters of ?2 cm (P=.002). No significant difference was shown between algorithms in the 1-cm sphere data set. For phantom spheres, amplitude-based methods recovered an average of 9.5% more motion displacement than temporal-based methods under regular breathing conditions and an average of 45.7% more in the presence of baseline drift (P<.001). Conclusions: Target volumes in images generated from amplitude-based gating are larger and more accurate, at levels that are potentially clinically significant, compared with those from temporal phase-based gating.

  6. Target assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Richard A. (Falls Church, VA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A target for a proton beam which is capable of generating neutrons for absorption in a breeding blanket includes a plurality of solid pins formed of a neutron emissive target material disposed parallel to the path of the beam and which are arranged axially in a plurality of layers so that pins in each layer are offset with respect to pins in all other layers, enough layers being used so that each proton in the beam will strike at least one pin with means being provided to cool the pins. For a 300 mA, 1 GeV beam (300 MW), stainless steel pins, 12 inches long and 0.23 inches in diameter are arranged in triangular array in six layers with one sixth of the pins in each layer, the number of pins being such that the entire cross sectional area of the beam is covered by the pins with minimum overlap of pins.

  7. Quantifying regional economic impacts of intensity targets in China*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with kind permission from Elsevier B.V. Reprint 2013-24 TSINGHUA - MIT China Energy & Climate Project #12 of Technology, Cambridge, U.S. c Center for Economic Research at ETH (CER-ETH), Department of Management China's 30 prov- inces and includes energy system detail, and apply it to assess the impact

  8. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    want to reduce their ‘carbon footprint,’ not by law, but todecreases of its carbon footprint could reduce emissions byTo decrease the carbon footprint of transportation, the

  9. Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer,...

  10. Quantifying Pollutant Emissions from Office Equipment Phase I Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddalena, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Hodgson, A.T.; McKone, T.E.; Perino, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in naphthalene and acenaphthene levels. The ordinate axisThe one exception was acenaphthene for which the calculatedand to a lesser extent, acenaphthene. The PAHs heavier than

  11. China-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpenadd:InformationInformationLow

  12. Mexico-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an GroupInformationMexico CentralEnergyMexico) JumpNRELOpen

  13. South Africa-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolarSolkar

  14. Recommended Practice for Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRay County,Open EnergyRecent content in| Open

  15. India-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua New EnergyITInformationIndia-MakingOpen Energy

  16. Brazil-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBoston CollegeBraziland EERE CooperationOpen

  17. Extreme Methane Emissions from a Swiss Hydropower Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Extreme Methane Emissions from a Swiss Hydropower Reservoir: Contribution from Bubbling Sediments and their importance were quantified during a yearlong survey of a temperate hydropower reservoir. Measurements using

  18. Quantifying entanglement with witness operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandao, Fernando G.S.L. [Grupo de Informacao Quantica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, Belo Horizonte, 30.123-970, MG (Brazil)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a unifying approach to the quantification of entanglement based on entanglement witnesses, which includes several already established entanglement measures such as the negativity, the concurrence, and the robustness of entanglement. We then introduce an infinite family of new entanglement quantifiers, having as its limits the best separable approximation measure and the generalized robustness. Gaussian states, states with symmetry, states constrained to super-selection rules, and states composed of indistinguishable particles are studied under the view of the witnessed entanglement. We derive new bounds to the fidelity of teleportation d{sub min}, for the distillable entanglement E{sub D} and for the entanglement of formation. A particular measure, the PPT-generalized robustness, stands out due to its easy calculability and provides sharper bounds to d{sub min} and E{sub D} than the negativity in most of the states. We illustrate our approach studying thermodynamical properties of entanglement in the Heisenberg XXX and dimerized models.

  19. Carbon emissions and the Kyoto commitment in the European Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viguier, Laurent L.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Reilly, John M.

    We estimate reference CO? emission projections in the European Union, and quantify the economic impacts of the Kyoto commitment on Member States. We consider the case where each EU member individually meets a CO? emissions ...

  20. Impact of European Emissions Trading System (EU-ETS) on carbon emissions and investment decisions in the power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feilhauer, Stephan M. (Stephan Marvin)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This masters thesis assesses the impact of a emissions trading on short-term carbon abatement and investment decisions in the power sector. Environmental benefits from carbon abatement due to emissions trading are quantified ...

  1. Quantifying uncertainty from material inhomogeneity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Emery, John M.; Brewer, Luke N.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most engineering materials are inherently inhomogeneous in their processing, internal structure, properties, and performance. Their properties are therefore statistical rather than deterministic. These inhomogeneities manifest across multiple length and time scales, leading to variabilities, i.e. statistical distributions, that are necessary to accurately describe each stage in the process-structure-properties hierarchy, and are ultimately the primary source of uncertainty in performance of the material and component. When localized events are responsible for component failure, or when component dimensions are on the order of microstructural features, this uncertainty is particularly important. For ultra-high reliability applications, the uncertainty is compounded by a lack of data describing the extremely rare events. Hands-on testing alone cannot supply sufficient data for this purpose. To date, there is no robust or coherent method to quantify this uncertainty so that it can be used in a predictive manner at the component length scale. The research presented in this report begins to address this lack of capability through a systematic study of the effects of microstructure on the strain concentration at a hole. To achieve the strain concentration, small circular holes (approximately 100 {micro}m in diameter) were machined into brass tensile specimens using a femto-second laser. The brass was annealed at 450 C, 600 C, and 800 C to produce three hole-to-grain size ratios of approximately 7, 1, and 1/7. Electron backscatter diffraction experiments were used to guide the construction of digital microstructures for finite element simulations of uniaxial tension. Digital image correlation experiments were used to qualitatively validate the numerical simulations. The simulations were performed iteratively to generate statistics describing the distribution of plastic strain at the hole in varying microstructural environments. In both the experiments and simulations, the deformation behavior was found to depend strongly on the character of the nearby microstructure.

  2. Approximate Quantifier Elimination for Propositional Boolean Formulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    monolithic (all or nothing) approaches based on resolution or model enumeration. 1 Introduction Model, namely existential and universal quantifier elimination, fit less comfortably with SAT than with BDDs

  3. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

  4. Analysis of Emissions Calculators for a National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emissions Reductions (CEDER) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2004, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued guidance on quantifying the air emissions benefits from electric sector energy efficiency and renewable energy. Because there was no clear best strategy, the EPA’s guidance provided a...

  5. Analysis of Climate Policy Targets under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    Although policymaking in response to the climate change is essentially a challenge of risk management, most studies of the relation of emissions targets to desired climate outcomes are either deterministic or subject to a ...

  6. Quantifying the Thermal Fatigue of CPV Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is presented to quantify thermal fatigue in the CPV die-attach from meteorological data. A comparative; study between cities demonstrates a significant difference in the accumulated damage. These differences are most; sensitive to the number of larger (?T) thermal cycles experienced for a location. High frequency data (<1/min) may; be required to most accurately employ this method.

  7. Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution First author: Amir Givati The Hebrew January 2004 #12;ABSTRACT: Urban and industrial air pollution has been shown qualitatively to suppress of the ratio of hill/coast precipitation during the 20th century in polluted areas in line with the increasing

  8. Quantifying Energy Savings by Improving Boiler Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, K.; Kissock, J. K.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dayton, OH ABSTRACT On/off operation and excess combustion air reduce boiler energy efficiency. This paper presents methods to quantify energy savings from switching to modulation control mode and reducing excess air in natural gas fired boilers... the accuracy of the methods. INTRODUCTION In our experience, common opportunities for improving boiler efficiency include switching from on/off to modulation control and reducing excess air. The decision about whether to pursue these opportunities...

  9. Quantification of Variability and Uncertainty in Hourly NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    to quantify variability and uncertainty for NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants. Data for hourly NOx Uncertainty, Variability, Emission Factors, Coal-Fired Power Plants, NOx emissions, Regression Models for different source categories, NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants are analyzed in this #12;2 paper

  10. Analysis of Emissions Calculators for the National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER): Annual Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Haberl, Jeff; Baltazar, Juan-Carlos; Do, Sung Lok

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2004, the USEPA issued guidance on quantifying the air emission benefits from electric sector energy efficiency and renewable energy. Because there was no clear best strategy, the EPA’s guidance provided a framework ...

  11. Accelerator target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  12. Accelerator target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Koehler, Conrad (Miller Place, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  13. Quantifying Dirac hydrogenic effects via complexity measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Bouvrie; S. López-Rosa; J. S. Dehesa

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary dynamical Dirac relativistic effects can only be seen in hydrogenic systems without the complications introduced by electron-electron interactions in many-electron systems. They are known to be the contraction-towards-the-origin of the electronic charge in hydrogenic systems and the nodal disapearance (because of the raising of all the non-relativistic minima) in the electron density of the excited states of these systems. In addition we point out the (largely ignored) gradient reduction of the charge density near and far the nucleus. In this work we quantify these effects by means of single (Fisher information) and composite (Fisher-Shannon complexity and plane, LMC complexity) information-theoretic measures. While the Fisher information measures the gradient content of the density, the (dimensionless) composite information-theoretic quantities grasp two-fold facets of the electronic distribution: The Fisher-Shannon complexity measures the combined balance of the gradient content and the total extent of the electronic charge, and the LMC complexity quantifies the disequilibrium jointly with the spreading of the density in the configuration space. Opposite to other complexity notions (e.g., computational and algorithmic complexities), these two quantities describe intrinsic properties of the system because they do not depend on the context but they are functionals of the electron density. Moreover, they are closely related to the intuitive notion of complexity because they are minimum for the two extreme (or least complex) distributions of perfect order and maximum disorder.

  14. Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone depleting substances Chemistry and Physics Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone depleting by different combinations of long-lived Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) and Ozone Depleting Substances (ODSs

  15. Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison Williams, Barbara Atkinson, Karina Garbesi and Francis savings. Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings

  16. Quantifier rank spectrum of L-infinity-omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Nathaniel Leedom

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Part A we will study the quantifier rank spectrum of sentences of L!1,!. We will show that there are scattered sentences with models of arbitrarily high but bounded quantifier rank. We will also consider the case of ...

  17. Quantifier Inference Rules for SMT proofs David Deharbe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Quantifier Inference Rules for SMT proofs David Deharbe Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte quantifiers in the proof format of the SMT-solver veriT. The quantifier-handling modules in veriT being fairly benefit the SMT community. 1 Introduction In the typical architecture of an SMT-solver, the core automated

  18. Towards Quantifying Complexity with Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan Tan; Daniel R. Terno; Jayne Thompson; Vlatko Vedral; Mile Gu

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    While we have intuitive notions of structure and complexity, the formalization of this intuition is non-trivial. The statistical complexity is a popular candidate. It is based on the idea that the complexity of a process can be quantified by the complexity of its simplest mathematical model - the model that requires the least past information for optimal future prediction. Here we review how such models, known as $\\epsilon$-machines can be further simplified through quantum logic, and explore the resulting consequences for understanding complexity. In particular, we propose a new measure of complexity based on quantum $\\epsilon$-machines. We apply this to a simple system undergoing constant thermalization. The resulting quantum measure of complexity aligns more closely with our intuition of how complexity should behave.

  19. Quantifying the Performance of Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Cafaro; S. L'Innocente; C. Lupo; S. Mancini

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the properties of error correcting codes for noise models in the presence of asymmetries and/or correlations by means of the entanglement fidelity and the code entropy. First, we consider a dephasing Markovian memory channel and characterize the performance of both a repetition code and an error avoiding code in terms of the entanglement fidelity. We also consider the concatenation of such codes and show that it is especially advantageous in the regime of partial correlations. Finally, we characterize the effectiveness of the codes and their concatenation by means of the code entropy and find, in particular, that the effort required for recovering such codes decreases when the error probability decreases and the memory parameter increases. Second, we consider both symmetric and asymmetric depolarizing noisy quantum memory channels and perform quantum error correction via the five qubit stabilizer code. We characterize this code by means of the entanglement fidelity and the code entropy as function of the asymmetric error probabilities and the degree of memory. Specifically, we uncover that while the asymmetry in the depolarizing errors does not affect the entanglement fidelity of the five qubit code, it becomes a relevant feature when the code entropy is used as a performance quantifier.

  20. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy efficiency literature suggests subsidies target efficiency in services with inelastic demand.demand for food, feed, timber and forestry products and supply side shocks such as weather and energydemand-side policies. Summary of leakage modeling literature Analyzing and quantifying leakage from energy

  1. Consequences of Mixed Pixels on Temperature Emissivity Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Foley, Michael G.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates the effect that a mixed pixel can have on temperature/emissivity seperation (i.e. temperature/emissivity estimation using long-wave infra-red data). Almost all temperature/emissivity estimation methods are based on a model that assumes both temperature and emissivity within the imaged pixel is homogeneous. A mixed pixel has heterogeneous temperature/emissivity and therefore does not satisfy the assumption. Needless to say, this heterogeneity causes biases in the estimates and this report quantifies the magnitude of the biases.

  2. Optical emission in magnetically confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, X. K.; Lu, Y. F.; Gebre, T.; Ling, H.; Han, Y. X. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0511 (United States)

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetically confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was investigated by studying the optical emission from laser-induced plasma plumes expanding across an external transverse magnetic field. KrF excimer laser pulses with a pulse duration of 23 ns and a wavelength of 248 nm were used to produce plasmas from Al, Cu, and Co targets. Various optical emission lines obtained from Al and Cu targets show an obvious enhancement in the intensity of optical emission when a magnetic field of {approx}0.8 T is applied, while the optical emission lines from Co targets show a decrease in the optical emission intensity. The enhancement factors of optical emission lines were measured to be around 2 for the Al and Mn (impurity) lines from Al targets, and 6-8 for Cu lines from Cu targets. Temporal evolution of the optical emission lines from the Al samples shows a maximum enhancement in emission intensity at time delays of 8-20 {mu}s after the incident laser pulse, while from the Cu targets it shows a continuous enhancement at time delays of 3-20 {mu}s after the pulse. The enhancement in the optical emission from the Al and Cu plasmas was presumably due to the increase in the effective plasma density as a result of magnetic confinement. The decrease in the emission intensity from the Co plasmas was suggested to be due to the decrease of effective plasma density as a result of the magnetic force.

  3. ANALYTICAL EMISSION MODELS FOR SIGNALISED ARTERIALS Bruce Hellinga, Mohammad Ali Khan, and Liping Fu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinga, Bruce

    ANALYTICAL EMISSION MODELS FOR SIGNALISED ARTERIALS Bruce Hellinga, Mohammad Ali Khan, and Liping for quantifying vehicle tailpipe emissions. In this paper we present non-linear regression models that can be used for emission data is examined using field data. The proposed models have adjusted R 2 values ranging from 0

  4. Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life Cycle Impacts Associated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Life Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: quan-tifying and simulating solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quan-tifying and simulating solar-plant variability using irradiance data Sandia PV Team Publishes Book Chapter On January 21, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy,...

  6. Sandia Energy - Quantifying Offshore Wind Scour with Sandia's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia's Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL---EFDC) Home Renewable Energy Energy News Wind Energy News & Events Computational Modeling & Simulation Quantifying Offshore Wind...

  7. Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  8. Analysis of Emissions Calculators for the National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER)- 2008 Annual Report to the United States Environmental Protection Agency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Do, S. L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2004, the USEPA issued guidance on quantifying the air emission benefits from electric sector energy efficiency and renewable energy. Because there was no clear best strategy, the EPA’s guidance provided a framework and the basic...

  9. The Cost of Kyoto Protocol Targets: The Case of Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey.

    This paper applies the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model to analysis of the cost of the Kyoto Protocol targets, with a special focus on Japan. The analysis demonstrates the implications of the use ...

  10. Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a 10 year DOE sponsored heavy-duty truck engine program, hereafter referred to as the NZ-50 program. This program was split into two major phases. The first phase was called â??Near-Zero Emission at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency,â?ť and was completed in 2007. The second phase was initiated in 2006, and this phase was named â??Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems to Enable High-Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engines.â?ť This phase was completed in September, 2010. The key objectives of the NZ-50 program for this first phase were to: â?˘ Quantify thermal efficiency degradation associated with reduction of engine-out NOx emissions to the 2007 regulated level of ~1.1 g/hp-hr. â?˘ Implement an integrated analytical/experimental development plan for improving subsystem and component capabilities in support of emerging engine technologies for emissions and thermal efficiency goals of the program. â?˘ Test prototype subsystem hardware featuring technology enhancements and demonstrate effective application on a multi-cylinder, production feasible heavy-duty engine test-bed. â?˘ Optimize subsystem components and engine controls (calibration) to demonstrate thermal efficiency that is in compliance with the DOE 2005 Joule milestone, meaning greater than 45% thermal efficiency at 2007 emission levels. â?˘ Develop technology roadmap for meeting emission regulations of 2010 and beyond while mitigating the associated degradation in engine fuel consumption. Ultimately, develop technical prime-path for meeting the overall goal of the NZ-50 program, i.e., 50% thermal efficiency at 2010 regulated emissions. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the NZ-50 program. The most noteworthy achievements in this program are summarized as follows: â?˘ Demonstrated technologies through advanced integrated experiments and analysis to achieve the technical objectives of the NZ-50 program with 50.2% equivalent thermal efficiency under EPA 2010 emissions regulations. â?˘ Experimentally demonstrate brake efficiency of 48.5% at EPA 2010 emission level at single steady-state point. â?˘ Analytically demonstrated additional brake efficiency benefits using advanced aftertreatment configuration concept and air system enhancement including, but not limited to, turbo-compound, variable valve actuator system, and new cylinder head redesign, thus helping to achieve the final program goals. â?˘ Experimentally demonstrated EPA 2010 emissions over FTP cycles using advanced integrated engine and aftertreatment system. These aggressive thermal efficiency and emissions results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. It used integrated analytical and experimental tools for subsystem component optimization encompassing advanced fuel injection system, increased EGR cooling capacity, combustion process optimization, and advanced aftertreatment technologies. Model based controls employing multiple input and output techniques enabled efficient integration of the various subsystems and ensured optimal performance of each system within the total engine package. . The key objective of the NZ-50 program for the second phase was to explore advancements in engine combustion systems using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) techniques to minimize cylinder-out emissions, targeting a 10% efficiency improvement. The most noteworthy achievements in this phase of the program are summarized as follows: â?˘ Experimentally and analytically evaluated numerous air system improvements related to the turbocharger and variable valve actuation. Some of the items tested proved to be very successful and modifications to the turbine discovered in this program have since been incorporated into production hardware. â?˘ The combustion system development continued with evaluation of various designs of the 2-step piston bowl. Significant improvemen

  11. Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    the spatial extent of the wake behind large offshore wind farms. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, LtdQuantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps: Study Area the North Sea C. B National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Offshore wind resources are quantified from satellite synthetic

  12. Scale model seismicity: a detailed study of deformation localisation from laboratory acoustic emission data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Caroline C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic emissions (AE) can provide information relating to the internal state of a deforming rock sample during laboratory testing and have been utilised to quantify damage progression for time-dependent failure modeling. ...

  13. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.; Anderson, S.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper quantifies the mobile air-conditioning fuel consumption of the typical Indian vehicle, exploring potential fuel savings and emissions reductions these systems for the next generation of vehicles.

  14. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  15. First SNS Target Replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    First SNS Target Replacement Experience M. Dayton, M. Rennich, Van Graves, J. DeVore Presented by T.S. Department of Energy AHIP Workshop Oct. 2009 Overview · Initial Target Replacement · Target Maintenance-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy AHIP Workshop Oct. 2009 First SNS Target Replacement · Replacement

  16. MECO Production Target Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    be reoptimized Tungsten target Simulations of design parameters with GEANT3 indicate that both production targetMECO Production Target Developments James L. Popp University of California, Irvine NuFact'03 Columbia, June, 2003 #12;June, 2003J.L.Popp, UCI MECO Production Target 2 MECO Collaboration Institute

  17. Tillage and seasonal emissions of CO2, N2O and NO across a seed bed and at the field scale in a Mediterranean climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    Tillage and seasonal emissions of CO2, N2O and NO across a seed bed and at the field scale, N2O emissions from soil management activities accounted for 29.7% of the combined emissions of CO2 estimates across fields remain uncertain. Here, we quantified CO2, N2O, and NO emissions from an irrigated

  18. The SDSS-IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: selecting Emission Line Galaxies using the Fisher Discriminant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raichoor, A; Delubac, T; Kneib, J -P; Yčche, C; Zou, H; Abdalla, F B; Dawson, K; Fan, X; Fan, Z; Jiang, Z; Jing, Y; Jouvel, S; Lang, D; Lesser, M; Li, C; Ma, J; Newman, J A; Nie, J; Olszewski, E; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Percival, W; Prada, F; Shen, S; Wang, J; Wu, Z; Zhang, T; Zhou, X; Zhou, Z

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new selection technique to produce spectroscopic target catalogues for massive spectroscopic surveys for cosmology. This work was conducted in the context of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), which will use 200,000 emission line galaxies (ELGs) at 0.6target: redshift and [Oii] flux. The proposed selections are simply done by applying a cut on magnitudes and this Fisher discriminant. We used public data and dedicated SDSS spectroscopy to quantify the redshift distribution and [Oii] flux of our ELG target selections. We demonstrate that two of our selections fulfill the initial eBOSS/ELG redshift requirements: for a target density of 180 d...

  19. Probabilistic Detection of Mobile Targets in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    , a surveillance system can be realized via fusion of data aggregated from various sensor modalities: infrared, CCD of detection can be quantified by evaluating the probability of detection by at least k sensors, where kProbabilistic Detection of Mobile Targets in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks Loukas Lazos Network

  20. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  1. Electrically charged targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Ronald K. (Livermore, CA); Hunt, Angus L. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  2. Evaluation of Partial Oxidation Reformer Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unnasch, Stefan; Fable, Scott; Waterland, Larry

    2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a gasoline fuel processor and an ethanol fuel processor were operated under conditions simulating both startup and normal operation. Emissions were measured before and after the AGB in order to quantify the effectiveness of the burner catalyst in controlling emissions. The emissions sampling system includes CEM for O2, CO2, CO, NOx, and THC. Also, integrated gas samples are collected in evacuated canisters for hydrocarbon speciation analysis via GC. This analysis yields the concentrations of the hydrocarbon species required for the California NMOG calculation. The PM concentration in the anode burner exhaust was measured through the placement of a filter in the exhaust stream. The emissions from vehicles with fully developed on board reformer systems were estimated.

  3. Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources Anupama Kowli and George in the electricity industry. In particular, there is a new class of consumers, called demand response resources (DRRs

  4. The Clean Development Mechanism and CER Price Formation in the Carbon Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    to earn Certified Emission Reduction (CER) credits, each equiva- lent to one ton of CO2. These CERs can is to reduce CO2 emissions from these installations by 10% by 2018. However, the European Union Emission House Gas (GHG) emission reduction targets set Partially supported by NSF: DMS-0806591. The second named

  5. Quantifying forested stands with the pulsed airborne laser profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whatley, Michael Craig

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) red H. Smeins (Member) Peter T Sprinz (Member) J ~ (Head aries Lee f Departmen ) May 1986 ABSTRACT Quantifying Forested Stands with the Pulsed Airborne Laser Profiler. (May 1986) Michael Craig Whatley, B. S. , Texas A&M University...; Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert C. Maggio The use of airborne laser technology to enumerate forested stands was explored. A ground-based simulation laser, mimicing the pulsed airborne laser profiler (PALP) was used to quantify the PALP...

