National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for quantifiable emissions targets

  1. Quantifying Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from South Asia Through a Targeted Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Philosophy in Climate Physics and Chemistry Abstract Methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and sulfur in India and are used for measurement- based assessment of emissions. Several features are identified are investigated to better quantify some of the uncertainties associated with this chemical transport model

  2. Quantifying avoided emissions from renewable generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Gabriel R. (Gabriel Rodriguez)

    2009-01-01

    Quantifying the reduced emissions due to renewable power integration and providing increasingly accurate emissions analysis has become more important for policy makers in the age of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and ...

  3. Quantifying emissions reductions from New England offshore wind energy resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlinski, Michael Peter

    2006-01-01

    Access to straightforward yet robust tools to quantify the impact of renewable energy resources on air emissions from fossil fuel power plants is important to governments aiming to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse ...

  4. Quantifying VOC emissions for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Lord, David L.

    2013-06-01

    A very important aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is regulatory compliance. One of the regulatory compliance issues deals with limiting the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted into the atmosphere from brine wastes when they are discharged to brine holding ponds. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set limits on the amount of VOCs that can be discharged to the atmosphere. Several attempts have been made to quantify the VOC emissions associated with the brine ponds going back to the late 1970's. There are potential issues associated with each of these quantification efforts. Two efforts were made to quantify VOC emissions by analyzing VOC content of brine samples obtained from wells. Efforts to measure air concentrations were mentioned in historical reports but no data have been located to confirm these assertions. A modeling effort was also performed to quantify the VOC emissions. More recently in 2011- 2013, additional brine sampling has been performed to update the VOC emissions estimate. An analysis of the statistical confidence in these results is presented here. Arguably, there are uncertainties associated with each of these efforts. The analysis herein indicates that the upper confidence limit in VOC emissions based on recent brine sampling is very close to the 0.42 ton/MMB limit used historically on the project. Refining this estimate would require considerable investment in additional sampling, analysis, and monitoring. An analysis of the VOC emissions at each site suggests that additional discharges could be made and stay within current regulatory limits.

  5. Combustion Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency Combustion Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and...

  6. Quantifying the impact of model errors on topdown estimates of carbon monoxide emissions using satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, Colette L.

    Quantifying the impact of model errors on topdown estimates of carbon monoxide emissions using use of inverse modeling to better quantify regional surface emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), which to or larger than the combustion source, optimizing the CO from NMVOC emissions on larger spatial scales than

  7. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES satellite sensor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES Figure S1. December-January-Febuary (DJF, top) and June-July-August (JJA, bottom) biogenic3 methanol 1 Figure S4. Regions employed for quantifying terrestrial methanol fluxes (red) and for2

  8. Quantifying the seasonal and interannual variability of North American isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    satellite observations of the formaldehyde column Paul I. Palmer,1,2 Dorian S. Abbot,1 Tzung-May Fu,1 Daniel isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns is subject to errors) to quantify the time-dependent HCHO production from isoprene, a- and b-pinenes, and methylbutenol and show

  9. Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1 sources and sinks of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, John B.

    Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary emission sources and greenhouse gases to climate change. In 1992, the United States signed and ratified and make available...national inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks

  10. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Courtney Adam; Walter-Anthony, Katey; Zhuang, Qianlai; Melillo, Jerry

    2013-04-26

    Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

  11. Quantifying Regional Economic Impacts of CO2 Intensity Targets in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da

    2012-09-01

    To address rising energy use and CO2 emissions, China’s leadership has enacted energy and CO2 intensity

  12. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qianlai Zhuang

    2012-11-16

    During the three-year project period, Purdue University has specifically accomplished the following: revised the existing Methane Dynamics Model (MDM) to consider the effects of changes of atmospheric pressure; applied the methane dynamics model (MDM) to Siberian region to demonstrate that ebullition estimates could increase previous estimates of regional terrestrial CH{sub 4} emissions 3- to 7-fold in Siberia; Conducted an analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006 to show that terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} that increased by 0.6 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup â??1} during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH{sub 4}; improved the quantification of CH{sub 4} fluxes in the Arctic with inversion methods; evaluated AIRS CH4 retrieval data with a transport and inversion model and surface flux and aircraft data; to better quantify methane emissions from wetlands, we extended the MDM within a biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to include a large-scale hydrology model, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model; more recently, we developed a single box atmospheric chemistry model involving atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO) and radical hydroxyl (OH) to analyze atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentrations from 1984 to 2008.

  13. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Wang Jiaxiang [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  14. The impact of traffic emissions on atmospheric ozone and OH: results from QUANTIFY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    fuel con- sumption and emissions, J. Geophys. Res. , 112,AERO2K Global Aviation Emissions Inventories for 2002 andJ. , v. , and Lauer, A. : Emissions from inter- national

  15. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    DEFRA), 2005a. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. London: DEFRA.Energy/GHG Tax Emissions trading Target Setting Penaltiesthe European Union Emissions Trading Scheme and a lack of

  16. Characterization of nuclear physics targets using Rutherford backscattering and particle induced x-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Th. Rubehn; G. J. Wozniak; L. Phair; L. G. Moretto; Kin M. Yu

    1996-09-23

    Rutherford backscattering and particle induced x-ray emission have been utilized to precisely characterize targets used in nuclear fission experiments. The method allows for a fast and non destructive determination of target thickness, homogeneity and element composition.

  17. become more important as countries agree to emission reduction targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    : immediate stabilization of carbon dioxide emissions, regulation of air pollution that balances removal

  18. Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

  19. Quantifying emissions of greenhouse gases from South Asia through a targeted measurement campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Anita Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Methane (CH 4 ), nitrous oxide (N20) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) are powerful greenhouse gases with global budgets that are well-known but regional distributions that are not adequately constrained for the purposes of ...

  20. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Avoided Energy/GHG Tax Emissions trading Target Settingexits • Calculating trading group targets • Measuring energyemissions trading scheme, and a “light touch” on energy

  1. Studies of Line Emission from Collisions of Multiply Charged Ions on He and Li Targets for Tokamak Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studies of Line Emission from Collisions of Multiply Charged Ions on He and Li Targets for Tokamak Diagnostics

  2. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01

    Affairs (DEFRA), 2005. UK Emissions Trading Scheme. http://targets through the UK Emissions Trading Scheme. 6 Table 1is to be adjusted for emissions trading. The reports must be

  3. CORONAL THICK TARGET HARD X-RAY EMISSIONS AND RADIO EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jeongwoo [Physics Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Lim, Daye; Choe, G. S.; Kim, Kap-Sung [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Minhwan [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-20

    A distinctive class of hard X-ray (HXR) sources located in the corona was recently found, which implies that the collisionally thick target model (CTTM) applies even to the corona. We investigated whether this idea can be independently verified by microwave radiations which have been known as the best companion to HXRs. This study is conducted on the GOES M2.3 class flare which occurred on 2002 September 9 and was observed by the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and the Owens Valley Solar Array. Interpreting the observed energy-dependent variation of HXR source size under the CTTM, the coronal density should be as high as 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} over a distance of up to 12''. To explain the cutoff feature of the microwave spectrum at 3 GHz, however, we require a density no higher than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Additional constraints must be placed on the temperature and magnetic field of the coronal source in order to reproduce the microwave spectrum as a whole. First, a spectral feature called the Razin suppression requires a magnetic field in a range of 250-350 G along with high viewing angles around 75 Degree-Sign . Second, to avoid excess fluxes at high frequencies due to the free-free emission that was not observed, we need a high temperature {>=}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K. These two microwave spectral features, Razin suppression and free-free emissions, become more significant at regions of high thermal plasma density and are essential for validating and determining additional parameters of the coronal HXR sources.

  4. A Study of Scotland's Emission and Energy Targets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeve, Rebecca

    2011-11-24

    This dissertation assesses the keys drivers that led to the choice of Scotland’s ambitious climate change targets and the feasibility of meeting them. It also assesses the social, economic or environmental implications of ...

  5. Potential for meeting the EU new passenger car CO? emissions targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Kandarp

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the European Parliament agreed to limit the CO2 emissions from new passenger cars sold in the European Union to an average of 130g/km by 2015. Further, a probable longer-term CO2 emissions target of 95g/km is ...

  6. Driving down emissions : analyzing a plan for meeting Massachusetts' carbon emission reduction targets for passenger vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvin, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Joanna)

    2015-01-01

    Massachusetts is one of the US states at the forefront of carbon emission reduction policy, and has the potential to model success to the rest of the country. The state's Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA) passed in 2008, ...

  7. Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters. M the emission yield of anionic clusters increases much faster with n than expected from simple proportionality. Accordingly, the most intense emission is observed for Au7 - : under Au9 + impact the Au7 - yield per incident

  8. Thermal emission of electrons under irradiation of a gold target by a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezhanov, S G; Kanavin, Andrey P; Uryupin, Sergey A

    2012-05-31

    We study the effect of d-electrons on heating of a gold target upon absorption of a femtosecond laser pulse as well as on subsequent thermal emission of hot electrons. It is shown that neglecting the effect of d-electrons leads to a significant overestimation of the number of the emitted electrons. It is found that the approximate description of the heating field in the skin layer without the inhomogeneity of the dielectric constant taken into account does not cause a significant change in the maximum temperature of the electrons at the metal surface, and has virtually no effect on the process of thermal emission.

  9. Comparative study of radiation emission without and with target in a 2.2 kJ plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-24

    The radiation emission in a 2.2 kJ Mather-type dense plasma focus device is investigated using a five channel BPX65 PIN diode spectrometer. Estimated X-ray associated with the hollow anode without and with target in Argon gas medium is compared. At optimum conditions, the radiation emission from the system is found to be strongly influenced with target in hollow anode and the filling gas pressure. The maximum X-ray yield in 4? sr was obtained in case of hollow anode in argon gas medium with target 'Lead' due to interaction of electron beam. Results indicated that an appropriate design of hollow anode with target could enhance the radiation emission by more intense interaction of expected electron beam with target. The outcomes are helpful in designing a plasma focus with enhanced X-ray radiation with improved shot to shot reproducibility in plasma focus device.

  10. Ion microtomography and particle-induced x-ray emission analysis of direct drive inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Micro Analytical Research Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia))

    1992-07-01

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide submicron-scale characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace-element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Rayleigh--Taylor instabilities. We obtain 1% total electron density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching 2 {mu}m. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few parts per million. We present examples of ICF target characterization by IMT and PIXE in order to demonstrate their potential impact in assessing target fabrication processes.

  11. Targets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable User Guide Nuclear ScienceTargets

  12. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  13. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  14. Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency Targeting EPA 2010 Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  15. Quantifying sources of black carbon in Western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-05-04

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source-receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over Western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over the Northwest USA andmore »West Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  16. Quantifying sources of black carbon in western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-11-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source–receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over northwestern USA and westernmore »Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  17. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    CO2 Emissions Reduced (Mt) Taxes Subsidies Agreements Total Source:CO2 from UTO Source: CARB, 2009a; LBNL own estimates Not Specified: emissions

  18. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01

    BEST: Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for industry toregarding energy use and energy saving measures. Accordingand quantifies the energy savings and simple payback period

  19. Consumption-Based Adjustment of China's Emissions-Intensity Targets: An Analysis of its Potential Economic Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springmann, M.

    China’s Twelfth Five-Year Plan (2011–2015) aims to achieve a national carbon intensity reduction of 17% through differentiated targets at the provincial level. Allocating the national target among China’s provinces is ...

  20. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley National Laboratory’s Energy Analysis Program forare often national-level energy or GHG programs that combinea national-level energy or GHG emissions mitigation program

  1. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    management program following national energy managementwith national-level energy or GHG tax programs, LBNLnational level energy efficiency and GHG emissions reduction programs.

  2. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio Segrè About the LabEmission

  3. Ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis direct drive of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Hornady, R.S. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Melbourne Univ. (Australia). Micro Analytical Research Centre)

    1991-11-20

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide micro-characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Taylor-Rayleigh instabilities. We obtain 1% density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching two microns. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few ppm. We present examples of IMT and PIXE analyses performed on several ICF targets.

  4. Locked into Copenhagen pledges - Implications of short-term emission targets for the cost and feasibility of long-term climate goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riahi, Keywan; Kriegler, Elmar; Johnson, Nils; Bertram, Christoph; den Elzen, Michel; Eom, Jiyong; Schaeffer, Michiel; Edmonds, James A.; Isaac, Morna; Krey, Volker; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Mejean, Aurelie; McCollum, David; Mima, Silvana; Turton, Hal; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wada, Kenichi; Bosetti, Valentina; Capros, Pantelis; Criqui, Patrick; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kainuma, M.; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the AMPERE intermodeling comparison with focus on the implications of near-term policies for the costs and attainability of long-term climate objectives. Ten modeling teams participated in the project to explore the consequences of global emissions following the proposed policy stringency of the national pledges from the Copenhagen Accord and Cancún Agreements to 2030. Specific features compared to earlier assessments are the explicit consideration of near-term 2030 emissions targets as well as the systematic sensitivity analysis for the availability and potential of mitigation technologies. Our estimates show that a 2030 mitigation effort comparable to the pledges would result in a further "lock-in" of the energy system into fossil fuels and thus impede the required energy transformation to reach low greenhouse-gas stabilization levels (450ppm CO2e). Major implications include significant increases in mitigation costs, increased risk that low stabilization targets become unattainable, and reduced chances of staying below the proposed temperature change target of 2C. With respect to technologies, we find that following the pledge pathways to 2030 would narrow policy choices, and increases the risks that some currently optional technologies, such as nuclear or carbon capture and storage (CCS), will become "a must" by 2030.

  5. L-[METHYL-{sup 11}C] Methionine Positron Emission Tomography for Target Delineation in Malignant Gliomas: Impact on Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahasittiwat, Pawinee; Mizoe, Jun-etsu Hasegawa, Azusa; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Yanagi, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryou D.D.S.; Pattaranutaporn, Pittayapoom; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the importance of {sup 11}C-methionine (MET)-positron emission tomography (PET) for clinical target volume (CTV) delineation. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 16 patients with malignant glioma (4 patients, anaplastic astrocytoma; 12 patients, glioblastoma multiforme) treated with surgery and carbon ion radiotherapy from April 2002 to Nov 2005. The MET-PET target volume was compared with gross tumor volume and CTV, defined by using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Correlations with treatment results were evaluated between positive and negative extended volumes (EVs) of the MET-PET target for CTV. Results: Mean volumes of the MET-PET targets, CTV1 (defined by means of high-intensity volume on T2-weighted MRI), and CTV2 (defined by means of contrast-enhancement volume on T1-weighted MRI) were 6.35, 264.7, and 117.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean EVs of MET-PET targets for CTV1 and CTV2 were 0.6 and 2.2 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The MET-PET target volumes were included in CTV1 and CTV2 in 13 (81.3%) and 11 patients (68.8%), respectively. Patients with a negative EV for CTV1 had significantly greater survival rate (p = 0.0069), regional control (p = 0.0047), and distant control time (p = 0.0267) than those with a positive EV. Distant control time also was better in patients with a negative EV for CTV2 than those with a positive EV (p = 0.0401). Conclusions: For patients with malignant gliomas, MET-PET has a possibility to be a predictor of outcome in carbon ion radiotherapy. Direct use of MET-PET fused to planning computed tomography will be useful and yield favorable results for the therapy.

  6. Urban Form Energy Use and Emissions in China: Preliminary Findings and Model Proof of Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    can be useful for quantifying the energy and environmentalcan be useful for quantifying the energy and environmentalcan be useful for quantifying broad energy and emissions

  7. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Schleich (2006). EU Emissions Trading: an Early Analysis of2002). Comparing Emission Trading with Absolute and Relativein the European Emissions Trading System: a Commentary.

  8. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    1999?for fuel economy, CO2 emissions, car dealerships Tax onfor passenger cars and induce GHG emission reductions. Taxesregulates CO2 emissions from passenger cars; the policy

  9. Quantifying the robustness of metro networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiangrong; Derrible, Sybil; Ahmad, Sk Nasir; Kooij, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Metros (heavy rail transit systems) are integral parts of urban transportation systems. Failures in their operations can have serious impacts on urban mobility, and measuring their robustness is therefore critical. Moreover, as physical networks, metros can be viewed as network topological entities, and as such they possess measurable network properties. In this paper, by using network science and graph theoretical concepts, we investigate both theoretical and experimental robustness metrics (i.e., the robustness indicator, the effective graph conductance, and the critical thresholds) and their performance in quantifying the robustness of metro networks under random failures or targeted attacks. We find that the theoretical metrics quantify different aspects of the robustness of metro networks. In particular, the robustness indicator captures the number of alternative paths and the effective graph conductance focuses on the length of each path. Moreover, the high positive correlation between the theoretical m...

  10. Target assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Richard A. (Falls Church, VA)

    1980-01-01

    A target for a proton beam which is capable of generating neutrons for absorption in a breeding blanket includes a plurality of solid pins formed of a neutron emissive target material disposed parallel to the path of the beam and which are arranged axially in a plurality of layers so that pins in each layer are offset with respect to pins in all other layers, enough layers being used so that each proton in the beam will strike at least one pin with means being provided to cool the pins. For a 300 mA, 1 GeV beam (300 MW), stainless steel pins, 12 inches long and 0.23 inches in diameter are arranged in triangular array in six layers with one sixth of the pins in each layer, the number of pins being such that the entire cross sectional area of the beam is covered by the pins with minimum overlap of pins.

  11. Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for Alternative Vehicles Emissions Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Nigel

    2012-01-31

    The overall objective of this project was to perform research to quantify and improve the energy efficiency and the exhaust emissions reduction from advanced technology vehicles using clean, renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicle and alternative fuel fleets were to be identified, and selected vehicles characterized for emissions and efficiency. Target vehicles were to include transit buses, school buses, vocational trucks, delivery trucks, and tractor-trailers. Gaseous species measured were to include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. An objective was to characterize particulate matter more deeply than by mass. Accurate characterization of efficiency and emissions was to be accomplished using a state-of-the-art portable emissions measurement system and an accompanying chassis dynamometer available at West Virginia University. These two units, combined, are termed the Transportable Laboratory. An objective was to load the vehicles in a real-world fashion, using coast down data to establish rolling resistance and wind drag, and to apply the coast down data to the dynamometer control. Test schedules created from actual vehicle operation were to be employed, and a specific objective of the research was to assess the effect of choosing a test schedule which the subject vehicle either cannot follow or can substantially outperform. In addition the vehicle loading objective was to be met better with an improved flywheel system.

  12. Exposure to air pollution Exposition is quantified as population weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Exposure to air pollution Exposition is quantified as population weighted concentration of relevant Benefit Analysis The sanitary benefits brought about by air pollution improvement as a result of climate by a collateral reduction of air pollutant emissions, hence a lower cost of AQ legislation. Modelling Framework

  13. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    want to reduce their ‘carbon footprint,’ not by law, but todecreases of its carbon footprint could reduce emissions byTo decrease the carbon footprint of transportation, the

  14. Quantifying Pollutant Emissions from Office Equipment Phase I Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddalena, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Hodgson, A.T.; McKone, T.E.; Perino, C.

    2006-01-01

    Windows XP Professional Memory 512MB DDR PC3200 SDRAM (2x256MB) 256MB DDR PC3200 SDRAM (1x256MB) 512MB DDR2SDRAM 32 x 64 256MB 400MHz DDR DIMM DUAL IN- LINE MEMORY

  15. Quantifying Pollutant Emissions from Office Equipment Phase I Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddalena, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Hodgson, A.T.; McKone, T.E.; Perino, C.

    2006-01-01

    GC analysis, such as Bisphenol A bis (diphenyl phosphate) (ethane TBBPA Tetrabromo bisphenol A Organophosphate Flame

  16. Quantifying Pollutant Emissions from Office Equipment Phase I Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddalena, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Hodgson, A.T.; McKone, T.E.; Perino, C.

    2006-01-01

    toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, styrene, formaldehyde andtoluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, styrene, formaldehyde andBicyclic aromatics Toluene Styrene Xylenes 2-Ethylhexanol n-

  17. South Africa-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "The participation of emerging economies is one of the major items of discussion on a future international climate regime. Action is called for and more and more emerging...

  18. Recommended Practice for Quantifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transit

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpen EnergyReclamation Project Act

  19. Brazil-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossence JumpJerseyEconomy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) | OpenOpen

  20. China-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd Jump to:ChangingCNE Jump to:NewCooperation Jump to:Open Energy

  1. Mexico-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,Mereg GmbH Jump to:EC-LEDS in theIAEAOpen Energy

  2. India-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimenMaking Energy Efficiency Real (MEER) Jump to:NIESOpen

  3. South Africa-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin Jump to:SolkarSector Programmes

  4. Quantifying entanglement with scattering experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Marty; M. Epping; H. Kampermann; D. Bruß; M. B. Plenio; M. Cramer

    2013-10-03

    We show how the entanglement contained in states of spins arranged on a lattice may be quantified with observables arising in scattering experiments. We focus on the partial differential cross-section obtained in neutron scattering from magnetic materials but our results are sufficiently general such that they may also be applied to, e.g., optical Bragg scattering from ultracold atoms in optical lattices or from ion chains. We discuss resonating valence bond states and ground and thermal states of experimentally relevant models--such as Heisenberg, Majumdar-Ghosh, and XY model--in different geometries and with different spin numbers. As a by-product, we find that for the one-dimensional XY model in a transverse field such measurements reveal factorization and the quantum phase transition at zero temperature.

  5. Carbon emissions and the Kyoto commitment in the European Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viguier, Laurent L.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Reilly, John M.

    We estimate reference CO? emission projections in the European Union, and quantify the economic impacts of the Kyoto commitment on Member States. We consider the case where each EU member individually meets a CO? emissions ...

  6. Quantifying uncertainty in stable isotope mixing models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davis, Paul; Syme, James; Heikoop, Jeffrey; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna; Perkins, George; Newman, Brent; Chrystal, Abbey E.; Hagerty, Shannon B.

    2015-05-19

    Mixing models are powerful tools for identifying biogeochemical sources and determining mixing fractions in a sample. However, identification of actual source contributors is often not simple, and source compositions typically vary or even overlap, significantly increasing model uncertainty in calculated mixing fractions. This study compares three probabilistic methods, SIAR [Parnell et al., 2010] a pure Monte Carlo technique (PMC), and Stable Isotope Reference Source (SIRS) mixing model, a new technique that estimates mixing in systems with more than three sources and/or uncertain source compositions. In this paper, we use nitrate stable isotope examples (?15N and ?18O) but all methods testedmore »are applicable to other tracers. In Phase I of a three-phase blind test, we compared methods for a set of six-source nitrate problems. PMC was unable to find solutions for two of the target water samples. The Bayesian method, SIAR, experienced anchoring problems, and SIRS calculated mixing fractions that most closely approximated the known mixing fractions. For that reason, SIRS was the only approach used in the next phase of testing. In Phase II, the problem was broadened where any subset of the six sources could be a possible solution to the mixing problem. Results showed a high rate of Type I errors where solutions included sources that were not contributing to the sample. In Phase III some sources were eliminated based on assumed site knowledge and assumed nitrate concentrations, substantially reduced mixing fraction uncertainties and lowered the Type I error rate. These results demonstrate that valuable insights into stable isotope mixing problems result from probabilistic mixing model approaches like SIRS. The results also emphasize the importance of identifying a minimal set of potential sources and quantifying uncertainties in source isotopic composition as well as demonstrating the value of additional information in reducing the uncertainty in calculated mixing fractions.« less

  7. Impact of European Emissions Trading System (EU-ETS) on carbon emissions and investment decisions in the power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feilhauer, Stephan M. (Stephan Marvin)

    2009-01-01

    This masters thesis assesses the impact of a emissions trading on short-term carbon abatement and investment decisions in the power sector. Environmental benefits from carbon abatement due to emissions trading are quantified ...

  8. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

    2011-01-14

    After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

  9. Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-05-27

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

  10. Quantifying the parameters of successful agricultural producers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaase, Gregory Herman

    2006-08-16

    The primary purpose of the study was to quantify the parameters of successful agricultural producers. Through the use of the Financial and Risk Management (FARM) Assistance database, this study evaluated economic measures ...

  11. A Study of Quantifier Phrases in Thai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deephuengton, Phawadee

    1992-01-01

    The structures of quantifier phrases in Thai are studied in the X -Syntax framework (Jackendoff 1977). Syntactic and Semantic arguments are provided to prove that this model remedies the deficiency of traditional and early ...

  12. Analysis of Emissions Calculators for a National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emissions Reductions (CEDER) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2008-07-18

    In August 2004, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued guidance on quantifying the air emissions benefits from electric sector energy efficiency and renewable energy. Because there was no clear best strategy, ...

  13. Analysis of Climate Policy Targets under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    Although policymaking in response to the climate change is essentially a challenge of risk management, most studies of the relation of emissions targets to desired climate outcomes are either deterministic or subject to a ...