  6. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPACT EMISSIONS HEV PHEV marginal power plant is a coalpower uses relatively little coal, but in other cases emissions

  7. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  8. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  9. Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stack parameters from both NEIs to retain only stacks thatwith them. Since both NEIs also report emissions fromparameter reported in both NEIs and the 1996 NET). For the

  10. Project No.: 003893 (GOCE) Quantifying the Climate Impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    to look at alternative fuels, with special focus on CO2 reduction options. Ozone precursors will still of most proposals for mitigation is the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions through reducing energy use emission scenarios that are explicitly designed as mitigation scenarios for all the transport sectors

  11. Driving Down Diesel Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harley, Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turnover on Drayage Truck Emissions at the Port of Oakland,”actions to clean up port truck emissions in Oakland serve asTurnover on Drayage Truck Emissions at the Port of Oakland,”

  12. On Computing Belief Change Operations using Quantified Boolean Formulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tompits, Hans

    of Computing Science Simon Fraser University Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5A 1S6 jim@cs.sfu.ca Torsten Schaub Institut an approach to belief revision and belief contraction can be ax- iomatised by means of quantified Boolean revision, contraction, update, and merging. For both the general approach and for specific operators, we

  13. Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr Tobias Preis1 *, Helen Susannah Moat1 social science. To investigate user attention to the Hurricane Sandy disaster in 2012, we analyze data to Hurricane Sandy bears a striking correlation to the atmospheric pressure in the US state New Jersey during

  14. RESEARCH Open Access Quantifying and understanding carbon storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESEARCH Open Access Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within: The carbon stored in vegetation varies across tropical landscapes due to a complex mix of climatic: We produce a map of carbon storage across the watershed of the Tanzanian Eastern Arc Mountains (33

  15. Quantifying intrapopulation variability in stable isotope data for Spotted Seatrout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    111 Quantifying intrapopulation variability in stable isotope data for Spotted Seatrout (Cynoscion of the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA. Abstract--Stable isotope (SI) values of carbon (13C) and nitrogen patterns of enrichment in fish caught from coastal to off- shore sites and as a function of fish size

  16. Expressing Default Abduction Problems as Quantified Boolean Formulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tompits, Hans

    1 Expressing Default Abduction Problems as Quantified Boolean Formulas Hans Tompits Institut f@kr.tuwien.ac.at Abduction is the process of finding explanations for observed phenomena in accord to known laws about, we deal with a model for abduction in which the domain knowledge is represented in terms of a default

  17. Quantifying the Impact of Daylight Saving Clock Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Simon I.

    Quantifying the Impact of Daylight Saving Clock Changes on Energy Consumption Simon I. Hill of Daylight Saving Clock Changes on Energy Consumption Simon I. Hill, Frédéric Desobry and Yu-Foong Chong May DST Daylight Saving Time EIA Energy Information Administration GDP Gross Domestic Product GMT

  18. QUANTIFYING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND THE HEAT IT GENERATES Dana Longcope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longcope, Dana

    in many aspects of coronal activity including the general process of coronal heating. Magnetic of that structure. Key words: Magnetic reconnection. 1. INTRODUCTION Models for heating the solar coronaQUANTIFYING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND THE HEAT IT GENERATES Dana Longcope Department of Physics

  19. NCSEC'07 Plano, TX Risk-Based Quantifiable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    NCSEC'07 Plano, TX Risk-Based Quantifiable Quality Improvement Jeff Tian (tian@engr.smu Risk · Quality for Customers/Users · Quality for Software Organizations March 30, 2007 Jeff Tian, SMU 2800 1536 1 883 737 5396 2583 45 37 9 March 30, 2007 Jeff Tian, SMU #12;NCSEC'07, Plano, TX Slide. 3

  20. A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO QUANTIFYING AND IMPROVING THE AVAILABILITY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO QUANTIFYING AND IMPROVING THE AVAILABILITY OF INTERNET SERVICES. BY KIRAN and Improving the Availability of Internet Services. by Kiran Nagaraja Dissertation Director: Thu D. Nguyen are demanding higher availability from them. Yet, studies show that these services are achieving only 99 to 99

  1. Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI Quantifying Uncertainties Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    1 Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI Quantifying Uncertainties Associated with Reservoir Simulation Solutions, Inc. SPE 102492 #12;2 Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI SPE 102492 Outline Reservoir Simulation Uncertainty, Using Surrogate Reservoir Model #12;3 Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI SPE 102492 Sources

  2. SHORT COMMUNICATION Quantifying the effects of individual and environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Alex

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Quantifying the effects of individual and environmental variability in fish ABSTRACT The effect of environmental variability on fish recruitment is analysed using simple linear growth in recruited fish, and in the mean observed growth rate of the overall population. These conclu- sions

  3. Dynamically Quantifying and Improving the Reliability of Distributed Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Ricardo

    Dynamically Quantifying and Improving the Reliability of Distributed Storage Systems Rekha Bachwani-scale storage systems can be significantly improved by using bet- ter reliability metrics and more efficient on a distributed storage system based on erasure codes. We find that MinI improves relia- bility significantly

  4. STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    this situation (e. g., "extRemes" package in open source statistical programming language R) Maximum likelihood1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute in Causes of Trends #12;4 (1) Introduction · Extreme value analysis under stationarity -- Statistical theory

  5. Quantifying Security in Hybrid Cellular Markus Jakobsson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying Security in Hybrid Cellular Networks Markus Jakobsson1 and Liu Yang2 1 School and recipients to provide auditing information. Our scheme is an exten- sion of [6], where the authors addressed be expected from the use of this approach. For one thing, the energy consumption of the mobile device can

  6. Short Paper Quantifying the source area of macroscopic charcoal with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitlock, Cathy L.

    for simulating sediment-charcoal records. The dispersal model captures the two-dimensional patternsShort Paper Quantifying the source area of macroscopic charcoal with a particle dispersal model charcoal deposition from an experimental fire to predictions from a particle dispersal model. This provides

  7. Quantifying the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    Quantifying the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines Stephen Rosea , Paulina Jaramilloa,1. Turbine tower buckling has been observed in typhoons, but no offshore wind turbines have yet been built be destroyed by hurricanes in an offshore wind farm. We apply this model to estimate the risk to offshore wind

  8. Quantifying Network Denial of Service: A Location Service Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kubiatowicz, John D.

    1 Quantifying Network Denial of Service: A Location Service Case Study Yan Chen, Adam Bargteil distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks with a few keystrokes [11]. Besides these com- mon flooding classes of network DoS at- tacks, we propose a novel benchmarking methodology and apply it to study

  9. DOE: Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes research to Quantify the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. This 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. Methods are described for valuation and planning of pumped storage and conventional hydropower. The project team conducted plant case studies, electric system modeling, market analysis, cost data gathering, and evaluations of operating strategies and constraints. Five other reports detailing these research results are available a project website, www.epri.com/hydrogrid. With increasing deployment of wind and solar renewable generation, many owners, operators, and developers of hydropower have recognized the opportunity to provide more flexibility and ancillary services to the electric grid. To quantify value of services, this study focused on the Western Electric Coordinating Council region. A security-constrained, unit commitment and economic dispatch model was used to quantify the role of hydropower for several future energy scenarios up to 2020. This hourly production simulation considered transmission requirements to deliver energy, including future expansion plans. Both energy and ancillary service values were considered. Addressing specifically the quantification of pumped storage value, no single value stream dominated predicted plant contributions in various energy futures. Modeling confirmed that service value depends greatly on location and on competition with other available grid support resources. In this summary, ten different value streams related to hydropower are described. These fell into three categories; operational improvements, new technologies, and electricity market opportunities. Of these ten, the study was able to quantify a monetary value in six by applying both present day and future scenarios for operating the electric grid. This study confirmed that hydropower resources across the United States contribute significantly to operation of the grid in terms of energy, capacity, and ancillary services. Many potential improvements to existing hydropower plants were found to be cost-effective. Pumped storage is the most likely form of large new hydro asset expansions in the U.S. however, justifying investments in new pumped storage plants remains very challenging with current electricity market economics. Even over a wide range of possible energy futures, up to 2020, no energy future was found to bring quantifiable revenues sufficient to cover estimated costs of plant construction. Value streams not quantified in this study may provide a different cost-benefit balance and an economic tipping point for hydro. Future studies are essential in the quest to quantify the full potential value. Additional research should consider the value of services provided by advanced storage hydropower and pumped storage at smaller time steps for integration of variable renewable resources, and should include all possible value streams such as capacity value and portfolio benefits i.e.; reducing cycling on traditional generation.

  10. Target Cost Management Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okano, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

  11. Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman and Annelne Decaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program the benefits of emissions trading in achieving the emission reduction targets implied by the Kyoto Protocol

  12. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 Cooling Channel in both walls for draining · Downstream end can be shortened, assuming the window cooling is adequate #12;11 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 Remote Handling

  13. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  14. Hydrodynamic instabilities in beryllium targets for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, S. A., E-mail: austinyi@lanl.gov; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium ablators offer higher ablation velocity, rate, and pressure than their carbon-based counterparts, with the potential to increase the probability of achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We present here a detailed hydrodynamic stability analysis of low (NIF Revision 6.1) and high adiabat NIF beryllium target designs. Our targets are optimized to fully utilize the advantages of beryllium in order to suppress the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. This results in an implosion that resists breakup of the capsule, and simultaneously minimizes the amount of ablator material mixed into the fuel. We quantify the improvement in stability of beryllium targets relative to plastic ones, and show that a low adiabat beryllium capsule can be at least as stable at the ablation front as a high adiabat plastic target.

  15. Macro-coherent two photon and radiative neutrino pair emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yoshimura; C. Ohae; A. Fukumi; K. Nakajima; I. Nakano; H. Nanjo; N. Sasao

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a possibility of detecting a coherent photon pair emission and related radiative neutrino pair emission from excited atoms. It is shown that atoms of lambda- and ladder-type three level system placed in a pencil-like cylinder give a back to back emission of two photons of equal energy $\\Delta/2$, sharply peaked with a width $\\propto $ 1/(target size) and well collimated along the cylinder axis. This process has a measurable rate $\\propto$ (target number density) $^2 \\times$ target volume, while a broader spectral feature of one-photon distribution separated by (mass sum of a neutrino pair)$^2/(2\\Delta)$ from the two photon peak may arise from radiative neutrino pair emission, with a much smaller rate.

  16. A Sectoral Prospective Analysis of CO2 Emissions in China, USA and France, 2010-2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A Sectoral Prospective Analysis of CO2 Emissions in China, USA and France, 2010-2050 Pascal da mitigation targets for CO2 emissions, which reflect their own specific situations. In this article, scenarios for CO2 emissions up to 2050 are set up for three representative countries: the United States of America

  17. SNS Target Systems Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    a failed gas seal on the shaft and leaking oil seals but has operated well since then · The moderator 7.5 k First target replacement · No observed corrosion · Internal Boroscope examination in progress · ~ 50 mm

  18. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, [October--December, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. During this quarter, tests of the LNCFS Level III system were conducted to determine the effect that fuel fineness has on NOx emissions and unburned carbon levels. Results showed that changing the fineness of the fuel has almost no effect on NOx emissions; however, unburned carbon levels can be reduced significantly by increasing fuel fineness.

  19. BP's Perspective on Emissions Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BP's Perspective on Emissions Trading Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop April 30, 2010 Mark - Government policies can create a carbon price via three primary mechanisms: - Emissions trading (BP's strong

  20. A Bayesian approach to simultaneously quantify assignments and linguistic uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Gregory M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Booker, Jane M [BOOKER SCIENTIFIC FREDERICKSBURG; Ross, Timothy J [UNM

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject matter expert assessments can include both assignment and linguistic uncertainty. This paper examines assessments containing linguistic uncertainty associated with a qualitative description of a specific state of interest and the assignment uncertainty associated with assigning a qualitative value to that state. A Bayesian approach is examined to simultaneously quantify both assignment and linguistic uncertainty in the posterior probability. The approach is applied to a simplified damage assessment model involving both assignment and linguistic uncertainty. The utility of the approach and the conditions under which the approach is feasible are examined and identified.

  1. Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint slide deck was originally presented at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review by Paul Denholm and Mark Mehos of NREL on April 23, 2013. Entitled "Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage," the presenters seek to answer the question, "What is the addition of TES to a CSP plant actually worth?" Ultimately they conclude that CSP with TES can actually complement other variable generation sources including solar PV and act as an enabling technology to achieve higher overall penetration of renewable energy.

  2. A pairwise additive strategy for quantifying multipartite entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo A. Paz-Silva; John H. Reina

    2007-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the idea of measuring the factorizability of a given density matrix, we propose a pairwise analysis strategy for quantifying and understanding multipartite entanglement. The methodology proves very effective as it immediately guarantees, in addition to the usual entanglement properties, additivity and strong super additivity. We give a specific set of quantities that fulfill the protocol and which, according to our numerical calculations, make the entanglement measure an LOCC non-increasing function. The strategy allows a redefinition of the structural concept of global entanglement.

  3. Methodology to Quantify Non-Program Savings Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals fromprocess used in mining - Energyto Quantify

  4. Quantifying Uncertainty in Computer Predictions | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL: ShalePutting!Quantifying Uncertainty in

  5. Sectoral targets for developing countries: Combining "Common but differentiated responsibilities"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , as also is the impact on the electricity price. Keywords Sectoral approach, sectoral target, developing-type absolute commitments, whilst developing countries adopt an emission trading system limited to electricity are auctioned by the government, which distributes its revenues lump-sum to households. In a second scenario

  6. Excess Emissions (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

  7. Impacts of High Resolution Extreme Events on U.S. Energy Demand and CO{sub 2} Emissions in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported in these areas: Validation of temperature and precipitation extremes; Time of emergence of severe heat stress in the United States; Quantifying the effects of temperature extremes on energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions.

  8. Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornhill, D. A.

    The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive ...

  9. Emissions Trading and Social Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    David  M.  Driesen,  Does  Emissions  Trading  Encourage  Jason  Coburn,  Emissions  Trading   and   Environmental  Szambelan,  U.S.  Emissions  Trading  Markets  for  SO 2  

  10. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  11. Quantifying uncertainty in LCA-modelling of waste management systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clavreul, Julie, E-mail: julc@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Guyonnet, Dominique [BRGM, ENAG BRGM-School, BP 6009, 3 Avenue C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainty in LCA-modelling of waste management is significant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model, scenario and parameter uncertainties contribute. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential procedure for quantifying uncertainty is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application of procedure is illustrated by a case-study. - Abstract: Uncertainty analysis in LCA studies has been subject to major progress over the last years. In the context of waste management, various methods have been implemented but a systematic method for uncertainty analysis of waste-LCA studies is lacking. The objective of this paper is (1) to present the sources of uncertainty specifically inherent to waste-LCA studies, (2) to select and apply several methods for uncertainty analysis and (3) to develop a general framework for quantitative uncertainty assessment of LCA of waste management systems. The suggested method is a sequence of four steps combining the selected methods: (Step 1) a sensitivity analysis evaluating the sensitivities of the results with respect to the input uncertainties, (Step 2) an uncertainty propagation providing appropriate tools for representing uncertainties and calculating the overall uncertainty of the model results, (Step 3) an uncertainty contribution analysis quantifying the contribution of each parameter uncertainty to the final uncertainty and (Step 4) as a new approach, a combined sensitivity analysis providing a visualisation of the shift in the ranking of different options due to variations of selected key parameters. This tiered approach optimises the resources available to LCA practitioners by only propagating the most influential uncertainties.

  12. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuckolls, John H. (Livermore, CA); Thiessen, Albert R. (Livermore, CA); Dahlbacka, Glen H. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  13. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Janse, Daniel M. (Brookline, MA)

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  14. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL -

  15. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL - -

  16. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL - -

  17. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) Target 1 Flight Path° flightTargetL - - -

  18. NWEC Comments: Environmental Costs and Benefits 1 Methodology for Determining Quantifiable Environmental Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NWEC Comments: Environmental Costs and Benefits 1 Methodology for Determining Quantifiable Environmental Costs and Benefits Comments of the NW Energy Coalition October 31, 2014 Introduction: Applying (Council) to include a methodology for determining quantifiable environmental costs and benefits in its

  19. Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating surface emissions. Until recently, dedicated research-grade instruments have been required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GHG columns · Quantifying local to regional GHG enhancements for emissions inventory verificationAbstract Airborne greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements provide essential constraints for estimating with another Cessna 210 over Central California quantified enhancements in CO2 and CH4 from urban

  20. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

  1. Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

  2. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  3. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F. [Radiology Division, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California 91010 (United States); Internal Medicine, University of California Davis Medical Center, 1508 Alhambra Boulevard, Suite 3100, Sacramento, California 95816 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wallace Tumor Institute WTI No. 117, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners.

  4. Edinburgh Research Explorer Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD diagrams with Bio-PEPA Citation for published version: Loewe, L, Moodie, S & Hillston, J 2009, 'Quantifying & Hillston This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License. Quantifying the implicit

  5. Solid Target Options S. Childress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    power is higher than for existing solid target designs - but not by a large factor. · NuMI graphite beam power) · High beam power solid targets frequently use higher z materials for increased yield plusSolid Target Options NuFACT'00 S. Childress Solid Target Options · The choice of a primary beam

  6. ISAC target vacuum system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yosifov, Dimo; Sekachev, Igor [TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF has been in full operation since 1999. The ISAC east and west targets use proton beam from the cyclotron to produce various radioactive isotopes, which are then ionized and extracted. The ions are then passed through the mass separator and selected ions are transferred to the low energy experiments or injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The accompanying radioactive contamination from the production of radioactive ions requires a complex vacuum system. The main target vacuum space consists of two semiseparate (primary and secondary) volumes pumped by turbo-molecular pumps. The primary volume uses four pumps while the secondary volume uses two pumps. Two hermetic rotary vane pumps are used as backing pumps. The nominal vacuum in both volumes is about 1.33x10{sup -4} Pa (1.0x10{sup -6} Torr). The pressure is monitored by two cold cathode and two hot filament ion gauges. The cold cathode gauges are used to interlock the system, which is critical during the bake out of the target and beam production. The exhaust gas from the vacuum pumps can be radioactive. Three gas storage tanks (decay tanks) are used for temporary storage of the radioactive exhaust and its controlled release to the atmosphere. Gas-species insensitive membrane gauges are used for monitoring the pressure in the storage tanks. This article describes the details of the ISAC target vacuum system as well as some procedures related to the handling of the exhaust gas with traces of radioactive contamination produced by the targets.

  7. Emissions-critical charge cooling using an organic rankine cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a system including a Rankine power cycle cooling subsystem providing emissions-critical charge cooling of an input charge flow. The system includes a boiler fluidly coupled to the input charge flow, an energy conversion device fluidly coupled to the boiler, a condenser fluidly coupled to the energy conversion device, a pump fluidly coupled to the condenser and the boiler, an adjuster that adjusts at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle subsystem to change a temperature of the input charge exiting the boiler, and a sensor adapted to sense a temperature characteristic of the vaporized input charge. The system includes a controller that can determine a target temperature of the input charge sufficient to meet or exceed predetermined target emissions and cause the adjuster to adjust at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle to achieve the predetermined target emissions.

  8. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  9. The Local Dimension: a method to quantify the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash Sarkar; Somnath Bharadwaj

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now well accepted that the galaxies are distributed in filaments, sheets and clusters all of which form an interconnected network known as the Cosmic Web. It is a big challenge to quantify the shapes of the interconnected structural elements that form this network. Tools like the Minkowski functionals which use global properties, though well suited for an isolated object like a single sheet or filament, are not suited for an interconnected network of such objects. We consider the Local Dimension $D$, defined through $N(R)=A R^D$, where $N(R)$ is the galaxy number count within a sphere of comoving radius $R$ centered on a particular galaxy, as a tool to locally quantify the shape in the neigbourhood of different galaxies along the Cosmic Web. We expect $D \\sim 1,2$ and 3 for a galaxy located in a filament, sheet and cluster respectively. Using LCDM N-body simulations we find that it is possible to determine $D$ through a power law fit to $N(R)$ across the length-scales 2 to $10 {\\rm Mpc}$ for $\\sim 33 %$ of the galaxies. We have visually identified the filaments and sheets corresponding to many of the galaxies with $D \\sim 1$ and 2 respectively. In several other situations the structure responsible for the $D$ value could not be visually identified, either due to its being tenuous or due to other dominating structures in the vicinity. We also show that the global distribution of the $D$ values can be used to visualize and interpret how the different structural elements are woven into the Cosmic Web.

  10. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and reactivity of supercritical CO{sub 2} in coal-bearing strata is unknown, and potential exists for supercritical conditions to develop below a depth of 2,480 feet following abandonment of the coalbed methane fields. High-pressure adsorption isotherms confirm that coal sorbs approximately twice as much CO{sub 2} as CH{sub 4} and approximately four times as much CO{sub 2} as N{sub 2}. Analysis of isotherm data reveals that the sorption performance of each gas can vary by a factor of two depending on rank and ash content. Gas content data exhibit extreme vertical and lateral variability that is the product of a complex burial history involving an early phase of thermogenic gas generation and an ongoing stage of late biogenic gas generation. Production characteristics of coalbed methane wells are helpful for identifying areas that are candidates for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Many geologic and engineering factors, including well construction, well spacing, and regional structure influence well performance. Close fault spacing limits areas where five-spot patterns may be developed for enhanced gas recovery, but large structural panels lacking normal faults are in several gas fields and can be given priority as areas to demonstrate and commercialize carbon sequestration technology in coalbed methane reservoirs.

  11. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  12. Modeling Traffic Flow Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappiello, Alessandra

    2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The main topic of this thesis is the development of light-duty vehicle dynamic emission models and their integration with dynamic traffic models. Combined, these models

  13. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  14. Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mass, membrane effects, fundamentals on permeability * DOC Pd:Pt ratios allow optimization * Gasoline emission control is amazing - Zone coating - Lower PGM with better...

  15. Time dependence of delayed neutron emission for fissionable isotope identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinlaw, M.T.; Hunt, A.W. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8263 (United States); Department of Physics, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8106 (United States)

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependence of delayed neutron emission was examined as a method of fissionable isotope identification. A pulsed bremsstrahlung photon beam was used to induce photofission reactions in {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 239}Pu targets. The resulting delayed neutron emission was recorded between irradiating pulses and is a well-known technique for fissionable material detection. Monitoring the decay of delayed neutron emission between irradiating pulses demonstrates the ability to not only detect the presence of fissionable materials, but also to identify which fissionable isotope is present.

  16. Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loree, deceased, Thomas R. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Bigio, Irving J. (Los Alamos, NM); Zuclich, Joseph A. (San Antonio, TX); Shimada, Tsutomu (Los Alamos, NM); Strobl, Karlheinz (Fiskdale, MA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens. The present invention includes the application of fiberoptic, OMA-based instrumentation as an in vivo diagnostic tool for the human ocular lens. Rapid, noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the optical characteristics of a lens using very modest levels of exciting light are described. Typically, the backscatter and fluorescence spectra (from about 300- to 900-nm) elicited by each of several exciting wavelengths (from about 300- to 600-nm) are collected within a few seconds. The resulting optical signature of individual lenses is then used to assess the overall optical quality of the lens by comparing the results with a database of similar measurements obtained from a reference set of normal human lenses having various ages. Several metrics have been identified which gauge the optical quality of a given lens relative to the norm for the subject's chronological age. These metrics may also serve to document accelerated optical aging and/or as early indicators of cataract or other disease processes.

  17. Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loree, T.R.; Bigio, I.J.; Zuclich, J.A.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Strobl, K.