  14. On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Measurements Worldwide -------- www.feat.biochem.du.edu Sajal S but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department(tons/day) RSD IM MOBILE5b #12;Implications · RSD method ideal for realistic on-road mobile source emissions

  15. Reducing GHG emissions in the United States' transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sujit [ORNL; Andress, David A [ORNL; Nguyen, Tien [U.S. DOE

    2011-01-01

    Reducing GHG emissions in the U.S. transportation sector requires both the use of highly efficient propulsion systems and low carbon fuels. This study compares reduction potentials that might be achieved in 2060 for several advanced options including biofuels, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV), assuming that technical and cost reduction targets are met and necessary fueling infrastructures are built. The study quantifies the extent of the reductions that can be achieved through increasing engine efficiency and transitioning to low-carbon fuels separately. Decarbonizing the fuels is essential for achieving large reductions in GHG emissions, and the study quantifies the reductions that can be achieved over a range of fuel carbon intensities. Although renewables will play a vital role, some combination of coal gasification with carbon capture and sequestration, and/or nuclear energy will likely be needed to enable very large reductions in carbon intensities for hydrogen and electricity. Biomass supply constraints do not allow major carbon emission reductions from biofuels alone; the value of biomass is that it can be combined with other solutions to help achieve significant results. Compared with gasoline, natural gas provides 20% reduction in GHG emissions in internal combustion engines and up to 50% reduction when used as a feedstock for producing hydrogen or electricity, making it a good transition fuel for electric propulsion drive trains. The material in this paper can be useful information to many other countries, including developing countries because of a common factor: the difficulty of finding sustainable, low-carbon, cost-competitive substitutes for petroleum fuels.

  16. November 18 PSERC Webinar: Quantifying and Mitigating the Impacts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    18 PSERC Webinar: Quantifying and Mitigating the Impacts of PV in Distribution Systems November 18 PSERC Webinar: Quantifying and Mitigating the Impacts of PV in Distribution...

  17. Inducing and Quantifying Forbidden Reactivity with Single Molecule...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inducing and Quantifying Forbidden Reactivity with Single Molecule Polymer Mechanochemistry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inducing and Quantifying Forbidden Reactivity...

  18. DISSERTATION QUANTIFYING SCALE RELATIONSHIPS IN SNOW DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    . To quantify this bias, or to properly design measurement schemes and model applications, the process scale (power law) scaling patterns over two distinct scale ranges, separated by a distinct break at the 15-40 m in wind redistribution processes from wind/vegetation interactions at small lags to wind

  19. Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution First author: Amir Givati The Hebrew January 2004 #12;ABSTRACT: Urban and industrial air pollution has been shown qualitatively to suppress. The evidence suggests that air pollution aerosols that are incorporated in orographic clouds slow down cloud

  20. Accelerator target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  1. Accelerator target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Koehler, Conrad (Miller Place, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  2. Target Chamber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:TakeSeptember 13,TaraTarget Chamber

  3. Development of a rapid global aircraft emissions estimation tool with uncertainty quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone, Nicholas W. (Nicholas William)

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft emissions impact the environment by changing the radiative balance of the atmosphere and impact human health by adversely affecting air quality. Many tools used to quantify aircraft emissions are not open source ...

  4. Quantifying Spatial Correlations of General Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ángel Rivas; Markus Müller

    2015-07-15

    Understanding the role of correlations in quantum systems is both a fundamental challenge as well as of high practical relevance for the control of multi-particle quantum systems. Whereas a lot of research has been devoted to study the various types of correlations that can be present in the states of quantum systems, in this work we introduce a general and rigorous method to quantify the amount of correlations in the dynamics of quantum systems. Using a resource-theoretical approach, we introduce a suitable quantifier and characterize the properties of correlated dynamics. Furthermore, we benchmark our method by applying it to the paradigmatic case of two atoms weakly coupled to the electromagnetic radiation field, and illustrate its potential use to detect and assess spatial noise correlations in quantum computing architectures.

  5. Engineering analysis of fugitive particulate matter emissions from cattle feedyards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamm, Lee Bradford

    2006-04-12

    cattle feedyard are due to two sources: unpaved roads (vehicle traffic) and pen surfaces (cattle activity). Objective 2 of this research was to quantify the mass fraction of the concentration measurements that was due to unpaved road emissions (vehicle...

  6. Quantification of Variability and Uncertainty in Hourly NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    1 Quantification of Variability and Uncertainty in Hourly NOx Emissions from Coal-Fired Power to quantify variability and uncertainty for NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants. Data for hourly NOx Uncertainty, Variability, Emission Factors, Coal-Fired Power Plants, NOx emissions, Regression Models

  7. Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone depleting substances., Reader, M. C. and Jonsson, A. I. (2010) Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone depleting substances and greenhouse gases. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10. pp. 8803

  8. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept V. Graves Target Studies EVO April 11, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 11 Apr 2012 Target Vessel;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 11 Apr 2012 Starting Point

  9. Quantifying truncation errors in effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Furnstahl; N. Klco; D. R. Phillips; S. Wesolowski

    2015-06-03

    Bayesian procedures designed to quantify truncation errors in perturbative calculations of quantum chromodynamics observables are adapted to expansions in effective field theory (EFT). In the Bayesian approach, such truncation errors are derived from degree-of-belief (DOB) intervals for EFT predictions. Computation of these intervals requires specification of prior probability distributions ("priors") for the expansion coefficients. By encoding expectations about the naturalness of these coefficients, this framework provides a statistical interpretation of the standard EFT procedure where truncation errors are estimated using the order-by-order convergence of the expansion. It also permits exploration of the ways in which such error bars are, and are not, sensitive to assumptions about EFT-coefficient naturalness. We first demonstrate the calculation of Bayesian probability distributions for the EFT truncation error in some representative examples, and then focus on the application of chiral EFT to neutron-proton scattering. Epelbaum, Krebs, and Mei{\\ss}ner recently articulated explicit rules for estimating truncation errors in such EFT calculations of few-nucleon-system properties. We find that their basic procedure emerges generically from one class of naturalness priors considered, and that all such priors result in consistent quantitative predictions for 68% DOB intervals. We then explore several methods by which the convergence properties of the EFT for a set of observables may be used to check the statistical consistency of the EFT expansion parameter.

  10. Monitoring emissions: Instrumentation aims for total system commitment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, T.C.

    1994-06-01

    This article examines different approaches to meeting the reporting requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments, particularly instrumentation needed to monitor emissions. Besides monitoring to meet CAA regulation, instrumentation today must also embrace analysis to measure air quality, including mass flow to quantify SO[sub 2] emissions, and data acquisition for regular reporting to EPA.

  11. Quantifying Sentiment and Influence in Blogspaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hui, Peter SY; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2010-07-25

    The weblog, or blog, has become a popular form of social media, through which authors can write posts, which can in turn generate feedback in the form of user comments. When considered in totality, a collection of blogs can thus be viewed as a sort of informal collection of mass sentiment and opinion. An obvious topic of interest might be to mine this collection to obtain some gauge of public sentiment over the wide variety of topics contained therein. However, the sheer size of the so-called blogosphere, combined with the fact that the subjects of posts can vary over a practically limitless number of topics poses some serious challenges when any meaningful analysis is attempted. Namely, the fact that largely anyone with access to the Internet can author their own blog, raises the serious issue of credibility— should some blogs be considered to be more influential than others, and consequently, when gauging sentiment with respect to a topic, should some blogs be weighted more heavily than others? In addition, as new posts and comments can be made on almost a constant basis, any blog analysis algorithm must be able to handle such updates efficiently. In this paper, we give a formalization of the blog model. We give formal methods of quantifying sentiment and influence with respect to a hierarchy of topics, with the specific aim of facilitating the computation of a per-topic, influence-weighted sentiment measure. Finally, as efficiency is a specific endgoal, we give upper bounds on the time required to update these values with new posts, showing that our analysis and algorithms are scalable.

  12. The Cost of Kyoto Protocol Targets: The Case of Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey.

    This paper applies the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model to analysis of the cost of the Kyoto Protocol targets, with a special focus on Japan. The analysis demonstrates the implications of the use ...

  13. Walljet Electrochemistry: Quantifying Molecular Transport through Metallopolymeric and Zirconium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walljet Electrochemistry: Quantifying Molecular Transport through Metallopolymeric and Zirconium electrochemistry to the study of molecular transport through model metallopolymeric films on indium tin oxide

  14. Microfluidic devices, systems, and methods for quantifying particles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    methods for quantifying particles using centrifugal force Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward microfluidic systems, apparatus, and methods for measuring a...

  15. Quantifying mass balance processes on the Southern Patagonia Icefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    distributed glacier mass balance for the Swiss Alps from re-al. : Quantifying mass balance processes on the SPI Glaciarand future surface mass balance of the Northern Patagonian

  16. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept Update V. Graves T. Lessard Target Studies EVO June 26, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 Review - Mercury Module Extraction #12;4 Managed by UT

  17. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept Update V. Graves Target Studies EVO June 12, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 12 June 2012 Review ­ IPAC #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 12 June 2012 Inner

  18. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concepts Updated 4/16/12 V. Graves Target Studies EVO April 11, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 16 Apr 2012 Target Vessel Requirements · Accurate jet placement · Jet/beam dump pool · Double containment of mercury

  19. Neutrino Factory Target Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Target Vessel Concept V. Graves Target Studies EVO May 1, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 1 May 2012 Review ­ Two Target Vessel Ideas · Solid-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Concept 1 May 2012 #12;4 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U

  20. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  1. Electrically charged targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Ronald K. (Livermore, CA); Hunt, Angus L. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  2. Ranking of Chemicals Measured in Emissions from R&D Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.

    2011-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of multidisciplinary laboratory research facilities for the U. S. Department of Energy and has sampled air chemical emissions from some of these facilities since 1998. The primary purpose of this sampling is to obtain data to compare estimated release fractions to those used for emissions estimates, verifying that methods used to determine compliance with air regulations and permits conservatively predict actual emissions. Sampling also identifies and quantifies emissions of air toxics to compare with compliance limits established by regulatory agencies. Hundreds of samples have been taken from four different buildings (325, 329, 331, and EMSL) over a 10-year time period. Results from initial sampling campaigns were evaluated and reported by Woodruff, Benar, and McCarthy (2000) who summarized the compliance approach used by PNNL and described sampling and analytical measurements for the first sampling campaigns. Conclusions reported in this paper were that none of the measurements of the target compounds exceeded an acceptable source impact level (ASIL) (Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 173-460) even using significant overestimation factors, and that an average release fraction calculated from the data provided reasonable validation of the factor used in compliance assessments. Subsequent analysis compared chemical signatures from the buildings (Ballinger, Duchsherer, and Metoyer 2008). Results from this analysis showed that stack emissions from three of the four buildings had relatively similar chemical signatures but the fourth building differed from the other three significantly using the developed metric. This paper presents additional analyses of the measured air chemical emissions to 1) rank the chemical compounds that present the greatest risk to a potential downstream receptor and 2) determine whether the sampling parameters and detection limits provided sufficient resolution to verify compliance at potential receptor locations. The ranking method includes chemical-specific parameters such as measured concentrations, detection limits, and regulatory limits plus building-specific parameters such as location, stack flow-rate, and distance to receptors.

  3. ANALYTICAL EMISSION MODELS FOR SIGNALISED ARTERIALS Bruce Hellinga, Mohammad Ali Khan, and Liping Fu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinga, Bruce

    ANALYTICAL EMISSION MODELS FOR SIGNALISED ARTERIALS Bruce Hellinga, Mohammad Ali Khan, and Liping for quantifying vehicle tailpipe emissions. In this paper we present non-linear regression models that can be used for emission data is examined using field data. The proposed models have adjusted R 2 values ranging from 0

  4. The polarized emissivity of a wind-roughened sea surface: A Monte Carlo model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theiler, James

    The polarized emissivity of a wind-roughened sea surface: A Monte Carlo model Bradley G. Henderson-infrared emissivity of a wind-roughened sea surface. The model includes the effects of both shadowing and the reflected component of surface emission. By using Stokes vectors to quantify the radiation along a given ray

  5. Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    the spatial extent of the wake behind large offshore wind farms. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, LtdQuantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps: Study Area the North Sea C. B National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Offshore wind resources are quantified from satellite synthetic

  6. Quantifying the Objective Cost of Uncertainty in Complex Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Byung-Jun

    in translational genomics. Index Terms Mean objective cost of uncertainty (MOCU), objective-based uncertaintyQuantifying the Objective Cost of Uncertainty in Complex Dynamical Systems Byung-Jun Yoon, Senior quantifies the uncertainty in a given system based on the expected increase of the operational cost

  7. Quantifying Maintenance Requirements From the Steady-State Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Quantifying Maintenance Requirements From the Steady-State Operation of a Two-Phase Partitioning remarkably through achievement of steady-state operation. The data conclusively show that maintenance and explicitly quantifying the maintenance energy requirements of pure cultures growing on volatile organic

  8. Probabilistic Detection of Mobile Targets in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    , a surveillance system can be realized via fusion of data aggregated from various sensor modalities: infrared, CCD of detection can be quantified by evaluating the probability of detection by at least k sensors, where kProbabilistic Detection of Mobile Targets in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks Loukas Lazos Network

  9. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  10. Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-31

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a 10 year DOE sponsored heavy-duty truck engine program, hereafter referred to as the NZ-50 program. This program was split into two major phases. The first phase was called â??Near-Zero Emission at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency,â?ť and was completed in 2007. The second phase was initiated in 2006, and this phase was named â??Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems to Enable High-Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engines.â?ť This phase was completed in September, 2010. The key objectives of the NZ-50 program for this first phase were to: â?˘ Quantify thermal efficiency degradation associated with reduction of engine-out NOx emissions to the 2007 regulated level of ~1.1 g/hp-hr. â?˘ Implement an integrated analytical/experimental development plan for improving subsystem and component capabilities in support of emerging engine technologies for emissions and thermal efficiency goals of the program. â?˘ Test prototype subsystem hardware featuring technology enhancements and demonstrate effective application on a multi-cylinder, production feasible heavy-duty engine test-bed. â?˘ Optimize subsystem components and engine controls (calibration) to demonstrate thermal efficiency that is in compliance with the DOE 2005 Joule milestone, meaning greater than 45% thermal efficiency at 2007 emission levels. â?˘ Develop technology roadmap for meeting emission regulations of 2010 and beyond while mitigating the associated degradation in engine fuel consumption. Ultimately, develop technical prime-path for meeting the overall goal of the NZ-50 program, i.e., 50% thermal efficiency at 2010 regulated emissions. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the NZ-50 program. The most noteworthy achievements in this program are summarized as follows: â?˘ Demonstrated technologies through advanced integrated experiments and analysis to achieve the technical objectives of the NZ-50 program with 50.2% equivalent thermal efficiency under EPA 2010 emissions regulations. â?˘ Experimentally demonstrate brake efficiency of 48.5% at EPA 2010 emission level at single steady-state point. â?˘ Analytically demonstrated additional brake efficiency benefits using advanced aftertreatment configuration concept and air system enhancement including, but not limited to, turbo-compound, variable valve actuator system, and new cylinder head redesign, thus helping to achieve the final program goals. â?˘ Experimentally demonstrated EPA 2010 emissions over FTP cycles using advanced integrated engine and aftertreatment system. These aggressive thermal efficiency and emissions results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. It used integrated analytical and experimental tools for subsystem component optimization encompassing advanced fuel injection system, increased EGR cooling capacity, combustion process optimization, and advanced aftertreatment technologies. Model based controls employing multiple input and output techniques enabled efficient integration of the various subsystems and ensured optimal performance of each system within the total engine package. . The key objective of the NZ-50 program for the second phase was to explore advancements in engine combustion systems using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) techniques to minimize cylinder-out emissions, targeting a 10% efficiency improvement. The most noteworthy achievements in this phase of the program are summarized as follows: â?˘ Experimentally and analytically evaluated numerous air system improvements related to the turbocharger and variable valve actuation. Some of the items tested proved to be very successful and modifications to the turbine discovered in this program have since been incorporated into production hardware. â?˘ The combustion system development continued with evaluation of various designs of the 2-step piston bowl. Significant improvemen

  11. First SNS Target Replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ) used to drain the mercury to a shielded storage tank is the only active element. · However, the process · A shielded "Target Service Bay" located downstream of the target-proton beam interaction monolith serves

  12. The impact of traffic emissions on atmospheric ozone and OH: results from QUANTIFY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    data set (32FT2000), www.mnp.nl/edgar/model/v32ft2000edgar/docv32ft2000, Joint Research Center, Institute for Environment and Sustainability (JRC-IES), Climate Change

  13. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  14. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; Xing, J.; Fu, K.; Fu, J. S.; Jang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Dong, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Wu, W. J.; Wang, J. D.; Hao, J. M.

    2015-01-30

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM???) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM??? concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM??? and its gaseous precursors on PM??? concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widely used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM??? and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM??? concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM??? to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM??? and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM??? to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.

  15. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; State Environmental Protection Key Lab. of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing; Xing, J.; Fu, K.; Fu, J. S.; Jang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Dong, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; et al

    2015-01-30

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM???) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM??? concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM??? and its gaseous precursors on PM??? concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widelymore »used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM??? and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM??? concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM??? to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM??? and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM??? to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.« less

  16. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, B. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Wang, S. X. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); State Environmental Protection Key Lab. of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing (China); Xing, J. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Fu, K. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Fu, J. S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Jang, C. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Zhu, Y. [South China Univ. of Technology (SCUT), Guangzhou (China); Dong, X. Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Gao, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wu, W. J. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Wang, J. D. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Hao, J. M. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); State Environmental Protection Key Lab. of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing (China)

    2015-01-01

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM???) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM??? concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM??? and its gaseous precursors on PM??? concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widely used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM??? and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM??? concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM??? to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM??? and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM??? to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.

  17. Quantifying Particle Coatings Using High-Precision Mass Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knudsen, Scott Michael

    We present a general method to quantify coatings on microparticle surfaces based on the additional mass. Particle buoyant mass is determined in a solution with a density that is nearly equivalent to that of the core particle, ...

  18. Quantifying internal friction in unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Quantifying internal friction in unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins with single reflects the "roughness" of the energy land- scape, plays an important role for proteins by modulating spectroscopy, and microfluidic mixing to determine the reconfiguration times of unfolded proteins

  19. Quantifying the causes of the global food commodity price crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, G; Rajagopal, D; Timilsina, G; Zilberman, D

    2014-01-01

    63 p. [17] Timmer C. Causes of high food prices. MandaluyongD. Quantifying the causes of the global food commodity priceCarter C, Rausser G, Smith A. Causes of the food price boom.

  20. Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources Anupama Kowli and George in the electricity industry. In particular, there is a new class of consumers, called demand response resources (DRRs

  1. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.; Anderson, S.

    2007-05-01

    This paper quantifies the mobile air-conditioning fuel consumption of the typical Indian vehicle, exploring potential fuel savings and emissions reductions these systems for the next generation of vehicles.

  2. Scale model seismicity: a detailed study of deformation localisation from laboratory acoustic emission data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Caroline C.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) can provide information relating to the internal state of a deforming rock sample during laboratory testing and have been utilised to quantify damage progression for time-dependent failure modeling. ...

  3. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  4. Ha Emission from the Magellanic Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Muller; Q. Parker

    2007-06-27

    We present here a preliminary report and commentary of recently processed observations of Ha emission towards the Magellanic Bridge. These data have been analysed in an attempt to quantify the extent to which the stellar population is capable of reshaping the local ISM. We find that the Ha emission regions are small, weak and sparsely distributed, consistent with a relatively quiescent and inactive ISM where radiative and collisional ionisation is inefficient and sporadic. This suggests that energetic processes at the small scale (i.e. ~tens of pc) do not dominate the energy balance within the ISM of the Bridge, which therefore hosts a pristine turbulent structure, otherwise inaccessible within our own Galaxy. We find Ha emission that is well correlated with detected 12CO(1-0) line emission (a proxy for molecular hydrogen), as well as other easily identified ring-like HI features.

  5. The UK government is currently committed to an economy-wide target of 80% reductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    decisions when purchasing a car. emissiOns taRgets The UK's main policy commitment with regards to transport emissions is currently its participation in a voluntary agreement between the European Union and car of reducing CO2 emissions to an average level of 140 g/km for all new passenger cars by 2009 and an average

  6. Investigation of heat release in the targets during irradiation by ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. D. Dalkarov; M. A. Negodaev; A. S. Rusetskii

    2015-07-31

    The DD-reaction is investigated and the heat emission off the targets during their irradiation with ion beams is studied at the HELIS ion accelerator at LPI. The heat emission is observed to be significantly higher in the case of irradiation of the Ti/TiO2:Dx-targets by a D+ beam, as compared to the H+ and Ne+ beams. Furthermore, it depends on the concentration of deuterium in the target and current density of the deuteron beam.

  7. Investigation of heat release in the targets during irradiation by ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalkarov, O D; Rusetskii, A S

    2015-01-01

    The DD-reaction is investigated and the heat emission off the targets during their irradiation with ion beams is studied at the HELIS ion accelerator at LPI. The heat emission is observed to be significantly higher in the case of irradiation of the Ti/TiO2:Dx-targets by a D+ beam, as compared to the H+ and Ne+ beams. Furthermore, it depends on the concentration of deuterium in the target and current density of the deuteron beam.

  8. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Climate Action Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    similar to the Land and Food Systems (LFS) Orchard Garden, 0.019 tons of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions an external source. This study attempts to quantify the GHG emissions from the transportation of the food Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral

  9. Quantify the energy and environmental benefits of implementing energy-efficiency measures in China’s iron and steel production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Ding; Chen, Wenying; Xu, Tengfang

    2015-08-21

    As one of the most energy-, emission- and pollution-intensive industries, iron and steel production is responsible for significant emissions of greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutants. Although many energy-efficiency measures have been proposed by the Chinese government to mitigate GHG emissions and to improve air quality, lacking full understanding of the costs and benefits has created barriers against implementing these measures widely. This paper sets out to advance the understanding by addressing the knowledge gap in costs, benefits, and cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures in iron and steel production. Specifically, we build a new evaluation framework to quantify energy benefits andmore »environmental benefits (i.e., CO2 emission reduction, air-pollutants emission reduction and water savings) associated with 36 energy-efficiency measures. Results show that inclusion of benefits from CO2 and air-pollutants emission reduction affects the cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures significantly, while impacts from water-savings benefits are moderate but notable when compared to the effects by considering energy benefits alone. The new information resulted from this study should be used to augment future programs and efforts in reducing energy use and environmental impacts associated with steel production.« less

  10. Quantify the energy and environmental benefits of implementing energy-efficiency measures in China’s iron and steel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Ding; Chen, Wenying; Xu, Tengfang

    2015-08-21

    As one of the most energy-, emission- and pollution-intensive industries, iron and steel production is responsible for significant emissions of greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutants. Although many energy-efficiency measures have been proposed by the Chinese government to mitigate GHG emissions and to improve air quality, lacking full understanding of the costs and benefits has created barriers against implementing these measures widely. This paper sets out to advance the understanding by addressing the knowledge gap in costs, benefits, and cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures in iron and steel production. Specifically, we build a new evaluation framework to quantify energy benefits and environmental benefits (i.e., CO2 emission reduction, air-pollutants emission reduction and water savings) associated with 36 energy-efficiency measures. Results show that inclusion of benefits from CO2 and air-pollutants emission reduction affects the cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures significantly, while impacts from water-savings benefits are moderate but notable when compared to the effects by considering energy benefits alone. The new information resulted from this study should be used to augment future programs and efforts in reducing energy use and environmental impacts associated with steel production.