    1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for quantifying optical properties of the human lens. The present invention includes the application of fiberoptic, OMA-based instrumentation as an in vivo diagnostic tool for the human ocular lens. Rapid, noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the optical characteristics of a lens using very modest levels of exciting light are described. Typically, the backscatter and fluorescence spectra (from about 300- to 900-nm) elicited by each of several exciting wavelengths (from about 300- to 600-nm) are collected within a few seconds. The resulting optical signature of individual lenses is then used to assess the overall optical quality of the lens by comparing the results with a database of similar measurements obtained from a reference set of normal human lenses having various ages. Several metrics have been identified which gauge the optical quality of a given lens relative to the norm for the subject`s chronological age. These metrics may also serve to document accelerated optical aging and/or as early indicators of cataract or other disease processes. 8 figs.

  18. QUANTIFYING THE EVOLVING MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlon, Paul A.; McAteer, R.T. James; Gallagher, Peter T.; Fennell, Linda, E-mail: mcateer@nmsu.ed [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The topical and controversial issue of parameterizing the magnetic structure of solar active regions has vital implications in the understanding of how these structures form, evolve, produce solar flares, and decay. This interdisciplinary and ill-constrained problem of quantifying complexity is addressed by using a two-dimensional wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method to study the multifractal properties of active region photospheric magnetic fields. The WTMM method provides an adaptive space-scale partition of a fractal distribution, from which one can extract the multifractal spectra. The use of a novel segmentation procedure allows us to remove the quiet Sun component and reliably study the evolution of active region multifractal parameters. It is shown that prior to the onset of solar flares, the magnetic field undergoes restructuring as Dirac-like features (with a Hoelder exponent, h = -1) coalesce to form step functions (where h = 0). The resulting configuration has a higher concentration of gradients along neutral line features. We propose that when sufficient flux is present in an active region for a period of time, it must be structured with a fractal dimension greater than 1.2, and a Hoelder exponent greater than -0.7, in order to produce M- and X-class flares. This result has immediate applications in the study of the underlying physics of active region evolution and space weather forecasting.

  19. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  20. Target: Subpoena (2010-SE-2001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Subpoena for Information and Production of Documents to Target Corporation requesting information regarding the compliance of various torchieres Target has distributed in commerce in the U.S.

  1. Non-PGM Target Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    targets that need to be met are cost, efficiency, and durability. A secondary target is heat rejection at rated power. (ANL) * Given that for current Pt systems catalyst cost is ...

  2. Synergy between Pollution and Carbon Emissions Control: Comparing China and the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Kyung-Min

    We estimate the potential synergy between pollution and climate control in the U.S. and China, summarizing the results as emissions cross-elasticities of control. We set a range of NOx and SO2 targets, and record the ...

  3. o meet the challenges of global climate change, greenhouse-gas emissions must

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    . Emissions from fossil fuels are the largest contributor to the anthropo- genic greenhouse effect, so . In my view, it is therefore an attractive target for energy subsidies and for inclusion in the global

  4. Laser wavelength effects on ionic and atomic emission from tin plasmas D. Campos,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Laser wavelength effects on ionic and atomic emission from tin plasmas D. Campos,a S. S. Harilal centered at 13.5 nm. Spitzer et al.1 reported that tin targets irradiated by a neodymium-doped yttrium alu

  5. Target | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0Information ExpansionTarget GmbH Jump

  6. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

  7. Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

  8. Cancer Cell Targeting Androgen Receptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    in the development of endo- crine therapies targeting estrogen production or ER for both breast cancer treatment targeting of AR, Wnt or HER2 signaling impairs androgen-stimulated tumor cell growth suggesting potential. Therapies targeting HER2 such as trastuzumab are becoming increasingly important in the treatment of HER2

  9. Rotating Target Development for SNS Second Target Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamy, Thomas J [ORNL; Rennich, Mark J [ORNL; Crawford, Roy K [ORNL; Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Janney, Jim G [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating target for the second target station (STS) at SNS has been identified as an option along with a mercury target. Evaluation of the rotating target alternative for STS has started at 1.5 MW which is considered an upper bound for the power. Previous preconceptual design work for a 3 MW rotating target is being modified for the lower power level. Transient thermal analysis for a total loss of active water cooling has been done for a simplified 2D model of the target and shielding monolith which shows that peak temperatures are well below the level at which tungsten vaporization by steam could exceed site boundary dose limits. Design analysis and integration configuration studies have been done for the target-moderator-reflector assembly which maximizes the number of neutron beam lines and provides for replacement of the target and moderators. Target building hot cell arrangement for this option will be described. An option for operation in rough vacuum without a proton beam window using Ferro fluid seals on a vertical shaft is being developed. A full scale prototypic drive module based on the 3 MW preconceptual design has been fabricated and successfully tested with a shaft and mock up target supplied by the ESS-Bilbao team. Overall planning leading to decision between mercury and the rotating target in 2011 will be discussed

  10. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: shishirk@gmail.com; Raghavan, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Duesberg, G. S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) and School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D2 (Ireland); Pratap, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ?10?nA ?m{sup ?1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  11. A Helium Gas-Scintillator Active Target for Photoreaction Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Al Jebali; J. R. M. Annand; J. -O. Adler; I. Akkurt; E. Buchanan; J. Brudvik; K. Fissum; S. Gardner; D. J. Hamilton; K. Hansen; L. Isaksson; K. Livingston; M. Lundin; J. C. McGeorge; I. J. D. MacGregor; R. MacRae; D. G. Middleton; A. J. H. Reiter; G. Rosner; B. Schröder; J. Sjögren; D. Sokhan; B. Strandberg

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-cell He gas-scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 $\\mathrm{g/cm^{2}}$ at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of $\\mathrm{N}_{2}$ to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has good timing resolution and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in $^{4}\\mathrm{He}$, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response.

  12. A Helium Gas-Scintillator Active Target for Photoreaction Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jebali, R Al; Adler, J -O; Akkurt, I; Buchanan, E; Brudvik, J; Fissum, K; Gardner, S; Hamilton, D J; Hansen, K; Isaksson, L; Livingston, K; Lundin, M; McGeorge, J C; MacGregor, I J D; MacRae, R; Middleton, D G; Reiter, A J H; Rosner, G; Schröder, B; Sjögren, J; Sokhan, D; Strandberg, B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-cell He gas-scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 $\\mathrm{g/cm^{2}}$ at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of $\\mathrm{N}_{2}$ to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has good timing resolution and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in $^{4}\\mathrm{He}$, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response...

  13. Regulated Emissions from Biodiesel Tested in Heavy-Duty Engines Meeting 2004 Emission Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Black, S.; Ireland, J.; McDaniel, T.; Williams, A.; Frailey, M.; Sharp, C. A.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiesel produced from soybean oil, canola oil, yellow grease, and beef tallow was tested in two heavy-duty engines. The biodiesels were tested neat and as 20% by volume blends with a 15 ppm sulfur petroleum-derived diesel fuel. The test engines were the following: 2002 Cummins ISB and 2003 DDC Series 60. Both engines met the 2004 U.S. emission standard of 2.5 g/bhp-h NO{sub x}+HC (3.35 g/kW-h) and utilized exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All emission tests employed the heavy-duty transient procedure as specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Reduction in PM emissions and increase in NO{sub x} emissions were observed for all biodiesels in all engines, confirming observations made in older engines. On average PM was reduced by 25% and NO{sub x} increased by 3% for the two engines tested for a variety of B20 blends. These changes are slightly larger in magnitude, but in the same range as observed in older engines. The cetane improver 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate was shown to have no measurable effect on NO{sub x} emissions from B20 in these engines, in contrast to observations reported for older engines. The effect of intake air humidity on NO{sub x} emissions from the Cummins ISB was quantified. The CFR NO{sub x}/humidity correction factor was shown to be valid for an engine equipped with EGR, operating at 1700 m above sea level, and operating on conventional or biodiesel.

  14. Quantifying object and material surface areas in residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Ming, Katherine Y.; Singer, Brett C.

    2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic behavior of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor environments depends, in part, on sorptive interactions between VOCs in the gas phase and material surfaces. Since information on the types and quantities of interior material surfaces is not generally available, this pilot-scale study was conducted in occupied residences to develop and demonstrate a method for quantifying surface areas of objects and materials in rooms. Access to 33 rooms in nine residences consisting of bathrooms, bedroom/offices and common areas was solicited from among research group members living in the East San Francisco Bay Area. A systematic approach was implemented for measuring rooms and objects from 300 cm{sup 2} and larger. The ventilated air volumes of the rooms were estimated and surface area-to-volume ratios were calculated for objects and materials, each segregated into 20 or more categories. Total surface area-to-volume ratios also were determined for each room. The bathrooms had the highest total surface area-to-volume ratios. Bedrooms generally had higher ratios than common areas consisting of kitchens, living/dining rooms and transitional rooms. Total surface area-to-volume ratios for the 12 bedrooms ranged between 2.3 and 4.7 m{sup 2} m{sup -3}. The importance of individual objects and materials with respect to sorption will depend upon the sorption coefficients for the various VOC/materials combinations. When combined, the highly permeable material categories, which may contribute to significant interactions, had a median ratio of about 0.5 m{sup 2} m{sup -3} for all three types of rooms.

  15. Trapped Between Two Tails: Trading Off Scientific Uncertainties via Climate Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemoine, Derek M.; McJeon, Haewon C.

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change policies must trade off uncertainties about future warming, about the social and ecological impacts of warming, and about the cost of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We show that laxer carbon targets produce broader distributions for climate damages, skewed towards severe outcomes. However, if potential low-carbon technologies fill overlapping niches, then more stringent carbon targets produce broader distributions for the cost of reducing emissions, skewed towards high-cost outcomes. We use the technology- rich GCAM integrated assessment model to assess the robustness of 450 ppm and 500 ppm carbon targets to each uncertain factor. The 500 ppm target provides net benefits across a broad range of futures. The 450 ppm target provides net benefits only when impacts are greater than conventionally assumed, when multiple technological breakthroughs lower the cost of abatement, or when evaluated with a low discount rate. Policy evaluations are more sensitive to uncertainty about abatement technology and impacts than to uncertainty about warming.

  16. Quantifying methane oxidation in a landfill-cover soil by gas push-pull tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, K.E. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: gomezke@hotmail.com; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Lazzaro, A. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schroth, M.H. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: martin.schroth@env.ethz.ch

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) oxidation by aerobic methanotrophs in landfill-cover soils decreases emissions of landfill-produced CH{sub 4} to the atmosphere. To quantify in situ rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation we performed five gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) at each of two locations in the cover soil of the Lindenstock landfill (Liestal, Switzerland) over a 4 week period. GPPTs consist of the injection of a gas mixture containing CH{sub 4}, O{sub 2} and noble gas tracers followed by extraction from the same location. Quantification of first-order rate constants was based upon comparison of breakthrough curves of CH{sub 4} with either Ar or CH{sub 4} itself from a subsequent inactive GPPT containing acetylene as an inhibitor of CH{sub 4} oxidation. The maximum calculated first-order rate constant was 24.8 {+-} 0.8 h{sup -1} at location 1 and 18.9 {+-} 0.6 h{sup -1} at location 2. In general, location 2 had higher background CH{sub 4} concentrations in vertical profile samples than location 1. High background CH{sub 4} concentrations in the cover soil during some experiments adversely affected GPPT breakthrough curves and data interpretation. Real-time PCR verified the presence of a large population of methanotrophs at the two GPPT locations and comparison of stable carbon isotope fractionation of CH{sub 4} in an active GPPT and a subsequent inactive GPPT confirmed that microbial activity was responsible for the CH{sub 4} oxidation. The GPPT was shown to be a useful tool to reproducibly estimate in situ rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation in a landfill-cover soil when background CH{sub 4} concentrations were low.

  17. Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Nikhil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

  18. EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gullberg, G.T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Resolution Computed Tomography of Positron Emitters,"of Dynamic Emission Computed Tomography," J. Nucl. Med. ~:IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY RECEIVED lAWRENCE

  19. Target detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brusseau, Charles A. (Tijeras, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  20. PDFs for nuclear targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Kovarik

    2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding nuclear effects in parton distribution functions (PDF) is an essential component needed to determine the strange and anti-strange quark contributions in the proton. In addition Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions (NPDF) are critically important for any collider experiment with nuclei (e.g. RHIC, ALICE). Here two next-to-leading order chi^2-analyses of NPDF are presented. The first uses neutral current charged-lepton Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan data for several nuclear targets and the second uses neutrino-nucleon DIS data. We compare the nuclear corrections factors (F_2^Fe/F_2^D) for the charged-lepton data with other results from the literature. In particular, we compare and contrast fits based upon the charged-lepton DIS data with those using neutrino-nucleon DIS data.

  1. Contraction & Convergence: UK carbon emissions and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    the EU's emissions trading scheme will do little to mitigate carbon emissions 4) Aviation growth must emissions. Keywords Contraction & Convergence; aviation; emissions trading; passengers; carbon dioxide #12

  2. Estimation of Annual Reductions of NOx Emissions in ERCOT for the HB3693 Electricity Savings Goals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diem, Art; Mulholland, Denise; Yarbrough, James; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Im, Piljae; Haberl, Jeff

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    avoided emission rate is approximately 0.51 pounds (lb) of NOx reduced per MWh of electricity savings. While House Bill 3693 is an Act related to energy and does not target emissions levels, the energy efficiency improvements would achieve air pollution...

  3. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  4. QUANTIFYING OBSERVATIONAL PROJECTION EFFECTS USING MOLECULAR CLOUD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaumont, Christopher N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Offner, Stella S.R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Shetty, Rahul; Glover, Simon C. O. [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goodman, Alyssa A., E-mail: beaumont@ifa.hawaii.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical properties of molecular clouds are often measured using spectral-line observations, which provide the only probes of the clouds' velocity structure. It is hard, though, to assess whether and to what extent intensity features in position-position-velocity (PPV) space correspond to 'real' density structures in position-position-position (PPP) space. In this paper, we create synthetic molecular cloud spectral-line maps of simulated molecular clouds, and present a new technique for measuring the reality of individual PPV structures. Using a dendrogram algorithm, we identify hierarchical structures in both PPP and PPV space. Our procedure projects density structures identified in PPP space into corresponding intensity structures in PPV space and then measures the geometric overlap of the projected structures with structures identified from the synthetic observation. The fractional overlap between a PPP and PPV structure quantifies how well the synthetic observation recovers information about the three-dimensional structure. Applying this machinery to a set of synthetic observations of CO isotopes, we measure how well spectral-line measurements recover mass, size, velocity dispersion, and virial parameter for a simulated star-forming region. By disabling various steps of our analysis, we investigate how much opacity, chemistry, and gravity affect measurements of physical properties extracted from PPV cubes. For the simulations used here, which offer a decent, but not perfect, match to the properties of a star-forming region like Perseus, our results suggest that superposition induces a ?40% uncertainty in masses, sizes, and velocity dispersions derived from {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0). As would be expected, superposition and confusion is worst in regions where the filling factor of emitting material is large. The virial parameter is most affected by superposition, such that estimates of the virial parameter derived from PPV and PPP information typically disagree by a factor of ?2. This uncertainty makes it particularly difficult to judge whether gravitational or kinetic energy dominate a given region, since the majority of virial parameter measurements fall within a factor of two of the equipartition level ? ? 2.

  5. Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

  6. Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80 percent by 2050, calculated relative to 2005 levels. These...

  7. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  8. Influence of laser pulse duration on extreme ultraviolet and ion emission features from tin plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Influence of laser pulse duration on extreme ultraviolet and ion emission features from tin plasmas ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from a laser pro- duced tin plasma has been studied extensively in recent years. The need for 13.5 nm wavelength and a regenerative target lead to the use of tin droplet targets.10 Hot tin

  9. Progress in diesel engine emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khair, M.K. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A considerable amount of work was carried out in the mid-1980s to develop heavy-duty diesel engines that could meet limits on particulate emissions. These limits, although high by today's standards, were considered very restrictive. Some manufacturers struggled to achieve the 0.6 g/bhp-h particulate matter limit with enough margin for production variabilities and to account for the deterioration factor. Significant progress was achieved in diesel emissions control through engine and fuel system design changes. This eventually made it possible to meet a particulate level of 0.25 g/bhp-h for 1991. The next target level for particulate emissions is 0.1 g/bhp-h for the 1994 heavy-duty engine. To meet the challenge, engine developers are not only considering engine and injection system design changes but also fuel improvements and exhaust aftertreatment. This paper includes a review of past and current strategies used to control emissions in the modern diesel engine.

  10. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  11. Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems with Variable Resources Electric Energy System #12;#12;Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems benefits correspond to a real-world power system, as we use actual data on demand-response and wind

  12. Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation indicator for quantifying wet scavenging. Specifically, nitric acid (HNO3), produced as a by-product of combustion, is highly soluble and removed efficiently from clouds by rain. Regional carbon monoxide (CO

  13. A QUANTIFIER ELIMINATION FOR THE THEORY OF P-ADIC NUMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egidi, Lavinia

    A QUANTIFIER ELIMINATION FOR THE THEORY OF P-ADIC NUMBERS Lavinia Egidi Abstract. This paper presents a detailed analysis of a quantifier elimi- nation algorithm for the first order theory of p-adic numbers based on a p-adic analogue of the cylindric algebraic decomposition. It is believed

  14. Characterization of wound monitoring systems used to quantify and locate plutonium contamination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimmerling, Paul James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When an accident involving the possibility of a plutonium contaminated wound occurs, the contamination is often quantified using sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and high purity germanium (HPGe) detection systems. The NaI(Tl) system is used to quantify...

  15. Quantifying Technology Infusion and Policy Impact on Low Earth Orbit Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying Technology Infusion and Policy Impact on Low Earth Orbit Communication Satellite Students #12;2 #12;Quantifying Technology Infusion and Policy Impact on Low Earth Orbit Communication-Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics and Technology and Policy Program Abstract Technology infusion

  16. SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER, and Architectural Engineering 2006 #12;ii This thesis entitled: Sources and Effects of Mining-Related and Natural Acid Rock Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison County, Colorado

  17. Quantifying the Equilibrium and Irreversibility Properties of the Nucleotide Substitution Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Quantifying the Equilibrium and Irreversibility Properties of the Nucleotide Substitution Process and Irreversibility Properties of the Nucleotide Substitution Process ­ p.1 #12;A Crash Course in Molecular Evolution AGTCCCTTT Quantifying the Equilibrium and Irreversibility Properties of the Nucleotide Substitution Process

  18. Characterization of wound monitoring systems used to quantify and locate plutonium contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimmerling, Paul James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When an accident involving the possibility of a plutonium contaminated wound occurs, the contamination is often quantified using sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and high purity germanium (HPGe) detection systems. The NaI(Tl) system is used to quantify...

  19. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted mixture of gases and aerosols. Primary emissions include sig- nificant amounts of CH4 and aerosol (organic

  20. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  1. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  2. Target Space Duality III: Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlando Alvarez; Blazej Ruszczycki

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize previous results on target space duality to the case where there are background fields and the sigma model lagrangian has a potential function.

  3. Target Selection for the LBTI Exozodi Key Science Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Alycia J; Kennedy, Grant M; Roberge, Aki; Defrčre, Denis; Hinz, Philip M; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Rieke, George; Bailey, Vanessa P; Danchi, William C; Haniff, Chris; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Skemer, Andrew J; Stapelfeldt, Karl R; Wyatt, Mark C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer will survey nearby stars for faint emission arising from ~300 K dust (exozodiacal dust), and aims to determine the exozodiacal dust luminosity function. HOSTS results will enable planning for future space telescopes aimed at direct spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets, as well as greater understanding of the evolution of exozodiacal disks and planetary systems. We lay out here the considerations that lead to the final HOSTS target list. Our target selection strategy maximizes the ability of the survey to constrain the exozodi luminosity function by selecting a combination of stars selected for suitability as targets of future missions and as sensitive exozodi probes. With a survey of approximately 50 stars, we show that HOSTS can enable an understanding of the statistical distribution of warm dust around various types of stars and is robust to the effects of varying levels ...

  4. Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

  5. Mileage efficiency and relative emission of automotive vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics dictates that cars with small mass will travel more miles per gallon (mpg) compared to massive trucks. Does this imply that small cars are more efficient machines? In this work a mileage efficiency metric is defined as a ratio of actual car mileage (mpg) to the mileage of an ideal car. This metric allows comparison of efficiencies of cars with different masses and fuel types. It is as useful to quantify efficiencies of cars as the concept of drag coefficient is to quantify the efficacy of their aerodynamic shapes. Maximum mileage and lowest CO2 emission of conventional gasoline cars, at different driving schedules, is reported based on the concept of an ideal car. This can help put government imposed standards in a rigorous context.

  6. Nonthermal Hard X-ray Emission and Iron Kalpha Emission from a Superflare on II Pegasi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Osten; S. Drake; J. Tueller; J. Cummings; M. Perri; A. Moretti; S. Covino

    2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on an X-ray flare detected on the active binary system II~Pegasi with the Swift telescope. The trigger had a 10-200 keV luminosity of 2.2$\\times10^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$-- a superflare, by comparison with energies of typical stellar flares on active binary systems. The trigger spectrum indicates a hot thermal plasma with T$\\sim$180 $\\times10^{6}$K. X-ray spectral analysis from 0.8--200 keV with the X-Ray Telescope and BAT in the next two orbits reveals evidence for a thermal component (T$>$80 $\\times10^{6}$K) and Fe K 6.4 keV emission. A tail of emission out to 200 keV can be fit with either an extremely high temperature thermal plasma (T$\\sim3\\times10^{8}$K) or power-law emission. Based on analogies with solar flares, we attribute the excess continuum emission to nonthermal thick-target bremsstrahlung emission from a population of accelerated electrons. We estimate the radiated energy from 0.01--200 keV to be $\\sim6\\times10^{36}$ erg, the total radiated energy over all wavelengths $\\sim10^{38}$ erg, the energy in nonthermal electrons above 20 keV $\\sim3\\times10^{40}$ erg, and conducted energy $energy in electrons $>$ 20 keV when compared to the upper and lower bounds on the thermal energy content of the flare. This marks the first occasion in which evidence exists for nonthermal hard X-ray emission from a stellar flare. We investigate the emission mechanism responsible for producing the 6.4 keV feature, and find that collisional ionization from nonthermal electrons appears to be more plausible than the photoionization mechanism usually invoked on the Sun and pre-main sequence stars.

  7. Target Proposal Feb. 15, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    enables simpler system design, compatible with high magnetic field, no toxic waste, replaceable option initial approach can be very important in progress toward a real facility #12; Target Proposal Feb. 15 Target Survivability (cont) . Cooling ­ 23 kW per MW of beam power -- A significant advantage of carbon

  8. VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL CALORIMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRIFT VC 1/2 FC 1/2 VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL DVC MC 1­3 HODOSCOPE H0 MONITOR BC 1/2 BC 3/4 TRD at Threashold Lambda Physics (u ­L spin transfer) Motivation: ­ W L Target cell e beam L p p e ­ Elastic: Peltier elements ( T ~ ­20C ) ­ Custom built electronics + HELIX chips low autgassing (

  9. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Kuraev; E. S. Kokoulina; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2015-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can be deviated in a magnetic field and detected. The collinear emission (along the beam direction) of a charged meson may be used to produce high energy (anti)neutron beams. This can be very useful to measure the difference of the cross sections of (anti)proton and (anti)neutron scattering from the target and may open the way for checking sum rules with antiparticles. Hard meson emission allows also to enhance the cross section when the energy loss from one of the incident particles lowers the total energy up to the mass of a resonance. The cross section can be calculated, on the basis of factorized formulas, where the probability of emission of the light mesons multiplies the cross section of the sub-process. Multiplicity distributions for neutral and charged meson production are also given.

  10. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xufei, X., E-mail: xiexufei@pku.edu.cn; Fan, T. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Nocente, M.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, Universitŕ di Milano-Bicocca, Milano 20216 (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, Milano 20216 (Italy); Bonomo, F. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35100 (Italy); Istituto Gas Ionizzati, CNR, Padova 35100 (Italy); Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching 84518 (Germany); Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, Milano 20216 (Italy); Grünauer, F. [Physics Consulting, Zorneding 85604 (Germany); Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Padova 35100 (Italy)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes.

  11. Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Lyons

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

  12. Controlled spontaneous emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae-Seung Lee; Mary A. Rohrdanz; A. K. Khitrin

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of spontaneous emission is studied by a direct computer simulation of the dynamics of a combined system: atom + radiation field. The parameters of the discrete finite model, including up to 20k field oscillators, have been optimized by a comparison with the exact solution for the case when the oscillators have equidistant frequencies and equal coupling constants. Simulation of the effect of multi-pulse sequence of phase kicks and emission by a pair of atoms shows that both the frequency and the linewidth of the emitted spectrum could be controlled.

  13. Optimal irreversible stimulated emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D Valente; Y Li; J P Poizat; J M Gerard; L C Kwek; M F Santos; A Auffeves

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the dynamics of an initially inverted atom in a semi-infinite waveguide, in the presence of a single propagating photon. We show that atomic relaxation is enhanced by a factor of 2, leading to maximal bunching in the output field. This optimal irreversible stimulated emission is a novel phenomenon that can be observed with state-of-the-art solid-state atoms and waveguides. When the atom interacts with two one-dimensional electromagnetic environments, the preferential emission in the stimulated field can be exploited to efficiently amplify a classical or a quantum state.

  14. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO{sub x} emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO{sub x} emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO{sub x} combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

  15. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO[sub x] emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO[sub x] emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO[sub x] combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

  16. Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM and Toxics Regulation in the South Coast Air Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Nancy J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM anda mar- ket-based emissions trading program called theimpacts cre- ated by emissions trading programs that affect

  17. Operational and policy implications of managing uncertainty in quality and emissions of multi-feedstock biodiesel systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gül?en, Ece

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an alternative transportation fuel to petrodiesel, biodiesel has been widely promoted within national energy portfolio targets across the world. Early estimations of low lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of ...

  18. `Capture ready' regulation of fossil fuel power plants Betting the UK's carbon emissions on promises of future technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    -linked UK energy and climate change policies. Current climate change targets include 20% reduction of national green house gas emissions by 2010 and 80% reduction by 2050 from a 1990 baseline. However, only

  19. Fugitive SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions from a smelter complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciccone, A. [BOVAR Environmental, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Storbeck, J. [Falconbridge Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions released into the local air shed from industrial facilities typically fall into one of two categories, namely point or fugitive sources. The first refers to emissions released directly through stacks or similar devices designed to direct or control emissions. These emissions are readily measured with the aid of standard stack sampling methods or techniques. The latter refers to emissions released into the atmosphere without control of flow or quantities that cannot be measured directly or easily using standard methods. As part of Falconbridge`s efforts to minimize the environmental impact on the community, a fugitive emission monitoring program was designed and implemented to quantify SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions during routine process operations at the Smelter Plant. The monitoring program consisted of simultaneous and continuous temperature and velocity measurements along with continuous SO{sub 2} monitoring and semi-continuous particulate measurements at 8 locations along the Roof Monitor. These measurements were made over 6 days, 24 hours per day. The emission data were correlated with process information and activities to statistically determine the contribution of each process to the emission inventory.

  20. Graphene Coating Coupled Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

  1. Secondary emission gas chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. In'shakov; V. Kryshkin; V. Skvortsov

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  2. A framework for quantifying complexity and understanding its sources : application to tow large-scale systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Pierre-Alain J. Y

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this work is to quantify the complexity of complex systems and to understand its sources. To study complexity, we develop a theoretical framework where the complex system of interest is embedded in a ...

  3. Deciding Quantifier-Free Presburger Formulas Using Parameterized Solution Sanjit A. Seshia Randal E. Bryant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Randal E.

    Randal E. Bryant Computer Science Department Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA Sanjit.Seshia, Randy.Bryantˇ @cs.cmu.edu Abstract Given a formula ˘ in quantifier

  4. Quantifying and managing the risk of information security breaches participants in a supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellefeuille, Cynthia Lynn

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical integration between companies can result in an increased risk of information security breaches. This thesis proposes a methodology for quantifying information security risk to a supply chain participant. Given a ...

  5. A novel three-dimensional model to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion Cyrus M. Ghajar, 1Miller AJ, Mihm MC, Jr. Melanoma. N Engl J Med 2006;355:51 –the microenvironment on melanoma cell fate determination and

  6. The development of a methodology to quantify the impacts of information management strategies on EPC projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreau, Karen Anne

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research develops and demonstrates a methodology to quantify time and cost impacts on Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) projects resulting from information management driven process changes in design related activities. Many...

  7. QUANTIFYING GROWTH AND CALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION OF CALLIARTHRON CHEILOSPORIOIDES (CORALLINALES, RHODOPHYTA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    NOTE QUANTIFYING GROWTH AND CALCIUM CARBONATE DEPOSITION OF CALLIARTHRON CHEILOSPORIOIDES Station of Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA Growth and calcium carbonate measurement of growth and calcium carbonate deposition at each meristem. In Calliarthron, meristematic

  8. The development of a methodology to quantify the impacts of information management strategies on EPC projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreau, Karen Anne

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research develops and demonstrates a methodology to quantify time and cost impacts on Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) projects resulting from information management driven process changes in design related activities. Many...

  9. Using satellite remote sensing to quantify woody cover and biomass across Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchard, Edward Thomas Alexander

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of quantifying the woody cover and biomass of tropical savannas, woodlands and forests using satellite data is becoming increasingly important, but limitations in current scientific understanding reduce the ...

  10. An accurate comparison of methods for quantifying variable importance in artificial neural networks using simulated data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joy, Mike

    An accurate comparison of methods for quantifying variable importance in artificial neural networks, Joy and Death: Assessing variable contributions in neural networks 2 Abstract Artificial neural elements called artificial neural networks (ANNs). Although ANNs were initially developed to better

  11. Towards Quantifying the (In)Security of Networked Systems Xiaohu Li T. Paul Parker Shouhuai Xu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    Towards Quantifying the (In)Security of Networked Systems Xiaohu Li T. Paul Parker Shouhuai Xu Traditional security analyses are often geared towards cryptographic primitives or protocols. Although approach. 1 Introduction Traditional security analyses are typically geared to- wards cryptographic

  12. Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean-deltaic lateral slopes in perialpine, fjord-type Lake Lucerne (Central Switzerland); (ii) their control

  13. SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, FEBRUARY 2002 1 Quantifying Transmission Reliability Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, FEBRUARY 2002 1 Quantifying Transmission, power transmission reliability, power system security, power system availability I. Introduction Bulk power transfer capability computations have many uses in electric power system operation and planning

  14. Quantifying plasticity-independent creep compliance and relaxation of viscoelastoplastic materials under contact loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandamme, Matthieu

    Here we quantify the time-dependent mechanical properties of a linear viscoelastoplastic material under contact loading. For contact load relaxation, we showed that the relaxation modulus can be measured independently of ...

  15. A New Analytical Method to Quantify Residual Fluid Cleanup in Hydraulic Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarrin, Tahira

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    hydraulic fracturing fluid has always been a major issue, and is believed to drastically undermine the performance of hydraulically fractured wells. Several attempts have been made to quantify the damage associated with residual fluid, with varying level...

  16. 15th International Conference Ramiran, May 3-6, 2013, Versailles Accounting GHG emissions from sludge treatment and disposal routes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sludge treatment and disposal routes ­ methodological problems focused on sludge land spreading% of sewage sludge is directly land spreading or composted before land spreading. Sludge application to quantify GHG emissions emitted during sludge treatment and disposal routes. This paper aims to present how

  17. Energy transfer and 1.54 m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films S. O. Kucheyev,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    spectrometry RBS and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy HRTEM to quantify the amount of Si, NEnergy transfer and 1.54 m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films S. Yerci,1 R. Li,1 S. O a broad energy spectrum and attributed to disorder-induced localized transitions in amorphous Er

  18. Will Monetized Carbon Emission Reductions Buy Enhanced Building Operations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millhone, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Role in Climate Change #0;z Estimates Vary Depending on Definitions #0;z IPCC WG-3 Latest Estimate (2007) ? Buildings Lead in Emission Reduction Potential ? Buildings Lead in the Certainty of Benefits #0;z Collateral Benefits ? Reduced Industrial..., 2012 ? Enforceable Target: Reduce State’s Kyoto GHG Emissions to 1990 Levels by 2020 ? Advisors Recommend Allocation-Based C&T with 4 Options—EU ETS Type to Broad Coverage ? Advisors Recommend Offsets, e.g. CDMs and JIs #0;z Regional Greenhouse Gas...

  19. Infrared laser induced plasma diagnostics of silver target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmat, L., E-mail: lubnaphysics@yahoo.com; Nadeem, Ali [Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory, National Institute of Lasers and Optronics (NILOP), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Ahmed, I. [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, the optical emission spectra of silver (Ag) plasma have been recorded and analyzed using the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. The emission line intensities and plasma parameters were investigated as a function of lens to sample distance, laser irradiance, and distance from the target surface. The electron number density (n{sub e}) and electron temperature (T{sub e}) were determined using the Stark broadened line profile and Boltzmann plot method, respectively. A gradual increase in the spectral line intensities and the plasma parameters, n{sub e} from 2.89?×?10{sup 17} to 3.92?×?10{sup 17?}cm{sup ?3} and T{sub e} from 4662 to 8967?K, was observed as the laser irradiance was increased 2.29?×?10{sup 10}–1.06?×?10{sup 11} W cm{sup ?2}. The spatial variations in n{sub e} and T{sub e} were investigated from 0 to 5.25?mm from the target surface, yielding the electron number density from 4.78?×?10{sup 17} to 1.72?×?10{sup 17?}cm{sup ?3} and electron temperature as 9869–3789?K. In addition, the emission intensities and the plasma parameters of silver were investigated by varying the ambient pressure from 0.36 to 1000 mbars.

  20. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an Advanced Overfire Air (AOFA) system followed by Low NO{sub x} Burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  1. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an Advanced Overfire Air (AOFA) system followed by Low NO{sub x} Burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  2. Allocation of emission rights Economic incentives for emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for all countries High cost effectiviness:High cost effectiviness: International Emission trading Fairness NAM Department of Physical Resource Theory #12;Financial flows from emissions trading 450 ppmGDP SAS CPA WEU NAM Department of Physical Resource Theory #12;Financial flows from emissions trading 450

  3. 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal fired boilers. Second quarterly technical progress report, [April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. Baseline, AOFA, and LNB without AOFA test segments have been completed. Analysis of the 94 days of LNB long-term data collected show the full-load NO{sub x} emission levels to be approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu with flyash LOI values of approximately 8 percent. Corresponding values for the AOFA configuration are 0.94 lb/MBtu and approximately 10 percent. For comparison, the long-term full-load, baseline NO{sub x} emission level was approximately 1.24 lb/MBtu at 5.2 percent LOI. Comprehensive testing of the LNB plus AOFA configuration began in May 1993 and is scheduled to end during August 1993. As of June 30, the diagnostic, performance, chemical emissions tests segments for this configuration have been conducted and 29 days of long-term, emissions data collected. Preliminary results from the May--June 1993 tests of the LNB plus AOFA system show that the full load NO{sub x} emissions are approximately 0.42 lb/MBtu with corresponding fly ash LOI values near 8 percent. This is a substantial improvement in both NO{sub x} emissions and LOI values when compared to the results obtained during the February--March 1992 abbreviated testing of this system.

  4. Possible Target Options Michael A. Green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Possible Target Options Michael A. Green WATER COOLED SOLID TARGETS For high energy drivers, a desirable target material should have a medium to high Z. For low energy drivers the targe should be made are obvious medium Z target materials. A less obvious candidate is a titanium or niobium-titanium alloy target

  5. Field emission from organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kymissis, Ioannis, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission displays (FEDs) show great promise as high performance flat panel displays. The light emission process is efficient, long lifetimes are possible with high brightness, and bright passive matrix displays can ...

  6. Fuels, Engines & Emissions | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels, Engines, Emissions SHARE Fuels, Engines and Emissions Research Fuels, Engines, and Emissions research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is helping identify ways to increase...

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

  8. Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohshita, Stephanie; Price, Lynn

    2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience with China's 20% energy intensity improvement target during the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (2006-2010) has shown the challenges of rapidly setting targets and implementing measures to meet them. For the 12th FYP (2011-2015), there is an urgent need for a more scientific methodology to allocate targets among the provinces and to track physical and economic indicators of energy and carbon saving progress. This report provides a sectoral methodology for allocating a national energy intensity target - expressed as percent change in energy per unit gross domestic product (GDP) - among China's provinces in the 12th FYP. Drawing on international experience - especially the European Union (EU) Triptych approach for allocating Kyoto carbon targets among EU member states - the methodology here makes important modifications to the EU approach to address an energy intensity rather than a CO{sub 2} emissions target, and for the wider variation in provincial energy and economic structure in China. The methodology combines top-down national target projections and bottom-up provincial and sectoral projections of energy and GDP to determine target allocation of energy intensity targets. Total primary energy consumption is separated into three end-use sectors - industrial, residential, and other energy. Sectoral indicators are used to differentiate the potential for energy saving among the provinces. This sectoral methodology is utilized to allocate provincial-level targets for a national target of 20% energy intensity improvement during the 12th FYP; the official target is determined by the National Development and Reform Commission. Energy and GDP projections used in the allocations were compared with other models, and several allocation scenarios were run to test sensitivity. The resulting allocations for the 12th FYP offer insight on past performance and offer somewhat different distributions of provincial targets compared to the 11th FYP. Recommendations for reporting and monitoring progress on the targets, and methodology improvements, are included.

  9. 6, 57735796, 2006 Vehicular emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be partly responsible for lower CO2 and higher CO and NO emission factors. Also, a fast reduction the emission (in g/km) of key and non-regulated pollutants, such as CO2, CO, NO, SO2, NH3, HCHO, NMHC, dur-10 of pollutants, even from a super ultra-low emission vehicle (SULEV). The emissions of HC's, NOx, CO20 and CO2

  10. 4, 507532, 2004 Emission uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and Physics Discussions Impact of different emission inventories on simulated tropospheric ozone over China The importance of emission inventory uncertainty on the simulation of summertime tro- pospheric Ozone over China has been analyzed using a regional chemical transport model. Three independent emissions inventories

  11. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  12. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); West, Brian H. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  13. Targets and methods for target preparation for radionuclide production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhuikov, Boris L; Konyakhin, Nicolai A; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir M; Srivastava, Suresh C

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to nuclear technology, and to irradiation targets and their preparation. One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for preparation of a target containing intermetallic composition of antimony Ti--Sb, Al--Sb, Cu--Sb, or Ni--Sb in order to produce radionuclides (e.g., tin-117 m) with a beam of accelerated particles. The intermetallic compounds of antimony can be welded by means of diffusion welding to a copper backing cooled during irradiation on the beam of accelerated particles. Another target can be encapsulated into a shell made of metallic niobium, stainless steel, nickel or titanium cooled outside by water during irradiation. Titanium shell can be plated outside by nickel to avoid interaction with the cooling water.

  14. Monotonic Target Assignment for Robotic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen L; Bullo, Francesco

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Target assignment for robotic networks: Worst-case andTARGET ASSIGNMENT FOR ROBOTIC NETWORKS [6] H. W. Kuhn, “TheTarget Assignment for Robotic Networks Stephen L. Smith,

  15. Timelines for mitigating methane emissions from energy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Mandira; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy technologies emitting differing proportions of methane and carbon dioxide vary in their relative climate impacts over time, due to the different atmospheric lifetimes of the two gases. Standard technology comparisons using the global warming potential (GWP) emissions equivalency metric do not reveal these dynamic impacts, and may not provide the information needed to assess technologies and emissions mitigation opportunities in the context of broader climate policy goals. Here we formulate a portfolio optimization model that incorporates changes in technology impacts as a radiative forcing (RF) stabilization target is approached. An optimal portfolio, maximizing allowed energy consumption while meeting the RF target, is obtained by year-wise minimization of the marginal RF impact in an intended stabilization year. The optimal portfolio calls for using certain higher methane-emitting technologies prior to an optimal switching year, followed by methane-light technologies as the stabilization year approac...

  16. Gas Turbine Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, J. D.

    technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry ??? ? (1...., "Authority to Construct for Badger Creek Limited," Kern County Air Pollution Control District, Bakersfield.. Ca., June 20, 1989. 3) Wark, K. and Warner, C. F., Air Pollution - Its Origin and Control, Harper and Row, New York, New York, 1976, pp. 453...

  17. Analysis of Emission Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Danielewicz

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Shapes of relative emission sources can be accessed by expanding shapes of correlations at low relative velocities in pair center of mass in Cartesian harmonics. Coefficients of expansion for correlations are related to the respective coefficients of expansion for the sources through one dimensional integral transforms involving properties of pair relative wavefunctions. The methodology is illustrated with analyses of NA49 and PHENIX correlation data.

  18. Diesel engine combustion and emissions from fuel to exhaust aftertreatment. SP-1113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many dimensions involved in any study of Diesel Engine Emissions. These dimensions include: the fuel used, how the fuel is presented into the combustion chamber, how the air is presented into the combustion chamber, the actual process of combustion and emissions formation, the treatment of the emissions after combustion, and the test methods used to quantify the emissions. All of these dimensions are covered in this publication. The fuel topics include: plant oil based fuels and gas dissolved in fuel oil. The air delivery to the combustion chamber is effected by both port performance and geometry and ambient conditions and these topics are included. The thermodynamics of the combustion process and modeling are included in this publication. Aftertreatment is included with a paper on particulate filters. A correlation study using the ISO8178 testing method is also included. All nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  19. Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

    2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

  20. Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

  1. Partnerships to continue moving toward zero emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Partnerships to continue moving toward zero emissions Zero Emission transportation goals Zero Emission MAP makes available technical assistance to states and cities to support the growth of zero emission mobility markets. 1 Research shows

  2. Influence of target structure on film stress in WTi sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, C.F.; Wang, H.; Gilman, P. [Materials Research Corp., Orangeburg, NY (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the effect of sputtering target microstructure on the deposited film stress was investigated. By controlling the metallurgical process, two types of W-10wt%Ti target constituents, namely single-phase and multiple-phase WTi, were prepared. The former one was composed of W-rich ({beta}Ti,W) phase only, the latter one was with W, W-rich ({beta}Ti,W) and Ti-rich ({beta}Ti,W) phases. The stress of the films deposited on 12.7 cm diameter silicon oxide wafers from the single-phase target tends to be more compressive than that from the multiple-phase target. By increasing wafer temperature, the compressive stress was linearly decreased. In addition, the level of film stress was also affected by the film thickness and other sputtering parameters. To understand the causes for the differences in film stress between the multiple-phase and single-phase derived films, an evaluation of the film structure using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and mechanical testing using a nano-indentation instrument were performed. Finer domains with denser laminar structure were observed on the films deposited from the single-phase target. However, no significant difference in mechanical properties was found between these two from the nano-indentation measurements. It is envisioned that the more uniform solid solution between the W and Ti in the films obtained by sputtering the single-phase targets generates a higher compressive stress when deposited on the silicon oxide wafers resulting in a higher compressive stress.

  3. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations. ”ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions

  4. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies...

  5. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

  6. A new time quantifiable Monte Carlo method in simulating magnetization reversal process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Z. Cheng; M. B. A. Jalil; H. K. Lee; Y. Okabe

    2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new time quantifiable Monte Carlo (MC) method to simulate the thermally induced magnetization reversal for an isolated single domain particle system. The MC method involves the determination of density of states, and the use of Master equation for time evolution. We derive an analytical factor to convert MC steps into real time intervals. Unlike a previous time quantified MC method, our method is readily scalable to arbitrarily long time scales, and can be repeated for different temperatures with minimal computational effort. Based on the conversion factor, we are able to make a direct comparison between the results obtained from MC and Langevin dynamics methods, and find excellent agreement between them. An analytical formula for the magnetization reversal time is also derived, which agrees very well with both numerical Langevin and time-quantified MC results, over a large temperature range and for parallel and oblique easy axis orientations.

  7. Efficient Scheme of Experimental Quantifying non-Markovianity in High-Dimension Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. -J. Dong; B. -H. Liu; Y. -N. Sun; Y. -J. Han; G. -C. Guo; Lixin He

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-Markovianity is a prominent concept of the dynamics of the open quantum systems, which is of fundamental importance in quantum mechanics and quantum information. Despite of lots of efforts, the experimentally measuring of non-Markovianity of an open system is still limited to very small systems. Presently, it is still impossible to experimentally quantify the non-Markovianity of high dimension systems with the widely used Breuer-Laine-Piilo (BLP) trace distance measure. In this paper, we propose a method, combining experimental measurements and numerical calculations, that allow quantifying the non-Markovianity of a $N$ dimension system only scaled as $N^2$, successfully avoid the exponential scaling with the dimension of the open system in the current method. After the benchmark with a two-dimension open system, we demonstrate the method in quantifying the non-Markovanity of a high dimension open quantum random walk system.

  8. Draft Language for targeted ad "Interface between infrastructure and ecosystems" The challenges in the area of infrastructure and ecosystems are to design, develop, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

    for targeted ad "Biodiesel efficiency for reduced air pollution" The University of Florida's College and publications in one or more of the following areas: biodiesel combustion mechanisms, fate/transport of the biodiesel emissions in the atmosphere, and/or the characterization of particulate and gaseous emissions

  9. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  10. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W. (Knoxville, TN); Whittaker, Jerry W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  11. Targets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails TakingRTape Mounts Last

  12. Research of a boundary condition quantifiable correction method in the assembly homogenization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, L. H.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhao, J. [Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, 100084 (China); Li, W. H. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Shenzhen, 518026 (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods and codes currently used in assembly homogenization calculation mostly adopt the reflection boundary conditions. The influences of real boundary conditions on the assembly homogenized parameters were analyzed. They were summarized into four quantifiable effects, and then the mathematical expressions could be got by linearization hypothesis. Through the calculation of a test model, it had been found that the result was close to transport calculation result when considering four boundary quantifiable effects. This method would greatly improve the precision of a core design code which using the assembly homogenization methods, but without much increase of the computing time. (authors)

  13. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    line Automated monitoring and targeting systems Change in90%. Automated monitoring and targeting systems: Installingan automated monitoring and targeting system at a cold strip

  14. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  15. Infrared Emission from AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Sanders

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared observations of complete samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) have shown that a substantial fraction of their bolometric luminosity is emitted at wavelengths ~8-1000microns. In radio-loud and Blazar-like objects much of this emission appears to be direct non-thermal synchrotron radiation. However, in the much larger numbers of radio-quiet AGN it is now clear that thermal dust emission is responsible for the bulk of radiation from the near-infrared through submillimeter wavelengths. Luminous infrared-selected AGN are often surrounded by powerful nuclear starbursts, both of which appear to be fueled by enormous supplies of molecular gas and dust funneled into the nuclear region during the strong interaction/merger of gas rich disks. All-sky surveys in the infrared show that luminous infrared AGN are at least as numerous as optically-selected AGN of comparable bolometric luminosity, suggesting that AGN may spend a substantial fraction of their lifetime in a dust-enshrouded phase. The space density of luminous infrared AGN at high redshift may be sufficient to account for much of the X-Ray background, and for a substantial fraction of the far-infrared background as well. These objects plausibly represent a major epoch in the formation of spheroids and massive black holes (MBH).