  11. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC)particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source-receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source- receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although the HTP local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in the HTP, this contribution is extremely sensitive to changes in the local emissions. Lastly, we show that the annual mean radiative forcing (0.42 W m-2) due to BC in snow outweighs the BC dimming effect-0.3 W m-2)at the surface over the HTP, although the mean BC-in- snow forcing is likely overestimated. We find strong seasonal and sub -region variation with a peak value of 5W m-2 in the spring over Northwest Plateau. The annual mean dust-in-snow forcing is comparable to that of BC over the entire HTP but significantly larger than BC over the North east Plateau. Such a large forcing of BC in snow is sufficient to cause earlier snow melting and potentially contribute to the acceleration of glacier retreat

  12. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-01-07

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fatemore »of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about 10% to BC in the HTP, this contribution is extremely sensitive to local emission changes. Lastly, we show that the annual mean radiative forcing (0.42 W m-2) due to BC in snow outweighs the BC dimming effect (-0.3 W m-2) at the surface over the HTP. We also find strong seasonal and spatial variation with a peak value of 5 W m-2 in the spring over Northwest Plateau. Such a large forcing of BC in snow is sufficient to cause earlier snow melting and potentially contribute to the acceleration of glacier retreat.« less

  13. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-06-08

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source-tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate ofmore »BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation in the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on season and location in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer, when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in the Himalayas and central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to the northeast plateau in all seasons and southeast plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching the northwest plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in the HTP, this contribution is extremely sensitive to local emission changes. Lastly, we show that the annual mean radiative forcing (0.42 W m-2) due to BC in snow outweighs the BC dimming effect (-0.3 W m-2) at the surface over the HTP. We also find strong seasonal and spatial variation with a peak value of 5 W m-2 in the spring over the northwest plateau. Such a large forcing of BC in snow is sufficient to cause earlier snow melting and potentially contribute to the acceleration of glacier retreat.« less

  14. QUANTIFYING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND THE HEAT IT GENERATES Dana Longcope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longcope, Dana

    where magnetic reconnection heats the corona the heating rate will scale with this rate of reconnection the heating rate and the magnetic reconnection rate. (i.e. different exponents in relation [1]). The formQUANTIFYING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND THE HEAT IT GENERATES Dana Longcope Department of Physics

  15. Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI Quantifying Uncertainties Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    1 Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI Quantifying Uncertainties Associated with Reservoir Simulation Solutions, Inc. SPE 102492 #12;2 Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI SPE 102492 Outline Reservoir Simulation Uncertainty, Using Surrogate Reservoir Model #12;3 Shahab D. Mohaghegh, WVU, ISI SPE 102492 Sources

  16. The Un-Quantifiable Values of Conservation Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    The Un-Quantifiable Values of Conservation Lands Win Everham Marine and Ecological Sciences Florida there are no values that are not economic (i.e it's the economy stupid!) #12;An economist "knows the price inappropriate #12;An economist "knows the price of everything and the value of nothing" "there is more

  17. Quantifying Individual Potential Contributions of the Hybrid Sulfur Electrolyzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    Quantifying Individual Potential Contributions of the Hybrid Sulfur Electrolyzer John A. Staser for the hybrid sulfur electrolyzer is controlled mainly by water transport in the cell. Water is required electrolyzer performance and operation. Experimental The experimental setup was the same as that described

  18. Quantifying environmental adaptation of metabolic pathways in metagenomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Quantifying environmental adaptation of metabolic pathways in metagenomics Tara A. Gianoulisa,1 processes is not well under- stood. Thus, a major challenge is how the usage of particular pathways, somewhat simplified classes (e.g., terrestrial vs. marine), and searched for obvious metabolic differences

  19. Quantifying the Effects of Removing Permissions from Android Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hao

    Quantifying the Effects of Removing Permissions from Android Applications Kristen Kennedy, Eric Gustafson, Hao Chen University of California, Davis Abstract With the growing popularity of Android smart study found that approximately 26% of Android applications in Google Play can access personal data

  20. The scale invariant generator technique for quantifying anisotropic scale invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    The scale invariant generator technique for quantifying anisotropic scale invariance G.M. Lewisa, 1 invariant generator technique (SIG). The accuracy of the technique is tested using anisotropic multifractal characteristics. The scale invariant generator technique can pro®tably be applied to the scale invariant study

  1. RESEARCH Open Access Quantifying and understanding carbon storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESEARCH Open Access Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within: The carbon stored in vegetation varies across tropical landscapes due to a complex mix of climatic: We produce a map of carbon storage across the watershed of the Tanzanian Eastern Arc Mountains (33

  2. Quantifying the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    Quantifying the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines Stephen Rosea , Paulina Jaramilloa,1. Turbine tower buckling has been observed in typhoons, but no offshore wind turbines have yet been built be destroyed by hurricanes in an offshore wind farm. We apply this model to estimate the risk to offshore wind

  3. A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO QUANTIFYING AND IMPROVING THE AVAILABILITY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO QUANTIFYING AND IMPROVING THE AVAILABILITY OF INTERNET SERVICES. BY KIRAN and Improving the Availability of Internet Services. by Kiran Nagaraja Dissertation Director: Thu D. Nguyen are demanding higher availability from them. Yet, studies show that these services are achieving only 99 to 99

  4. On quantifying the space of uncertainty of stochastic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyland, Gary

    a formal measure of dissimilarity for generated realizations by adapting the Kantorovich metric to quantify the dissimilarity of different realizations, and to use this information for modeling reduction, Kantorovich distance. 1 Introduction Major sources of financial risk for mining projects include

  5. Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr Tobias Preis1 *, Helen Susannah Moat1 social science. To investigate user attention to the Hurricane Sandy disaster in 2012, we analyze data to Hurricane Sandy bears a striking correlation to the atmospheric pressure in the US state New Jersey during

  6. DOE: Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-31

    The report summarizes research to Quantify the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. This 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. Methods are described for valuation and planning of pumped storage and conventional hydropower. The project team conducted plant case studies, electric system modeling, market analysis, cost data gathering, and evaluations of operating strategies and constraints. Five other reports detailing these research results are available a project website, www.epri.com/hydrogrid. With increasing deployment of wind and solar renewable generation, many owners, operators, and developers of hydropower have recognized the opportunity to provide more flexibility and ancillary services to the electric grid. To quantify value of services, this study focused on the Western Electric Coordinating Council region. A security-constrained, unit commitment and economic dispatch model was used to quantify the role of hydropower for several future energy scenarios up to 2020. This hourly production simulation considered transmission requirements to deliver energy, including future expansion plans. Both energy and ancillary service values were considered. Addressing specifically the quantification of pumped storage value, no single value stream dominated predicted plant contributions in various energy futures. Modeling confirmed that service value depends greatly on location and on competition with other available grid support resources. In this summary, ten different value streams related to hydropower are described. These fell into three categories; operational improvements, new technologies, and electricity market opportunities. Of these ten, the study was able to quantify a monetary value in six by applying both present day and future scenarios for operating the electric grid. This study confirmed that hydropower resources across the United States contribute significantly to operation of the grid in terms of energy, capacity, and ancillary services. Many potential improvements to existing hydropower plants were found to be cost-effective. Pumped storage is the most likely form of large new hydro asset expansions in the U.S. however, justifying investments in new pumped storage plants remains very challenging with current electricity market economics. Even over a wide range of possible energy futures, up to 2020, no energy future was found to bring quantifiable revenues sufficient to cover estimated costs of plant construction. Value streams not quantified in this study may provide a different cost-benefit balance and an economic tipping point for hydro. Future studies are essential in the quest to quantify the full potential value. Additional research should consider the value of services provided by advanced storage hydropower and pumped storage at smaller time steps for integration of variable renewable resources, and should include all possible value streams such as capacity value and portfolio benefits i.e.; reducing cycling on traditional generation.

  7. Air Quality and Emissions Impacts of Heat Island Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by generating fewer emissions from electricity production. These benefits, however, are difficult quality planning process. If a model were available to accurately predict the decrease in temperature and detailed manner is important if heat island control strategies are to be viewed as "quantifiable

  8. Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory for the Denver Metropolitan Area Sajal S -legally correct but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department -quite precise Inventory -uncertainty can be estimated Travel Based Model Fuel

  9. Hydrodynamic instabilities in beryllium targets for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, S. A., E-mail: austinyi@lanl.gov; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Beryllium ablators offer higher ablation velocity, rate, and pressure than their carbon-based counterparts, with the potential to increase the probability of achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We present here a detailed hydrodynamic stability analysis of low (NIF Revision 6.1) and high adiabat NIF beryllium target designs. Our targets are optimized to fully utilize the advantages of beryllium in order to suppress the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. This results in an implosion that resists breakup of the capsule, and simultaneously minimizes the amount of ablator material mixed into the fuel. We quantify the improvement in stability of beryllium targets relative to plastic ones, and show that a low adiabat beryllium capsule can be at least as stable at the ablation front as a high adiabat plastic target.

  10. Fates of methane from different lake habitats: Connecting whole-lake budgets and CH4 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Fates of methane from different lake habitats: Connecting whole-lake budgets and CH4 emissions September 2007; revised 3 February 2008; accepted 28 February 2008; published 24 May 2008. [1] Methane (CH4 clear. We quantified internal cycling and methane emissions in three lakes during summer stratification

  11. COMPLEXITY & APPROXIMABILITY OF QUANTIFIED & STOCHASTIC CONSTRAINT SATISFACTION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. B. HUNT; M. V. MARATHE; R. E. STEARNS

    2001-06-01

    Let D be an arbitrary (not necessarily finite) nonempty set, let C be a finite set of constant symbols denoting arbitrary elements of D, and let S and T be an arbitrary finite set of finite-arity relations on D. We denote the problem of determining the satisfiability of finite conjunctions of relations in S applied to variables (to variables and symbols in C) by SAT(S) (by SATc(S).) Here, we study simultaneously the complexity of decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. We present simple yet general techniques to characterize simultaneously, the complexity or efficient approximability of a number of versions/variants of the problems SAT(S), Q-SAT(S), S-SAT(S),MAX-Q-SAT(S) etc., for many different such D,C,S,T. These versions/variants include decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. Our unified approach is based on the following two basic concepts: (i) strongly-local replacements/reductions and (ii) relational/algebraic representability. Some of the results extend the earlier results in [Pa85,LMP99,CF+93,CF+94] Our techniques and results reported here also provide significant steps towards obtaining dichotomy theorems, for a number of the problems above, including the problems MAX-Q-SAT(S), and MAX-S-SAT(S). The discovery of such dichotomy theorems, for unquantified formulas, has received significant recent attention in the literature [CF+93, CF+94, Cr95, KSW97]. Keywords: NP-hardness; Approximation Algorithms; PSPACE-hardness; Quantified and Stochastic Constraint Satisfaction Problems.

  12. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9...

  13. Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman and Annelne Decaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program the benefits of emissions trading in achieving the emission reduction targets implied by the Kyoto Protocol

  14. PROVO POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAM A study designed to show that cost-effective on-road emissions reductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    -road emissions reductions can be achieved with a targeted repair program. Prepared by University of Denver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Chemistry of CO and HC Emissions from Automobiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 B. Remote Sensing-road emissions monitor. It is capable of monitoring emissions at vehicle speeds between 2.5 and 150 mph in under

  15. COMPLEXITY&APPROXIMABILITY OF QUANTIFIED&STOCHASTIC CONSTRAINT SATISFACTION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, H. B.; Marathe, M. V.; Stearns, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    Let D be an arbitrary (not necessarily finite) nonempty set, let C be a finite set of constant symbols denoting arbitrary elements of D, and let S and T be an arbitrary finite set of finite-arity relations on D. We denote the problem of determining the satisfiability of finite conjunctions of relations in S applied to variables (to variables and symbols in C) by SAT(S) (by SATc(S).) Here, we study simultaneously the complexity of decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. We present simple yet general techniques to characterize simultaneously, the complexity or efficient approximability of a number of versions/variants of the problems SAT(S), Q-SAT(S), S-SAT(S),MAX-Q-SAT(S) etc., for many different such D,C ,S, T. These versions/variants include decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. Our unified approach is based on the following two basic concepts: (i) strongly-local replacements/reductions and (ii) relational/algebraic represent ability. Some of the results extend the earlier results in [Pa85,LMP99,CF+93,CF+94O]u r techniques and results reported here also provide significant steps towards obtaining dichotomy theorems, for a number of the problems above, including the problems MAX-&-SAT( S), and MAX-S-SAT(S). The discovery of such dichotomy theorems, for unquantified formulas, has received significant recent attention in the literature [CF+93,CF+94,Cr95,KSW97

  16. Quantifying the health impacts of future changes in temperature in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostro, Bart, E-mail: Bostro@Creal.cat [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, CA (United States) [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, CA (United States); Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Barcelona (Spain); Rauch, Stephen; Green, Shelley [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, CA (United States)] [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Background: Several epidemiological studies demonstrate associations between high summer temperatures and increased mortality. However, the quantitative implications of projected future increases in temperature have not been well characterized. Objective: This study quantifies the effects of projected future temperatures on both mortality and morbidity in California, including the potential effects of mitigation. Data and methods: We first estimated the association between temperature and mortality for populations close to weather stations throughout the state. These dose-response estimates for mortality were then combined with local measures of current and projected changes in population, and projected changes in temperature, using a baseline of average temperatures from 1961 to 1990, for the years 2025 and 2050. The latter were based on two greenhouse gas emissions scenarios (A2 and B1) developed for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In addition, we assessed the impacts of future adaptation through use of air conditioners. Several sensitivity analyses were conducted to determine the likely range of estimates. Results: These analyses indicate that for the high emissions scenario, the central estimate of annual premature mortality ranges from 2100 to 4300 for the year 2025 and from 6700 to 11,300 for 2050. The highest estimates are from the models that use age-specific dose-response functions, while the low estimates are from the models that adjust for ozone. Estimates using the low emissions scenario are roughly half of these estimates. Mitigation based on our estimates of the effects of 10% and 20% increase in air conditioner use would generate reductions of 16% and 33% in the years 2025 and 2050, respectively. Conclusion: Our estimates suggest significant public health impacts associated with future projected increases in temperature.

  17. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  18. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Janse, Daniel M. (Brookline, MA)

    2008-05-13

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  19. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuckolls, John H. (Livermore, CA); Thiessen, Albert R. (Livermore, CA); Dahlbacka, Glen H. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  20. Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regionalized Global Energy Scenarios Meeting Stringent Climate Targets ­ cost effective fuel in the energy system it is less costly to reduce CO2-emissions #12;Global energy system model #12;Global energy system model Optimisation #12;Global energy system model Optimisation Minimises the total cost under

  1. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews vehicle emission control highlighting representative studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art

  2. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  3. Diesel Emission Control Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications

  4. Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint slide deck was originally presented at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review by Paul Denholm and Mark Mehos of NREL on April 23, 2013. Entitled "Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage," the presenters seek to answer the question, "What is the addition of TES to a CSP plant actually worth?" Ultimately they conclude that CSP with TES can actually complement other variable generation sources including solar PV and act as an enabling technology to achieve higher overall penetration of renewable energy.

  5. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the...

  6. Solvent recovery targeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, B.S.; Barton, P.I.

    1999-02-01

    One of the environmental challenges faced by the pharmaceutical and specialty chemical industries is the widespread use of organic solvents. With a solvent-based chemistry, the solvent necessarily has to be separated from the product. Chemical species in waste-solvent streams typically form multicomponent azeotropic mixtures, and this often complicates separation and, hence, recovery of solvents. A design approach is presented whereby process modifications proposed by the engineer to reduce the formation of waste-solvent streams can be evaluated systematically. This approach, called solvent recovery targeting, exploits a recently developed algorithm for elucidating the separation alternatives achievable when applying batch distillation to homogeneous multicomponent mixtures. The approach places the composition of the waste-solvent mixture correctly in the relevant residue curve map and computes the maximum amount of pure material that can be recovered via batch distillation. Solvent recovery targeting is applied to two case studies derived from real industrial processes.

  7. Target | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd JumpJumpInformationTaosTarget

  8. Apparatus for forming targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woerner, Robert L. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  9. Risk-Quantified Decision-Making at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-15

    Surface soils in the 903 Pad Lip Area of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) were contaminated with {sup 239/240}Pu by site operations. To meet remediation goals, accurate definition of areas where {sup 239/240}Pu activity exceeded the threshold level of 50 pCi/g and those below 50- pCi/g needed definition. In addition, the confidence for remedial decisions needed to be quantified and displayed visually. Remedial objectives needed to achieve a 90 percent certainty that unremediated soils had less than a 10 percent chance of {sup 239/240}Pu activity exceeding 50-pCi/g. Removing areas where the chance of exceedance is greater than 10 percent creates a 90 percent confidence in the remedial effort results. To achieve the stipulated goals, the geostatistical approach of probability kriging (Myers 1997) was implemented. Lessons learnt: Geostatistical techniques provided a risk-quantified approach to remedial decision-making and provided visualizations of the excavation area. Error analysis demonstrated compliance and confirmed that more than sufficient soils were removed. Error analysis also illustrated that any soils above the threshold that were not removed would be of nominal activity. These quantitative approaches were useful from a regulatory, engineering, and stakeholder satisfaction perspective.

  10. NWEC Comments: Environmental Costs and Benefits 1 Methodology for Determining Quantifiable Environmental Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NWEC Comments: Environmental Costs and Benefits 1 Methodology for Determining Quantifiable Environmental Costs and Benefits Comments of the NW Energy Coalition October 31, 2014 Introduction: Applying (Council) to include a methodology for determining quantifiable environmental costs and benefits in its

  11. The potential of positron emission tomography for intratreatment dynamic lung tumor tracking: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jaewon [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yamamoto, Tokihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Mazin, Samuel R. [RefleXion Medical, Inc., Burlingame, California 94010 (United States)] [RefleXion Medical, Inc., Burlingame, California 94010 (United States); Graves, Edward E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate the potential and feasibility of positron emission tomography for dynamic lung tumor tracking during radiation treatment. The authors propose a center of mass (CoM) tumor tracking algorithm using gated-PET images combined with a respiratory monitor and investigate the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Methods: The proposed PET dynamic lung tumor tracking algorithm estimated the target position information through the CoM of the segmented target volume on gated PET images reconstructed from accumulated coincidence events. The information was continuously updated throughout a scan based on the assumption that real-time processing was supported (actual processing time at each frame ?10?s). External respiratory motion and list-mode PET data were acquired from a phantom programmed to move with measured respiratory traces (external respiratory motion and internal target motion) from human subjects, for which the ground truth target position was known as a function of time. The phantom was cylindrical with six hollow sphere targets (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm in diameter). The measured respiratory traces consisted of two sets: (1) 1D-measured motion from ten healthy volunteers and (2) 3D-measured motion from four lung cancer patients. The authors evaluated the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm by quantifying estimation errors (Euclidean distance) between the actual motion of targets (1D-motion and 3D-motion traces) and CoM trajectories estimated by the proposed algorithm as a function of time. Results: The time-averaged error of 1D-motion traces over all trajectories of all targets was 1.6 mm. The error trajectories decreased with time as coincidence events were accumulated. The overall error trajectory of 1D-motion traces converged to within 2 mm in approximately 90 s. As expected, more accurate results were obtained for larger targets. For example, for the 37 mm target, the average error over all 1D-motion traces was 1.1 mm; and for the 10 mm target, the average error over all 1D-motion traces was 2.8 mm. The overall time-averaged error of 3D-motion traces was 1.6 mm, which was comparable to that of the 1D-motion traces. There were small variations in the errors between the 3D-motion traces, although the motion trajectories were very different. The accuracy of the estimates was consistent for all targets except for the smallest. Conclusions: The authors developed an algorithm for dynamic lung tumor tracking using list-mode PET data and a respiratory motion signal, and demonstrated proof-of-principle for PET-guided lung tumor tracking. The overall tracking error in phantom studies is less than 2 mm.

  12. BP's Perspective on Emissions Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BP's Perspective on Emissions Trading Purdue Emissions Trading Workshop April 30, 2010 Mark - Government policies can create a carbon price via three primary mechanisms: - Emissions trading (BP's strong

  13. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRL -

  14. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRL - -

  15. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRL - -

  16. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRL - - -

  17. Flight Path Target 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory05 Target 1 Flight Path90L2

  18. Development of aircraft fuel burn modeling techniques with applications to global emissions modeling and assessment of the benefits of reduced vertical separation minimums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Tim (Tim Alan)

    2007-01-01

    Given the current level of concern over anthropogenic climate change and the role of commercial aviation in this process, the ability to adequately model and quantify fuel burn and emissions on a system wide scale is of ...

  19. Impacts of High Resolution Extreme Events on U.S. Energy Demand and CO{sub 2} Emissions in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2013-06-21

    Progress is reported in these areas: Validation of temperature and precipitation extremes; Time of emergence of severe heat stress in the United States; Quantifying the effects of temperature extremes on energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions.

  20. Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornhill, D. A.

    The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive ...

  1. SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER Acid Rock Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison County, Colorado of Mining-Related and Natural Acid Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison

  2. Target: Subpoena (2010-SE-2001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Subpoena for Information and Production of Documents to Target Corporation requesting information regarding the compliance of various torchieres Target has distributed in commerce in the U.S.

  3. Emissions Trading and Social Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    David  M.  Driesen,  Does  Emissions  Trading  Encourage  Jason  Coburn,  Emissions  Trading   and   Environmental  Szambelan,  U.S.  Emissions  Trading  Markets  for  SO 2  

  4. Quantifying chaotic dynamics from integrate-and-fire processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Pavlova, O. N.; Mohammad, Y. K.; Kurths, J.

    2015-01-15

    Characterizing chaotic dynamics from integrate-and-fire (IF) interspike intervals (ISIs) is relatively easy performed at high firing rates. When the firing rate is low, a correct estimation of Lyapunov exponents (LEs) describing dynamical features of complex oscillations reflected in the IF ISI sequences becomes more complicated. In this work we discuss peculiarities and limitations of quantifying chaotic dynamics from IF point processes. We consider main factors leading to underestimated LEs and demonstrate a way of improving numerical determining of LEs from IF ISI sequences. We show that estimations of the two largest LEs can be performed using around 400 mean periods of chaotic oscillations in the regime of phase-coherent chaos. Application to real data is discussed.

  5. Quantifying dynamical spillover in co-evolving multiplex networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Vikram S; Maoz, Zeev; D'Souza, Raissa M

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex networks (a system of multiple networks that have different types of links but share a common set of nodes) arise naturally in a wide spectrum of fields. Theoretical studies show that in such multiplex networks, correlated edge dynamics between the layers can have a profound effect on dynamical processes. However, how to extract the correlations from real-world systems is an outstanding challenge. Here we provide a null model based on Markov chains to quantify correlations in edge dynamics found in longitudinal data of multiplex networks. We use this approach on two different data sets: the network of trade and alliances between nation states, and the email and co-commit networks between developers of open source software. We establish the existence of "dynamical spillover" showing the correlated formation (or deletion) of edges of different types as the system evolves. The details of the dynamics over time provide insight into potential causal pathways.

  6. Quantifying the Impact of Unavailability in Cyber-Physical Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aissa, Anis Ben; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Federick T.; Mili, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system discussed in this work manages a distributed control network for the Tunisian Electric & Gas Utility. The network is dispersed over a large geographic area that monitors and controls the flow of electricity/gas from both remote and centralized locations. The availability of the SCADA system in this context is critical to ensuring the uninterrupted delivery of energy, including safety, security, continuity of operations and revenue. Such SCADA systems are the backbone of national critical cyber-physical infrastructures. Herein, we propose adapting the Mean Failure Cost (MFC) metric for quantifying the cost of unavailability. This new metric combines the classic availability formulation with MFC. The resulting metric, so-called Econometric Availability (EA), offers a computational basis to evaluate a system in terms of the gain/loss ($/hour of operation) that affects each stakeholder due to unavailability.

  7. The Local Dimension: a method to quantify the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash Sarkar; Somnath Bharadwaj

    2008-12-09

    It is now well accepted that the galaxies are distributed in filaments, sheets and clusters all of which form an interconnected network known as the Cosmic Web. It is a big challenge to quantify the shapes of the interconnected structural elements that form this network. Tools like the Minkowski functionals which use global properties, though well suited for an isolated object like a single sheet or filament, are not suited for an interconnected network of such objects. We consider the Local Dimension $D$, defined through $N(R)=A R^D$, where $N(R)$ is the galaxy number count within a sphere of comoving radius $R$ centered on a particular galaxy, as a tool to locally quantify the shape in the neigbourhood of different galaxies along the Cosmic Web. We expect $D \\sim 1,2$ and 3 for a galaxy located in a filament, sheet and cluster respectively. Using LCDM N-body simulations we find that it is possible to determine $D$ through a power law fit to $N(R)$ across the length-scales 2 to $10 {\\rm Mpc}$ for $\\sim 33 %$ of the galaxies. We have visually identified the filaments and sheets corresponding to many of the galaxies with $D \\sim 1$ and 2 respectively. In several other situations the structure responsible for the $D$ value could not be visually identified, either due to its being tenuous or due to other dominating structures in the vicinity. We also show that the global distribution of the $D$ values can be used to visualize and interpret how the different structural elements are woven into the Cosmic Web.

  8. Grid Expansion Planning for Carbon Emissions Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toole, Gasper L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-18

    There is a need to upgrade and expand electric power transmission and generation to meet specified renewable energy targets and simultaneously minimize construction cost and carbon emissions. Some challenges are: (1) Renewable energy sources have variable production capacity; (2) Deficiency of transmission capacity at desirable renewable generation locations; (3) Need to incorporate models of operations into planning studies; and (4) Prevent undesirable operational outcomes such as negative dispatch prices or curtailment of carbon neutral generation.

  9. Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

  10. Emissions-critical charge cooling using an organic rankine cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-07-15

    The disclosure provides a system including a Rankine power cycle cooling subsystem providing emissions-critical charge cooling of an input charge flow. The system includes a boiler fluidly coupled to the input charge flow, an energy conversion device fluidly coupled to the boiler, a condenser fluidly coupled to the energy conversion device, a pump fluidly coupled to the condenser and the boiler, an adjuster that adjusts at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle subsystem to change a temperature of the input charge exiting the boiler, and a sensor adapted to sense a temperature characteristic of the vaporized input charge. The system includes a controller that can determine a target temperature of the input charge sufficient to meet or exceed predetermined target emissions and cause the adjuster to adjust at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle to achieve the predetermined target emissions.

  11. Optical control of the emission direction of a quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, I. J.; Wasley, N. A.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Ramsay, A. J.; Thijssen, A. C. T.; Oulton, R.; Hugues, M.; CNRS-CRHEA, rue Bernard Grégory, 06560 Valbonne

    2013-12-09

    Using the helicity of a non-resonant excitation laser, control over the emission direction of an InAs/GaAs quantum dot is demonstrated. The quantum dot is located off-center in a crossed-waveguide structure, such that photons of opposite circular polarization are emitted into opposite waveguide directions. By preferentially exciting spin-polarized excitons, the direction of emission can therefore be controlled. The directional control is quantified by using the ratio of the intensity of the light coupled into the two waveguides, which reaches a maximum of ±35%.

  12. Target detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brusseau, Charles A. (Tijeras, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  13. PDFs for nuclear targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Kovarik

    2010-06-25

    Understanding nuclear effects in parton distribution functions (PDF) is an essential component needed to determine the strange and anti-strange quark contributions in the proton. In addition Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions (NPDF) are critically important for any collider experiment with nuclei (e.g. RHIC, ALICE). Here two next-to-leading order chi^2-analyses of NPDF are presented. The first uses neutral current charged-lepton Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan data for several nuclear targets and the second uses neutrino-nucleon DIS data. We compare the nuclear corrections factors (F_2^Fe/F_2^D) for the charged-lepton data with other results from the literature. In particular, we compare and contrast fits based upon the charged-lepton DIS data with those using neutrino-nucleon DIS data.

  14. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    carbon-intensive fossil fuel, increased by 4.8 percent. 2.8. Carbon dioxide emissions and carbon sequestration from nonfuel uses of energy inputs Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for...

  15. A Helium Gas-Scintillator Active Target for Photoreaction Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Al Jebali; J. R. M. Annand; J. -O. Adler; I. Akkurt; E. Buchanan; J. Brudvik; K. Fissum; S. Gardner; D. J. Hamilton; K. Hansen; L. Isaksson; K. Livingston; M. Lundin; J. C. McGeorge; I. J. D. MacGregor; R. MacRae; D. G. Middleton; A. J. H. Reiter; G. Rosner; B. Schröder; J. Sjögren; D. Sokhan; B. Strandberg

    2015-03-18

    A multi-cell He gas-scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 $\\mathrm{g/cm^{2}}$ at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of $\\mathrm{N}_{2}$ to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has good timing resolution and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in $^{4}\\mathrm{He}$, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response.

  16. Method of depositing a high-emissivity layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickersham, Charles E. (Columbus, OH); Foster, Ellis L. (Powell, OH)

    1983-01-01

    A method of depositing a high-emissivity layer on a substrate comprising RF sputter deposition of a carbide-containing target in an atmosphere of a hydrocarbon gas and a noble gas. As the carbide is deposited on the substrate the hydrocarbon gas decomposes to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon deposits on the target and substrate causing a carbide/carbon composition gradient to form on the substrate. At a sufficiently high partial pressure of hydrocarbon gas, a film of high-emissivity pure carbon will eventually form over the substrate.

  17. Planck and the local Universe: quantifying the tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Licia Verde; Pavlos Protopapas; Raul Jimenez

    2013-06-28

    We use the latest Planck constraints, and in particular constraints on the derived parameters (Hubble constant and age of the Universe) for the local universe and compare them with local measurements of the same quantities. We propose a way to quantify whether cosmological parameters constraints from two different experiments are in tension or not. Our statistic, T, is an evidence ratio and therefore can be interpreted with the widely used Jeffrey's scale. We find that in the framework of the LCDM model, the Planck inferred two dimensional, joint, posterior distribution for the Hubble constant and age of the Universe is in "strong" tension with the local measurements; the odds being ~ 1:50. We explore several possibilities for explaining this tension and examine the consequences both in terms of unknown errors and deviations from the LCDM model. In some one-parameter LCDM model extensions, tension is reduced whereas in other extensions, tension is instead increased. In particular, small total neutrino masses are favored and a total neutrino mass above 0.15 eV makes the tension "highly significant" (odds ~ 1:150). A consequence of accepting this interpretation of the tension is that the degenerate neutrino hierarchy is highly disfavoured by cosmological data and the direct hierarchy is slightly favored over the inverse.

  18. Quantifying Stochastic Effects in Biochemical Reaction Networks using Partitioned Leaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard A. Harris; Aaron M. Piccirilli; Emily R. Majusiak; Paulette Clancy

    2009-07-06

    "Leaping" methods show great promise for significantly accelerating stochastic simulations of complex biochemical reaction networks. However, few practical applications of leaping have appeared in the literature to date. Here, we address this issue using the "partitioned leaping algorithm" (PLA) [L.A. Harris and P. Clancy, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 144107 (2006)], a recently-introduced multiscale leaping approach. We use the PLA to investigate stochastic effects in two model biochemical reaction networks. The networks that we consider are simple enough so as to be accessible to our intuition but sufficiently complex so as to be generally representative of real biological systems. We demonstrate how the PLA allows us to quantify subtle effects of stochasticity in these systems that would be difficult to ascertain otherwise as well as not-so-subtle behaviors that would strain commonly-used "exact" stochastic methods. We also illustrate bottlenecks that can hinder the approach and exemplify and discuss possible strategies for overcoming them. Overall, our aim is to aid and motivate future applications of leaping by providing stark illustrations of the benefits of the method while at the same time elucidating obstacles that are often encountered in practice.

  19. Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loree, T.R.; Bigio, I.J.; Zuclich, J.A.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Strobl, K.

    1999-04-13

    A method is disclosed for quantifying optical properties of the human lens. The present invention includes the application of fiberoptic, OMA-based instrumentation as an in vivo diagnostic tool for the human ocular lens. Rapid, noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the optical characteristics of a lens using very modest levels of exciting light are described. Typically, the backscatter and fluorescence spectra (from about 300- to 900-nm) elicited by each of several exciting wavelengths (from about 300- to 600-nm) are collected within a few seconds. The resulting optical signature of individual lenses is then used to assess the overall optical quality of the lens by comparing the results with a database of similar measurements obtained from a reference set of normal human lenses having various ages. Several metrics have been identified which gauge the optical quality of a given lens relative to the norm for the subject`s chronological age. These metrics may also serve to document accelerated optical aging and/or as early indicators of cataract or other disease processes. 8 figs.

  20. Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loree, deceased, Thomas R. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Bigio, Irving J. (Los Alamos, NM); Zuclich, Joseph A. (San Antonio, TX); Shimada, Tsutomu (Los Alamos, NM); Strobl, Karlheinz (Fiskdale, MA)

    1999-01-01

    Method for quantifying optical properties of the human lens. The present invention includes the application of fiberoptic, OMA-based instrumentation as an in vivo diagnostic tool for the human ocular lens. Rapid, noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the optical characteristics of a lens using very modest levels of exciting light are described. Typically, the backscatter and fluorescence spectra (from about 300- to 900-nm) elicited by each of several exciting wavelengths (from about 300- to 600-nm) are collected within a few seconds. The resulting optical signature of individual lenses is then used to assess the overall optical quality of the lens by comparing the results with a database of similar measurements obtained from a reference set of normal human lenses having various ages. Several metrics have been identified which gauge the optical quality of a given lens relative to the norm for the subject's chronological age. These metrics may also serve to document accelerated optical aging and/or as early indicators of cataract or other disease processes.

  1. Determination of usage patterns and emissions for propane/LPG in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine California usage patterns of Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG), and to estimate propane emissions resulting from LPG transfer operations statewide, and by county and air basin. The study is the first attempt to quantify LPG transfer emissions for California. This was accomplished by analyzing data from a telephone survey of California businesses that use LPG, by extracting information from existing databases.

  2. Quantifying the seasonal and interannual variability of North American isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the formaldehyde column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde over North Americasatellites: Application to formaldehyde retrievals from theNorth America using formaldehyde column observations from

  3. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  4. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  5. Analysis ? Targeting Zero Net Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis - Targeting Zero Net Energy 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Scott Horowitz, scott.horowitz@nrel.gov NREL Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 2010 Planned...

  6. Synergy between Pollution and Carbon Emissions Control: Comparing China and the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Kyung-Min

    We estimate the potential synergy between pollution and climate control in the U.S. and China, summarizing the results as emissions cross-elasticities of control. We set a range of NOx and SO2 targets, and record the ...

  7. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and general technology approaches for heavy- and light-duty vehicle emissions control - filter technology, new catalysts, NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters

  8. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  9. Modeling Traffic Flow Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappiello, Alessandra

    2002-09-17

    The main topic of this thesis is the development of light-duty vehicle dynamic emission models and their integration with dynamic traffic models. Combined, these models

  10. Biological Air Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol,...

  11. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  12. Quantifying intra- and inter-fractional motion in breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Scott; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Owen, Rebecca; Ramsay, Jonathan

    2015-03-15

    The magnitude of intra- and inter-fractional variation in the set up of breast cancer patients treated with tangential megavoltage photon beams was investigated using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Daily cine-EPID images were captured during delivery of the tangential fields for ten breast cancer patients treated in the supine position. Measurements collected from each image included the central lung distance (CLD), central flash distance (CFD), superior axial measurement (SAM) and the inferior axial measurement (IAM). The variation of motion within a fraction (intra-fraction) and the variation between fractions (inter-fraction) was analysed to quantify set up variation and motion due to respiration. Altogether 3775 EPID images were collected from 10 patients. The effect of respiratory motion during treatment was <0.1 cm standard deviation (SD) in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. The inter-fraction movement caused by variations in daily set up was larger at 0.28 cm SD in the AP direction. Superior–inferior (SI) variation was more difficult to summarise and proved unreliable as the measurements were taken to an ambiguous point on the images. It was difficult to discern true SI movement from that implicated by AP movement. There is minimal intra-fractional chest wall motion due to respiration during treatment. Inter-fractional variation was larger, however, on average it remained within departmental tolerance (0.5 cm) for set up variations. This review of our current breast technique provides confidence in the feasibility of utilising advanced treatment techniques (field-in-field, intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) following a review of the current imaging protocol.

  13. New Directions: GEIA’s 2020 Vision for Better Air Emissions Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, G. J.; Middleton, Paulette; Tarrason, Leonor; Granier, Claire; Guenther, Alex B.; Cardenas, B.; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Keating, Terry; Klimont, Z.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Liousse, Catherine; Nickovic, S.; Ohara, Toshimasa; Schultz, Martin; Skiba, Ute; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We are witnessing a crucial change in how we quantify and understand emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants, with an increasing demand for science-based transparent emissions information produced by robust community efforts. Today’s scientific capabilities, with near-real-time in-situ and remote sensing observations combined with forward and inverse models and a better understanding of the controlling processes, are contributing to this transformation and providing new approaches to derive, verify, and forecast emissions (Tong et al., 2011; Frost et al., 2012) and to quantify their impacts on the environment (e.g., Bond et al., 2013). At the same time, the needs for emissions information and the demands for their accuracy and consistency have grown. Changing economies, demographics, agricultural practices, and energy sources, along with mandates to evaluate emissions mitigation efforts, demonstrate compliance with legislation, and verify treaties, are leading to new challenges in emissions understanding. To quote NOAA Senior Technical Scientist David Fahey, "We are in the Century of Accountability. Emissions information is critical not only for environmental science and decision-making, but also as an instrument of foreign policy and international diplomacy." Emissions quantification represents a key step in explaining observed variability and trends in atmospheric composition and in attributing these observed changes to their causes. Accurate emissions data are necessary to identify feasible controls that reduce adverse impacts associated with air quality and climate and to track the success of implemented policies. To progress further, the international community must improve the understanding of drivers and contributing factors to emissions, and it must strengthen connections among and within different scientific disciplines that characterize our environment and entities that protect the environment and influence further emissions. The Global Emissions InitiAtive, GEIA (http://www.geiacenter.org/), is a center for emissions information exchange and competence building created in 1990 in response to the need for high quality global emissions data (Graedel et al., 1993). While the past two decades have seen considerable progress in developing, improving and assessing emission estimates, emissions continue to be a major contributor to overall uncertainty in atmospheric model simulations. Moving forward, GEIA aims to help build emissions knowledge in a rapidly evolving society by: 1) enhancing understanding, quantification, and analysis of emissions processes; 2) improving access to emissions information; and 3) strengthening the community of emissions groups involved in research, assessment, operations, regulation and policy.

  14. Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-04-01

    Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

  15. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  16. QUANTIFYING PHOTOVOLTAIC FIRE DANGER REDUCTION WITH ARC-FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUANTIFYING PHOTOVOLTAIC FIRE DANGER REDUCTION WITH ARC-FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTERS Kenneth M, shock hazards, and cause system downtime in photovoltaic (PV) systems. The 2011 National Electrical Code

  17. Memory in microbes: quantifying history-Dependent behavior in a bacterium.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Denise M.

    2010-01-01

    Memory in Microbes: Quantifying History-Dependent Behaviorboth the persistence of memory in microbes and the amount ofan evolutionary advantage in microbes as well. For instance,

  18. Memory in Microbes: Quantifying History-Dependent Behavior in a Bacterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Denise M.

    2009-01-01

    Memory in Microbes: Quantifying History-Dependent Behaviorboth the persistence of memory in microbes and the amount ofan evolutionary advantage in microbes as well. For instance,

  19. Target Selection for the LBTI Exozodi Key Science Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Alycia J; Kennedy, Grant M; Roberge, Aki; Defrčre, Denis; Hinz, Philip M; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Rieke, George; Bailey, Vanessa P; Danchi, William C; Haniff, Chris; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Skemer, Andrew J; Stapelfeldt, Karl R; Wyatt, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer will survey nearby stars for faint emission arising from ~300 K dust (exozodiacal dust), and aims to determine the exozodiacal dust luminosity function. HOSTS results will enable planning for future space telescopes aimed at direct spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets, as well as greater understanding of the evolution of exozodiacal disks and planetary systems. We lay out here the considerations that lead to the final HOSTS target list. Our target selection strategy maximizes the ability of the survey to constrain the exozodi luminosity function by selecting a combination of stars selected for suitability as targets of future missions and as sensitive exozodi probes. With a survey of approximately 50 stars, we show that HOSTS can enable an understanding of the statistical distribution of warm dust around various types of stars and is robust to the effects of varying levels ...

  20. Target R & D LBNE Collaboration Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    are not planning on having an integrated target / horn 1 · Will of course change if appropriate · The R&D effort Hall utilities) David Hickson (Target Hall utilities) Pat Hurh (Target technical components Tariq (Target pile, remote handling) Karl Williams (Target Hall utilities) Tim Wyman (Target Hall

  1. Targeted Specular Photons Michelle Laprade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montréal, Université de

    Targeted Specular Photons Michelle Laprade Département d'Informatique et de Recherche in the resulting image which are not captured using traditional photon map- ping algorithms. This method uses a separate group of photons ­ targeted specular photons ­ which are shot specifically towards

  2. On-Road Emissions of Motor Vehicles in Brazil: Current Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Emissions of Motor Vehicles in Brazil: Current Status and Future Possibilities of Denver 2101 E. Wesley Ave. Denver, CO 80208 #12;#12;On-road system Motorcycle system #12;#12;RSD measures pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department -quite precise

  3. NWCF Evaporator Tank System 2001 Offgas Emissions Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, R.D.; Lamb, K.M.; Matejka, L.A.; Nenni, J.A.

    2002-02-27

    An offgas emissions inventory and liquid stream characterization of the Idaho New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Evaporator Tank System (ETS), formerly known as the High Level Liquid Waste Evaporator (HLLWE), has been completed. The emissions rates of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, multiple metals, particulate, and hydrochloric acid were measured in accordance with an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) and Test Plan that invoked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard sample collection and analysis procedures. Offgas samples were collected during the start up and at the end of evaporator batches when it was hypothesized the emissions would be at peak rates. Corresponding collection of samples from the evaporator feed overhead condensate, and bottoms was made at approximately the same time as the emissions inventory to support material balance determinations for the evaporator process. The data indicate that organic compound emissions are slightly higher at the beginning of the batch while metals emissions, including mercury, are slightly higher at the end of the evaporator batch. The maximum emissions concentrations are low for all constituents of primary concern. Mercury emissions were less than 5 ppbv, while the sum of HCl and Cl2 emissions was less than 1 ppmv. The sum of all organic emissions also was less than 1 ppmv. The estimated hazardous quotient (HQ) for the evaporator was 6.2e-6 as compared to 0.25 for the EPA target criteria. The cancer risk was 1.3e-10 compared to an EPA target of le-5.

  4. NWCF Evaporator Tank System 2001 Offgas Emissions Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, Richard Doin; Lamb, Kenneth Mitchel; Matejka, Leon Anthony; Nenni, Joseph A

    2002-02-01

    An offgas emissions inventory and liquid stream characterization of the Idaho New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Evaporator Tank System (ETS), formerly known as the High Level Liquid Waste Evaporator (HLLWE), has been completed. The emissions rates of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, multiple metals, particulate, and hydrochloric acid were measured in accordance with an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) and Test Plan that invoked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard sample collection and analysis procedures. Offgas samples were collected during the start up and at the end of evaporator batches when it was hypothesized the emissions would be at peak rates. Corresponding collection of samples from the evaporator feed overhead condensate, and bottoms was made at approximately the same time as the emissions inventory to support material balance determinations for the evaporator process. The data indicate that organic compound emissions are slightly higher at the beginning of the batch while metals emissions, including mercury, are slightly higher at the end of the evaporator batch. The maximum emissions concentrations are low for all constituents of primary concern. Mercury emissions were less than 5 ppbv, while the sum of HCl and Cl2 emissions was less than 1 ppmv. The sum of all organic emissions also was less than 1 ppmv. The estimated hazardous quotient (HQ) for the evaporator was 6.2e-6 as compared to 0.25 for the EPA target criteria. The cancer risk was 1.3e-10 compared to an EPA target of le-5.

  5. A TUTORIAL ON IGNITION AND GAIN FOR SMALL FUSION TARGETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, R. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 087545 (United States)

    2009-07-26

    Nuclear fusion was discovered experimentally in 1933-34 and other charged particle nuclear reactions were documented shortly thereafter. Work in earnest on the fusion ignition problem began with Edward Teller's group at Los Alamos during the war years. His group quantified all the important basic atomic and nuclear processes and summarized their interactions. A few years later, the success of the early theory developed at Los Alamos led to very successful thermonuclear weapons, but also to decades of unsuccessful attempts to harness fusion as an energy source of the future. The reasons for this history are many, but it seems appropriate to review some of the basics with the objective of identifying what is essential for success and what is not. This tutorial discusses only the conditions required for ignition in small fusion targets and how the target design impacts driver requirements. Generally speaking, the driver must meet the energy, power and power density requirements needed by the fusion target. The most relevant parameters for ignition of the fusion fuel are the minimum temperature and areal density (rhoR), but these parameters set secondary conditions that must be achieved, namely an implosion velocity, target size and pressure, which are interrelated. Despite the apparent simplicity of inertial fusion targets, there is not a single mode of fusion ignition, and the necessary combination of minimum temperature and areal density depends on the mode of ignition. However, by providing a magnetic field of sufficient strength, the conditions needed for fusion ignition can be drastically altered. Magnetized target fusion potentially opens up a vast parameter space between the extremes of magnetic and inertial fusion.

  6. Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines Nanoparticle Emissions from Internal Combustion Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  7. Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

  8. Design Life Level: Quantifying risk in a changing climate Holger Rootzen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    Design Life Level: Quantifying risk in a changing climate Holger Rootzen1 and Richard W. Katz2 of return levels and return periods have been standard and important tools for engineering design. However, whether local or global. In this paper, we propose a refined concept, Design Life Level, which quantifies

  9. Numerical simulations of radon as an in situ partitioning tracer for quantifying NAPL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    Numerical simulations of radon as an in situ partitioning tracer for quantifying NAPL contamination­pull partitioning tracer tests using radon-222 to quantify non- aqueous phase liquid contamination. J. Contam. Hydrol. 58, 129­146] of push­pull tests using radon as a naturally occurring partitioning tracer

  10. Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems with Variable Resources Electric Energy System #12;#12;Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems benefits correspond to a real-world power system, as we use actual data on demand-response and wind

  11. Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

  12. Contraction & Convergence: UK carbon emissions and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    the EU's emissions trading scheme will do little to mitigate carbon emissions 4) Aviation growth must emissions. Keywords Contraction & Convergence; aviation; emissions trading; passengers; carbon dioxide #12

  13. Inhalation of Vehicle Emissions in Urban Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Julian David

    2005-01-01

    distances between vehicles, and emissions from neighboringgasoline on motor vehicle emissions. 2. 6 Volatile organicgasoline on motor vehicle emissions. 1. Mass emission rates.

  14. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA)

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  15. Performance targets for electric vehicle batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Michael Tse-Gene

    2015-01-01

    Light-duty vehicle transportation accounted for 17.2% of US greenhouse gas emissions in 2012 [95]. An important strategy for reducing CO? emissions emitted by light-duty vehicles is to reduce per-mile CO? emissions. While ...

  16. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    non-marketed natural gas. g Includes methane emissions related to energy, agriculture, waste management, and industrial processes. h Includes nitrous oxide emissions related...

  17. EPA Emissions | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EPA Emissions ORNL research informs new EPA emissions standards July 11, 2014 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a streamlined method for determining vehicle...

  18. Progress in diesel engine emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khair, M.K. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States))

    1992-07-01

    A considerable amount of work was carried out in the mid-1980s to develop heavy-duty diesel engines that could meet limits on particulate emissions. These limits, although high by today's standards, were considered very restrictive. Some manufacturers struggled to achieve the 0.6 g/bhp-h particulate matter limit with enough margin for production variabilities and to account for the deterioration factor. Significant progress was achieved in diesel emissions control through engine and fuel system design changes. This eventually made it possible to meet a particulate level of 0.25 g/bhp-h for 1991. The next target level for particulate emissions is 0.1 g/bhp-h for the 1994 heavy-duty engine. To meet the challenge, engine developers are not only considering engine and injection system design changes but also fuel improvements and exhaust aftertreatment. This paper includes a review of past and current strategies used to control emissions in the modern diesel engine.

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    ........................................................................................ 21 2.3.5 Pulp and paper industry Technologies and Measures in Pulp and Paper IndustryCARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES AND MEASURES IN US INDUSTRIAL SECTOR FINAL REPORT

  20. Gas Turbine Emissions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack...

  1. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  2. High Power Target Design and Operational Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of Energy SNS Target Systems and Status Update Target R&D Program Has Addressed Key Design and Operational-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy SNS Target Systems and Status Update Mercury target development activities.S. Department of Energy SNS Target Systems and Status Update · Peak energy deposition in Hg for a single pulse

  3. Targets for Multimegawatt Proton Beams %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%&'())0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , 2003 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Sketches of a 4-MW Target Station Kirk T. Mc and granular targets. · Liquid target studies. · Continuing R&D (including targets for linear colliders). Kirk accelerator neutrino beams, where targetry is a major challenge. Kirk T. McDonald Fermilab Long Range Planning

  4. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  5. Allocation of emission rights Economic incentives for emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allocation of emission rights Economic incentives for emission reductions of CO2 in developing of Physical Resource Theory #12;CO2 per capita emissions in 1999 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Population PercapitaCO2emissions(tonC/cap/yr) AFRICA CPA FAR EAST MEA OCEANIA WEU NAM FSU/ EEU WORLD AVERAGE LAM Department

  6. A HISTORY OF ON-ROAD EMISSIONS AND EMISSIONS DETERIORATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    emissions relative to the newer. · Why? IM240 is registration based, every old car is supposed to be testedA HISTORY OF ON-ROAD EMISSIONS AND EMISSIONS DETERIORATION www.feat.biochem.du.edu www of Denver 2101 E. Wesley Ave. Denver, CO 80208 303 871-2580.. FAX 2587 dstedman@du.edu #12;Emissions

  7. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Emission factors Shawn Urbanski Missoula Fire burning Greenhouse gases Emission factors a b s t r a c t While the vast majority of carbon emitted mixture of gases and aerosols. Primary emissions include sig- nificant amounts of CH4 and aerosol (organic

  8. Infrared laser induced plasma diagnostics of silver target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmat, L. Nadeem, Ali; Ahmed, I.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, the optical emission spectra of silver (Ag) plasma have been recorded and analyzed using the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. The emission line intensities and plasma parameters were investigated as a function of lens to sample distance, laser irradiance, and distance from the target surface. The electron number density (n{sub e}) and electron temperature (T{sub e}) were determined using the Stark broadened line profile and Boltzmann plot method, respectively. A gradual increase in the spectral line intensities and the plasma parameters, n{sub e} from 2.89?×?10{sup 17} to 3.92?×?10{sup 17?}cm{sup ?3} and T{sub e} from 4662 to 8967?K, was observed as the laser irradiance was increased 2.29?×?10{sup 10}–1.06?×?10{sup 11} W cm{sup ?2}. The spatial variations in n{sub e} and T{sub e} were investigated from 0 to 5.25?mm from the target surface, yielding the electron number density from 4.78?×?10{sup 17} to 1.72?×?10{sup 17?}cm{sup ?3} and electron temperature as 9869–3789?K. In addition, the emission intensities and the plasma parameters of silver were investigated by varying the ambient pressure from 0.36 to 1000 mbars.

  9. Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

  10. Improved modelling of helium and tritium production for spallation targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Leray; A. Boudard; J. Cugnon; J. C. David; A. Kelic-Heil; D. Mancusi; M. V. Ricciardi

    2009-12-11

    Reliable predictions of light charged particle production in spallation reactions are important to correctly assess gas production in spallation targets. In particular, the helium production yield is important for assessing damage in the window separating the accelerator vacuum from a spallation target, and tritium is a major contributor to the target radioactivity. Up to now, the models available in the MCNPX transport code, including the widely used default option Bertini-Dresner and the INCL4.2-ABLA combination of models, were not able to correctly predict light charged particle yields. The work done recently on both the intranuclear cascade model INCL4, in which cluster emission through a coalescence process has been introduced, and on the de-excitation model ABLA allows correcting these deficiencies. This paper shows that the coalescence emission plays an important role in the tritium and $^3He$ production and that the combination of the newly developed versions of the codes, INCL4.5-ABLA07, now lead to good predictions of both helium and tritium cross sections over a wide incident energy range. Comparisons with other available models are also presented.

  11. Targets and methods for target preparation for radionuclide production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhuikov, Boris L; Konyakhin, Nicolai A; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir M; Srivastava, Suresh C

    2012-10-16

    The invention relates to nuclear technology, and to irradiation targets and their preparation. One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for preparation of a target containing intermetallic composition of antimony Ti--Sb, Al--Sb, Cu--Sb, or Ni--Sb in order to produce radionuclides (e.g., tin-117 m) with a beam of accelerated particles. The intermetallic compounds of antimony can be welded by means of diffusion welding to a copper backing cooled during irradiation on the beam of accelerated particles. Another target can be encapsulated into a shell made of metallic niobium, stainless steel, nickel or titanium cooled outside by water during irradiation. Titanium shell can be plated outside by nickel to avoid interaction with the cooling water.