  16. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  17. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

  18. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Hydropower Reservoirs: FY2011 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify the net emissions of key greenhouse gases (GHG) - notably, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} - from hydropower reservoirs in moist temperate areas within the U.S. The rationale for this objective is straightforward: if net emissions of GHG can be determined, it would be possible to directly compare hydropower to other power-producing methods on a carbon-emissions basis. Studies of GHG emissions from hydropower reservoirs elsewhere suggest that net emissions can be moderately high in tropical areas. In such areas, warm temperatures and relatively high supply rates of labile organic matter can encourage high rates of decomposition, which (depending upon local conditions) can result in elevated releases of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emissions also tend to be higher for younger reservoirs than for older reservoirs, because vegetation and labile soil organic matter that is inundated when a reservoir is created can continue to decompose for several years (Galy-Lacaux et al. 1997, Barros et al. 2011). Water bodies located in climatically cooler areas, such as in boreal forests, could be expected to have lower net emissions of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} because their organic carbon supplies tend to be relatively recalcitrant to microbial action and because cooler water temperatures are less conducive to decomposition.

  19. Characterizing the marginal basis source energy and emissions associated with comfort cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reindl, D.T.; Knebel, D.E.; Gansler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ten-story commercial office building located in Fort Worth, Texas, was used as a prototype to investigate the environmental impact associated with applying various electric and gas technologies for providing ventilation and comfort conditioning. The instantaneous (hourly) electrical and gas requirements demanded by the building were ``traced`` back to their source, the point where fuel is extracted from the ground The total energy consumed and emissions produced are quantified for both electric and gas technologies. On an annual basis, electric technologies had carbon dioxide emissions that were 20% to 26% lower when compared with the gas cooling technology. The gas cooling technology had lower total carbon monoxide emissions; however, after accounting for environmental oxidation of the carbon monoxide emissions, the gas cooling technology had an overall 24% to 35% greater oxide of carbon emission impact. The gas technology had a 19% to 25% lower oxide of nitrogen emission rate when compared with the electric technologies. The gas technology had a 3% to 15% lower annual total emission of sulfur dioxide compared to electric technologies. The primary reason for this is the absence of sulfur in the ``clean`` fuel assumed to be used by the gas technology (natural gas). The gas cooling technologies required 20% to 30% more energy to be extracted from the earth to provide the equivalent space conditioning for the prototypical office building when compared with the worst-and best-case electric technologies, respectively.

  20. The development of high-performance alkali-hybrid polarized He3 targets for electron scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Jaideep T. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Technische Universitat Munchen, Exzellenzcluster Universe, Garching, Germany (Europe); Dolph, Peter A.M. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Tobias, William Al [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Averett, Todd D. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aiden [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Mooney, K. E. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Nelyubin, Vladimir V. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Wang, Yunxiao [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Zheng, Yuan [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Cates, Gordon D. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the development of high-performance polarized łHe targets for use in electron scattering experiments that utilize the technique of alkali-hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping. We include data obtained during the characterization of 24 separate target cells, each of which was constructed while preparing for one of four experiments at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. The results presented here document dramatic improvement in the performance of polarized łHe targets, as well as the target properties and operating parameters that made those improvements possible. Included in our measurements were determinations of the so-called X-factors that quantify a temperature-dependent and as-yet poorly understood spin-relaxation mechanism that limits the maximum achievable łHe polarization to well under 100%. The presence of this spin-relaxation mechanism was clearly evident in our data. We also present results from a simulation of the alkali-hydrid spin-exchange optical pumping process that was developed to provide guidance in the design of these targets. Good agreement with actual performance was obtained by including details such as off-resonant optical pumping. Now benchmarked against experimental data, the simulation is useful for the design of future targets. Included in our results is a measurement of the K- łHe spin-exchange rate coefficient $k^\\mathrm{K}_\\mathrm{se} = \\left ( 7.46 \\pm 0.62 \\right )\\!\\times\\!10^{-20}\\ \\mathrm{cm^3/s}$ over the temperature range 503 K to 563 K.

  1. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclos...

  2. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California, 1982. 26. R. E. Simkins, "Evaporative runningevapora- tive emissions. Simkins concluded that runningis consis- tent with Simkins’ result. Weuse EPA’sestimates

  3. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland’s 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires all electric companies and electricity suppliers to provide customers with details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of...

  4. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions to customers. Electric utilities and...

  5. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia’s 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation....

  6. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simkins, "Evaporative running loss emissions," NIPER- 266,soak emissionsoccur. Running losses are evaporative lossesdiurnal, hot soak, running loss), and gasoline station and

  7. Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

  8. QCSP-Solve: A Solver for Quantified Constraint Satisfaction Problems Ian P. Gent and Peter Nightingale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    and speed up search by orders of magnitude. We also show how the performance of the solver can be further) is a generalization of the CSP in which some variables are universally quantified. It has been shown that a solver of the variables may be universally quanti- fied. For each possible value of such variables, we have to find values

  9. The Power of Friction: Quantifying the ``Goodness'' of Frictional Grasps \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Bud

    The Power of Friction: Quantifying the ``Goodness'' of Frictional Grasps \\Lambda Marek Teichmann of fingers, coefficient of friction and the the goodness of a grasp. In particular, we give a general framework for defining a grasp metric that takes friction into account. Our approach rectifies a flaw

  10. Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas isotopes by groundwater (or oil) degassing. Other natural gas fields may have been produced in-situ or migrated as a free expert academics from across the CDT and also experienced oil and gas industry professionals

  11. Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swarup, Samarth

    Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu a policy that encourages healthy behaviors (such as covering your cough and using hand sanitizers) at four coughs, minimizing contact with potential fomites) at major tourist locations. We use a synthetic

  12. Quantifying the gap between embedded control models and time-triggered implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    Quantifying the gap between embedded control models and time-triggered implementations Hakan the controller design is complete, the designed controller model is typically expressed as a set of control control components to exe- cutable code introduces errors due to a variety of factors

  13. Quantifying sediment transport across an undisturbed prairie landscape using cesium-137 and high resolution topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heimsath, Arjun M.

    and quantify soil erosion at the Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, an undisturbed in soils at our site. 137 Cs soil concentrations and amounts typically vary by 10% to 30% on small scales of soil erosion across different types of landscapes is critical, therefore, for developing sustainable

  14. A STOCHASTIC PROGRAMMING APPROACH TO QUANTIFYING EFFECTS OF CONTINGENCIES ON LOCATIONAL MARGINAL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stankoviæ, Aleksandar

    on varia- tions of Locational Marginal Prices (LMPs) in restruc- tured power markets. The process: Locational marginal prices (LMPs), Un- certainty, Power system security, Optimization meth- ods, StochasticA STOCHASTIC PROGRAMMING APPROACH TO QUANTIFYING EFFECTS OF CONTINGENCIES ON LOCATIONAL MARGINAL

  15. Risk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    to generate 20% of its electricity from wind. Developers are actively planning offshore wind farms along the URisk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore Wind of Energy has estimated that over 50 GW of offshore wind power will be required for the United States

  16. SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY Thomas E create major problems that will require major mitigation efforts. #12;SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally industry believe it could constrain the penetration of gridconnected PV. The U.S. Department of Energy

  17. Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete statistical description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete Chernobyl after the 1986 disaster and find three new results: i the histogram of fluctuations is well.60. x, 02.50.Fz, 05.45.Tp, 87.66.Na I. INTRODUCTION Chernobyl's No. 4 reactor was completely destroyed

  18. Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete statistical description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete fluctuations measured near Chernobyl after the 1986 disaster and find three new results: #i# the histogram patterns. PACS number#s#: 89.60.#x, 02.50.Fz, 05.45.Tp, 87.66.Na I. INTRODUCTION Chernobyl's No. 4 reactor

  19. A novel three-dimensional model to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    A novel three-dimensional model to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion Cyrus M. Ghajar,1 Vinod. Culturing melanomas of different meta- static capacities within the system showed that each cell type (i.e., matrix components, interstitial cell presence) on planar and vertical melanoma invasion. We

  20. Neural Network-Based Noise Suppressor and Predictor for Quantifying Valve Stiction in Oscillatory Control Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annan, Carl Ashie

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    . This work proposes a neural network approach to quantify the degree of stiction in a valve once the phenomenon has been detected. Several degrees of stiction are simulated in a closed loop control system by specifying the magnitude of static (fs) and dynamic...

  1. A simplified approach to quantifying predictive and parametric uncertainty in artificial neural network hydrologic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaubey, Indrajeet

    considerable interest in developing methods for uncertainty analysis of artificial neural network (ANN) models and parametric uncertainty in artificial neural network hydrologic models, Water Resour. Res., 43, W10407, doi:10A simplified approach to quantifying predictive and parametric uncertainty in artificial neural

  2. RAPID COMMUNICATION Quantifying the quality of femtosecond laser ablation of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simsek, Ergun

    RAPID COMMUNICATION Quantifying the quality of femtosecond laser ablation of graphene Ramazan Sahin abla- tion quality and ablation size is experimentally studied on graphene-coated silicon Introduction Graphene micro- and nano-structures are considered potential building blocks for future opto

  3. Quantifying a bystander response following microbeam irradiation using single-cell RT-PCR analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1a (p21/Cip1/ WAF1) were quantified at the mRNA level in single normal human- rowed from a similar phenomenon previously reported from viral transfection experiments [1­4]. Early or of energy depositions in extracellular medium. Similar types of experiments have also demon- strated

  4. Quantifying mucosal blood volume fraction from multispectral images of the colon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, Ela

    Quantifying mucosal blood volume fraction from multispectral images of the colon Ela Claridge changes associated with cancer is the formation of a dense, irregular and leaky network of new blood vessels, which result in the increase of the blood volume fraction (BVF) at the site of a tumour

  5. Quantifying Performance Benefits of Overlap using MPI-2 in a Seismic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panda, Dhabaleswar K.

    Work ICS '10 #12;AWM-ODC - Seismic Modeling · The 3D volume representing the ground area is decomposed into 3D rectangular sub-grids · Each processor performs stress and velocity calculations, each elementQuantifying Performance Benefits of Overlap using MPI-2 in a Seismic Modeling Application Sreeram

  6. Quantifying Performance Benefits of Overlap using MPI-2 in a Seismic Modeling Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panda, Dhabaleswar K.

    motion simulation code based on a parallel finite difference solution of the 3-D velocity- stress waveQuantifying Performance Benefits of Overlap using MPI-2 in a Seismic Modeling Application Sreeram and Engineering 2 Ohio Supercomputer Center The Ohio State University Columbus, OH, USA 43212 Columbus, OH, USA

  7. Quantifying sequence proportions in a DNA-based diet study using Ion Torrent amplicon sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying sequence proportions in a DNA-based diet study using Ion Torrent amplicon sequencing relative abundances of different taxa based on sequence read proportions generated by high-throughput sequencing. However, potential biases associated with this approach are only beginning to be examined. We

  8. A mass-balance framework for quantifying downstream changes in fluvial architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola, Chris

    A mass-balance framework for quantifying downstream changes in fluvial architecture NIKKI STRONG models that emphasize the three-dimensionality of alluvial architecture. New data are pre- sented from control on architecture, rather than subsidence per se. A simple coordinate transformation is proposed

  9. Estimating Wind Turbine Parameters and Quantifying Their Effects on Dynamic Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    1 Estimating Wind Turbine Parameters and Quantifying Their Effects on Dynamic Behavior Jonathan variable-speed wind turbines in grid stability studies. Often the values for model parameters are poorly parameters on the dynamic behavior of wind turbine generators. A parameter estimation process is then used

  10. Quantifying the Effectiveness of Innovative Contracting Strategies on Schedule, Cost and Change Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaur, Ankit

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the state of Florida . For this research the study was conducted to quantify the changes to project duration and cost caused by change orders in the project under different contracting strategies and type of work. This was done through evaluating 2844...

  11. Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO Yale, CT 06520 USA; email: {saha, trifonov, shao}@cs.yale.edu. Permission to make digital/hard copy of all, Pages 1--51. #12; 2 · Bratin Saha et al. 1995; Crary et al. 1998] and makes several important new

  12. Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO Yale, CT 06520 USA; email: {saha, trifonov, shao}@cs.yale.edu. Permission to make digital/hard copy of all, Pages 1­51. #12;2 · Bratin Saha et al. 1995; Crary et al. 1998] and makes several important new

  13. A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were calculated using peat ages calibrated to the sidereal time scale and burial depths a polynomial that relates the peat age to the position of sea-level at that time in the past. The "sea

  14. Scientific perspectives on MRV: approaches, techniques, and requirements of quantifying GHG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific perspectives on MRV: approaches, techniques, and requirements of quantifying GHG-up inventories - measure changes in stocks or flows of carbon, extrapolate to all ecosystems. ~Bottom-up TBMs to Bedrich Benes, Jason Lambert, Yuyu Zhou #12;INFLUX Background CO2, CH4 WindWind Urban CO2, CH4 Thanks

  15. Advanced Unbounded CTL Model Checking Based on AIGs, BDD Sweeping, And Quantifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

    and gates and inverters Simple data structure Every Boolean function can be represented by an AIG 5 Florian Networks of 2-input and gates and inverters Simple data structure Every Boolean function can be representedAdvanced Unbounded CTL Model Checking Based on AIGs, BDD Sweeping, And Quantifier Scheduling

  16. Using the Wild Bootstrap to Quantify Uncertainty in DTI Brandon Whitcher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcher, Brandon

    Using the Wild Bootstrap to Quantify Uncertainty in DTI Brandon Whitcher David S. Tuch Jonathan J; confidence interval; fiber orientation; fractional anisotropy Running head. The wild bootstrap in DTI 1 #12. In contrast to the regular bootstrap, the wild bootstrap method can be applied to such protocols in which

  17. Quantifying the differential contributions of deep groundwater to streamflow in nested basins, using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    -solute, deep groundwater and a low-solute, soil-water. The mixing model indicated 69% ± 10% deep groundwater-member mixing, hydrological pathway, interbasin groundwater flow INTRODUCTION Knowledge of hydrological pathwaysQuantifying the differential contributions of deep groundwater to streamflow in nested basins

  18. Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind S.C. Pryor1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds S.C. Pryor1,2 , R, Bloomington, IN47405, USA. Tel: 1-812-855-5155. Fax: 1-812-855-1661 Email: spryor@indiana.edu 2 Dept. of Wind an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because in principle they also offer

  19. Quantifying Desorption of Saturated Hydrocarbons from Silicon with Quantum Calculations and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seideman, Tamar

    Quantifying Desorption of Saturated Hydrocarbons from Silicon with Quantum Calculations hydrocarbon on silicon, desorption is observed at bias magnitudes as low as 2.5 V, albeit the desorption with conventional silicon microelectronic tech- nology [17­22]. A detailed understanding of both the electronic

  20. Quantifying uncertainties of cloud microphysical property retrievals with a perturbation method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    to their modification effects on global radiation balance and atmospheric water cycle. However, representation of clouds Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility, whose primary goal is to carry out long-term observations of cloudsQuantifying uncertainties of cloud microphysical property retrievals with a perturbation method

  1. A Search for Optical Laser Emission Using Keck HIRES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tellis, Nathaniel K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for laser emission coming from point sources in the vicinity of 2796 stars, including 1368 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) that host one or more exoplanets. We search for extremely narrow emission lines in the wavelength region between 3640 and 7890 Angstroms using the Keck 10-meter telescope and spectroscopy with high resolution ($\\lambda/\\Delta \\lambda$ = 60,000). Laser emission lines coming from non-natural sources are distinguished from natural astrophysical sources by being monochromatic and coming from an unresolved point in space. We search for laser emission located 2-7 arcsec from the 2796 target stars. The detectability of laser emission is limited by Poisson statistics of the photons and scattered light, yielding a detection threshold flux of approximately $10^{-2}$ photons $m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for typical Kepler stars and 1 photon $m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for solar-type stars within 100 light-years. Diffraction-limited lasers having a 10-meter aperture can be detected from 100 light-years ...

  2. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuraev, E A; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can b...

  3. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  4. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  5. Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost from Mobile Source Emission Reduction Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschein, Perry S.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost From Mobilehave tested various emissions trading policies to supplementAn Analysis of EPA's Emissions Trading Program, 6 YALE J. ON

  6. Silicate emission in Orion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Cesarsky; A. P. Jones; J. Lequeux; L. Verstraete

    2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present mid-infrared spectro-imagery and high-resolution spectroscopy of the Orion bar and of a region in the Orion nebula. These observations have been obtained in the Guaranteed Time with the Circular Variable Filters of the ISO camera (CAM-CVF) and with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS), on board the European Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Our data shows emission from amorphous silicate grains from the entire HII region and around the isolated O9.5V star Theta2 Ori A. The observed spectra can be reproduced by a mixture of interstellar silicate and carbon grains heated by the radiation of the hot stars present in the region. Crystalline silicates are also observed in the Orion nebula and suspected around Theta2 Ori A. They are probably of interstellar origin. The ionization structure and the distribution of the carriers of the Aromatic Infrared Bands (AIBs) are briefly discussed on the basis of the ISO observations.

  7. LIFE Target Fabrication Research Plan Sept 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S; Montesanti, R; Satcher, J; Spadaccini, C; Rose, K; Wang, M; Hamza, A; Alexander, N; Brown, L; Hund, J; Petzoldt, R; Sweet, W; Goodin, D

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The target-system for the baseline LIFE fast-ignition target was analyzed to establish a preliminary estimate for the costs and complexities involved in demonstrating the technologies needed to build a prototype LIFE plant. The baseline fast-ignition target upon which this analysis was developed is shown in Figure 1.0-1 below. The LIFE target-system incorporates requirements for low-cost, high throughput manufacture, high-speed, high accuracy injection of the target into the chamber, production of sufficient energy from implosion and recovery and recycle of the imploded target material residue. None of these functions has been demonstrated to date. Existing target fabrication techniques which lead to current 'hot spot' target costs of {approx}$100,000 per target and at a production rate of 2/day are unacceptable for the LIFE program. Fabrication techniques normally used for low-cost, low accuracy consumer products such as toys must be adapted to the high-accuracy LIFE target. This will be challenge. A research program resulting is the demonstration of the target-cycle technologies needed for a prototype LIFE reactor is expected to cost {approx}$51M over the course of 5 years. The effort will result in targets which will cost an estimated $0.23/target at a rep-rate of 20 Hz or about 1.73M targets/day.

  8. X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen/s)Velocity (km/s) #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;The

  9. A Member of the Food Chain?: Quantifying Primary Productivity from Nazi Germany to the International Biological Program, 1933-74

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Adam Christopher

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forestry Management in Germany”. In: The Quantifying Spiritthe Biological Perspective in Germany. University of Chicagoby Clements and Germany’s chief plant sociologist, Reinhold

  10. Evaluation of approaches to quantify total residual oxidants in ballast water management systems employing chlorine for disinfection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer-Faust, AG; Ambrose, RF; Ambrose, RF; Tamburri, MN

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantify total residual oxidants in ballast water managementand discharge (residual concentrations) during ballast waterquantifying residual chlorine levels in natural waters (e.g.

  11. A probabilistic production costing analysis of SO sub 2 emissions reduction strategies for Ohio: Emissions, cost, and employment tradeoffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heslin, J.S.; Hobbs, B.F. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach for state- and utility-level analysis of the cost and regional economic impacts of strategies for reducing utility SO{sub 2} emissions is summarized and applied to Ohio. The methodology is based upon probabilistic production costing and economic input-output analysis. It is an improvement over previous approaches because it: accurately models random outages of generating units, must-run constraints on unit output, and the distribution of power demands; and runs quickly on a microcomputer and yet considers the entire range of potential control strategies from a systems perspective. The input-output analysis considers not only the economic effects of utility fuel use and capital investment, but also those of increased electric rates. Two distinct strategies are found to be most attractive for Ohio. The first, more flexible one, consists of emissions dispatching (ED) alone to meet short run emissions reduction targets. A 75 percent reduction can then be achieved by the turn of the century by combining ED and fuel switching (FS) with flue gas desulfurization, limestone injection multistage burners, and physical coal cleaning at selected plants. The second is a scrubber-based strategy which includes ED. By the year 2000, energy conservation becomes a cost effective component of these strategies. In order to minimize compliance costs, acid rain legislation which facilitates emissions trading and places regional tonnage limits on emissions is desirable.

  12. Measurement of emission diameter as a function of time on foam z- pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazier, S.E.; Barber, T.L. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Derzon, M.S.; Kellogg, J.W.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a streaked imaging capability to make time-resolved measurements of the emission size for low density foam z-pinches. By lens coupling visible emission from the z-pinch target to an array of fiber optics we obtained the emission profile in the visible as a function of time with radial resolution of 300 {mu}m. To measure the emission at temperatures greater than {approx}40 eV the source was slit-imaged or pin-hole imaged onto an x-ray filtered scintillator. Non-uniformities in both visible and x-ray emission were observed. We describe the diagnostics, the image unfold process, and results from the instrument for both visible and x-ray measurements.

  13. Neutron production using a pyroelectric driven target coupled with a gated field ionization source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellsworth, J. L.; Tang, V.; Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Naranjo, B.; Putterman, S. [University of California Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A palm sized, portable neutron source would be useful for widespread implementation of detection systems for shielded, special nuclear material. We present progress towards the development of the components for an ultracompact neutron generator using a pulsed, meso-scale field ionization source, a deuterated (or tritiated) titanium target driven by a negative high voltage lithium tantalate crystal. Neutron production from integrated tests using an ion source with a single, biased tungsten tip and a 3 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm, vacuum insulated crystal with a plastic deuterated target are presented. Component testing of the ion source with a single tip produces up to 3 nA of current. Dielectric insulation of the lithium tantalate crystals appears to reduce flashover, which should improve the robustness. The field emission losses from a 3 cm diameter crystal with a plastic target and 6 cm diameter crystal with a metal target are compared.

  14. Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

    2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

  15. New Cyclotron Targetry to Enhance F-18 clinical Position Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Michael Doster

    2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This project proposes to develop cyclotron targets that produce F-18 for clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at significantly higher rates than that available from current targetry. This production rate of 18F is directly proportional to the beam current. Higher beam currents would result in increased 18F production but would be accompanied by higher heat loads to the target. The beam power available in most commercial cyclotrons exceeds the heat removal capacity of current target technology by a factor of two to four, significantly limiting the production rate of Fluorine-18.

  16. Target 4 Flight Path 90L (FIRE House) Target 4 Flight Path...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and industrial research. LANSCE has two spallation neutron sources: the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Target-1) and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (Target-4)....

  17. USING DISPLAY ENERGY CERTIFICATES TO QUANTIFY PUBLIC SECTOR OFFICE ENERGY CONSUMPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Peter; Godoy-Shimizu, Daniel; Steemers, Koen; Chenvidyakarn, Torwong

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    include a building’s annual CO2 emissions, as well as information on various building characteristics including total floor area, HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) system and details of any renewable energy generated on site. The DEC...

  18. Quantifying the climate impacts of albedo changes due to biofuel production: a comparison with biogeochemical effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caiazzo, Fabio

    Lifecycle analysis is a tool widely used to evaluate the climate impact of greenhouse gas emissions attributable to the production and use of biofuels. In this paper we employ an augmented lifecycle framework that includes ...

  19. Multiple metrics for quantifying the intensity of water consumption of energy production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, E S

    Discussion of the environmental implications of worldwide energy demand is currently dominated by the effects of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) emissions on global climate. At the regional scale, however, water resource ...