  12. Mileage efficiency and relative emission of automotive vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-01-01

    Physics dictates that cars with small mass will travel more miles per gallon (mpg) compared to massive trucks. Does this imply that small cars are more efficient machines? In this work a mileage efficiency metric is defined as a ratio of actual car mileage (mpg) to the mileage of an ideal car. This metric allows comparison of efficiencies of cars with different masses and fuel types. It is as useful to quantify efficiencies of cars as the concept of drag coefficient is to quantify the efficacy of their aerodynamic shapes. Maximum mileage and lowest CO2 emission of conventional gasoline cars, at different driving schedules, is reported based on the concept of an ideal car. This can help put government imposed standards in a rigorous context.

  13. On the impact of CO{sub 2} emission-trading on power generation emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappin, E.J.L.; Dijkema, G.P.J.

    2009-03-15

    In Europe one of the main policy instruments to meet the Kyoto reduction targets is CO{sub 2} emission-trading (CET), which was implemented as of January 2005. In this system, companies active in specific sectors must be in the possession of CO{sub 2} emission rights to an amount equal to their CO{sub 2} emission. In Europe, electricity generation accounts for one-third of CO{sub 2} emissions. Since the power generation sector has been liberalized, reregulated and privatized in the last decade, around Europe autonomous companies determine the sectors' CO{sub 2} emission. Short-term they adjust their operation, long-term they decide on (dis) investment in power generation facilities and technology selection. An agent-based model is presented to elucidate the effect of CET on the decisions of power companies in an oligopolistic market. Simulations over an extensive scenario-space show that there CET does have an impact. A long-term portfolio shift towards less-CO{sub 2} intensive power generation is observed. However, the effect of CET is relatively small and materializes late. The absolute emissions from power generation rise under most scenarios. This corresponds to the dominant character of current capacity expansion planned in the Netherlands (50%) and in Germany (68%), where companies have announced many new coal based power plants. Coal is the most CO{sub 2} intensive option available and it seems surprising that even after the introduction of CET these capacity expansion plans indicate a preference for coal. Apparently in power generation the economic effect of CO{sub 2} emission-trading is not sufficient to outweigh the economic incentives to choose for coal.

  14. Monotonic Target Assignment for Robotic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen L; Bullo, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Target assignment for robotic networks: Worst-case andTARGET ASSIGNMENT FOR ROBOTIC NETWORKS [6] H. W. Kuhn, “TheTarget Assignment for Robotic Networks Stephen L. Smith,

  15. Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics The Sun is a strong radio source (one of the first objects discusses incoher­ ent emission from thermal plasma in the non­flaring so­ lar atmosphere; other relevant material may be found in Coherent Plasma Emission and in Solar Flares: Radio Bursts. Emission mechanisms

  16. Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Emission Reduction Specialists

  17. Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohshita, Stephanie; Price, Lynn

    2011-03-21

    Experience with China's 20% energy intensity improvement target during the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (2006-2010) has shown the challenges of rapidly setting targets and implementing measures to meet them. For the 12th FYP (2011-2015), there is an urgent need for a more scientific methodology to allocate targets among the provinces and to track physical and economic indicators of energy and carbon saving progress. This report provides a sectoral methodology for allocating a national energy intensity target - expressed as percent change in energy per unit gross domestic product (GDP) - among China's provinces in the 12th FYP. Drawing on international experience - especially the European Union (EU) Triptych approach for allocating Kyoto carbon targets among EU member states - the methodology here makes important modifications to the EU approach to address an energy intensity rather than a CO{sub 2} emissions target, and for the wider variation in provincial energy and economic structure in China. The methodology combines top-down national target projections and bottom-up provincial and sectoral projections of energy and GDP to determine target allocation of energy intensity targets. Total primary energy consumption is separated into three end-use sectors - industrial, residential, and other energy. Sectoral indicators are used to differentiate the potential for energy saving among the provinces. This sectoral methodology is utilized to allocate provincial-level targets for a national target of 20% energy intensity improvement during the 12th FYP; the official target is determined by the National Development and Reform Commission. Energy and GDP projections used in the allocations were compared with other models, and several allocation scenarios were run to test sensitivity. The resulting allocations for the 12th FYP offer insight on past performance and offer somewhat different distributions of provincial targets compared to the 11th FYP. Recommendations for reporting and monitoring progress on the targets, and methodology improvements, are included.

  18. Transmission Line MTF: Magnetized Target Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transmission Line MTF: Magnetized Target Fusion Initial target: preheated & magnetized Subsequent for the FRC. Abstract Block Diagram theta coil transmission line Bias cap. bank maincapacitor inductor PI cap

  19. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 November 2014 Review of the...

  20. A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production Print Thursday, 02 February 2012 13:34 The sesquiterpene bisabolene was...

  1. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Kuraev; E. S. Kokoulina; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2015-03-07

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can be deviated in a magnetic field and detected. The collinear emission (along the beam direction) of a charged meson may be used to produce high energy (anti)neutron beams. This can be very useful to measure the difference of the cross sections of (anti)proton and (anti)neutron scattering from the target and may open the way for checking sum rules with antiparticles. Hard meson emission allows also to enhance the cross section when the energy loss from one of the incident particles lowers the total energy up to the mass of a resonance. The cross section can be calculated, on the basis of factorized formulas, where the probability of emission of the light mesons multiplies the cross section of the sub-process. Multiplicity distributions for neutral and charged meson production are also given.

  2. SU-D-18A-04: Quantifying the Ability of Tumor Tracking to Spare Normal Tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, A; Buzurovic, I; Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Lewis, J; Mishra, P; Seco, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumor tracking allows for smaller tissue volumes to be treated, potentially reducing normal tissue damage. However, tumor tracking is a more complex treatment and has little benefit in some scenarios. Here we quantify the benefit of tumor tracking for a range of patients by estimating the dose of radiation to organs at risk and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for both standard and tracking treatment plans. This comparison is performed using both patient 4DCT data and extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) digital phantoms. Methods: We use 4DCT data for 10 patients. Additionally, we generate digital phantoms with motion derived from measured patient long tumor trajectories to compare standard and tracking treatment plans. The standard treatment is based on the average intensity projection (AIP) of 4DCT images taken over a breath cycle. The tracking treatment is based on doses calculated on images representing the anatomy at each time point. It is assumed that there are no errors in tracking the target. The NTCP values are calculated based on RTOG guidelines. Results: The mean reduction in the mean dose delivered was 5.5% to the lungs (from 7.3 Gy to 6.9 Gy) and 4.0% to the heart (from 12.5 Gy to 12.0 Gy). The mean reduction in the max dose delivered was 13% to the spinal cord (from 27.6 Gy to 24.0 Gy), 2.5% to the carina (from 31.7 Gy to 30.9 Gy), and 15% to the esophagus (from 69.6 Gy to 58.9 Gy). The mean reduction in the probability of 2nd degree radiation pneumonitis (RP) was 8.7% (3.1% to 2.8%) and the mean reduction in the effective volume was 6.8% (10.8% to 10.2%). Conclusions: Tumor tracking has the potential to reduce irradiation of organs at risk, and consequentially reduce the normal tissue complication probability. The benefits vary based on the clinical scenario. This study is supported by Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  3. The development of a methodology to quantify the impacts of information management strategies on EPC projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreau, Karen Anne

    1997-01-01

    This research develops and demonstrates a methodology to quantify time and cost impacts on Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) projects resulting from information management driven process changes in design related activities. Many...

  4. Quantifying and managing the risk of information security breaches participants in a supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellefeuille, Cynthia Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Technical integration between companies can result in an increased risk of information security breaches. This thesis proposes a methodology for quantifying information security risk to a supply chain participant. Given a ...

  5. Identifying and quantifying nonconservative energy production/destruction terms in hydrostatic Boussinesq primitive equation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tailleux, Remi

    Identifying and quantifying nonconservative energy production/destruction terms in hydrostatic that physical inconsistencies between thermodynamics and dynamics usually introduce nonconservative production/destruction terms in the local total energy balance equation in numerical ocean general circulation models (OGCMs

  6. Quantifying Peptides in Isotopically Labeled Protease Digests by Ion Mobility/Time-of-Flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    Quantifying Peptides in Isotopically Labeled Protease Digests by Ion Mobility/Time-of-Flight Mass-terminus can be accomplished by digesting proteins in 18O-labeled water,11-20 resulting in incorpora- tion

  7. www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 8432011, Vol. 10 Quantifying Solute Transport at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singha, Kamini

    Critical Zone Observatory We collected and analyzed Br- breakthrough curve (BTC) data to identify quantify transport behavior within the SH-CZO. Abbreviations: ADE, advection­dispersion equation; BTC

  8. Quantifying Holocene lithospheric subsidence rates underneath the Mississippi Delta Shi-Yong Yu a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    Quantifying Holocene lithospheric subsidence rates underneath the Mississippi Delta Shi-Yong Yu: Mississippi Delta relative sea level glacial isostatic adjustment flexural subsidence Holocene The pattern), and lithospheric flexural subsidence associated with Mississippi Delta sediment loading remains unre- solved. Here

  9. Quantifying plasticity-independent creep compliance and relaxation of viscoelastoplastic materials under contact loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandamme, Matthieu

    Here we quantify the time-dependent mechanical properties of a linear viscoelastoplastic material under contact loading. For contact load relaxation, we showed that the relaxation modulus can be measured independently of ...

  10. Under consideration for publication in Math. Struct. in Comp. Science Quantifying Information Flow in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köpf, Boris

    Under consideration for publication in Math. Struct. in Comp. Science Quantifying Information Flow. 2 IMDEA Software Institute, Madrid, Spain. We provide a novel definition of quantitative information flow, called transmissible information, that is suitable for reasoning about informational

  11. Using satellite remote sensing to quantify woody cover and biomass across Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchard, Edward Thomas Alexander

    2012-06-25

    The goal of quantifying the woody cover and biomass of tropical savannas, woodlands and forests using satellite data is becoming increasingly important, but limitations in current scientific understanding reduce the ...

  12. ISSUES RELATED TO QUANTIFYING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF TRANSPORTATION STRATEGIES USING GPS DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinga, Bruce

    -gases, such as CO2, that contribute to global warming, and other tail-pipe emissions such as carbon monoxide, oxides-by-second speed and acceleration data collected via a GPS-equipped floating car. A kernel smoothing technique energy and emissions model is used to estimate fuel consumption and tail-pipe emissions on the basis

  13. Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Lyons

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

  14. Operational and policy implications of managing uncertainty in quality and emissions of multi-feedstock biodiesel systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gül?en, Ece

    2012-01-01

    As an alternative transportation fuel to petrodiesel, biodiesel has been widely promoted within national energy portfolio targets across the world. Early estimations of low lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of ...

  15. Target

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:TakeSeptember 13,Tara

  16. Controlled spontaneous emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae-Seung Lee; Mary A. Rohrdanz; A. K. Khitrin

    2007-07-03

    The problem of spontaneous emission is studied by a direct computer simulation of the dynamics of a combined system: atom + radiation field. The parameters of the discrete finite model, including up to 20k field oscillators, have been optimized by a comparison with the exact solution for the case when the oscillators have equidistant frequencies and equal coupling constants. Simulation of the effect of multi-pulse sequence of phase kicks and emission by a pair of atoms shows that both the frequency and the linewidth of the emitted spectrum could be controlled.

  17. Optimal irreversible stimulated emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D Valente; Y Li; J P Poizat; J M Gerard; L C Kwek; M F Santos; A Auffeves

    2012-08-28

    We studied the dynamics of an initially inverted atom in a semi-infinite waveguide, in the presence of a single propagating photon. We show that atomic relaxation is enhanced by a factor of 2, leading to maximal bunching in the output field. This optimal irreversible stimulated emission is a novel phenomenon that can be observed with state-of-the-art solid-state atoms and waveguides. When the atom interacts with two one-dimensional electromagnetic environments, the preferential emission in the stimulated field can be exploited to efficiently amplify a classical or a quantum state.

  18. Mercury Intense Target (MERIT) Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    requirement for the system to deliver a 20 m/s jet - Two hydraulic cylinders drive a Hg cylinder - Stainless with Airline Hydraulics Co. today!) (2) Target Delivery System - Consists of primary and secondary containments, unconstrained jet of Hg in 1-atmosphere of air, into 15 Tesla field (Vacuum Is Under Review) #12;8 OAK RIDGE

  19. Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM and Toxics Regulation in the South Coast Air Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Nancy J.

    1993-01-01

    Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM anda mar- ket-based emissions trading program called theimpacts cre- ated by emissions trading programs that affect

  20. Secondary emission gas chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. In'shakov; V. Kryshkin; V. Skvortsov

    2014-12-10

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  1. Graphene Coating Coupled Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

  2. An Emission Saved is an Emission Earned: An Empirical Study of Emission Banking for Light-Duty Vehicle Manufacturers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Jonathan D.; Kling, Catherine

    1993-01-01

    System for Light-Duty Vehicle Emission Control," Ph.D.the same number of vehicles and emissions in each category.estimates for vehicle emissions, unpublished manuscript,

  3. A Bottom up Approach to on-Road CO2 Emissions Estimates: Improved Spatial Accuracy and Applications for Regional Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    targets for power plants and other point sources, but California's also sets future fuel economy standards Supporting Information ABSTRACT: On-road transportation is responsible for 28% of all U.S. fossil- fuel CO2 emissions. Mapping vehicle emissions at regional scales is challenging due to data limitations. Existing

  4. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  5. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, James R. (Butler, PA); Del Vecchio, Robert M. (Vandergrift, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  6. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    consumption 13 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from nonfuel uses of energy fuels 14 U.S. carbon sequestration from nonfuel uses of energy fuels 15 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions:...

  7. Timelines for mitigating methane emissions from energy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Mandira; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01

    Energy technologies emitting differing proportions of methane and carbon dioxide vary in their relative climate impacts over time, due to the different atmospheric lifetimes of the two gases. Standard technology comparisons using the global warming potential (GWP) emissions equivalency metric do not reveal these dynamic impacts, and may not provide the information needed to assess technologies and emissions mitigation opportunities in the context of broader climate policy goals. Here we formulate a portfolio optimization model that incorporates changes in technology impacts as a radiative forcing (RF) stabilization target is approached. An optimal portfolio, maximizing allowed energy consumption while meeting the RF target, is obtained by year-wise minimization of the marginal RF impact in an intended stabilization year. The optimal portfolio calls for using certain higher methane-emitting technologies prior to an optimal switching year, followed by methane-light technologies as the stabilization year approac...

  8. Sharing a quota on cumulative carbon emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    redistribution by emissions trading) is the time for whichof offset such as emissions trading (see below). For thebefore any possible emissions trading, are plotted against

  9. Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

    2009-01-01

    Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

  10. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahl, Linnea

    2012-01-01

    470E-20Ě1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared by:Environmental Protection Agency, National Emission Standardsfor Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From

  11. Sesquiterpene emissions from vegetation: A review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duhl, AB

    2008-01-01

    The investigators plotted ?-Car emission data as function ofbelow which ?-Car emissions cannot occur. Temperature ex-e.g. , Helmig, 2006). ?-Car emissions from sunflower were

  12. Fuels, Engines & Emissions | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels, Engines, Emissions SHARE Fuels, Engines and Emissions Research Fuels, Engines, and Emissions research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is helping identify ways to increase...

  13. LIFE Target Fabrication Research Plan Sept 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S; Montesanti, R; Satcher, J; Spadaccini, C; Rose, K; Wang, M; Hamza, A; Alexander, N; Brown, L; Hund, J; Petzoldt, R; Sweet, W; Goodin, D

    2008-11-10

    The target-system for the baseline LIFE fast-ignition target was analyzed to establish a preliminary estimate for the costs and complexities involved in demonstrating the technologies needed to build a prototype LIFE plant. The baseline fast-ignition target upon which this analysis was developed is shown in Figure 1.0-1 below. The LIFE target-system incorporates requirements for low-cost, high throughput manufacture, high-speed, high accuracy injection of the target into the chamber, production of sufficient energy from implosion and recovery and recycle of the imploded target material residue. None of these functions has been demonstrated to date. Existing target fabrication techniques which lead to current 'hot spot' target costs of {approx}$100,000 per target and at a production rate of 2/day are unacceptable for the LIFE program. Fabrication techniques normally used for low-cost, low accuracy consumer products such as toys must be adapted to the high-accuracy LIFE target. This will be challenge. A research program resulting is the demonstration of the target-cycle technologies needed for a prototype LIFE reactor is expected to cost {approx}$51M over the course of 5 years. The effort will result in targets which will cost an estimated $0.23/target at a rep-rate of 20 Hz or about 1.73M targets/day.

  14. CSIRO AUSTRALIA Future Emissions and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CSIRO AUSTRALIA Future Emissions and Concentrations of Carbon Dioxide: Key Ocean Cataloguing­in­Publication Entry Enting, I.G. Future Emissions and Concentrations of Carbon Dioxide: Key Ocean Emissions and Concentrations of Carbon Dioxide: Key Ocean/Atmosphere/Land Analyses Written and edited by I

  15. Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakes, Terry

    range: 1-10 mm Gamma-Ray range: 10 mm - 8 positron annihilation #12;Positron Emission TomographyIntroduction to Positron Emission Tomography Positron Annihilation 180 o #1 #2 with your host detector #2 detector #1 #2 #1 detector ring #12;Positron Emission Tomography detector #2 detector #1 #2

  16. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dorsey, George F. (Farragut, TN); West, Brian H. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  17. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  18. Diesel hybridization and emissions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquier, M.; Monnet, G.

    2004-04-21

    The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.

  19. The development of high-performance alkali-hybrid polarized He3 targets for electron scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Jaideep T. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Technische Universitat Munchen, Exzellenzcluster Universe, Garching, Germany (Europe); Dolph, Peter A.M. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Tobias, William Al [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Averett, Todd D. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aiden [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Mooney, K. E. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Nelyubin, Vladimir V. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Wang, Yunxiao [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Zheng, Yuan [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Cates, Gordon D. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    We present the development of high-performance polarized łHe targets for use in electron scattering experiments that utilize the technique of alkali-hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping. We include data obtained during the characterization of 24 separate target cells, each of which was constructed while preparing for one of four experiments at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. The results presented here document dramatic improvement in the performance of polarized łHe targets, as well as the target properties and operating parameters that made those improvements possible. Included in our measurements were determinations of the so-called X-factors that quantify a temperature-dependent and as-yet poorly understood spin-relaxation mechanism that limits the maximum achievable łHe polarization to well under 100%. The presence of this spin-relaxation mechanism was clearly evident in our data. We also present results from a simulation of the alkali-hydrid spin-exchange optical pumping process that was developed to provide guidance in the design of these targets. Good agreement with actual performance was obtained by including details such as off-resonant optical pumping. Now benchmarked against experimental data, the simulation is useful for the design of future targets. Included in our results is a measurement of the K- łHe spin-exchange rate coefficient $k^\\mathrm{K}_\\mathrm{se} = \\left ( 7.46 \\pm 0.62 \\right )\\!\\times\\!10^{-20}\\ \\mathrm{cm^3/s}$ over the temperature range 503 K to 563 K.

  20. Diesel engine combustion and emissions from fuel to exhaust aftertreatment. SP-1113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    There are many dimensions involved in any study of Diesel Engine Emissions. These dimensions include: the fuel used, how the fuel is presented into the combustion chamber, how the air is presented into the combustion chamber, the actual process of combustion and emissions formation, the treatment of the emissions after combustion, and the test methods used to quantify the emissions. All of these dimensions are covered in this publication. The fuel topics include: plant oil based fuels and gas dissolved in fuel oil. The air delivery to the combustion chamber is effected by both port performance and geometry and ambient conditions and these topics are included. The thermodynamics of the combustion process and modeling are included in this publication. Aftertreatment is included with a paper on particulate filters. A correlation study using the ISO8178 testing method is also included. All nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  1. Analysis of Emission Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Danielewicz

    2007-07-03

    Shapes of relative emission sources can be accessed by expanding shapes of correlations at low relative velocities in pair center of mass in Cartesian harmonics. Coefficients of expansion for correlations are related to the respective coefficients of expansion for the sources through one dimensional integral transforms involving properties of pair relative wavefunctions. The methodology is illustrated with analyses of NA49 and PHENIX correlation data.

  2. Multivariate characterization of hydrogen Balmer emission in cataclysmic variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon E. Sarty; Kinwah Wu

    2006-08-18

    The ratios of hydrogen Balmer emission line intensities in cataclysmic variables are signatures of the physical processes that produce them. To quantify those signatures relative to classifications of cataclysmic variable types, we applied the multivariate statistical analysis methods of principal components analysis and discriminant function analysis to the spectroscopic emission data set of Williams (1983). The two analysis methods reveal two different sources of variation in the ratios of the emission lines. The source of variation seen in the principal components analysis was shown to be correlated with the binary orbital period. The source of variation seen in the discriminant function analysis was shown to be correlated with the equivalent width of the H$\\beta$ line. Comparison of the data scatterplot with scatterplots of theoretical models shows that Balmer line emission from T CrB systems is consistent with the photoionization of a surrounding nebula. Otherwise, models that we considered do not reproduce the wide range of Balmer decrements, including "inverted" decrements, seen in the data.

  3. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2004-01-01

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

  4. A new time quantifiable Monte Carlo method in simulating magnetization reversal process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Z. Cheng; M. B. A. Jalil; H. K. Lee; Y. Okabe

    2005-04-14

    We propose a new time quantifiable Monte Carlo (MC) method to simulate the thermally induced magnetization reversal for an isolated single domain particle system. The MC method involves the determination of density of states, and the use of Master equation for time evolution. We derive an analytical factor to convert MC steps into real time intervals. Unlike a previous time quantified MC method, our method is readily scalable to arbitrarily long time scales, and can be repeated for different temperatures with minimal computational effort. Based on the conversion factor, we are able to make a direct comparison between the results obtained from MC and Langevin dynamics methods, and find excellent agreement between them. An analytical formula for the magnetization reversal time is also derived, which agrees very well with both numerical Langevin and time-quantified MC results, over a large temperature range and for parallel and oblique easy axis orientations.

  5. Efficient Scheme of Experimental Quantifying non-Markovianity in High-Dimension Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. -J. Dong; B. -H. Liu; Y. -N. Sun; Y. -J. Han; G. -C. Guo; Lixin He

    2015-01-29

    The non-Markovianity is a prominent concept of the dynamics of the open quantum systems, which is of fundamental importance in quantum mechanics and quantum information. Despite of lots of efforts, the experimentally measuring of non-Markovianity of an open system is still limited to very small systems. Presently, it is still impossible to experimentally quantify the non-Markovianity of high dimension systems with the widely used Breuer-Laine-Piilo (BLP) trace distance measure. In this paper, we propose a method, combining experimental measurements and numerical calculations, that allow quantifying the non-Markovianity of a $N$ dimension system only scaled as $N^2$, successfully avoid the exponential scaling with the dimension of the open system in the current method. After the benchmark with a two-dimension open system, we demonstrate the method in quantifying the non-Markovanity of a high dimension open quantum random walk system.

  6. Quantifying the Comprehensive Greenhouse Gas Co-Benefits of Green Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mozingo, Louise; Arens, Ed

    2014-01-01

    gas,  to  the  per-­?square-­?foot  energy  consumption  emissions  per  square  foot  from  operational  energy  per  square  foot  of  office  building  as  operational  energy,  

  7. Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

    2008-08-13

    Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

  8. Effect of Environmental Factors on Sulfur Gas Emissions from Drywall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy

    2011-08-20

    Problem drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) investigation of problem drywall incorporates three parallel tracks: (1) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and reported health symptoms; (2) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and electrical and fire safety issues in affected homes; and (3) tracing the origin and the distribution of the drywall. To assess the potential impact on human health and to support testing for electrical and fire safety, the CPSC has initiated a series of laboratory tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The LBNL study consisted of two phases. In Phase 1 of this study, LBNL tested thirty drywall samples provided by CPSC and reported standard emission factors for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aldehydes, reactive sulfur gases (RSGs) and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). The standard emission factors were determined using small (10.75 liter) dynamic test chambers housed in a constant temperature environmental chamber. The tests were all run at 25 C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and with an area-specific ventilation rate of {approx}1.5 cubic meters per square meter of emitting surface per hour [m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/h]. The thirty samples that were tested in Phase 1 included seventeen that were manufactured in China in 2005, 2006 and 2009, and thirteen that were manufactured in North America in 2009. The measured emission factors for VOCs and aldehydes were generally low and did not differ significantly between the Chinese and North American drywall. Eight of the samples tested had elevated emissions of volatile sulfur-containing compounds with total RSG emission factors between 32 and 258 micrograms per square meter per hour [{micro}g/m{sup 2}/h]. The dominant sulfur containing compounds in the RSG emission stream were hydrogen sulfide with emission factors between 17-201 {micro}g/m{sup 2}/h, and sulfur dioxide with emission factors between 8-64 {micro}g/m{sup 2}/h. The four highest emitting samples also had a unique signature of VSC emissions including > 40 higher molecular weight sulfur-containing compounds although the emission rate for the VSCs was several orders of magnitude lower than that of the RSGs. All of the high emitting drywall samples were manufactured in China in 2005-2006. Results from Phase 1 provided baseline emission factors for drywall samples manufactured in China and in North America but the results exclude variations in environmental conditions that may exist in homes or other built structures, including various combinations of temperature, RH, ventilation rate and the influence of coatings such as texture and paints. The objective of Phase 2 was to quantify the effect of temperature and RH on the RSG emission factors for uncoated drywall, and to measure the effect of plaster and paint coatings on RSG emission factors from drywall. Additional experiments were also performed to assess the influence of ventilation rate on measured emission factors for drywall.

  9. Fossil shell emission in dying radio loud AGNs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kino, M; Kawakatu, N; Orienti, M; Nagai, H; Wajima, K; Itoh, R

    2015-01-01

    We investigate shell emission associated with dying radio loud AGNs. First, based on our recent work by Ito et al. (2015), we describe the dynamical and spectral evolutions of shells after stopping the jet energy injection. We find that the shell emission overwhelms that of the radio lobes soon after stopping the jet energy injection because fresh electrons are continuously supplied into the shell via the forward shock while the radio lobes rapidly fade out without jet energy injection. We find that such fossil shells can be a new class of target sources for SKA telescope. Next, we apply the model to the nearby radio source 3C84. Then, we find that the fossil shell emission in 3C84 is less luminous in radio band while it is bright in TeV gamma-ray band and it can be detectable by CTA.

  10. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  11. Small Molecule Target Identification using Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability (DARTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lomenick, Brett Eugene

    2013-01-01

    FIGURE 2.8: Resveratrol does not inhibitFIGURE 2.9: Resveratrol target analysis withFIGURE 2.10: Resveratrol target analysis with

  12. Review of the Renewable Energy Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Review of the Renewable Energy Target Response to Expert Panel's Call for Submissions Paper #12;NSW Government Submission to the Review of the Renewable Energy Target, May 2014 2/20 Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY IN NSW

  13. Targets and processes for fabricating same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowna, Thomas; Malekos, Steven; Korgan, Grant; Adams, Jesse; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; LeGalloudec, Nathalie

    2014-06-10

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

  14. Nanoparticles for targeting the infarcted heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvir, Tal

    We report a nanoparticulate system capable of targeting the heart after myocardial infarction (MI). Targeting is based on overexpression of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in the infarcted heart. Liposomes 142 nm in ...

  15. Solid Target Studies for NF Rob Edgecock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    . Proposed lubricant (coating): WS2 Demonstrated to work to ~1300oC in vacuum. #12;Target Change #12;Target Calculations and Optimisation. John 4. Chain Design Optimisation ­ roller chain or alternative. David Consult

  16. Targets and processes for fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowan, Thomas (Dresden, DE); Malekos, Steven (Reno, NV); Korgan, Grant (Reno, NV); Adams, Jesse (Reno, NV); Sentoku, Yasuhiko (Reno, NV); Le Galloudec, Nathalie (Reno, NV); Fuchs, Julien (Paris, FR)

    2012-07-24

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

  17. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations. ”ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions

  18. Enterprise Assessments, Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - November 2013 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Argonne National Laboratory - November 2014 Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project - December...

  19. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01

    line Automated monitoring and targeting systems Change in90%. Automated monitoring and targeting systems: Installingan automated monitoring and targeting system at a cold strip

  20. QUANTIFYING THE POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF ATMS ON AIR QUALITY Bruce Hellinga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinga, Bruce

    pollution. Currently, in the United States, motor vehicles release up to 90% of the carbon monoxide (CO); and more than 50% of the hazardous air pollutants [1]. Many of the air pollutants emitted by motor vehicles spatially and temporally correlated pollutant emissions on the basis of a drive mode elemental emissions sub

  1. Automatic Target Word Disambiguation Using Syntactic Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic Target Word Disambiguation Using Syntactic Relationships Ebony Domingo1 and Rachel Edita. Multiple target translations are due to several meanings of source words, and various target word equivalents depending on the context of the source word. Thus, an automated approach is presented

  2. Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    ARTICLES Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs Michael J. Keiser1,2 *, Vincent Setola3 drugs are intended to be selective, at least some bind to several physiological targets, explaining side effects and efficacy. Because many drug­target combinations exist, it would be useful to explore possible

  3. Drug-Target Interaction Predicates Combining Similarities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    Drug-Target Interaction Predicates DataSet Combining Similarities Collective Inference Collective Inference and Multi-Relational Learning for Drug­Target Interaction Prediction Shobeir Fakhraei1, Bert Huang1 and Lise Getoor1,2 Poly-pharmacology Drug Repurposing Drug-Target Interaction Network Studies

  4. QUANTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STORMWATER FROM A PARKING LOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 QUANTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STORMWATER FROM A PARKING LOT (VOCs) in stormwater from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g. gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important non-point sources of VOCs, with each being important

  5. Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean failure initiation, and (iii) the quantitative assessment of subaqueous slope stability. Three detailed stable under static loading conditions (factor of safety of 1.5­2) failed along planar sliding surfaces

  6. Quantifying the sensitivity of wind farm performance to array layout options using large-eddy simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the effects of array layout on the performance of offshore wind farms. Array layout is characterized on peri- odic boundary conditions. This code, named Simulator for Offshore/Onshore Wind Farm ApplicationsQuantifying the sensitivity of wind farm performance to array layout options using large

  7. Risk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    to generate 20% of its electricity from wind. Developers are actively planning offshore wind farms along the URisk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore Wind of Energy has estimated that over 50 GW of offshore wind power will be required for the United States

  8. Development of imaging methods to quantify the laminar microstructure in rat hearts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Kristen Kay

    2004-11-15

    can be investigated and its laminar structure can be quantified. Many of the techniques that have been used to view the microstructure of the heart require the use of toxic or caustic chemicals for fixation or staining. An efficient imaging method...

  9. A mathematical model quantifies proliferation and motility effects of TGF on cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinow, Peter

    A mathematical model quantifies proliferation and motility effects of TGF­ on cancer cells Peter et al. Motility and growth of cells #12;Collaborators Shizhen Wang, Nicole Bryce (Department) Peter Hinow et al. Motility and growth of cells #12;Overview of the talk Introduction to the biological

  10. Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas isotopes by groundwater (or oil) degassing. Other natural gas fields may have been produced in-situ or migrated as a free expert academics from across the CDT and also experienced oil and gas industry professionals

  11. Using CO2 spatial variability to quantify representation errors of satellite CO2 retrievals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalak, Anna M.

    global data of column- averaged CO2 dry-air mole fraction (XCO2) at high spatial resolutions. These dataUsing CO2 spatial variability to quantify representation errors of satellite CO2 retrievals A. A 2008; published 29 August 2008. [1] Satellite measurements of column-averaged CO2 dry- air mole

  12. Computational mechanics of molecular systems: Quantifying high-dimensional dynamics by distribution of Poincare recurrence times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerukh, Dmitry

    Computational mechanics of molecular systems: Quantifying high- dimensional dynamics computational mechanics as a bridge between deterministic chaos in nonlinear dynamical systems with few degrees-Hakodate, School of Systems Information Science, Department of Complex System, 116-2 Kamedanakano-cho, Hakodate

  13. QUANTIFYING RESIDENTIAL PV ECONOMICS IN THE US PAYBACK vs. CASH FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    QUANTIFYING RESIDENTIAL PV ECONOMICS IN THE US --- PAYBACK vs. CASH FLOW DETERMINATION OF FAIR by prospective PV owners. Contrasting this measure with another financial gauge -- life-cycle cash flow -- the paper discusses why payback may not be the most appropriate measure for residential PV applications

  14. SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY Thomas E power output variability from a fleet of photovoltaic (PV) systems, ranging from a single central station to a set of distributed PV systems. The approach demonstrates that the relative power output

  15. TECHNICAL ADVANCE A high-throughput method for quantifying growth of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dangl, Jeff

    : Arabidopsis, resistance genes, Pseudomonas syringae, phytopathogenic bacteria, counting bacteria IntroductionTECHNICAL ADVANCE A high-throughput method for quantifying growth of phytopathogenic bacteria; email: dangl@email.unc.edu) Summary Measuring the growth of pathogenic bacteria in leaves is a mainstay

  16. QUANTIFYING CROSS-WEAVE IMPACT ON CAPACITY REDUCTION FOR FREEWAY FACILITIES WITH MANAGED LANES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    raises concerns towards environmental impact and sustainable development of transportation5 systems. One With the increasing concerns towards environmental impacts and sustainability of roadway2 capacity expansionDRAFT QUANTIFYING CROSS-WEAVE IMPACT ON CAPACITY REDUCTION FOR FREEWAY FACILITIES WITH MANAGED

  17. Quantifying mountain block recharge by means of catchment-scale storage-discharge relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    Quantifying mountain block recharge by means of catchment-scale storage-discharge relationships the importance of mountainous catchments for providing freshwater resources, especially in semi-arid regions, little is known about key hydrological processes such as mountain block recharge (MBR). Here we implement

  18. Using design abstractions to visualize, quantify, and restructure Byung-Kyoo Kang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieman, James M.

    use intuition, rather than an objective set of criteria, to determine or recapture the design criteria for comparing alternative design structures. The process for visualizing and quantifying design. Objective criteria for evaluating design alternatives are needed. Many existing criteria are applicable

  19. Local observability of state variables and parameters in nonlinear modeling quantified by delay reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parlitz, Ulrich; Luther, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Features of the Jacobian matrix of the delay coordinates map are exploited for quantifying the robustness and reliability of state and parameter estimations for a given dynamical model using an observed time series. Relevant concepts of this approach are introduced and illustrated for discrete and continuous time systems employing a filtered H\\'enon map and a R\\"ossler system.

  20. Z .Chemical Geology 157 1999 219234 z /Quantifying the platinum group elements PGEs and gold in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z .Chemical Geology 157 1999 219­234 z /Quantifying the platinum group elements PGEs and gold in geological samples using cation exchange pretreatment and ultrasonic nebulization inductively coupled plasma Department of CiŐil Engineering and Geological Sciences, UniŐersity of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556

  1. Quantifying submarine groundwater discharge in the coastal zone via multiple methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review Quantifying submarine groundwater discharge in the coastal zone via multiple methods W Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Brazil m Department Geological Engineering, Hacettepe February 2006; received in revised form 1 May 2006; accepted 4 May 2006 Abstract Submarine groundwater

  2. Quantifying the effect of fuel reduction treatments on fire behavior in boreal forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    NOTE Quantifying the effect of fuel reduction treatments on fire behavior in boreal forests B direct measurement of fire intensity and forest floor consumption during a single prescribed burn Rédaction] Introduction Concerns about a growing wildland-urban interface and the potential for forest fires

  3. Quantifying stratospheric ozone response to changes in methane and nitrous oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourqui, Michel

    Quantifying stratospheric ozone response to changes in methane and nitrous oxide concentrations of Ozone destruction and creation at different altitudes and concentrations of CH4 and N2O #12;Contents levels have varying conditions and are governed by different chemical regimes We will simulate ozone

  4. Market dynamics immediately before and after financial shocks: Quantifying the Omori, productivity, and Bath laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Market dynamics immediately before and after financial shocks: Quantifying the Omori, productivity market shocks. We define the time of a market shock Tc to be the time for which the market volatility V" triggered by the "main shock" is quan- titatively similar to earthquakes and solar flares, which have been

  5. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals Mohsen and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high-resolution live cell

  6. Quantifying Desorption of Saturated Hydrocarbons from Silicon with Quantum Calculations and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seideman, Tamar

    Quantifying Desorption of Saturated Hydrocarbons from Silicon with Quantum Calculations hydrocarbon on silicon, desorption is observed at bias magnitudes as low as 2.5 V, albeit the desorption with conventional silicon microelectronic tech- nology [17­22]. A detailed understanding of both the electronic

  7. Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swarup, Samarth

    Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu a policy that encourages healthy behaviors (such as covering your cough and using hand sanitizers) at four coughs, minimizing contact with potential fomites) at major tourist locations. We use a synthetic

  8. Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind S.C. Pryor1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds S.C. Pryor1,2 , R, Bloomington, IN47405, USA. Tel: 1-812-855-5155. Fax: 1-812-855-1661 Email: spryor@indiana.edu 2 Dept. of Wind an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because in principle they also offer

  9. Quantifier-Elimination for the First-Order Theory of Boolean Algebras with Linear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revesz, Peter

    . In the case of atomic Boolean algebras of sets, this is a new generalization of Boole's well-known variableQuantifier-Elimination for the First-Order Theory of Boolean Algebras with Linear Cardinality of semi-algebraic or semi-linear sets, provide a natural description of data in many problems. What

  10. DEFINING AND QUANTIFYING FEEDBACKS IN EARTH'S CLIMATE SYSTEM Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEFINING AND QUANTIFYING FEEDBACKS IN EARTH'S CLIMATE SYSTEM Stephen E. Schwartz For presentation.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Feedbacks in Earth's climate system are increasingly being examined to identify processes of climate models to accurately represent the actual climate system and changes due to increases

  11. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: FROM GENOTYPES, MOLECULAR PHENOTYPES AND THE QUANTIFIED SELF, TOWARDS IMPROVED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Steven E.

    PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: FROM GENOTYPES, MOLECULAR PHENOTYPES AND THE QUANTIFIED SELF, TOWARDS IMPROVED MEDICINE JOEL T DUDLEY Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1425 Madison Ave., New York, NY are expanding the scope of personalized medicine beyond genotypes, providing new opportunities for developing

  12. Quantifying Location Privacy Leakage from Transaction Prices Arthur Gervais, Hubert Ritzdorf, Mario Lucic, Srdjan Capkun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Quantifying Location Privacy Leakage from Transaction Prices Arthur Gervais, Hubert Ritzdorf, Mario potential privacy risks that are difficult to foresee. In this paper we study the impact that the prices a small set of low-priced product prices from the consumers' purchase histories, an adversary can de

  13. Quantifying tsunami risk using SRTM digital elevation data and scenario earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilham, Roger

    Tsunami Tsunami Tsunami Tsunami Tsunami Quantifying tsunami risk submarine slides submarine slides suggest a history of great earthquakes #12;1m Chennai Tsunami run-up estimates from SRTM data for different tsunami maxima suggest that large tsunamis may leave a record in coastal swamps #12;3m Chennai

  14. Quantifying fluctuations in market liquidity: Analysis of the bid-ask spread Vasiliki Plerou,* Parameswaran Gopikrishnan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Quantifying fluctuations in market liquidity: Analysis of the bid-ask spread Vasiliki Plerou the statistical features of the bid-ask spread offers the possibility of understanding some aspects of market liquidity. Using quote data for the 116 most frequently traded stocks on the New York Stock Exchange over

  15. Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO Yale, CT 06520 USA; email: {saha, trifonov, shao}@cs.yale.edu. Permission to make digital/hard copy of all, Pages 1--51. #12; 2 · Bratin Saha et al. 1995; Crary et al. 1998] and makes several important new

  16. Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intensional Analysis of Quantified Types BRATIN SAHA, VALERY TRIFONOV, and ZHONG SHAO Yale, CT 06520 USA; email: {saha, trifonov, shao}@cs.yale.edu. Permission to make digital/hard copy of all, Pages 1­51. #12;2 · Bratin Saha et al. 1995; Crary et al. 1998] and makes several important new

  17. New conjunctive CubeSat and balloon measurements to quantify rapid energetic electron precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    New conjunctive CubeSat and balloon measurements to quantify rapid energetic electron precipitation precipitation into the atmosphere can contribute significant losses to the outer radiation belt. In particular, rapid narrow precipitation features termed precipitation bands have been hypothesized to be an integral

  18. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-00

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  19. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W. (Knoxville, TN); Whittaker, Jerry W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  20. PLUTONIUM-238 PRODUCTION TARGET DESIGN STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurt, Christopher J [ORNL; Wham, Robert M [ORNL; Hobbs, Randall W [ORNL; Owens, R Steven [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A new supply chain is planned for plutonium-238 using existing reactors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and existing chemical recovery facilities at ORNL. Validation and testing activities for new irradiation target designs have been conducted in three phases over a 2 year period to provide data for scale-up to production. Target design, qualification, target fabrication, and irradiation of fully-loaded targets have been accomplished. Data from post-irradiation examination (PIE) supports safety analysis and irradiation of future target designs.

  1. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  2. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  3. Terahertz-based target typing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Wanke, Michael Clement; Reno, John Louis; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Grine, Albert D.; Barrick, Todd A.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to create a THz component set and understanding to aid in the rapid analysis of transient events. This includes the development of fast, tunable, THz detectors, along with filter components for use with standard detectors and accompanying models to simulate detonation signatures. The signature effort was crucial in order to know the spectral range to target for detection. Our approach for frequency agile detection was to utilize plasmons in the channel of a specially designed field-effect transistor called the grating-gate detector. Grating-gate detectors exhibit narrow-linewidth, broad spectral tunability through application of a gate bias, and no angular dependence in their photoresponse. As such, if suitable sensitivity can be attained, they are viable candidates for Terahertz multi-spectral focal plane arrays.

  4. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathore, Dharmendar (Blacksburg, VA); Jani, Dewal (Blacksburg, VA); Nagarkatti, Rana (Blacksburg, VA)

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  5. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  6. Target Fabrication: A View from the Users

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrala, George A.; Balkey, Matthew M.; Barnes, Cris W.; Batha, Steven H.; Christensen, Cindy R.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James; Keiter, Paul; Lanier, Nicholas; Paisley, Dennis; Sorem, Michael; Swift, Damian; Workman, Jonathan

    2004-03-15

    Targets are used for a variety of purposes, but ultimately we use them to validate codes that help us predict and understand new phenomena or effects. The sophistication and complexity of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets has increased in to match the advances made in modeling complex phenomena. The targets have changed from simple hohlraums, spherical geometries, and planar foils, to 3-dimensional geometries that require precision in construction, alignment, and metrology. Furthermore, material properties, such as surface morphologies and volume texture, have significant impact on the behavior of the targets and must be measured and controlled. In the following we will discuss how experimental physicists view targets and the influence that target construction has on interpreting the experimental results. We review a representative sampling of targets fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that are used in different experiments in support of ICF and HEDP.

  7. TARGET FABRICATION: A VIEW FROM THE USERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrala, George A.; Balkey, Matthew M.; Batha, Steven H.; Barnes, Cris W.; Christensen, Cindy; Cobble, James; Fincke, James; Keiter, Paul; Lanier, Nicholas; Paisley, Dennis; Sorem, Michael S.; Swift, Damian; Workman, Jonathan

    2003-07-18

    Targets are used for a variety of purposes, but ultimately we use them to validate codes that help us predict and understand new phenomena or effects. The sophistication and complexity of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets has increased in time to match the advances made in modeling complex phenomena. The targets have changed from simple hohlraums, spherical geometries, and planar foils, to 3-dimensional geometries that require precision in construction, alignment, and metrology. Furthermore, material properties, such as surface morphologies and volume texture, have significant impact on the behavior of the targets and must be measured and controlled. In the following we will discuss how experimental physicists view targets and the influence that target construction has on interpreting the experimental results. We review a representative sampling of targets fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that are used in different experiments in support of ICF and HEDP.

  8. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  9. Effects of the dynamics of droplet-based laser-produced plasma on angular extreme ultraviolet emission profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giovannini, Andrea Z.; Abhari, Reza S.

    2014-05-12

    The emission distribution of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from droplet targets is dependent on the dynamics of the laser-produced plasma. The EUV emission is measured on a 2% bandwidth centered at 13.5?nm (in-band). The targets of the laser are small (sub-50 ?m) tin droplets, and the in-band emission distribution is measured for different laser irradiances and droplet sizes at various angular positions. Larger droplets lead to a faster decay of EUV emission at larger angles with respect to the laser axis. A decrease in laser irradiance has the opposite effect. The measurements are used together with an analytical model to estimate plume dynamics. Additionally, the model is used to estimate EUV emission distribution for a desired droplet diameter and laser irradiance.

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL- AND CNG-POWERED URBAN BUSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COROLLER, P; PLASSAT, G

    2003-08-24

    Couple years ago, ADEME engaged programs dedicated to the urban buses exhaust emissions studies. The measures associated with the reduction of atmospheric and noise pollution has particular importance in the sector of urban buses. In many cases, they illustrate the city's environmental image and contribute to reinforcing the attractiveness of public transport. France's fleet in service, presently put at about 14,000 units, consumes about 2 per cent of the total energy of city transport. It causes about 2 per cent of the HC emissions and from 4 to 6 per cent of the NOx emissions and particles. These vehicles typically have a long life span (about 15 years) and are relatively expensive to buy, about 150.000 euros per unit. Several technical solutions were evaluated to quantify, on a real condition cycle for buses, on one hand pollutants emissions, fuel consumption and on the other hand reliability, cost in real existing fleet. This paper presents main preliminary results on urban buses exhaust emission on two different cases: - existing Diesel buses, with fuel modifications (Diesel with low sulphur content), Diesel with water emulsion and bio-Diesel (30% oil ester in standard Diesel fuel); renovating CNG powered Euro II buses fleet, over representative driving cycles, set up by ADEME and partners. On these cycles, pollutants (regulated and unregulated) were measured as well as fuel consumption, at the beginning of a program and one year after to quantify reliability and increase/decrease of pollutants emissions. At the same time, some after-treatment technologies were tested under real conditions and several vehicles. Information such as fuel consumption, lubricant analysis, problem on the technology were following during a one year program. On the overall level, it is the combination of various action, pollution-reduction and renewal that will make it possible to meet the technological challenge of reducing emissions and fuel consumption by urban bus networks.

  11. Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

    2006-09-28

    Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

  12. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    or collectively). EMCON Methane Generation Model: A model for estimating the production of methane from municipal solid waste landfills. Emissions: Anthropogenic releases...

  13. Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost from Mobile Source Emission Reduction Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschein, Perry S.

    1995-01-01

    Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost From Mobilehave tested various emissions trading policies to supplementAn Analysis of EPA's Emissions Trading Program, 6 YALE J. ON

  14. Improved land cover and emission factors for modeling biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions from Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, DYC; Wong, P; Cheung, BKH; Guenther, A

    2010-01-01

    organic compounds emissions in Hong Kong. Atmosphericvolatile organic compounds emission inventory for Beijing.volatile organic compound emissions. Journal of Geophysical

  15. Biogenic emissions of isoprenoids and NO in China and comparison to anthropogenic emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tie, X; Li, G; Ying, Z; Guenther, A; Madronich, S

    2006-01-01

    hydrocarbons and biogenic emission fluxes in the Amazonincrease in pollutant emissions. For example, the energyEq. (1) to calculate the emission rates. Each component of

  16. The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    W. M. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:Physics The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment:A. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:

  17. A probabilistic production costing analysis of SO sub 2 emissions reduction strategies for Ohio: Emissions, cost, and employment tradeoffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heslin, J.S.; Hobbs, B.F. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1991-08-01

    A new approach for state- and utility-level analysis of the cost and regional economic impacts of strategies for reducing utility SO{sub 2} emissions is summarized and applied to Ohio. The methodology is based upon probabilistic production costing and economic input-output analysis. It is an improvement over previous approaches because it: accurately models random outages of generating units, must-run constraints on unit output, and the distribution of power demands; and runs quickly on a microcomputer and yet considers the entire range of potential control strategies from a systems perspective. The input-output analysis considers not only the economic effects of utility fuel use and capital investment, but also those of increased electric rates. Two distinct strategies are found to be most attractive for Ohio. The first, more flexible one, consists of emissions dispatching (ED) alone to meet short run emissions reduction targets. A 75 percent reduction can then be achieved by the turn of the century by combining ED and fuel switching (FS) with flue gas desulfurization, limestone injection multistage burners, and physical coal cleaning at selected plants. The second is a scrubber-based strategy which includes ED. By the year 2000, energy conservation becomes a cost effective component of these strategies. In order to minimize compliance costs, acid rain legislation which facilitates emissions trading and places regional tonnage limits on emissions is desirable.

  18. Measurement of emission diameter as a function of time on foam z- pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazier, S.E.; Barber, T.L. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Derzon, M.S.; Kellogg, J.W.

    1996-05-14

    We have developed a streaked imaging capability to make time-resolved measurements of the emission size for low density foam z-pinches. By lens coupling visible emission from the z-pinch target to an array of fiber optics we obtained the emission profile in the visible as a function of time with radial resolution of 300 {mu}m. To measure the emission at temperatures greater than {approx}40 eV the source was slit-imaged or pin-hole imaged onto an x-ray filtered scintillator. Non-uniformities in both visible and x-ray emission were observed. We describe the diagnostics, the image unfold process, and results from the instrument for both visible and x-ray measurements.

  19. Quantifying the climate impacts of albedo changes due to biofuel production: a comparison with biogeochemical effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caiazzo, Fabio

    Lifecycle analysis is a tool widely used to evaluate the climate impact of greenhouse gas emissions attributable to the production and use of biofuels. In this paper we employ an augmented lifecycle framework that includes ...

  20. Multiple metrics for quantifying the intensity of water consumption of energy production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, E. S.

    Discussion of the environmental implications of worldwide energy demand is currently dominated by the effects of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) emissions on global climate. At the regional scale, however, water resource ...

  1. Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Technical targets for fuel cell...

  2. Proposed SPAR Modeling Method for Quantifying Time Dependent Station Blackout Cut Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. Schroeder

    2010-06-01

    Abstract: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (USNRC’s) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models and industry risk models take similar approaches to analyzing the risk associated with loss of offsite power and station blackout (LOOP/SBO) events at nuclear reactor plants. In both SPAR models and industry models, core damage risk resulting from a LOOP/SBO event is analyzed using a combination of event trees and fault trees that produce cut sets that are, in turn, quantified to obtain a numerical estimate of the resulting core damage risk. A proposed SPAR method for quantifying the time-dependent cut sets is sometimes referred to as a convolution method. The SPAR method reflects assumptions about the timing of emergency diesel failures, the timing of subsequent attempts at emergency diesel repair, and the timing of core damage that may be different than those often used in industry models. This paper describes the proposed SPAR method.