  20. Emission Characteristics of the Projectile Fragments at Relativistic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. K. Singh; A. K. Soma; Ramji Pathak; V. Singh

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A projectile (84^Kr_36) having kinetic energy around 1 A GeV was used to expose NIKFI BR-2 emulsion target. A total of 700 inelastic events are used in the present studies on projectile fragments. The emission angle of the projectile fragments are strongly affected by charge of the other projectile fragments emitted at same time with different emission angle is observed. The angular distribution studies show symmetrical nature for lighter charge projectile fragments. The symmetrical nature decreased with the charge of projectile fragments. At ~4o of emission angle for double charge projectile fragments, the momentum transfer during interaction is similar for various target species of emulsion were observed. We also observed a small but significant amplitude peaks on both side of the big peak for almost all light charge projectile fragments having different delta angle values. It reflects that there are few percent of projectile fragments that are coming from the decay of heavy projectile fragments or any other process.

  1. Qualified Target Industry Tax Refund (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Qualified Target Industry Tax Refund incentive is available for companies that create high wage jobs in targeted high value-added industries. The incentive refunds up to $3,000 per new full...

  2. Targets and processes for fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowan, Thomas (Dresden, DE); Malekos, Steven (Reno, NV); Korgan, Grant (Reno, NV); Adams, Jesse (Reno, NV); Sentoku, Yasuhiko (Reno, NV); Le Galloudec, Nathalie (Reno, NV); Fuchs, Julien (Paris, FR)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

  3. Review of the Renewable Energy Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Review of the Renewable Energy Target Response to Expert Panel's Call for Submissions Paper #12;NSW Government Submission to the Review of the Renewable Energy Target, May 2014 2/20 Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY IN NSW

  4. Nanoparticles for targeting the infarcted heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvir, Tal

    We report a nanoparticulate system capable of targeting the heart after myocardial infarction (MI). Targeting is based on overexpression of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in the infarcted heart. Liposomes 142 nm in ...

  5. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In developing countries, there is an urgent need for access to safe, efficient, and more affordable cooking technologies. Nearly 2.5 billion people currently use an open fire or traditional cookstove to prepare their meals, and recent models predict that use of biomass for cooking will continue to be the dominant energy use in rural, resource-poor households through 2030. For these families, cooking poses serious risks to health, safety, and income. An alarming 4 million people, primarily women and children, die prematurely each year from indoor and outdoor exposure to the harmful emissions released by solid fuel combustion. Use of traditional stoves can also have a significant impact on deforestation and climate change. This dire situation creates a critical need for cookstoves that significantly and verifiably reduce fuel use and emissions in order to reach protective levels for human health and the environment. Additionally, advances in the scientific equipment needed to measure and monitor stove fuel use and emissions have not kept pace with the significant need within the industry. While several testing centers in the developed world may have hundred thousand-dollar emissions testing systems, organizations in the field have had little more than a thermometer, a scale, and subjective observations to quantify the performance of stove designs. There is an urgent need for easy-to-use, inexpensive, accurate, and robust stove testing equipment for use by laboratory and field researchers around the world. ASAT and their research partner, Aprovecho Research Center (ARC), have over thirty years of experience addressing these two needs, improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment, with expertise spanning the full spectrum of development from conceptual design to product manufacturing and dissemination. This includes: 1) research, design, and verification of clean biomass cookstove technology and emissions monitoring equipment; 2) mass production of quality-controlled stove and emissions equipment at levels scalable to meet global demand; and 3) global distribution through a variety of channels and partners. ARC has been instrumental in designing and improving more than 100 stove designs over the past thirty years. In the last four years, ASAT and ARC have played a key role in the production and sales of over 200,000 improved stoves in the developed and developing world. The ARC-designed emissions equipment is currently used by researchers in laboratories and field studies on five continents. During Phase I of the DOE STTR grant, ASAT and ARC worked together to apply their wealth of product development experience towards creating the next generation of improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment. Highlights of Phase I for the biomass cookstove project include 1) the development of several new stove technologies that reached the DOE 50/90 benchmark; 2) fabrication of new stove prototypes by ASAT’s manufacturing partner, Shengzhou Stove Manufacturing (SSM); 3) field testing of prototype stoves with consumers in Puerto Rico and the US; and 4) the selection of three stove prototypes for further development and commercialization during Phase II. Highlights of Phase I for the emissions monitoring equipment project include: 1) creation of a new emissions monitoring equipment product, the Laboratory Emissions Monitoring System (LEMS 2) the addition of gravimetric PM measurements to the stove testing systems to meet International Standards Organization criteria; 3) the addition of a CO{sub 2} sensor and wireless 3G capability to the IAP Meter; and 4) and the improvement of sensors and signal quality on all systems. Twelve Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers purchased this equipment during the Phase I project period.

  6. 30-month report, September 2007 QUANTIFY 1 of 16 2. Status of Deliverables and Milestones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    inventories for 2000 (gridded) for avia- tion 32 O RE MMU D1.1.3.5 Global transport volumes for past years inventories of road, rail and inland waterways' transport emissions 30 30 O RE CATS D1.1.6.1 Reviewed inventories of road and rail transport emissions 30 31 O RE CIRT D1.2.1.3 Report on transport scenario

  7. Emission Inventories and Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streets, D. G.; van Aardenne, John; Battye, Bill; Garivait, Savitri; Grano, D.; Guenther, Alex; Klimont, Z.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lu, Zifeng; Maenhout, Greet; Ohara, Toshimasa; Parrish, David J.; Smith, Steven J.; Vallack, Harry

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Executive Body to the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution took the decision to establish the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP) in December 2004, it was on the basis of a growing understanding of the issues surrounding the hemispheric and intercontinental transport of air pollutants. It was recognised that whilst current regional emissions on their own created pollution levels that exceeded internationally-agreed air quality objectives, hemispheric transport could exacerbate local and regional air quality problems.Two particular pollutants of concern, and the focus of this report, are ozone and particulate matter (PM), known for their detrimental impacts on human health (these impacts and others are described in Chapter 5). There was well-documented evidence for the intercontinental transport of ozone and PM but, at that time, the significance of this intercontinental influence on the design of air pollution control policies was not well understood. The European Union, in drawing up its Thematic Strategy on Clean Air for Europe during 2004, became aware of the significance of intercontinental transport and the importance of sources of pollution beyond its borders and sphere of influence, in meeting its air quality goals.

  8. Driving and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The Evidence Base and How to Learn More

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Driving and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The Evidence Base and How to Learn;SB 375 GHG Reduc2on Targets · SCAG (greater Los Angeles) ­ 189 ci2es and 6 as underlying data, rela2onships, and calibra2on. 2. Policies and Prac2ces a) Models

  9. One proton, two proton, and alpha emission from 14o+alpha resonance interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Changbo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, proton, two proton, and emission from the 14O + a interactions were studied with the modified thick target inverse kinematics approach. The radioactive beam was obtained by using resonances in the 14N(p, n)14O reaction. The 14...

  10. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential for Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission ReductionPotential for Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission ReductionPotential for Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction

  11. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In almost all cases, the emissions related to traded fuelsextraction (F Er ) and production (F Pr ) emissions (i.e. ,the net effect of emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top),

  12. Recent increases in global HFC-23 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990-2007, Rep.A. Lindley (2007), Global emissions of HFC-23 estimated to2009), Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data, http://unfccc.int/ghg_

  13. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that energy use and CO2 emissions in developed countries w icap-and-trade program for CO2 emissions from the electricalout and "sequester" the CO2 emissions, though the cost and

  14. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimated to produce CO2 emission reductions ranging frombetween low CO2 emissions and the reductions in the auto usea 16 percent reduction in CO2 traffic emissions within the

  15. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Cementfor Fuel Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron andElectricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron

  16. Quantifying breakage parameters of fragile archaeological components to determine the feasibility of site burial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushmore, Forest Paul

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1968) ~ The Cahokia site, located in the broad alluvial plain, east of St. Louis, within the Mississippi River Valley known as the American Bottom, is without a doubt 35 the largest prehistoric site in North America north of central Mexico (Fowler...QUANTIFYING BREAKAGE PARAMETERS OF FRAGILE ARCHAEOLOGICAL COMPONENTS TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF SITE BURIAL A Thesis by Forest Paul Rushmore III Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment...

  17. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a: Fire emissions Emissions inventories Greenhouse gases a b s t r a c t Emissions from wildland fire fire emissions change considerably due to fluctuations from year to year with overall fire season

  18. 1948 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 4, NO. 4, JULY 2005 Quantifying the Power Loss When Transmit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    to the ideal case, we quantify the power loss due to the finite-rate constraint across the entire SNR range. Index Terms--Finite-rate feedback, multi-antenna systems, power loss, transmit beamforming. I1948 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 4, NO. 4, JULY 2005 Quantifying the Power

  19. October 15, 2004 23:18 GMB TJ1303-02/40139 Quantifying CaCO3 Microprecipitates Within Developing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decho, Alan

    October 15, 2004 23:18 GMB TJ1303-02/40139 Quantifying CaCO3 Microprecipitates Within Developing DOI: 10.1080/01490450490888037 Quantifying CaCO3 Microprecipitates Within Developing Surface Mats and min- eral CaCO3 provides a fluorescence signature detectable using con- ventional confocal scanning

  20. Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b , Peng Gong c t The level of air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago was quantified using a dry deposition model. The result showed that a total of 1675 kg of air pollutants was removed by 19.8 ha of green roofs in one year

  1. Quantifying oxygen diffusion in ZnO nanobelt Jin Liu, Puxian Gao, Wenjie Mai, Changshi Lao, and Zhong L. Wanga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Quantifying oxygen diffusion in ZnO nanobelt Jin Liu, Puxian Gao, Wenjie Mai, Changshi Lao A method is presented for quantifying oxygen diffusion behavior in a nanodevice fabricated using individual for several days, oxygen in air diffused into the nanobelt and significantly changed the conductivity

  2. Validating the role of AFVs in voluntary mobile source emission reduction programs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Saricks, C. L.

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Late in 1997, EPA announced new allowances for voluntary emission control programs. As a result, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Cities and other metro areas that have made an ongoing commitment to increasing participation by alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in local fleets have the opportunity to estimate the magnitude and obtain emission reduction credit for following through on that commitment. Unexpectedly large reductions in key ozone precursor emissions in key locations and times of the day can be achieved per vehicle-mile by selecting specific light duty AFV offerings from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in lieu of their gasoline-fueled counterparts. Additional benefit accrues from the fact that evaporative emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (generated in the case of CNG, LNG, and LPG by closed fuel-system AFV technology) can be essentially negligible. Upstream emissions from fuel storage and distribution with the airshed of interest are also reduced. This paper provides a justification and outlines a method for including AFVs in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality, and for quantifying emission reduction credits. At the time of submission of this paper, the method was still under review by the US EPA Office of Mobile Sources, pending mutually satisfactory resolution of several of its key points. Some of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  3. Quantifying the thermodynamic interactions of polyhedral boranes in solution to guide nanocomposite fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutz, M [The University of Tennessee; Eastwood, Eric Allen [ORNL; LeeJr, Mark E [University of Missouri; BowenIII, Daniel E [Honeywell, Inc.; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solubility of boron containing nanoparticles in a variety of solvents is quantified using static light scattering in conjunction with refractometry. Four polyhedral boranes were tested in this work, using refractometry to obtain dn/dc, while static light scattering quantifies A2. A2 obtained from these measurements was then used to calculate v, the solute solvent interaction parameter, and the ildebrand solubility parameter, d, which provides a quantifiable method to identify good solvents. Of the nanoparticles studied, 1,3-di-o-carboranylpropane is thermodynamically stable in toluene, with a v less than 0.5, a solubility limit of 2.47 mg/mL, and all solutions remaining clear with no visible particle settling. For all of the particles tested, there was good correlation between the physical observations of the solutions, v, and d. For instance, lower values of v correspond to a smaller radius of gyration (Rg). A list of suitable solvents based on d is also presented.

  4. Air Pollution Emissions and Abatement (Minnesota) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Regulations A person who controls the source of an emission must notify the Pollution Control Agency immediately of excessive or abnormal unpermitted emissions, and...

  5. Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a variety of photoexcitation sources including synchrotron emission, femtosecond laser pulses and conventional UV lamp emission. Each source has advantages, for example, fs...

  6. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from Advanced Technologies Effects of Advanced Combustion Technologies on Particulate Matter Emissions Characteristics Efficient Emissions Control for Multi-Mode Lean DI Engines...

  7. Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using...

  8. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

  9. Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction...

  10. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top), production (F Pr )Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO 2 Emissions (Carbonfrom the burning of fossil fuels are conventionally

  11. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahl, Linnea

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-470E-20Ě1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Estimating Fugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides fromStandards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides),

  12. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

  13. Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

  14. PLUTONIUM-238 PRODUCTION TARGET DESIGN STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurt, Christopher J [ORNL; Wham, Robert M [ORNL; Hobbs, Randall W [ORNL; Owens, R Steven [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new supply chain is planned for plutonium-238 using existing reactors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and existing chemical recovery facilities at ORNL. Validation and testing activities for new irradiation target designs have been conducted in three phases over a 2 year period to provide data for scale-up to production. Target design, qualification, target fabrication, and irradiation of fully-loaded targets have been accomplished. Data from post-irradiation examination (PIE) supports safety analysis and irradiation of future target designs.

  15. Quantifying the role of the electronics industry in managing conflict minerals using printers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason S., S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronics manufacturing industry has been experiencing a fast-changing landscape with recent legislations targeting the supply chains for the 3TG minerals: tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold mined from the Democratic ...

  16. High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission, Integrated Process Heater System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Howard; Boral, Anindya; Chhotray, San; Martin, Matthew

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The team of TIAX LLC, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, and Callidus Technologies, LLC conducted a six-year program to develop an ultra-low emission process heater burner and an advanced high efficiency heater design. This project addresses the critical need of process heater operators for reliable, economical emission reduction technologies to comply with stringent emission regulations, and for heater design alternatives that reduce process heater energy requirements without significant cost increase. The key project targets were NOx emissions of 10 ppm (@ 3% O2), and a heater thermal efficiency of 95 percent. The ultra low NOx burner was developed through a series of pilot-scale and field tests combined with computational fluid dynamic modeling to arrive at simultaneous low emissions and suitable flame shape and stability. Pilot scale tests were run at TIAX, at the 2 MMBtu/hr scale, and at Callidus at 8 MMBtu/hr. The full scale burner was installed on a 14 burner atmospheric pipestill furnace at an ExxonMobil refinery. A variety of burner configurations, gas tips and flame stabilizers were tested to determine the lowest emissions with acceptable flame shape and stability. The resulting NOx emissions were 22 ppm on average. Starting in 2001, Callidus commercialized the original ultra low NOx burner and made subsequent design improvements in a series of commercial burners evolving from the original concept and/or development. Emissions in the field with the ultra low-NOx burner over a broad spectrum of heater applications have varied from 5 ppm to 30 ppm depending on heater geometry, heater service, fuel and firing capacity. To date, 1550 of the original burners, and 2500 of subsequent generation burners have been sold by Callidus. The advanced heater design was developed by parametric evaluations of a variety of furnace and combustion air preheater configurations and technologies for enhancing convective and radiative heat transfer. The design evolution relied heavily on computational fluid dynamic predictions of design alternatives. The final design features modular separate radiant cells, each with one and two-side fired vertical tubes. The convection section configuration is vertical tube banks enclosed in the radiant channels. Commercial modular plate air preheaters are used. The predicted performance for the integrated advanced heater and Callidus burner is 95 percent efficiency with 9 ppm NOx emissions firing natural gas, and 12 ppm firing refinery gas. The total erected cost is less than a conventional heater with combustion air preheat.

  17. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    category includes California-owned power plants out- sideCalifornia Air ResourcesBoard, "Uncontrolled and controlled power-plantsCalifornia. First, we include emissions from out-state coal power plants.

  18. The Value of Emissions Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David.

    This paper estimates the value of international emissions trading, focusing attention on a here-to-fore neglected component: its value as a hedge against uncertainty. Much analysis has been done of the Kyoto Protocol and ...

  19. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  20. Trading quasi-emission permits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan-Pablo

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I study the design of environmental policies for a regulator that has incomplete information on firms' emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in cities with numerous small polluting sources). ...

  1. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

  2. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  3. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2001, Nevada enacted legislation requiring the state’s electric utilities to provide details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation to their customers. Utilities must...

  4. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan's Customer Choice and Electric Reliability Act of 2000 (P.A. 141) requires electric suppliers to disclose to customers details related to the fuel mix and emissions, in pounds per megawatt...

  5. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  6. Diesel Emission Control Technology Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Conf. 5-06 However, despite considerable increases in vehicle mass, power, and capacity, CO2 emissions have still dropped. 5 To sell European cars into the US market, a minimum of...

  7. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  8. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, Donald L. (Saline, MI); Mruzek, Michael T. (Britton, MI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  9. The new air emission regulations for gas turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solt, C.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the US, there are three new regulations now in development that will lower the limits for NO{sub x} emissions from gas turbines: (1) New National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Particulate Matter, and Possibly revision to the Ozone standard (both of these new programs will target NO{sub x} emissions); (2) New regulations stemming from the Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG) recommendations (again, NO{sub x} is the primary focus); (3) Revision of the New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) for gas turbines and a new rule that will impose new toxic emission requirements, (the Industrial Combustion Coordinated Rulemaking, stemming from revisions to Title III of the Clean Sir Act Amendments of 1990). The toxic rule should be of particular concern to the gas turbine industry in that it may impose the use of expensive toxic emission control techniques that may not provide any significant health benefits to the public. In addition, the European Community is currently drafting a new regulation for combustion sources that will require gas turbines to meet levels that are lower than any in Europe today. This paper will consider all 5 of these regulatory actions and will: review the proposed regulations; discuss timing for regulation development and implementation; assess the probable impact of each regulation; and provide opinions on the fate of each regulation. Both manufacturers and users of gas turbines should be aware of these proceedings and take an active role in the rule development.

  10. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  11. Economic targeting in modern warfare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambeth, B.S.; Lewis, K.N.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear weapons and strategies for their use play a variety of roles in the defense and foreign policies of the United States and Soviet Union. Accordingly, both nations buy forces and prepare war plans for many purposes. Although it is perhaps the least likely contingency for which either country prepares, the scenario in which both sides launch more or less all-out attacks against their opponent's economic or urban-industrial target system often dominates public consideration of strategic policy issues. These kinds of strikes, generically termed countervalue attacks, are usually assumed to throw many thousands of nuclear weapons against cities and isolated facilities in order to destroy the adversary nation as an organized, functioning, and economically viable entity.

  12. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission of complex fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, D.R.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex fragment emission (Z{gt}2) has been studied in the reactions of 50, 80, and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C, and 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au. Charge, angle, and energy distributions were measured inclusively and in coincidence with other complex fragments, and were used to extract the source rapidities, velocity distributions, and cross sections. The experimental emission velocity distributions, charge loss distributions, and cross sections have been compared with calculations based on statistical compound nucleus decay. The binary signature of the coincidence events and the sharpness of the velocity distributions illustrate the primarily 2-body nature of the {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reaction mechanism between 50 and 100 MeV/u. The emission velocities, angular distributions, and absolute cross sections of fragments of 20{le}Z{le}35 at 50 MeV/u, 19{le}Z{le}28 at 80 MeV/u, and 17{le}Z{le}21 at 100 MeV/u indicate that these fragments arise solely from the binary decay of compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions in which the {sup 139}La projectile picks up about one-half of the {sup 12}C target. In the 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions, the disappearance of the binary signature in the total charge and velocity distributions suggests and increase in the complex fragment and light charged particle multiplicity with increasing target mass. As in the 80 and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reactions, the lighter complex fragments exhibit anisotropic angular distributions and cross sections that are too large to be explained exclusively by statistical emission. 143 refs., 67 figs.

  13. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  14. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.; Auerbach, J.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Whitlock, R.R.; Obenshain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 ..mu..m and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 10/sup 7/ cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils.

  15. Possible Effects of Pair Echoes on Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohta Murase; Bing Zhang; Keitaro Takahashi; Shigehiro Nagataki

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is widely expected but had been sparsely observed until recently when the Fermi satellite was launched. If >TeV gamma rays are produced in GRBs and can escape from the emission region, they are attenuated by the cosmic infrared background photons, leading to regeneration of GeV-TeV secondary photons via inverse-Compton scattering. This secondary emission can last for a longer time than the duration of GRBs, and it is called a pair echo. We investigate how this pair echo emission affects spectra and light curves of high energy afterglows, considering not only prompt emission but also afterglow as the primary emission. Detection of pair echoes is possible as long as the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in voids is weak. We find (1) that the pair echo from the primary afterglow emission can affect the observed high-energy emission in the afterglow phase after the jet break, and (2) that the pair echo from the primary prompt emission can also be relevant, but only when significant energy is emitted in the TeV range, typically E_{gamma, >0.1 TeV} > (Y/(1+Y)) epsilon_e E_k. Even non-detections of the pair echoes could place interesting constraints on the strength of IGMF. The more favorable targets to detect pair echoes may be the "naked" GRBs without conventional afterglow emission, although energetic naked GRBs would be rare. If the IGMF is weak enough, it is predicted that the GeV emission extends to >30-300 s.

  16. Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2012 Independent Oversight Targeted Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2012 February 2012 Targeted Review...

  17. Explanations of FreedomCAR/DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Explanations of FreedomCARDOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Explanations of FreedomCARDOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Summary of FreedomCAR Targets and Basis for...

  18. The study of downstream targets and other characteristics of NTT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fung, Michelle W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAN DIEGO The Study of Downstream Targets and OtherOF THE THESIS The Study of Downstream Targets and Othera number of putative downstream targets of NTT, including

  19. Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Technical targets for fuel cell...

  20. Role of non-fossil energy in meeting China's energy and climate target for 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Tong, Qing; Yu, Sha; Wang, Yu; Chai, Qimin; Zhang, Xiliang

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China is the largest energy consumer and CO2 emitter in the world. The Chinese government faces growing challenges of ensuring energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. To address these two issues, the Chinese government has announced two ambitious domestic indicative autonomous mitigation targets for 2020: increasing the ratio of non-fossil energy to 15% and reducing carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP by 40-45% from 2005 levels. To explore the role of non-fossil energy in achieving these two targets, this paper first provides an overview of current status of non-fossil energy development in China; then gives a brief review of GDP and primary energy consumption; next assesses in detail the role of the non fossil energy in 2020, including the installed capacity and electricity generation of non-fossil energy sources, the share and role of non-fossil energy in the electricity structure, emissions reduction resulting from the shift to non-fossil energy, and challenges for accomplishing the mitigation targets in 2020 ; finally, conclusions and policy measures for non-fossil energy development are proposed.

  1. Electromagnetic dissociation of relativistic {sup 28}Si by nucleon emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnadara, U.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of the electromagnetic dissociation of {sup 28}Si by nucleon emission at E{sub lab}/A = 14.6 (GeV/nucleon was carried out with {sup 28}Si beams interacting on {sup 208}Pb). {sup 120}Sn. {sup 64}C targets. The measurements apparatus consists of detectors in the target area which measure the energy and charged multiplicity, and a forward spectrometer which measures the position, momentum and energy of the reaction fragments. The exclusive electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for decay channels having multiple nucleons in the final state have been measured which enables the selection of events produced in pure electromagnetic interactions. The measured cross sections agree well with previous measurements obtained for the removal of a few nucleons as well as with measurements on total charge removal cross sections from other experiments. The dependence of the integrated cross sections on the target charge Z{sub T} and the target mass AT confirms that for higher Z targets the excitation is largely electromagnetic. Direct measurements of the excitation energy for the electromagnetic dissociation of {sup 28}Si {yields} p+{sup 27}Al and {sup 28}Si {yields} n+{sup 27}Si have been obtained through a calculation of the invariant mass in kinematically, reconstructed events. The excitation energy spectrum for all targets peak near the isovector giant dipole resonance in {sup 28}Si. These distributions are well reproduced by combining the photon spectrum calculated using the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation with the experimental data on the photonuclear {sup 28}Si({sub {gamma},p}){sup 27}Al and {sup 28}Si({sub {gamma},n}){sup 27}Si. The possibilities of observing double giant dipole resonance excitations in {sup 28}Si have been investigated with cross section measurements as well as with excitation energy reconstruction.