  3. Post-Irradiation Examination of 237Np Targets for 238Pu Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Baldwin, Charles A [ORNL; Hobbs, Randy W [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is recovering the US 238Pu production capability and the first step in the process has been to evaluate the performance of a 237Np target cermet pellet encased in an aluminum clad. The process proceeded in 3 steps; the first step was to irradiate capsules of single pellets composed of NpO2 and aluminum power to examine their shrinkage and gas release. These pellets were formed by compressing sintered NpO2 and aluminum powder in a die at high pressure followed by sintering in a vacuum furnace. Three temperatures were chosen for sintering the solution precipitated NpO2 power used for pellet fabrication. The second step was to irradiate partial targets composed of 8 pellets in a semi-prototypical arrangement at the two best performing sintering temperatures to determine which temperature gave a pellet that performed the best under the actual planned irradiation conditions. The third step was to irradiate ~50 pellets in an actual target configuration at design irradiation conditions to assess pellet shrinkage and gas release, target heat transfer, and dimensional stability. The higher sintering temperature appeared to offer the best performance after one cycle of irradiation by having the least shrinkage, thus keeping the heat transfer gap between the pellets and clad small minimizing the pellet operating temperature. The final result of the testing was a target that can meet the initial production goals, satisfy the reactor safety requirements, and can be fabricated in production quantities. The current focus of the program is to verify that the target can be remotely dissembled, the pellets dissolved, and the 238Pu recovered. Tests are being conducted to examine these concerns and to compare results to code predictions. Once the performance of the full length targets has been quantified, the pellet 237Np loading will be revisited to determine if it can be increased to increase 238Pu production.

  4. Table of contents www.q2s.ntnu.no 1 Centre for Quantifiable Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nřrvĺg, Kjetil

    Table of contents www.q2s.ntnu.no 1 Q2S Centre for Quantifiable Quality of Service in Communication Systems AnnualReport2008 #12;www.q2s.ntnu.no Table of contents2 The sixth year of Q2S Telefax: +47 73 59 27 90 Email: secretary@q2s.ntnu.no Internet: www.q2s.ntnu.no Table of contents #12;3The

  5. Quantifying breakage parameters of fragile archaeological components to determine the feasibility of site burial 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushmore, Forest Paul

    1988-01-01

    burial is a viable option to consider once the site specifics are known and the breakage parameters of whole ceramic vessels are quantified. Through a review of aboriginal physical and cultural remains from mound sites, it can be empirically... ABORIGINAL MOUNDS Mound Location and Construction Burials 24 29 32 37 TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE 40 GENERAL SUMMARY OF MECHANICAL CONDITIONS . . . 55 PHYSICAL LAB TESTS Explanation of Experiments EXPERIMENTS...

  6. Quantifying CO2 removal by living walls: a case study of the Center for Design Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera, Eric

    2014-04-01

    20 | JOURNAL OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH Quantifying CO2 removal by living walls: a case study of the Center for Design Research Eric Rivera Q&A How did you become involved in doing research? I became interested in research through the Mc... to improve IAQ, located at the University of Kansas. This study investigated the effectiveness of the living wall in reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration levels indoors, as well as the impact the mechanical system has in reducing CO2 concentration...

  7. Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakes, Terry

    Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography with your host, Terry Oakes Positron Annihilation #1 neighboring atom Positron range: 1-10 mm Gamma-Ray range: 10 mm - 8 positron annihilation #2 #1 T.R.Oakes Univ. WI-Madison #12;Positron Emission Tomography detector #2 detector #1 #2 #1 detector ring T

  8. Liquid Hydrogen Target for the COMPASS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremer, J; Duday-Chanat, L; Geyer, R; Mallot, G K; Pirotte, O; Vullierme, B

    2014-01-01

    A liquid hydrogen target has been developed for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The target has a diameter of 40 mm and a length of 2.5 meter, creating an active volume of about 3 liter of liquid hydrogen. The cylindrical part of the target wall is formed by a Kapton® foil strip, wound and glued to a thickness of 0.125 mm. The Kapton® foil is used to minimize the energy loss of the particles, scattered or created within the target volume, crossing the target boundary. The two end-caps enclosing the target volume have been fabricated from Mylar®. The system is cooled with a 30 W at 20 K cryocooler, delivering the cooling capacity for the cool-down as well as for the continuous operation of the system.

  9. THERMAL OSCILLATIONS IN LIQUID HELIUM TARGETS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANG,L.; JIA,L.X.

    2001-07-16

    A liquid helium target for the high-energy physics was built and installed in the proton beam line at the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. The target flask has a liquid volume of 8.25 liters and is made of thin Mylar film. A G-M/J-T cryocooler of five-watts at 4.2K was used to produce liquid helium and refrigerate the target. A thermosyphon circuit for the target was connected to the J-T circuit by a liquid/gas separator. Because of the large heat load to the target and its long transfer lines, thermal oscillations were observed during the system tests. To eliminate the oscillation, a series of tests and analyses were carried out. This paper describes the phenomena and provides the understanding of the thermal oscillations in the target system.

  10. Tensor Target Polarization at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G

    2014-10-27

    The first measurements of tensor observables in $\\pi \\vec{d}$ scattering experiments were performed in the mid-80's at TRIUMF, and later at SIN/PSI. The full suite of tensor observables accessible in $\\pi \\vec{d}$ elastic scattering were measured: $T_{20}$, $T_{21}$, and $T_{22}$. The vector analyzing power $iT_{11}$ was also measured. These results led to a better understanding of the three-body theory used to describe this reaction. %Some measurements were also made in the absorption and breakup channels. A direct measurement of the target tensor polarization was also made independent of the usual NMR techniques by exploiting the (nearly) model-independent result for the tensor analyzing power at 90$^\\circ _{cm}$ in the $\\pi \\vec{d} \\rightarrow 2p$ reaction. This method was also used to check efforts to enhance the tensor polarization by RF burning of the NMR spectrum. A brief description of the methods developed to measure and analyze these experiments is provided.

  11. Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b , Peng Gong c t The level of air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago was quantified using a dry deposition model. The result showed that a total of 1675 kg of air pollutants was removed by 19.8 ha of green roofs in one year

  12. Emission Characteristics of the Projectile Fragments at Relativistic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. K. Singh; A. K. Soma; Ramji Pathak; V. Singh

    2011-08-01

    A projectile (84^Kr_36) having kinetic energy around 1 A GeV was used to expose NIKFI BR-2 emulsion target. A total of 700 inelastic events are used in the present studies on projectile fragments. The emission angle of the projectile fragments are strongly affected by charge of the other projectile fragments emitted at same time with different emission angle is observed. The angular distribution studies show symmetrical nature for lighter charge projectile fragments. The symmetrical nature decreased with the charge of projectile fragments. At ~4o of emission angle for double charge projectile fragments, the momentum transfer during interaction is similar for various target species of emulsion were observed. We also observed a small but significant amplitude peaks on both side of the big peak for almost all light charge projectile fragments having different delta angle values. It reflects that there are few percent of projectile fragments that are coming from the decay of heavy projectile fragments or any other process.

  13. Quantifying the role of the electronics industry in managing conflict minerals using printers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason S., S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    The electronics manufacturing industry has been experiencing a fast-changing landscape with recent legislations targeting the supply chains for the 3TG minerals: tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold mined from the Democratic ...

  14. A nonintrusive method of quantifying flow visualization data in vortex flow fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sei, Vincent Joseph

    1994-01-01

    drawbacks to employing video imaging was the introduction of false motion due to camera movement in flight. A relative motion approach using fixed targets along with the flow visualization scheme was utilized to remove unwanted motion. The relative motion...

  15. Role of non-fossil energy in meeting China's energy and climate target for 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Tong, Qing; Yu, Sha; Wang, Yu; Chai, Qimin; Zhang, Xiliang

    2012-12-01

    China is the largest energy consumer and CO2 emitter in the world. The Chinese government faces growing challenges of ensuring energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. To address these two issues, the Chinese government has announced two ambitious domestic indicative autonomous mitigation targets for 2020: increasing the ratio of non-fossil energy to 15% and reducing carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP by 40-45% from 2005 levels. To explore the role of non-fossil energy in achieving these two targets, this paper first provides an overview of current status of non-fossil energy development in China; then gives a brief review of GDP and primary energy consumption; next assesses in detail the role of the non fossil energy in 2020, including the installed capacity and electricity generation of non-fossil energy sources, the share and role of non-fossil energy in the electricity structure, emissions reduction resulting from the shift to non-fossil energy, and challenges for accomplishing the mitigation targets in 2020 ; finally, conclusions and policy measures for non-fossil energy development are proposed.

  16. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Sandia National Laboratories...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Security Administration sites that perform work at nuclear facilities and other high consequence hazards (e.g., chemical and biological). This targeted review area also...

  17. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review, Lawrence Livermore National...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Laboratory - February 2015 February 2015 Targeted Review of the Safety-Class Room Ventilation Systems and Associated Final Filtration Stages, and Review of Federal...

  18. Project Plan Remote Target Fabrication Refurbishment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Gary L; Taylor, Robin D

    2009-08-01

    In early FY2009, the DOE Office of Science - Nuclear Physics Program reinstated a program for continued production of {sup 252}Cf and other transcurium isotopes at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The FY2009 major elements of the workscope are as follows: (1) Recovery and processing of seven transuranium element targets undergoing irradiation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL; (2) Development of a plan to manufacture new targets for irradiation beginning in early- to mid-FY10 to supply irradiated targets for processing Campaign 75 (TRU75); and (3) Refurbishment of the target manufacturing equipment to allow new target manufacture in early FY10 The {sup 252}Cf product from processing Campaign 74 (recently processed and currently shipping to customers) is expected to supply the domestic demands for a period of approximately two years. Therefore it is essential that new targets be introduced for irradiation by the second quarter of FY10 (HFIR cycle 427) to maintain supply of {sup 252}Cf; the average irradiation period is {approx}10 HFIR cycles, requiring about 1.5 calendar years. The strategy for continued production of {sup 252}Cf depends upon repairing and refurbishing the existing pellet and target fabrication equipment for one additional target production campaign. This equipment dates from the mid-1960s to the late 1980s, and during the last target fabrication campaign in 2005- 2006, a number of component failures and operations difficulties were encountered. It is expected that following the target fabrication and acceptance testing of the targets that will supply material for processing Campaign 75 a comprehensive upgrade and replacement of the remote hot-cell equipment will be required prior to subsequent campaigns. Such a major refit could start in early FY 2011 and would take about 2 years to complete. Scope and cost estimates for the repairs described herein were developed, and authorization for the work was received in July 2009 under the Remote Target Fabrication Refurbishment Task of the Enhanced Utilization of Isotope Facilities project (Project Identification Code 2005230) funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The goal of this project is to recover the capability to produce 4-5 curium targets for the irradiation period starting with HFIR cycle 427, currently scheduled to begin 2/17/10. Assuming success, the equipment would then be used to fabricate 6-7 additional targets to hold for the next irradiation campaign specified by the program. Specific objectives are the return to functionality of the Cubicle 3 Pellet Fabrication Line; Cubicle 2 Target Assembly equipment; and Cubicle 1 Target Inspection and Final Assembly system.

  19. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Implications of structural...

  20. Setting Energy Savings Targets for Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    Helps policymakers understand how electric and natural gas utilities can achieve greater efficiency by establishing numeric energy savings targets and goals for energy efficiency programs.

  1. DEFINING RADIOTHERAPY TARGET VOLUMES USING 18F-FLUORO-DEOXY-GLUCOSE POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    further the process of making available new technology. We therefore suggest a more radical stance) investigated the use of fixed thresholds to define NSCLC tumors PET volumes exhibiting heterogeneous uptake. They found no correlation between the CT-based and the PET-based volumes, and associated the observed

  2. Impact of California Reformulated Gasoline On Motor Vehicle Emissions. 1. Mass Emission Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Singer, Brett C.; Harley, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    gasoline on motor vehicle emissions. 2. Volatile organicOn Motor Vehicle Emissions 1. Mass Emission Rates ThomasW.the effect of phase RFGon vehicle emissions, including cold-

  3. Ion emission spectra in the Jovian X-ray aurora V. Kharchenko,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Phillip C.

    June 2006. [1] X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet emission spectra resulting from energetic sulfur sections for stripping, electron capture, and target ionization. Energy and charge distributions of precipitating sulfur ions are presented for the first time and the equilibrium charge model is shown

  4. 15 Energy for development: solar home systemsin Africa and global carbon emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    15 Energy for development: solar home systemsin Africa and global carbon emissions RICHARD D. DUKEl, private and non- governmental organization (NGG) projects have already targeted SHS in Africa. The World;market transformation;photovoltaics; solar home systems; buydown ABST RACT A growingnumberofrural

  5. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15

    In developing countries, there is an urgent need for access to safe, efficient, and more affordable cooking technologies. Nearly 2.5 billion people currently use an open fire or traditional cookstove to prepare their meals, and recent models predict that use of biomass for cooking will continue to be the dominant energy use in rural, resource-poor households through 2030. For these families, cooking poses serious risks to health, safety, and income. An alarming 4 million people, primarily women and children, die prematurely each year from indoor and outdoor exposure to the harmful emissions released by solid fuel combustion. Use of traditional stoves can also have a significant impact on deforestation and climate change. This dire situation creates a critical need for cookstoves that significantly and verifiably reduce fuel use and emissions in order to reach protective levels for human health and the environment. Additionally, advances in the scientific equipment needed to measure and monitor stove fuel use and emissions have not kept pace with the significant need within the industry. While several testing centers in the developed world may have hundred thousand-dollar emissions testing systems, organizations in the field have had little more than a thermometer, a scale, and subjective observations to quantify the performance of stove designs. There is an urgent need for easy-to-use, inexpensive, accurate, and robust stove testing equipment for use by laboratory and field researchers around the world. ASAT and their research partner, Aprovecho Research Center (ARC), have over thirty years of experience addressing these two needs, improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment, with expertise spanning the full spectrum of development from conceptual design to product manufacturing and dissemination. This includes: 1) research, design, and verification of clean biomass cookstove technology and emissions monitoring equipment; 2) mass production of quality-controlled stove and emissions equipment at levels scalable to meet global demand; and 3) global distribution through a variety of channels and partners. ARC has been instrumental in designing and improving more than 100 stove designs over the past thirty years. In the last four years, ASAT and ARC have played a key role in the production and sales of over 200,000 improved stoves in the developed and developing world. The ARC-designed emissions equipment is currently used by researchers in laboratories and field studies on five continents. During Phase I of the DOE STTR grant, ASAT and ARC worked together to apply their wealth of product development experience towards creating the next generation of improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment. Highlights of Phase I for the biomass cookstove project include 1) the development of several new stove technologies that reached the DOE 50/90 benchmark; 2) fabrication of new stove prototypes by ASAT’s manufacturing partner, Shengzhou Stove Manufacturing (SSM); 3) field testing of prototype stoves with consumers in Puerto Rico and the US; and 4) the selection of three stove prototypes for further development and commercialization during Phase II. Highlights of Phase I for the emissions monitoring equipment project include: 1) creation of a new emissions monitoring equipment product, the Laboratory Emissions Monitoring System (LEMS 2) the addition of gravimetric PM measurements to the stove testing systems to meet International Standards Organization criteria; 3) the addition of a CO{sub 2} sensor and wireless 3G capability to the IAP Meter; and 4) and the improvement of sensors and signal quality on all systems. Twelve Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers purchased this equipment during the Phase I project period.

  6. Active Diesel Emission Control Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Active Diesel Emission Control Systems 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conferencen Presentation: RYPOS Active Diesel Emission Control Systems...

  7. Data Needs for Evolving Motor Vehicle Emission Modeling Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guensler, Randall

    1993-01-01

    Agency; Highway Vehicle Emission Estimates; Office offor Evolving Motor Vehicle Emission Modeling Approachesfor Evolving Motor Vehicle Emission Modeling Approaches

  8. Potential Cost-Effective Opportunities for Methane Emission Abatement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Ethan; Steinberg, Daniel; Hodson, Elke; Heath, Garvin

    2015-08-01

    The energy sector was responsible for approximately 84% of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the U.S. in 2012 (EPA 2014a). Methane is the second most important GHG, contributing 9% of total U.S. CO2e emissions. A large portion of those methane emissions result from energy production and use; the natural gas, coal, and oil industries produce approximately 39% of anthropogenic methane emissions in the U.S. As a result, fossil-fuel systems have been consistently identified as high priority sectors to contribute to U.S. GHG reduction goals (White House 2015). Only two studies have recently attempted to quantify the abatement potential and cost associated with the breadth of opportunities to reduce GHG emissions within natural gas, oil, and coal supply chains in the United States, namely the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (2013a) and ICF (2014). EPA, in its 2013 analysis, estimated the marginal cost of abatement for non-CO2 GHG emissions from the natural gas, oil, and coal supply chains for multiple regions globally, including the United States. Building on this work, ICF International (ICF) (2014) provided an update and re-analysis of the potential opportunities in U.S. natural gas and oil systems. In this report we synthesize these previously published estimates as well as incorporate additional data provided by ICF to provide a comprehensive national analysis of methane abatement opportunities and their associated costs across the natural gas, oil, and coal supply chains. Results are presented as a suite of marginal abatement cost curves (MACCs), which depict the total potential and cost of reducing emissions through different abatement measures. We report results by sector (natural gas, oil, and coal) and by supply chain segment - production, gathering and boosting, processing, transmission and storage, or distribution - to facilitate identification of which sectors and supply chain segments provide the greatest opportunities for low cost abatement.

  9. Explanations of FreedomCAR/DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of FreedomCAR Targets and Basis for Targets prepared for the Grand Challenge Hydrogen Storage Solicitation.

  10. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 {+-} 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy ({approximately}10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 {+-} 0.3 TW/cm{sup 2} and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of {approximately}2 cm/{micro}s is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented.

  11. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01

    In almost all cases, the emissions related to traded fuelsextraction (F Er ) and production (F Pr ) emissions (i.e. ,the net effect of emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top),

  12. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation, particulate matter emissions may become a significant barrier to deploying beneficial alternative fuel that particulate matter from sparkignition vehicles contributes significantly to particulate matter emissions

  13. Recent increases in global HFC-23 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990-2007, Rep.A. Lindley (2007), Global emissions of HFC-23 estimated to2009), Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data, http://unfccc.int/ghg_

  14. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  15. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a: Fire emissions Emissions inventories Greenhouse gases a b s t r a c t Emissions from wildland fire fire emissions change considerably due to fluctuations from year to year with overall fire season

  16. Study on the effect of target on plasma parameters of magnetron sputtering discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikia, P.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur-782 402, Kamrup, Assam (India)] [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur-782 402, Kamrup, Assam (India)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the effect of magnetron target on different plasma parameters of Argon/Hydrogen (Ar - H{sub 2}) direct current (DC) magnetron discharge is examined. Here, Copper (Cu) and Chromium (Cr) are used as magnetron targets. The value of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (kT{sub e}), electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for both the target are studied as a function of input power and hydrogen content in the discharge. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. The obtained results show that electron and ion density decline with gradual addition of Hydrogen in the discharge and increase with rising input power. It brings significant changes on the degree of ionization of Ar and dissociation of H{sub 2}. The enhanced value of electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of Ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for Cr compared to Cu target is explained on the basis of it's higher Ion Induced Secondary Electron Emission Coefficient (ISEE) value.

  17. Validating the role of AFVs in voluntary mobile source emission reduction programs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Saricks, C. L.

    1999-03-17

    Late in 1997, EPA announced new allowances for voluntary emission control programs. As a result, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Cities and other metro areas that have made an ongoing commitment to increasing participation by alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in local fleets have the opportunity to estimate the magnitude and obtain emission reduction credit for following through on that commitment. Unexpectedly large reductions in key ozone precursor emissions in key locations and times of the day can be achieved per vehicle-mile by selecting specific light duty AFV offerings from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in lieu of their gasoline-fueled counterparts. Additional benefit accrues from the fact that evaporative emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (generated in the case of CNG, LNG, and LPG by closed fuel-system AFV technology) can be essentially negligible. Upstream emissions from fuel storage and distribution with the airshed of interest are also reduced. This paper provides a justification and outlines a method for including AFVs in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality, and for quantifying emission reduction credits. At the time of submission of this paper, the method was still under review by the US EPA Office of Mobile Sources, pending mutually satisfactory resolution of several of its key points. Some of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  18. The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01

    Damage Costs of Carbon Dioxide Emissions: An Assessment ofper Megawatt Hrs) Carbon Dioxide Emissions Cost ($ per Year)Megawatt Hrs) Carbon Dioxide Emissions Cost MSA Emissions

  19. Exposure to motor vehicle emissions: An intake fraction approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Julian D.

    2002-01-01

    on California Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions." EnvironmentalGasoline on Motor Vehicle Emissions. 2. Volatile OrganicGasoline on Motor Vehicle Emissions. I. Mass Emission

  20. A method for comparing impacts with real targets to impacts onto the IAEA unyielding target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The severity of the IAEA accident conditions test requirement (IAEA 1990) of an impact onto an essentially unyielding target from a drop height of 9 meters encompasses a large fraction of all real world impacts. This is true, in part, because of the unyielding nature of the impact target. Impacts onto the unyielding target have severities equivalent to higher velocity impacts onto real targets which are not unyielding. The severity of impacts with yielding targets is decreased by the amount of the impact energy absorbed in damaging the target. In demonstrating the severity of the regulatory impact event it is advantageous to be able to relate this impact onto an essentially unyielding target to impacts with yielding targets.

  1. Development of granular target for CADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    deposited by proton beam ~ X kW/cm^3 Industrial facility ~50MW=2.0GeV@25mA accelerator Spallation target, spheres, or plates to produce the neutrons, and coolant flowing between the elements for heat removal. · Liquid target options where a flowing liquid metal acts both as the source of neutrons and the heat

  2. TARGETING CANCER STEM CELLS Summary of technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    TARGETING CANCER STEM CELLS Summary of technology Cancerstemcells(CSCs)playasignificantroleinleukemia, glioma, and breast, lung, gastrointestinal, prostate and ovarian cancer etiology, causing therapy of a new adjunct for targeted therapy of cancer involving CSCs, for use in combination with existing cancer

  3. Target Volatility Option Pricing Giuseppe Di Graziano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macrina, Andrea

    for the pricing of Target Volatility Options (TVOs), a recent market innovation in the eld of volatility are lower than the target volatility, the pay-o of the former is higher than the pay-o of the corresponding experi- enced a steep increase, with a signicant impact on option (long vega) costs. The generalized

  4. Technical Design Report, Second Target Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galambos, John D.; Anderson, David E.; Bechtol, D.; Bethea, Katie L.; Brown, N.; Carden, W. F.; Chae, Steven M.; Clark, A.; Counce, Deborah M.; Craft, K.; Crofford, Mark T.; Collins, Richard M.; Cousineau, Sarah M.; Curry, Douglas E.; Cutler, Roy I.; Dayton, Michael J.; Dean, Robert A.; Deibele, Craig E.; Doleans, Marc; Dye, T.; Eason, Bob H.; Eckroth, James A.; Fincrock, C.; Fritts, S.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Gawne, Ken R.; Hartman, Steven M.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Hess, S.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Horak, Charlie M.; Howell, Matthew P.; Iverson, Erik B.; Jacobs, Lorelei L.; Jones, Larry C.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, S.; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Laughon, Gregory J.; Lu, W.; Mahoney, Kelly L.; Mammosser, John; McManamy, T.; Michilini, M.; Middendorf, Mark E.; O'Neal, Ed; Nemec, B.; Peters, Roy Cecil; Plum, Michael A.; Reagan, G.; Remec, Igor; Rennich, Mark J.; Riemer, Bernie; Saethre, Robert B.; Schubert, James Phillip; Shishlo, Andrei P.; Smith, C. Craig; Strong, William Herb; Tallant, Kathie M.; Tennant, David Alan; Thibadeau, Barbara M.; Trumble, S.; Trotter, Steven M.; Wang, Z.; Webb, Steven B.; Williams, Derrick C.; White, Karen S.; Zhao, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    The Second Target Station (STS) is a proposed upgrade for SNS. It includes a doubling of the accelerator power and an additional instrument hall. The new instrument hall will receive a 467 kW 10 Hz beam. The parameters and preliminary design aspects of the STS are presented for the accelerator, target systems, instrument hall, instruments and civil construction aspects.

  5. Benchmarking and Evaluating Recongurable Architectures Targeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luk, Wayne

    benchmarking suite that evaluates the power consumption of reconfigurable technology for applications targeting the mobile computing domain. This benchmark suite includes seven designs; one design targets fine-grained FPGA fabrics allowing for quick state- of-the-art evaluation, and six designs are specified at a high

  6. Air Pollution Emissions and Abatement (Minnesota) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Regulations A person who controls the source of an emission must notify the Pollution Control Agency immediately of excessive or abnormal unpermitted emissions, and...

  7. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Action Programme Against Greenhouse Gas Emissions. City ofActionProgramme_against Greenhouse_Gases 2002. pdf. (2002).calculating emissions of greenhouse gases: key facts and

  8. Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using...