  2. Electromagnetic dissociation of relativistic [sup 28]Si by nucleon emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnadara, U.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of the electromagnetic dissociation of [sup 28]Si by nucleon emission at E[sub lab]/A = 14.6 (GeV/nucleon was carried out with [sup 28]Si beams interacting on [sup 208]Pb). [sup 120]Sn. [sup 64]C targets. The measurements apparatus consists of detectors in the target area which measure the energy and charged multiplicity, and a forward spectrometer which measures the position, momentum and energy of the reaction fragments. The exclusive electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for decay channels having multiple nucleons in the final state have been measured which enables the selection of events produced in pure electromagnetic interactions. The measured cross sections agree well with previous measurements obtained for the removal of a few nucleons as well as with measurements on total charge removal cross sections from other experiments. The dependence of the integrated cross sections on the target charge Z[sub T] and the target mass AT confirms that for higher Z targets the excitation is largely electromagnetic. Direct measurements of the excitation energy for the electromagnetic dissociation of [sup 28]Si [yields] p+[sup 27]Al and [sup 28]Si [yields] n+[sup 27]Si have been obtained through a calculation of the invariant mass in kinematically, reconstructed events. The excitation energy spectrum for all targets peak near the isovector giant dipole resonance in [sup 28]Si. These distributions are well reproduced by combining the photon spectrum calculated using the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation with the experimental data on the photonuclear [sup 28]Si([sub [gamma],p])[sup 27]Al and [sup 28]Si([sub [gamma],n])[sup 27]Si. The possibilities of observing double giant dipole resonance excitations in [sup 28]Si have been investigated with cross section measurements as well as with excitation energy reconstruction.

  3. Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chs@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Fredenslund, Anders M., E-mail: amf@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Chanton, Jeffrey, E-mail: jchanton@fsu.edu [Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, 117 N. Woodward Avenue, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Fl 32306-4320 (United States); Pedersen, Gitte Bukh, E-mail: gbp@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Kjeldsen, Peter, E-mail: pk@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljovej - Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH{sub 4} emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called 'biocovers') to enhance biological oxidation of CH{sub 4}. A full scale biocover system to reduce CH{sub 4} emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH{sub 4} oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000 m{sup 2} were integrated into the existing cover at the 12 ha site. To increase CH{sub 4} load to the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH{sub 4} was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of total CH{sub 4} emissions showed that a significant portion of the emission quantified in the baseline study continued unabated from the site. Total emission measurements suggested a reduction in CH{sub 4} emission of approximately 28% at the end of the one year monitoring period. This was supported by analysis of stable carbon isotopes which showed an increase in oxidation efficiency from 16% to 41%. The project documented that integrating approaches such a whole landfill emission measurements using tracer techniques or stable carbon isotope measurements of ambient air samples are needed to document CH{sub 4} mitigation efficiencies of biocover systems. The study also revealed that there still exist several challenges to better optimize the functionality. The most important challenges are to control gas flow and evenly distribute the gas into the biocovers.

  4. Emissions Trading: A Feasible Analysis for UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emissions Trading: A Feasible Analysis for UBC Vivian Hoffman, J Chisholm I. Introduction The GVRD environmental objectives are achieved. Emissions reduction credit trading (or emissions trading) is an example Valley (LFV). Section III describes the market-based instruments of emissions trading and facility

  5. Atmospheric Mercury: Emissions, Transport/Fate,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , global...) Is "emissions trading" workable and ethical? Is the recently promulgated Clean Air Mercury

  6. Evaluation of the potential utility of flat panel CT for quantifying relative contrast enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, A. Kyle; Mahvash, Armeen [Department of Imaging Physics, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Interventional Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Certain directed oncologic therapies seek to take advantage of the fact that tumors are typically more susceptible to directed therapeutic agents than normal tissue owing to their extensive networks of poorly formed, leaky vasculature. If differences between the vascularity of normal and tumor tissues could be quantified, patients could be selected for or excluded from directed treatments on the basis of this difference. However, angiographic imaging techniques such as digital subtraction angiography (DSA) yield two-dimensional data that may be inadequate for this task. As a first step, the authors evaluated the feasibility of using a commercial implementation of flat panel computed tomography (FPCT) to quantify differences in enhancement of a simulated tumor compared with normal tissue based on differences in CT number measured in precontrast and postcontrast scans. Methods: To evaluate the FPCT scanner studied, the authors scanned several phantoms containing simulated normal and tumor tissues. In the first experiment, the authors used an anthropomorphic phantom containing inclusions representing normal, tumor, and bone tissue to evaluate the constancy of CT numbers in scans repeated at clinically relevant intervals of 1 and 3 min. The authors then scanned gelatin phantoms containing dilutions of iodinated contrast to evaluate the accuracy of relative contrast enhancement measurements for a clinical FPCT system. Data were analyzed using widely available software. Results: CT numbers measured in identical locations were constant over both scan intervals evaluated. Measured relative contrast enhancement values were accurate compared with known relative contrast enhancement values. Care must be taken to avoid artifacts in reconstructed images when placing regions of interest. Conclusions: Despite its limitations, FPCT in the interventional laboratory can be used to quantify relative contrast enhancement in phantoms. This is accomplished by measuring CT number in simulated tumor and normal tissue on precontrast and postcontrast scans. This information opens the door for refinement of technique in an effort to use such a technique to plan directed therapies.

  7. Quantifying the Cosmic Web in the New Era of Redshift Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofer Lahav

    2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two main strategies have been implemented in mapping the local universe: whole-sky 'shallow' surveys and 'deep' surveys over limited parts of the sky. The two approaches complement each other in studying cosmography and statistical properties of the Universe. We summarise some results on the power spectrum of fluctuations and Wiener reconstruction of the density field from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) of 230,000 redshifts. We then discuss future challenges in quantifying the web of cosmic structure in the on-going redshift surveys.

  8. Quantifying the Operational Benefits of Conventional and Advanced Pumped Storage Hydro on Reliability and Efficiency: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krad, I.; Ela, E.; Koritarov, V.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pumped storage hydro (PSH) plants have significant potential to provide reliability and efficiency benefits in future electric power systems with high penetrations of variable generation. New PSH technologies, such as adjustable-speed PSH, have been introduced that can also present further benefits. This paper demonstrates and quantifies some of the reliability and efficiency benefits afforded by PSH plants by utilizing the Flexible Energy Scheduling Tool for the Integration of Variable generation (FESTIV), an integrated power system operations tool that evaluates both reliability and production costs.

  9. Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL: ShalePutting!Quantifying Uncertainty

  10. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Winkelman; Tim Hargrave; Christine Vanderlan

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors conclude in this report that an upstream system would ensure complete regulatory coverage of transportation sector emissions in an efficient and feasible manner, and as such represents a key component of a national least-cost GHG emissions abatement strategy. The broad coverage provided by an upstream system recommends this approach over vehicle-maker based approaches, which would not cover emissions from heavy-duty vehicles and the aviation, marine and off-road sub-sectors. The on-road fleet approach unfairly and inefficiently burdens vehicle manufacturers with responsibility for emissions that they cannot control. A new vehicles approach would exclude emissions from vehicles on the road prior to program inception. The hybrid approach faces significant technical and political complications, and it is not clear that the approach would actually change behavior among vehicle makers and users, which is its main purpose. They also note that a trading system would fail to encourage many land use and infrastructure measures that affect VMT growth and GHG emissions. They recommend that this market failure be addressed by complementing the trading system with a program specifically targeting land use- and infrastructure-related activities. A key issue that must be addressed in designing a national GHG control strategy is whether or not it is necessary to guarantee GHG reductions from the transport sector. Neither an upstream system nor a downstream approach would do so, since both would direct capital to the least-cost abatement opportunities wherever they were found. They review two reasons why it may be desirable to force transportation sector reductions: first, that the long-term response to climate change will require reductions in all sectors; and second, the many ancillary benefits associated with transportation-related, and especially VMT-related, emissions reduction activities. If policy makers find it desirable to establish transportation-specific policies, they recommend (in addition to the land use policies mentioned above), that they combine an upstream trading system with a carbon efficiency standard similar to the current CAFE standard. Under this approach a fuel price signal would be complemented by incentives for manufacturers to produce more carbon efficient vehicles. To prevent vehicle manufacturers from being forced to pay more than other sectors for reducing GHG emissions, they recommend that the vehicle makers be allowed to pay a cash penalty equal to the market price of allowances in lieu of meeting carbon efficiency requirements.

  11. Study of hadron interactions in a lead-emulsion target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirokazu Ishida; Tsutomu Fukuda; Takafumi Kajiwara; Koichi Kodama; Masahiro Komatsu; Tomokazu Matsuo; Shoji Mikado; Mitsuhiro Nakamura; Satoru Ogawa; Andrey Sheshukov; Hiroshi Shibuya; Jun Sudou; Taira Suzuki; Yusuke Tsuchida

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological and kinematical characteristics of hadron interactions have been studied using a lead-emulsion target exposed to 2, 4 and 10 GeV/c hadron beams. A total length of 60 m $\\pi^-$ tracks was followed using a high speed automated emulsion scanning system. A total of 318 hadron interaction vertices and their secondary charged particle tracks were reconstructed. Measurement results of interaction lengths, charged particle multiplicity, emission angles and momenta of secondary charged particles are compared with a Monte Carlo simulation and appear to be consistent. Nuclear fragments emitted from interaction vertices were also detected by a newly developed emulsion scanning system with wide-angle acceptance. Their emission angle distributions are in good agreement with the simulated distributions. Probabilities of an event being associated with at least one fragment track are found to be greater than 50% for beam momentum $P > 4$ GeV/c and are well reproduced by the simulation. These experimental results validate estimation of the background due to hadron interactions in the sample of $\\tau$ decay candidates in the OPERA $\

  12. Development of granular target for CADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Exchanger 90K Max velocity of cold fluid 1.52m/s Wall Thickness of Heat Exchanger 1.75cm Flux of Gas inject Design goals: For CIADS, the target can accommodate 2.5MW=250MeV@10mA; the target system can update pipe can choose ~30-40 cm, then, the target would be design for >10MW. The heat removal of the window

  13. Moller Polarimetry with Atomic Hydrogen Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chudakov, Eugene [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Luppov, V. [University of Michigan Spin Physics Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposal to use polarized atomic hydrogen gas as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on the Moller scattering is described. Such a gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, would provide a target of practically 100\\% polarized electrons. It is conceivable to reach a $\\sim$0.3\\% systematic accuracy of the beam polarimetry with such a target. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed.

  14. Estimation of landfill emission lifespan using process oriented modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ustohalova, Veronika [Institute of Waste Management, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)]. E-mail: veronika.ustohalova@uni-essen.de; Ricken, Tim [Institute of Mechanics, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Widmann, Renatus [Institute of Waste Management, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on the particular pollutants emitted, landfills may require service activities lasting from hundreds to thousands of years. Flexible tools allowing long-term predictions of emissions are of key importance to determine the nature and expected duration of maintenance and post-closure activities. A highly capable option represents predictions based on models and verified by experiments that are fast, flexible and allow for the comparison of various possible operation scenarios in order to find the most appropriate one. The intention of the presented work was to develop a experimentally verified multi-dimensional predictive model capable of quantifying and estimating processes taking place in landfill sites where coupled process description allows precise time and space resolution. This constitutive 2-dimensional model is based on the macromechanical theory of porous media (TPM) for a saturated thermo-elastic porous body. The model was used to simulate simultaneously occurring processes: organic phase transition, gas emissions, heat transport, and settlement behavior on a long time scale for municipal solid waste deposited in a landfill. The relationships between the properties (composition, pore structure) of a landfill and the conversion and multi-phase transport phenomena inside it were experimentally determined. In this paper, we present both the theoretical background of the model and the results of the simulations at one single point as well as in a vertical landfill cross section.

  15. Tensor Target Polarization at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The first measurements of tensor observables in $\\pi \\vec{d}$ scattering experiments were performed in the mid-80's at TRIUMF, and later at SIN/PSI. The full suite of tensor observables accessible in $\\pi \\vec{d}$ elastic scattering were measured: $T_{20}$, $T_{21}$, and $T_{22}$. The vector analyzing power $iT_{11}$ was also measured. These results led to a better understanding of the three-body theory used to describe this reaction. %Some measurements were also made in the absorption and breakup channels. A direct measurement of the target tensor polarization was also made independent of the usual NMR techniques by exploiting the (nearly) model-independent result for the tensor analyzing power at 90$^\\circ _{cm}$ in the $\\pi \\vec{d} \\rightarrow 2p$ reaction. This method was also used to check efforts to enhance the tensor polarization by RF burning of the NMR spectrum. A brief description of the methods developed to measure and analyze these experiments is provided.

  16. Study on the effect of target on plasma parameters of magnetron sputtering discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikia, P.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur-782 402, Kamrup, Assam (India)] [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur-782 402, Kamrup, Assam (India)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the effect of magnetron target on different plasma parameters of Argon/Hydrogen (Ar - H{sub 2}) direct current (DC) magnetron discharge is examined. Here, Copper (Cu) and Chromium (Cr) are used as magnetron targets. The value of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (kT{sub e}), electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for both the target are studied as a function of input power and hydrogen content in the discharge. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. The obtained results show that electron and ion density decline with gradual addition of Hydrogen in the discharge and increase with rising input power. It brings significant changes on the degree of ionization of Ar and dissociation of H{sub 2}. The enhanced value of electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of Ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for Cr compared to Cu target is explained on the basis of it's higher Ion Induced Secondary Electron Emission Coefficient (ISEE) value.

  17. Quantifying sources of methane using light alkanes in the Los Angeles basin, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Air Resources Board (CARB) was tasked with compiling and verifying an inventory of GHG emissions of the statewide 2006 CARB GHG inventory and from a bottom-up accounting of CH4 sources, respectively. [3] Several are larger than expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories, consistent with previously

  18. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Lawrence Livermore National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 2015 Targeted Review of the Safety-Class Room Ventilation Systems and Associated Final Filtration Stages, and Review of Federal Assurance Capability at the Lawrence...

  19. DOE Program/Targets and Workshop Objectives

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nancy Garland DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell Operation at Sub- Freezing Temperatures DOE ProgramTargets and Workshop Objectives Sub-Freezing Temperature Effects on Fuel Cells...

  20. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  1. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  2. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  3. Metal vapor target for precise studies of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, W., E-mail: w.chen@gsi.de; Vorobyev, G.; Herfurth, F.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Spillmann, U. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Guo, D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 Gansu (China); Trotsenko, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Gumberidze, A. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Stöhlker, Th. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although different ion-atom collisions have been studied in various contexts, precise values of cross-sections for many atomic processes were seldom obtained. One of the main uncertainties originates from the value of target densities. In this paper, we describe a unique method to measure a target density precisely with a combination of physical vapor deposition and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. This method is preliminarily applied to a charge transfer cross-section measurement in collisions between highly charged ions and magnesium vapor. The final relative uncertainty of the target density is less than 2.5%. This enables the precise studies of atomic processes in ion-atom collisions, even though in the trial test the deduction of precise capture cross-sections was limited by other systematic errors.

  4. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A. [and others

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 {+-} 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy ({approximately}10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 {+-} 0.3 TW/cm{sup 2} and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of {approximately}2 cm/{micro}s is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented.

  5. Quantifying the source of reentrant line variability and the effects of processes standardization on tool availability variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peavey, Milo Camp

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis quantifies the sensitivity of tool availability variability with respect to product throughput and examines how Intel's High Precision Maintenance initiative can be used to minimize these effects. Tools with ...

  6. New Double Soft Emission Theorems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freddy Cachazo; Song He; Ellis Ye Yuan

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behavior of the tree-level S-matrix of a variety of theories as two particles become soft. By analogy with the recently found subleading soft theorems for gravitons and gluons, we explore subleading terms in double soft emissions. We first consider double soft scalar emissions and find subleading terms that are controlled by the angular momentum operator acting on hard particles. The order of the subleading theorems depends on the presence or not of color structures. Next we obtain a compact formula for the leading term in a double soft photon emission. The theories studied are a special Galileon, DBI, Einstein-Maxwell-Scalar, NLSM and Yang-Mills-Scalar. We use the recently found CHY representation of these theories in order to give a simple proof of the leading order part of all these theorems

  7. Microwave emissions from police radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, John Michael

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM POLICE RADAR A Thesis by JOHN MICHAEL FINK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject...: Industrial Hygiene MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM POLICE RADAR A Thesis by JOHN MICHAEL FINK Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE John P. Wag (Chair of Committee) Jero e J. C...

  8. Locomotive emission study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work for the report involved the estimation of the air pollution emissions arising from the operation of railroad locomotives in six non-attainment air management basins within California. The six air basins are the Bay Area, the Central Coast (which includes the North Central Coast and the South Central Coast basins), the South Coast, San Diego, San Joaquin, and the Sacramento Valley basins. In addition, the effort involved the development of information about the efficacy and cost of feasible control strategies for locomotive-generated air pollution emissions, for both long and short term implementation.

  9. Kinetics of ion and prompt electron emission from laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Ding, H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated ion emission dynamics of laser-produced plasma from several elements, comprised of metals and non-metals (C, Al, Si, Cu, Mo, Ta, W), under vacuum conditions using a Faraday cup. The estimated ion flux for various targets studied showed a decreasing tendency with increasing atomic mass. For metals, the ion flux is found to be a function of sublimation energy. A comparison of temporal ion profiles of various materials showed only high-Z elements exhibited multiple structures in the ion time of flight profile indicated by the observation of higher peak kinetic energies, which were absent for low-Z element targets. The slower ions were seen regardless of the atomic number of target material propagated with a kinetic energy of 1–5 keV, while the fast ions observed in high-Z materials possessed significantly higher energies. A systematic study of plasma properties employing fast photography, time, and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and electron analysis showed that there existed different mechanisms for generating ions in laser ablation plumes. The origin of high kinetic energy ions is related to prompt electron emission from high-Z targets.

  10. Estimating Air Chemical Emissions from Research Activities Using Stack Measurement Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.; Woodruff, Rodger K.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current methods of estimating air emissions from research and development (R&D) activities use a wide range of release fractions or emission factors with bases ranging from empirical to semi-empirical. Although considered conservative, the uncertainties and confidence levels of the existing methods have not been reported. Chemical emissions were estimated from sampling data taken from four research facilities over ten years. The approach was to use a Monte Carlo technique to create distributions of annual emission estimates for target compounds detected in source test samples. Distributions were created for each year and building sampled for compounds with sufficient detection frequency to qualify for the analysis. The results using the Monte Carlo technique without applying a filter to remove negative emission values showed almost all distributions spanning zero, and forty percent of the distributions having a negative mean. This indicates that emissions are so low as to be indistinguishable from building background. Application of a filter to allow only positive values in the distribution provided a more realistic value for emissions and increased the distribution mean by an average of sixteen percent. Release fractions were calculated by dividing the emission estimates by a building chemical inventory quantity. Two variations were used for this quantity: chemical usage, and chemical usage plus one-half standing inventory. Filters were applied so that only release fraction values from zero to one were included in the resulting distributions. Release fractions had a wide range among chemicals and among data sets for different buildings and/or years for a given chemical. Regressions of release fractions to molecular weight and vapor pressure showed weak correlations. Similarly, regressions of mean emissions to chemical usage, chemical inventory, molecular weight and vapor pressure also gave weak correlations. These results highlight the difficulties in estimating emissions from R&D facilities using chemical inventory data.

  11. The development of high-performance alkali-hybrid polarized He3 targets for electron scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Jaideep T.; Dolph, Peter A.M.; Tobias, William Al; Averett, Todd D.; Kelleher, Aiden; Mooney, K. E.; Nelyubin, Vladimir V.; Wang, Yunxiao; Zheng, Yuan; Cates, Gordon D.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the development of high-performance polarized łHe targets for use in electron scattering experiments that utilize the technique of alkali-hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping. We include data obtained during the characterization of 24 separate target cells, each of which was constructed while preparing for one of four experiments at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. The results presented here document dramatic improvement in the performance of polarized łHe targets, as well as the target properties and operating parameters that made those improvements possible. Included in our measurements were determinations of the so-called X-factors that quantify a temperature-dependent and as-yet poorlymore »understood spin-relaxation mechanism that limits the maximum achievable łHe polarization to well under 100%. The presence of this spin-relaxation mechanism was clearly evident in our data. We also present results from a simulation of the alkali-hydrid spin-exchange optical pumping process that was developed to provide guidance in the design of these targets. Good agreement with actual performance was obtained by including details such as off-resonant optical pumping. Now benchmarked against experimental data, the simulation is useful for the design of future targets. Included in our results is a measurement of the K- łHe spin-exchange rate coefficient $k^\\mathrm{K}_\\mathrm{se} = \\left ( 7.46 \\pm 0.62 \\right )\\!\\times\\!10^{-20}\\ \\mathrm{cm^3/s}$ over the temperature range 503 K to 563 K.« less

  12. A method for comparing impacts with real targets to impacts onto the IAEA unyielding target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D. J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The severity of the IAEA accident conditions test requirement (IAEA 1990) of an impact onto an essentially unyielding target from a drop height of 9 meters encompasses a large fraction of all real world impacts. This is true, in part, because of the unyielding nature of the impact target. Impacts onto the unyielding target have severities equivalent to higher velocity impacts onto real targets which are not unyielding. The severity of impacts with yielding targets is decreased by the amount of the impact energy absorbed in damaging the target. In demonstrating the severity of the regulatory impact event it is advantageous to be able to relate this impact onto an essentially unyielding target to impacts with yielding targets.

  13. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  14. IFE Target Fabrication, Delivery, and Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    synergism but key differences that lead to specific technologies Heavy Ion Fusion Laser Fusion Z-Pinch IFE of this talk....... 1. IFE target technology builds upon the larger ICF program - Not starting from "zero" for IFE - Large effort for NIC fosters efficiency (e.g., foam shells) 2. The recent IFE target technology

  15. Radioactive Target Detection Using Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tonglin

    Chapter 31 Radioactive Target Detection Using Wireless Sensor Network Tonglin Zhang Abstract for wireless sensor network data to detect and locate a hidden nuclear target in a large study area. The method assumes multiple radiation detectors have been used as sensor nodes in a wireless sensor network

  16. TechnicalDesign Report, Second Target Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galambos, John D [ORNL; Anderson, David E [ORNL; Bechtol, D [HDR, Inc.; Bethea, Katie L [ORNL; Brown, N [Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon, Inc.; Carden, W. F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chae, Steven M [ORNL; Clark, A. [Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon, Inc.; Counce, Deborah M [ORNL; Craft, K [Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon, Inc.; Crofford, Mark T [ORNL; Collins, Richard M [ORNL; Cousineau, Sarah M [ORNL; Curry, Douglas E [ORNL; Cutler, Roy I [ORNL; Dayton, Michael J [ORNL; Dean, Robert A [ORNL; Deibele, Craig E [ORNL; Doleans, Marc [ORNL; Dye, T. [HDR, Inc.; Eason, Bob H [ORNL; Eckroth, James A [ORNL; Fincrock, C [HDR, Inc.; Fritts, S. [Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon, Inc.; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Gawne, Ken R [ORNL; Hartman, Steven M [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Hess, S. [HDR, Inc.; Holmes, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Howell, Matthew P [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL; Jacobs, Lorelei L [ORNL; Jones, Larry C [ORNL; Johnson, B. [HDR, Inc.; Johnson, S. [HDR, Inc.; Kasemir, Kay [ORNL; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL; Laughon, Gregory J [ORNL; Lu, W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Mahoney, Kelly L [ORNL; Mammosser, John [ORNL; McManamy, T. [McManamy Consulting, Inc.; Michilini, M. [HDR, Inc.; Middendorf, Mark E [ORNL; O'Neal, Ed [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Nemec, B. [Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon, Inc.; Peters, Roy Cecil [ORNL; Plum, Michael A [ORNL; Reagan, G. [Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon, Inc.; Remec, Igor [ORNL; Rennich, Mark J [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Saethre, Robert B [ORNL; Schubert, James Phillip [ORNL; Shishlo, Andrei P [ORNL; Smith, C Craig [ORNL; Strong, William Herb [ORNL; Tallant, Kathie M [ORNL; Tennant, David Alan [ORNL; Thibadeau, Barbara M [ORNL; Trumble, S. [HDR, Inc.; Trotter, Steven M [ORNL; Wang, Z. [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences; Webb, Steven B [ORNL; Williams, Derrick C [ORNL; White, Karen S [ORNL; Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Second Target Station (STS) is a proposed upgrade for SNS. It includes a doubling of the accelerator power and an additional instrument hall. The new instrument hall will recieve a 467 kW 10 Hz beam. The parameters and preliminary design aspects of the STS are presented for the accelerator, target systems, instrument hall, instruments and civil construction aspects.

  17. THE ROTATING TARGET FLOW TEST FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    @idom.com) Fernando Sordo, ESS Bilbao Tom McManamy, ORNL/SNS #12;Status of the RTFT 4th HPTW of a RotaAng Target for ESS · In 2009 ESS Bilbao worked out a preliminary design for a rotaZng target for ESS. · Disc formed by un-clad tungsten bricks cooled

  18. Dissecting Apicoplast Targeting in the Malaria Parasite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, Geoff

    and are only poorly understood. We extracted amino acid features from transit peptides that target proteins to the relict plastid (apicoplast) of malaria parasites. Based on these amino acid characteristics, we to be important for correct targeting. Plastid transit peptides mediate accurate tar- geting of many hundreds

  19. TARGET STATION INFRASTRUCTURE THE CNGS EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of Aluminum Water cooled Current: 150kA (horn) ­ 180 kA (reflector) Pulse duration 7ms #12;Key elements Remote handling Remote station for radiation survey in the target chamber #12;CNGS Target Area I per cooling circuit 2007 run radiation effects on ventilation system electronics broken flexible stripline

  20. Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the building/street scale for a large US city

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurney, Kevin R.; Razlivanov, I.; Song, Yang; Zhou, Yuyu; Benes, Bedrich; Abdul- Massih, Michel

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system and contribute to quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. Called the ‘Hestia Project’, this research effort is the first to use bottom-up methods to quantify all fossil fuel CO2 emissions down to the scale of individual buildings, road segments, and industrial/electricity production facilities on an hourly basis for an entire urban landscape. a large city (Indianapolis, Indiana USA). Here, we describe the methods used to quantify the on-site fossil fuel CO2 emissions across the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. This effort combines a series of datasets and simulation tools such as a building energy simulation model, traffic data, power production reporting and local air pollution reporting. The system is general enough to be applied to any large U.S. city and holds tremendous potential as a key component of a carbon monitoring system in addition to enabling efficient greenhouse gas mitigation and planning. We compare our estimate of fossil fuel emissions from natural gas to consumption data provided by the local gas utility. At the zip code level, we achieve a bias adjusted pearson r correlation value of 0.92 (p<0.001).

  1. Delayed neutrons measurement at the MEGAPIE target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Panebianco; Pavel Bokov; Diane Dore; Xavier Ledoux; Alain Letourneau; Aurelien Prevost; Danas Ridikas

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the Neutronic and Nuclear Assessment Task Group of the MEGAPIE experiment we measured the delayed neutron (DN) flux at the top of the target. The measurement was proposed mainly for radioprotection purposes since the DN flux at the top of the target has been estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the prompt neutron flux. Given the strong model-dependence of DN predictions, the measurement of DN contribution to the total neutron activity at the top of the target was thus desired. Moreover, this measurement is complementary to the DN experiments performed at PNPI (Gatchina) on solid lead and bismuth targets. The DN measurement at MEGAPIE was performed during the start-up phase of the target. In this paper we present a detailed description of the experimental setup and some preliminary results on decay spectra.

  2. Delayed neutrons measurement at the MEGAPIE target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panebianco, Stefano; Dore, Diane; Ledoux, Xavier; Letourneau, Alain; Prevost, Aurelien; Ridikas, Danas

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the Neutronic and Nuclear Assessment Task Group of the MEGAPIE experiment we measured the delayed neutron (DN) flux at the top of the target. The measurement was proposed mainly for radioprotection purposes since the DN flux at the top of the target has been estimated to be of the same order of magnitude as the prompt neutron flux. Given the strong model-dependence of DN predictions, the measurement of DN contribution to the total neutron activity at the top of the target was thus desired. Moreover, this measurement is complementary to the DN experiments performed at PNPI (Gatchina) on solid lead and bismuth targets. The DN measurement at MEGAPIE was performed during the start-up phase of the target. In this paper we present a detailed description of the experimental setup and some preliminary results on decay spectra.

  3. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Keith, James Brock, Christopher Carlin, Sara Comer, David Kashy, Josephine McAndrew, David Meekins, Eugene Pasyuk, Joshua Pierce, Mikell Seely

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  4. Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakes, Terry

    range: 1-10 mm Gamma-Ray range: 10 mm - 8 positron annihilation #12;Positron Emission Tomography #12;P.E.T. measures Concentration of Radioactivity 1) Gamma-rays escape from body: External detection possible. 2) Two gamma rays emitted at 180 when a positron annihilates: The annihilation occured somewhere

  5. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  6. Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    and inversely proportional to the square of frequency and to temperature to the power 1.5. It is therefore discusses incoher­ ent emission from thermal plasma in the non­flaring so­ lar atmosphere; other relevant. The opacity of this mecha­ nism is proportional to the product of the electron and ion charge densities

  7. High energy emission from microquasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Fender; Tom Maccarone

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The microquasar phenomenon is associated with the production of jets by X-ray binaries and, as such, may be associated with the majority of such systems. In this chapter we briefly outline the associations, definite, probable, possible, and speculative, between such jets and X-ray, gamma-ray and particle emission.

  8. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA); Olsen, Khris B. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

  9. Cooperative target convergence using multiple agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work considers the problem of causing multiple (100`s) autonomous mobile robots to converge to a target and provides a follow-the-leader approach to the problem. Each robot has only a limited-range sensor for sending the target and also larger but also limited-range robot-to-robot communication capability. Because of the small amount of information available to the robots, a practical approach to improve convergence to the target is to have a robot follow the robot with the best quality of information. Specifically, each robot emits a signal that informs in-range robots what its status is. A robot has a status value of 0 if it is itself in range of the target. A robot has a status of 1 if it is not in range of the target but is in communication range of a robot that is in range of the target. A robot has a status of 2 if it is not in range of the target but is within range of another robot that has status 1, and so on. Of all the mobile robots that any given robot is in range of, it follows the one with the best status. The emergent behavior is the ant-like trails of robots following each other toward the target. If the robot is not in range of another robot that is either in range of the target or following another robot, the robot will assign-1 to its quality-of-information, and will execute an exhaustive search. The exhaustive search will continue until it encounters either the target or another robot with a nonnegative quality-of-information. The quality of information approach was extended to the case where each robot only has two-bit signals informing it of distance to in-range robots.

  10. Final report on LDRD Project: Quantum confinement and light emission in silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Follstaedt, D.M. [and others

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemically formed porous silicon (PS) was reported in 1991 to exhibit visible photoluminescence. This discovery could lead to the use of integrated silicon-based optoelectronic devices. This LDRD addressed two general goals for optical emission from Si: (1) investigate the mechanisms responsible for light emission, and (2) tailor the microstructure and composition of the Si to obtain photoemission suitable for working devices. PS formation, composition, morphology, and microstructure have been under investigation at Sandia for the past ten years for applications in silicon-on-insulator microelectronics, micromachining, and chemical sensors. The authors used this expertise to form luminescent PS at a variety of wavelengths and have used analytical techniques such as in situ Raman and X-ray reflectivity to investigate the luminescence mechanism and quantify the properties of the porous silicon layer. Further, their experience with ion implantation in Si lead to an investigation into alternate methods of producing Si nanostructures that visibly luminesce.

  11. Delayed neutron emission probabilities of Li-F nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeder, P.L.; Warner, R.A.; Hensley, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed neutron emission probabilities (P{sub n}) have been measured for 18 nuclides ranging from {sup 9}Li to {sup 25}F. Neutron-rich nuclides were produced by reaction of 800 MeV p on a {sup 232}Th target at the LAMPF accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Recoil nuclides were individually identified as to their mass, nuclear charged, and ionic charge by use of the Time-of-Flight Isochronous (TOFI) spectrometer. The distribution of time intervals between the arrival of a specific ion and the subsequent detection of a neutron was determined. The P{sub n} was calculated from the total number of ions observed, the initial neutron count rate, the neutron counting efficiency, and the half-life. The technique is shown to be valid for half-lives ranging from 10 ms ({sup 15}B) to 4 s ({sup 17}N) and for P{sub n} values as low as 0.3% ({sup 13}B). Delayed neutron emission has been measured for {sup 12}Be, {sup 14}B, {sup 17}C, {sup 18}N, {sup 21}N, and {sup 25}F for the first time. A small branch for beta-delayed two-neutron emission was observed in {sup 15}B (P{sub 2n} = 0.4 {plus minus} 0.2%). 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A rock physics strategy for quantifying uncertainty in common hydrocarbon indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.; Mukerji, T.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a strategy for hydrocarbon detection and for quantifying the uncertainty in hydrocarbon indicators, by combining statistical techniques with deterministic rock physics relations derived from the laboratory and theory. A simple example combines Gassmann`s deterministic equation for fluid substitution with statistics inferred from log and core data, to detect hydrocarbons from observed seismic velocities. The formulation gives the most likely estimate of the pore fluid modulus, corresponding to each observed velocity, and also the uncertainty of that interpretation. The variances of seismic velocity and porosity in the calibration data determine the uncertainty of the pore fluid interpretation. As expected, adding information about shear wave velocity, from AVO for example, narrows the uncertainty of the hydrocarbon indicator. The formulation offers a convenient way to implement deterministic fluid substitution equations in the realistic case when the reference porosity and velocity span a range of values.

  13. Network and topology for identifying, locating and quantifying physical phenomena, systems and methods for employing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richardson, John G.; Moore, Karen A.; Carrington, Robert A.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting, locating and quantifying a physical phenomena such as strain or a deformation in a structure. A plurality of laterally adjacent conductors may each include a plurality of segments. Each segment is constructed to exhibit a unit value representative of a defined energy transmission characteristic. A plurality of identity groups are defined with each identity group comprising a plurality of segments including at least one segment from each of the plurality of conductors. The segments contained within an identity group are configured and arranged such that each of their associated unit values may be represented by a concatenated digit string which is a unique number relative to the other identity groups. Additionally, the unit values of the segments within an identity group maintain unique ratios with respect to the other unit values in the identity group.

  14. Structures including network and topology for identifying, locating and quantifying physical phenomena

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richardson, John G.; Moore, Karen A.; Carrington, Robert A.

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting, locating and quantifying a physical phenomena such as strain or a deformation in a structure. A plurality of laterally adjacent conductors may each include a plurality of segments. Each segment is constructed to exhibit a unit value representative of a defined energy transmission characteristic. A plurality of identity groups are defined with each identity group comprising a plurality of segments including at least one segment from each of the plurality of conductors. The segments contained within an identity group are configured and arranged such that each of their associated unit values may be represented by a concatenated digit string which is a unique number relative to the other identity groups. Additionally, the unit values of the segments within an identity group maintain unique ratios with respect to the other unit values in the identity group.

  15. Pipeline including network and topology for identifying, locating and quantifying physical phenomena

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richardson, John G.; Moore, Karen A.; Carrington, Robert A.

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting, locating and quantifying a physical phenomena such as strain or a deformation in a structure. A plurality of laterally adjacent conductors may each include a plurality of segments. Each segment is constructed to exhibit a unit value representative of a defined energy transmission characteristic. A plurality of identity groups are defined with each identity group comprising a plurality of segments including at least one segment from each of the plurality of conductors. The segments contained within an identity group are configured and arranged such that each of their associated unit values may be represented by a concatenated digit string which is a unique number relative to the other identity groups. Additionally, the unit values of the segments within an identity group maintain unique ratios with respect to the other unit values in the identity group.

  16. A New Approach to Quantify Level 2 SPAR Models in SAPHIRE 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhegang Ma; John Schroeder; Curtis Smith; Ted Wood; Martin Sattison

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (USNRC) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Level 2 models for U.S. commercial nuclear power plants has historically used a partitioning approach for plant damage state (PDS) binning and model quantification since late 1990s [1]. While this approach has the advantage to be able to identify the details of the severe accident sequences with one or more individual PDS vector characters, the Level 2 model quantification process is tedious and error-prone with multiple steps involved. A new approach to quantify Level 2 SPAR models was recently developed and implemented in the latest SAPHIRE Version 8 [2]. The new approach removes the partition rules and greatly simplifies the quantification process.

  17. What does the 2°C Target Imply for a Global Climate Agreement in 2020? The LIMITS Study on Durban Action Platform Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Tavoni, Massimo; Aboumahboub, Tino; Luderer, Gunnar; Calvin, Katherine V.; DeMaere, Gauthier; Krey, Volker; Riahi, Keywan; Rosler, Hilke; Schaeffer, Michiel; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a novel and comprehensive model?based assessment of possible outcomes of the Durban Platform negotiations with a focus on emissions reduction requirements, the consistency with the 2°C target and global economic impacts. The Durban Action scenarios investigated in the LIMITS study—all assuming the implementation of comprehensive global emission reductions after 2020, but assuming different 2020 emission reduction levels and different long?term stabilization targets—show that the probability of exceeding the 2°C limit increases with stabilization target from below one third for 450?470 ppm to 40?60% for 490?510 ppm in 2100. Global time?averaged economic costs of the Durban Action scenarios are limited across models, and are largely unaffected by the stringency of 2020 pledges. By contrast, the economic impact of delaying action beyond 2030 is much stronger on transitional costs. The main significance of short term action in the period 2010?2030 lies in preparing the ground for steep emissions reductions thereafter by inducing global emissions to peak and decline. The institutional challenges of all scenarios with fragmented near?term climate policy can be expected to be high as reflected in a steep rise of carbon prices and decarbonization rates until 2040. We conclude that an agreement on comprehensive emissions reductions to be implemented from 2020 onwards has particular significance for meeting long term climate policy objectives.

  18. Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

  19. Memory in Microbes: Quantifying History-Dependent Behavior in a Bacterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Denise M.; Fontaine-Bodin, Lisa; Bischofs, Ilka; Price, Gavin; Keasling, Jay; Arkin, Adam P.

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Memory is usually associated with higher organisms rather than bacteria. However, evidence is mounting that many regulatory networks within bacteria are capable of complex dynamics and multi-stable behaviors that have been linked to memory in other systems. Moreover, it is recognized that bacteria that have experienced different environmental histories may respond differently to current conditions. These"memory" effects may be more than incidental to the regulatory mechanisms controlling acclimation or to the status of the metabolic stores. Rather, they may be regulated by the cell and confer fitness to the organism in the evolutionary game it participates in. Here, we propose that history-dependent behavior is a potentially important manifestation of memory, worth classifying and quantifying. To this end, we develop an information-theory based conceptual framework for measuring both the persistence of memory in microbes and the amount of information about the past encoded in history-dependent dynamics. This method produces a phenomenologicalmeasure of cellular memory without regard to the specific cellular mechanisms encoding it. We then apply this framework to a strain of Bacillus subtilis engineered to report on commitment to sporulation and degradative enzyme (AprE) synthesisand estimate the capacity of these systems and growth dynamics to"remember" 10 distinct cell histories prior to application of a common stressor. The analysis suggests that B. subtilis remembers, both in short and long term, aspects of its cellhistory, and that this memory is distributed differently among the observables. While this study does not examine the mechanistic bases for memory, it presents a framework for quantifying memory in cellular behaviors and is thus a starting point for studying new questions about cellular regulation and evolutionary strategy.

  20. Memory in microbes: quantifying history-Dependent behavior in a bacterium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Denise M.; Fontaine-Bodin, Lisa; Bischofs, Ilka; Price, Gavin; Keaslin, Jay; Arkin, Adam P.

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Memory is usually associated with higher organisms rather than bacteria. However, evidence is mounting that many regulatory networks within bacteria are capable of complex dynamics and multi-stable behaviors that have been linked to memory in other systems. Moreover, it is recognized that bacteria that have experienced different environmental histories may respond differently to current conditions. These"memory" effects may be more than incidental to the regulatory mechanisms controlling acclimation or to the status of the metabolic stores. Rather, they may be regulated by the cell and confer fitness to the organism in the evolutionary game it participates in. Here, we propose that history-dependent behavior is a potentially important manifestation of memory, worth classifying and quantifying. To this end, we develop an information-theory based conceptual framework for measuring both the persistence of memory in microbes and the amount of information about the past encoded in history-dependent dynamics. This method produces a phenomenological measure of cellular memory without regard to the specific cellular mechanisms encoding it. We then apply this framework to a strain of Bacillus subtilis engineered to report on commitment to sporulation and degradative enzyme (AprE) synthesis and estimate the capacity of these systems and growth dynamics to 'remember' 10 distinct cell histories prior to application of a common stressor. The analysis suggests that B. subtilis remembers, both in short and long term, aspects of its cell history, and that this memory is distributed differently among the observables. While this study does not examine the mechanistic bases for memory, it presents a framework for quantifying memory in cellular behaviors and is thus a starting point for studying new questions about cellular regulation and evolutionary strategy.

  1. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

  2. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  3. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  4. Pricing landfill externalities: Emissions and disamenity costs in Cape Town, South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahman, Anton, E-mail: anahman@csir.co.za [Environmental and Resource Economics Group, Natural Resources and the Environment, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 320, Stellenbosch 7599 (South Africa)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > The paper estimates landfill externalities associated with emissions, disamenities and transport. > Transport externalities vary from 24.22 to 31.42 Rands per tonne. > Costs of emissions (estimated using benefits transfer) vary from 0.07 to 28.91 Rands per tonne. > Disamenities (estimated using hedonic pricing) vary from 0.00 to 57.46 Rands per tonne. > Overall, external costs for urban landfills exceed those of a regional landfill. - Abstract: The external (environmental and social) costs of landfilling (e.g. emissions to air, soil and water; and 'disamenities' such as odours and pests) are difficult to quantify in monetary terms, and are therefore not generally reflected in waste disposal charges or taken into account in decision making regarding waste management options. This results in a bias against alternatives such as recycling, which may be more expensive than landfilling from a purely financial perspective, but preferable from an environmental and social perspective. There is therefore a need to quantify external costs in monetary terms, so that different disposal options can be compared on the basis of their overall costs to society (financial plus external costs). This study attempts to estimate the external costs of landfilling in the City of Cape Town for different scenarios, using the benefits transfer method (for emissions) and the hedonic pricing method (for disamenities). Both methods (in particular the process of transferring and adjusting estimates from one study site to another) are described in detail, allowing the procedures to be replicated elsewhere. The results show that external costs are currently R111 (in South African Rands, or approximately US$16) per tonne of waste, although these could decline under a scenario in which energy is recovered, or in which the existing urban landfills are replaced with a new regional landfill.

  5. High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

  6. Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    might eventually offer the greatest benefits at competitive costs if gasoline prices and battery life gasoline prices, low- emiss may (1) produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions when powered by electricity instead of gasoline

  7. Smoke and Visible Emissions (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes controls on smoke and visible emissions from certain sources.  This rule is not intended to preempt any more stringent controls on smoke and visible emissions provided in any...

  8. Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General analysis, and public education in global environmental change. It seeks to provide leadership;1 Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium

  9. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires...

  10. Global Mortality Attributable to Aircraft Cruise Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britter, Rex E.

    Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft ...

  11. Photon emission within the linear sigma model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Wunderlich; B. Kampfer

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft-photon emission rates are calculated within the linear sigma model. The investigation is aimed at answering the question to which extent the emissivities map out the phase structure of this particular effective model of strongly interacting matter.

  12. Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schnee; J. Li; A. A. Goodman; A. I. Sargent

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity can not be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

  13. Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.

    Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

  14. Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

    Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

  15. Emission trading with absolute and intensity caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jaemin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kyoto Protocol introduced emission trading to help reduce the cost of compliances for the Annex B countries that have absolute caps. However, we need to expand the emission trading to cover developing countries in order ...

  16. Reducing Emissions in Plant Flaring Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duck, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , lowering emissions and maximizing production. Saving energy and reducing emissions are the internal requirements for every division of this major corporation. To achieve the public goals the company set, they issued a five year plan called Methods on Energy...

  17. Direct-illumination spherical-target experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of spherical target experiments was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of three techniques for achieving higher convergence implosions. They are (1) cryogenically frozen fuel layers, (2) submicron wavelength laser light, and (3) temporally tailored pulse shapes. A second set of experiments provides information about energy transport by thermal and suprathermal electrons and uses multilayered targets as an integral component of the diagnostics. These results, in conjunction with existing laser-target coupling data, provide a more comprehensive test of our understanding of laser plasma interaction, energy transport, and hydrodynamic response of small scale spherical laser fusion experiments.

  18. Self-assessing target with automatic feedback

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larkin, Stephen W.; Kramer, Robert L.

    2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A self assessing target with four quadrants and a method of use thereof. Each quadrant containing possible causes for why shots are going into that particular quadrant rather than the center mass of the target. Each possible cause is followed by a solution intended to help the marksman correct the problem causing the marksman to shoot in that particular area. In addition, the self assessing target contains possible causes for general shooting errors and solutions to the causes of the general shooting error. The automatic feedback with instant suggestions and corrections enables the shooter to improve their marksmanship.

  19. Targeting engineering synchronization in chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sourav K. Bhowmick; Dibakar Ghosh

    2015-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of targeting engineering synchronization states in two identical and mismatch chaotic systems is explained in details. The method is proposed using linear feedback controller coupling for engineering synchronization such as mixed synchronization, linear and nonlinear generalized synchronization and targeting fixed point. The general form of coupling design to target any desire synchronization state under unidirectional coupling with the help of Lyapunov function stability theory is derived analytically. A scaling factor is introduced in the coupling definition to smooth control without any loss of synchrony. Numerical results are done on two mismatch Lorenz systems and two identical Sprott oscillators.

  20. ESO Imaging Survey: Finding Targets for VLT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. N. da Costa

    1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the wide-angle, moderately deep ESO Imaging Survey have been used to produce target lists for the first year of the VLT. About 250 candidate clusters of galaxies have been identified from the I-band images covering $\\sim$ 17 square degrees. In addition, using the multicolor data available over an area of 1.3 square degrees over 300 potentially interesting point-sources have been selected. The color-selected targets include low-mass stars/brown dwarfs, white-dwarfs and quasars. Images, object catalogs and derived target lists are available from the world-wide web (http://www.eso.org/eis)