  9. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahl, Linnea

    2012-01-01

    LBNL-470E-20Ě1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Estimating Fugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides fromStandards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides),

  10. French perspective on diesel engines & emissions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    French perspective on diesel engines & emissions French perspective on diesel engines & emissions 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Aaqius & Aaqius 2002deernino.pdf More...

  11. Marine Sciences Laboratory Radionuclide Air Emissions Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, "National Emission Standards...

  12. School Bus Emissions Study | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    School Bus Emissions Study School Bus Emissions Study 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: international Truck and Engine Corporation deer2003slodowske.pdf More Documents &...

  13. Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable...

  14. Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction...

  15. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    impacts to public health and welfare deer09greenbaum.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)...

  16. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

  17. DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments 2005deerandreoni.pdf More Documents & Publications Cleaning Up Diesel Engines...

  18. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Peters, G. P; Caldeira, K.

    2011-01-01

    emissions from traded fossil fuels; Top), production (F Pr )Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO 2 Emissions (Carbonfrom the burning of fossil fuels are conventionally

  19. The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Emissions Program - Part 1 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Maritime Administration 2002deergore1.pdf More Documents & Publications Recent Diesel Engine Emission...

  20. The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Maritime Administration 2002deergore2.pdf More Documents & Publications Recent Diesel Engine Emission...

  1. Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional and Policy Lessons Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Emission Development...

  2. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

  3. High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission, Integrated Process Heater System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Howard; Boral, Anindya; Chhotray, San; Martin, Matthew

    2006-06-19

    The team of TIAX LLC, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, and Callidus Technologies, LLC conducted a six-year program to develop an ultra-low emission process heater burner and an advanced high efficiency heater design. This project addresses the critical need of process heater operators for reliable, economical emission reduction technologies to comply with stringent emission regulations, and for heater design alternatives that reduce process heater energy requirements without significant cost increase. The key project targets were NOx emissions of 10 ppm (@ 3% O2), and a heater thermal efficiency of 95 percent. The ultra low NOx burner was developed through a series of pilot-scale and field tests combined with computational fluid dynamic modeling to arrive at simultaneous low emissions and suitable flame shape and stability. Pilot scale tests were run at TIAX, at the 2 MMBtu/hr scale, and at Callidus at 8 MMBtu/hr. The full scale burner was installed on a 14 burner atmospheric pipestill furnace at an ExxonMobil refinery. A variety of burner configurations, gas tips and flame stabilizers were tested to determine the lowest emissions with acceptable flame shape and stability. The resulting NOx emissions were 22 ppm on average. Starting in 2001, Callidus commercialized the original ultra low NOx burner and made subsequent design improvements in a series of commercial burners evolving from the original concept and/or development. Emissions in the field with the ultra low-NOx burner over a broad spectrum of heater applications have varied from 5 ppm to 30 ppm depending on heater geometry, heater service, fuel and firing capacity. To date, 1550 of the original burners, and 2500 of subsequent generation burners have been sold by Callidus. The advanced heater design was developed by parametric evaluations of a variety of furnace and combustion air preheater configurations and technologies for enhancing convective and radiative heat transfer. The design evolution relied heavily on computational fluid dynamic predictions of design alternatives. The final design features modular separate radiant cells, each with one and two-side fired vertical tubes. The convection section configuration is vertical tube banks enclosed in the radiant channels. Commercial modular plate air preheaters are used. The predicted performance for the integrated advanced heater and Callidus burner is 95 percent efficiency with 9 ppm NOx emissions firing natural gas, and 12 ppm firing refinery gas. The total erected cost is less than a conventional heater with combustion air preheat.

  4. The new air emission regulations for gas turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solt, C.

    1998-07-01

    In the US, there are three new regulations now in development that will lower the limits for NO{sub x} emissions from gas turbines: (1) New National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Particulate Matter, and Possibly revision to the Ozone standard (both of these new programs will target NO{sub x} emissions); (2) New regulations stemming from the Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG) recommendations (again, NO{sub x} is the primary focus); (3) Revision of the New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) for gas turbines and a new rule that will impose new toxic emission requirements, (the Industrial Combustion Coordinated Rulemaking, stemming from revisions to Title III of the Clean Sir Act Amendments of 1990). The toxic rule should be of particular concern to the gas turbine industry in that it may impose the use of expensive toxic emission control techniques that may not provide any significant health benefits to the public. In addition, the European Community is currently drafting a new regulation for combustion sources that will require gas turbines to meet levels that are lower than any in Europe today. This paper will consider all 5 of these regulatory actions and will: review the proposed regulations; discuss timing for regulation development and implementation; assess the probable impact of each regulation; and provide opinions on the fate of each regulation. Both manufacturers and users of gas turbines should be aware of these proceedings and take an active role in the rule development.

  5. The development of high-performance alkali-hybrid polarized He3 targets for electron scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Jaideep T.; Dolph, Peter A.M.; Tobias, William Al; Averett, Todd D.; Kelleher, Aiden; Mooney, K. E.; Nelyubin, Vladimir V.; Wang, Yunxiao; Zheng, Yuan; Cates, Gordon D.

    2015-05-01

    We present the development of high-performance polarized łHe targets for use in electron scattering experiments that utilize the technique of alkali-hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping. We include data obtained during the characterization of 24 separate target cells, each of which was constructed while preparing for one of four experiments at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Virginia. The results presented here document dramatic improvement in the performance of polarized łHe targets, as well as the target properties and operating parameters that made those improvements possible. Included in our measurements were determinations of the so-called X-factors that quantify a temperature-dependent and as-yet poorlymore »understood spin-relaxation mechanism that limits the maximum achievable łHe polarization to well under 100%. The presence of this spin-relaxation mechanism was clearly evident in our data. We also present results from a simulation of the alkali-hydrid spin-exchange optical pumping process that was developed to provide guidance in the design of these targets. Good agreement with actual performance was obtained by including details such as off-resonant optical pumping. Now benchmarked against experimental data, the simulation is useful for the design of future targets. Included in our results is a measurement of the K- łHe spin-exchange rate coefficient $k^\\mathrm{K}_\\mathrm{se} = \\left ( 7.46 \\pm 0.62 \\right )\\!\\times\\!10^{-20}\\ \\mathrm{cm^3/s}$ over the temperature range 503 K to 563 K.« less

  6. Kinetics of target site localization of a protein on DNA: a stochastic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Coppey; O. Benichou; R. Voituriez; M. Moreau

    2005-02-23

    It is widely recognized that the cleaving rate of a restriction enzyme on target DNA sequences is several orders of magnitude faster than the maximal one calculated from the diffusion--limited theory. It was therefore commonly assumed that the target site interaction of a restriction enzyme with DNA has to occur via two steps: one--dimensional diffusion along a DNA segment, and long--range jumps coming from association/dissociation events. We propose here a stochastic model for this reaction which comprises a series of 1D diffusions of a restriction enzyme on non-specific DNA sequences interrupted by 3D excursions in the solution until the target sequence is reached. This model provides an optimal finding strategy which explains the fast association rate. Modeling the excursions by uncorrelated random jumps, we recover the expression of the mean time required for target site association to occur given by Berg & al. \\cite{berg81}, and we explicitly give several physical quantities describing the stochastic pathway of the enzyme. For competitive target sites we calculate two quantities: processivity and preference. By comparing these theoretical expressions to recent experimental data obtained for \\textit{Eco}RV--DNA interaction, we quantify: i) the mean residence time per binding event of \\textit{Eco}RV on DNA for a representative 1D diffusion coefficient, ii) the average lengths of DNA scanned during the 1D diffusion (during one binding event and during the overall process), iii) the mean time and the mean number of visits needed to go from one target site to the other. Further, we evaluate the dynamics of DNA cleavage with regard to the probability for the restriction enzyme to perform another 1D diffusion on the same DNA substrate following a 3D excursion.

  7. Diesel Emission Control in Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  8. The Value of Emissions Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort David.

    This paper estimates the value of international emissions trading, focusing attention on a here-to-fore neglected component: its value as a hedge against uncertainty. Much analysis has been done of the Kyoto Protocol and ...

  9. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  10. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  11. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    category includes California-owned power plants out- sideCalifornia Air ResourcesBoard, "Uncontrolled and controlled power-plantsCalifornia. First, we include emissions from out-state coal power plants.

  12. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  13. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ACES is a cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new, advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010.

  14. Trading quasi-emission permits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan-Pablo

    2002-01-01

    I study the design of environmental policies for a regulator that has incomplete information on firms' emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in cities with numerous small polluting sources). ...

  15. Quantifying the Operational Benefits of Conventional and Advanced Pumped Storage Hydro on Reliability and Efficiency: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krad, I.; Ela, E.; Koritarov, V.

    2014-07-01

    Pumped storage hydro (PSH) plants have significant potential to provide reliability and efficiency benefits in future electric power systems with high penetrations of variable generation. New PSH technologies, such as adjustable-speed PSH, have been introduced that can also present further benefits. This paper demonstrates and quantifies some of the reliability and efficiency benefits afforded by PSH plants by utilizing the Flexible Energy Scheduling Tool for the Integration of Variable generation (FESTIV), an integrated power system operations tool that evaluates both reliability and production costs.

  16. Quantifying the Cosmic Web in the New Era of Redshift Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofer Lahav

    2004-11-03

    Two main strategies have been implemented in mapping the local universe: whole-sky 'shallow' surveys and 'deep' surveys over limited parts of the sky. The two approaches complement each other in studying cosmography and statistical properties of the Universe. We summarise some results on the power spectrum of fluctuations and Wiener reconstruction of the density field from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) of 230,000 redshifts. We then discuss future challenges in quantifying the web of cosmic structure in the on-going redshift surveys.

  17. Applications of recurrence quantified analysis to study the dynamics of chaotic chemical reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Castellini; L. Romanelli

    2002-11-28

    Recurrence plot is a quite easy tool to be used in time series analysis,in particular for measuring unstable periodic orbits embedded in a chaotic dynamical system. Recurrence quantified analysis (RQA) is an advance tool that allows the study of intrinsic complexity of dynamical system with a set of few parameters. We use RQA for measuring chaotic transitions of NADH chemical reaction and determine numerically its characteristic parameters such as: Correlation integral, information entropy, Maximal Lyapunov's exponent, etc. For this work we have developed command sets with performance better than TISEAN package

  18. Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid: Final Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary From: Julia Hammandscheduling,certification seal. The1Quantifying

  19. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium emission of complex fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, D.R.

    1989-08-01

    Complex fragment emission (Z{gt}2) has been studied in the reactions of 50, 80, and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C, and 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au. Charge, angle, and energy distributions were measured inclusively and in coincidence with other complex fragments, and were used to extract the source rapidities, velocity distributions, and cross sections. The experimental emission velocity distributions, charge loss distributions, and cross sections have been compared with calculations based on statistical compound nucleus decay. The binary signature of the coincidence events and the sharpness of the velocity distributions illustrate the primarily 2-body nature of the {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reaction mechanism between 50 and 100 MeV/u. The emission velocities, angular distributions, and absolute cross sections of fragments of 20{le}Z{le}35 at 50 MeV/u, 19{le}Z{le}28 at 80 MeV/u, and 17{le}Z{le}21 at 100 MeV/u indicate that these fragments arise solely from the binary decay of compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions in which the {sup 139}La projectile picks up about one-half of the {sup 12}C target. In the 80 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 27}Al, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions, the disappearance of the binary signature in the total charge and velocity distributions suggests and increase in the complex fragment and light charged particle multiplicity with increasing target mass. As in the 80 and 100 MeV/u {sup 139}La + {sup 12}C reactions, the lighter complex fragments exhibit anisotropic angular distributions and cross sections that are too large to be explained exclusively by statistical emission. 143 refs., 67 figs.

  20. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  1. Electromagnetic dissociation of relativistic {sup 28}Si by nucleon emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnadara, U.J.

    1992-12-01

    A detailed study of the electromagnetic dissociation of {sup 28}Si by nucleon emission at E{sub lab}/A = 14.6 (GeV/nucleon was carried out with {sup 28}Si beams interacting on {sup 208}Pb). {sup 120}Sn. {sup 64}C targets. The measurements apparatus consists of detectors in the target area which measure the energy and charged multiplicity, and a forward spectrometer which measures the position, momentum and energy of the reaction fragments. The exclusive electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for decay channels having multiple nucleons in the final state have been measured which enables the selection of events produced in pure electromagnetic interactions. The measured cross sections agree well with previous measurements obtained for the removal of a few nucleons as well as with measurements on total charge removal cross sections from other experiments. The dependence of the integrated cross sections on the target charge Z{sub T} and the target mass AT confirms that for higher Z targets the excitation is largely electromagnetic. Direct measurements of the excitation energy for the electromagnetic dissociation of {sup 28}Si {yields} p+{sup 27}Al and {sup 28}Si {yields} n+{sup 27}Si have been obtained through a calculation of the invariant mass in kinematically, reconstructed events. The excitation energy spectrum for all targets peak near the isovector giant dipole resonance in {sup 28}Si. These distributions are well reproduced by combining the photon spectrum calculated using the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation with the experimental data on the photonuclear {sup 28}Si({sub {gamma},p}){sup 27}Al and {sup 28}Si({sub {gamma},n}){sup 27}Si. The possibilities of observing double giant dipole resonance excitations in {sup 28}Si have been investigated with cross section measurements as well as with excitation energy reconstruction.

  2. Electromagnetic dissociation of relativistic [sup 28]Si by nucleon emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnadara, U.J.

    1992-12-01

    A detailed study of the electromagnetic dissociation of [sup 28]Si by nucleon emission at E[sub lab]/A = 14.6 (GeV/nucleon was carried out with [sup 28]Si beams interacting on [sup 208]Pb). [sup 120]Sn. [sup 64]C targets. The measurements apparatus consists of detectors in the target area which measure the energy and charged multiplicity, and a forward spectrometer which measures the position, momentum and energy of the reaction fragments. The exclusive electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for decay channels having multiple nucleons in the final state have been measured which enables the selection of events produced in pure electromagnetic interactions. The measured cross sections agree well with previous measurements obtained for the removal of a few nucleons as well as with measurements on total charge removal cross sections from other experiments. The dependence of the integrated cross sections on the target charge Z[sub T] and the target mass AT confirms that for higher Z targets the excitation is largely electromagnetic. Direct measurements of the excitation energy for the electromagnetic dissociation of [sup 28]Si [yields] p+[sup 27]Al and [sup 28]Si [yields] n+[sup 27]Si have been obtained through a calculation of the invariant mass in kinematically, reconstructed events. The excitation energy spectrum for all targets peak near the isovector giant dipole resonance in [sup 28]Si. These distributions are well reproduced by combining the photon spectrum calculated using the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation with the experimental data on the photonuclear [sup 28]Si([sub [gamma],p])[sup 27]Al and [sup 28]Si([sub [gamma],n])[sup 27]Si. The possibilities of observing double giant dipole resonance excitations in [sup 28]Si have been investigated with cross section measurements as well as with excitation energy reconstruction.

  3. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  4. Possible Effects of Pair Echoes on Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohta Murase; Bing Zhang; Keitaro Takahashi; Shigehiro Nagataki

    2009-02-27

    High-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is widely expected but had been sparsely observed until recently when the Fermi satellite was launched. If >TeV gamma rays are produced in GRBs and can escape from the emission region, they are attenuated by the cosmic infrared background photons, leading to regeneration of GeV-TeV secondary photons via inverse-Compton scattering. This secondary emission can last for a longer time than the duration of GRBs, and it is called a pair echo. We investigate how this pair echo emission affects spectra and light curves of high energy afterglows, considering not only prompt emission but also afterglow as the primary emission. Detection of pair echoes is possible as long as the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in voids is weak. We find (1) that the pair echo from the primary afterglow emission can affect the observed high-energy emission in the afterglow phase after the jet break, and (2) that the pair echo from the primary prompt emission can also be relevant, but only when significant energy is emitted in the TeV range, typically E_{gamma, >0.1 TeV} > (Y/(1+Y)) epsilon_e E_k. Even non-detections of the pair echoes could place interesting constraints on the strength of IGMF. The more favorable targets to detect pair echoes may be the "naked" GRBs without conventional afterglow emission, although energetic naked GRBs would be rare. If the IGMF is weak enough, it is predicted that the GeV emission extends to >30-300 s.

  5. Protein search for multiple targets on DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Lange; Maria Kochugaeva; Anatoly B. Kolomeisky

    2015-08-03

    Protein-DNA interactions are crucial for all biological processes. One of the most important fundamental aspects of these interactions is the process of protein searching and recognizing specific binding sites on DNA. A large number of experimental and theoretical investigations have been devoted to uncovering the molecular description of these phenomena, but many aspects of the mechanisms of protein search for the targets on DNA remain not well understood. One of the most intriguing problems is the role of multiple targets in protein search dynamics. Using a recently developed theoretical framework we analyze this question in detail. Our method is based on a discrete-state stochastic approach that takes into account most relevant physical-chemical processes and leads to fully analytical description of all dynamic properties. Specifically, systems with two and three targets have been explicitly investigated. It is found that multiple targets in most cases accelerate the search in comparison with a single target situation. However, the acceleration is not always proportional to the number of targets. Surprisingly, there are even situations when it takes longer to find one of the multiple targets in comparison with the single target. It depends on the spatial position of the targets, distances between them, average scanning lengths of protein molecules on DNA, and the total DNA lengths. Physical-chemical explanations of observed results are presented. Our predictions are compared with experimental observations as well as with results from a continuum theory for the protein search. Extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations fully support our theoretical calculations.

  6. Minutes Act. 3, presentation Annual Quantify Meeting 20 feb 1008 by Richard Bintanja

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    % reduction in Nox aircraft: Change in O3 = 4ppb (max). 4) Aircraft + Road + Ships versus All for 5%: very)? A: This is uncertain. Presenter: O. Dessens 1) 20 x 5% reduction or 100% reduction? Linearity of the response. 2) 5, 10, 20% reduction in aircraft emissions: linear for O3 and NH4 on various levels. 3) 5

  7. A direct approach to quantifying organic matter lost as a result of peatland wildfire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    or biomass loss during fire or of changes in carbon emissions following fire in peatlands (Zoltai et al. 1998 combustion as well as post-disturbance ef- fects on biogeochemical processes directly involved in carbon than 20% of the emis- sions linked to global biomass burning. Many studies have recorded long

  8. ESO Imaging Survey: Finding Targets for VLT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. N. da Costa

    1998-09-16

    Data from the wide-angle, moderately deep ESO Imaging Survey have been used to produce target lists for the first year of the VLT. About 250 candidate clusters of galaxies have been identified from the I-band images covering $\\sim$ 17 square degrees. In addition, using the multicolor data available over an area of 1.3 square degrees over 300 potentially interesting point-sources have been selected. The color-selected targets include low-mass stars/brown dwarfs, white-dwarfs and quasars. Images, object catalogs and derived target lists are available from the world-wide web (http://www.eso.org/eis)

  9. Targeting engineering synchronization in chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sourav K. Bhowmick; Dibakar Ghosh

    2015-06-14

    A method of targeting engineering synchronization states in two identical and mismatch chaotic systems is explained in details. The method is proposed using linear feedback controller coupling for engineering synchronization such as mixed synchronization, linear and nonlinear generalized synchronization and targeting fixed point. The general form of coupling design to target any desire synchronization state under unidirectional coupling with the help of Lyapunov function stability theory is derived analytically. A scaling factor is introduced in the coupling definition to smooth control without any loss of synchrony. Numerical results are done on two mismatch Lorenz systems and two identical Sprott oscillators.

  10. Diagnostics for High Power Targets and Dumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gschwendtner, E

    2012-01-01

    High power targets are generally used for neutrino, antiproton, neutron and secondary beam production whereas dumps are needed in beam waste management. In order to guarantee an optimized and safe use of these targets and dumps, reliable instrumentation is needed; the diagnostics in high power beams around targets and dumps is reviewed. The suite of beam diagnostics devices used in such extreme environments is discussed, including their role in commissioning and operation. The handling and maintenance of the instrumentation components in high radiation areas is also addressed.

  11. Self-assessing target with automatic feedback

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larkin, Stephen W.; Kramer, Robert L.

    2004-03-02

    A self assessing target with four quadrants and a method of use thereof. Each quadrant containing possible causes for why shots are going into that particular quadrant rather than the center mass of the target. Each possible cause is followed by a solution intended to help the marksman correct the problem causing the marksman to shoot in that particular area. In addition, the self assessing target contains possible causes for general shooting errors and solutions to the causes of the general shooting error. The automatic feedback with instant suggestions and corrections enables the shooter to improve their marksmanship.

  12. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  13. Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2002-05-31

    Advocates of renewable energy have long argued that wind power and other renewable technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that wind and other renewables provide. This paper attempts to quantify this benefit by equating it with the cost of achieving price stability through other means, particularly gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps). We find that over the past two years, natural gas consumers have had to pay a premium of roughly 0.50 cents/kWh over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost is potentially large enough to tip the scales away from new investments in natural gasfired generation and in favor of investments in wind power and other renewable technologies.

  14. Quantifying the source of reentrant line variability and the effects of processes standardization on tool availability variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peavey, Milo Camp

    2007-01-01

    This thesis quantifies the sensitivity of tool availability variability with respect to product throughput and examines how Intel's High Precision Maintenance initiative can be used to minimize these effects. Tools with ...

  15. Using Decline Curve Analysis, Volumetric Analysis, and Bayesian Methodology to Quantify Uncertainty in Shale Gas Reserve Estimates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Jimenez, Raul 1988-

    2012-11-30

    Probabilistic decline curve analysis (PDCA) methods have been developed to quantify uncertainty in production forecasts and reserves estimates. However, the application of PDCA in shale gas reservoirs is relatively new. Limited work has been done...

  16. 7, 68436902, 2007 An Asian emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 6843­6902, 2007 An Asian emission inventory for the period 1980­2020 T. Ohara et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions An Asian emission inventory of anthropogenic emission sources 7, 6843­6902, 2007 An Asian emission inventory for the period 1980­2020 T. Ohara et al. Title Page

  17. Emissions Trading: A Feasible Analysis for UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emissions Trading: A Feasible Analysis for UBC Vivian Hoffman, J Chisholm I. Introduction The GVRD environmental objectives are achieved. Emissions reduction credit trading (or emissions trading) is an example Valley (LFV). Section III describes the market-based instruments of emissions trading and facility

  18. Winter Motor-Vehicle EMISSIONS in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Winter Motor-Vehicle EMISSIONS in Yellowstone National Park A ir-pollution emissions from off- road recreational vehicles have ris- en in national importance, even as emissions from these vehicles have declined of lawsuits, a new study shows that reductions in snowmobile emissions highlight the need for the snowcoach

  19. Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions CarmenM. Benkovitz, Hajime inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial on emissions is also required at high resolution for the design of policies aimed at reducing emissions

  20. Implementation of SB 1368 Emission Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ........................................................................... 8 Chapter 4: Emissions Performance Standard .....................13 Coal................................................................................................................. 14 Petroleum Coke

  1. Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban turf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Czimczik, Claudia I

    2010-01-01

    facts: Average carbon dioxide emissions resulting fromcalculation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from fuel

  2. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, T

    2006-01-01

    D. W. T. : Emissions from smoldering combustion of biomassthe combustion process. Emission factors for biomass burning

  3. Impact of Real-World Driving Characteristics on Vehicular Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NESAMANI, K.S.; SUBRAMANIAN, K.P.

    2006-01-01

    In India, vehicular emissions and energy consumption havesince two decades in India. emissions and energy consumption

  4. Nanotechnology-mediated targeting of tumor angiogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Deboshri

    Abstract Angiogenesis is disregulated in many diseased states, most notably in cancer. An emerging strategy for the development of therapies targeting tumor-associated angiogenesis is to harness the potential of nanotechnology ...

  5. Webinar: Targeted Algal Biofuels and Bioproducts FOA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Bioenergy Technologies Office will present a live informational webcast on the Targeted Algal Biomass and Bioproducts Funding Opportunity (DE-FOA-0001162) on October 8, 2014...

  6. Tagging and Targeting of Energy Efficiency Subsidies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allcott, Hunt

    A corrective tax or subsidy is "well-targeted" if it primarily affects choices that are more distorted by market failures. Energy efficiency subsidies are designed to correct multiple distortions: externalities, credit ...

  7. Statistical Modeling of Single Target Cell Encapsulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, SangJun

    High throughput drop-on-demand systems for separation and encapsulation of individual target cells from heterogeneous mixtures of multiple cell types is an emerging method in biotechnology that has broad applications in ...

  8. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsakraklides, Vasiliki

    Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of ...

  9. Targeting cancer metabolism: a therapeutic window opens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    Genetic events in cancer activate signalling pathways that alter cell metabolism. Clinical evidence has linked cell metabolism with cancer outcomes. Together, these observations have raised interest in targeting metabolic ...

  10. Improving Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Using Nuclear Nanotechnology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jordan Andrew

    2013-05-03

    The objectives of this thesis are to produce radioactive antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy for the treatment of cancer, and to demonstrate that this product can be produced at Texas A...

  11. Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, James T. (Los Alamos, NM); Miller, John R. (Penfield, NY)

    1984-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers.

  12. Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, J.T.; Miller, J.R.

    1984-08-07

    An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers. 6 figs.

  13. Cryostat including heater to heat a target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

    1990-09-11

    A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

  14. Current status of the liquid lithium target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    in target (mm) 252 x 125Maximum beam current (mA) ~1~10~100Beam spot on the target (cm2) >2 (peak)0.52.5Beam Water direction #12;15 Be Trap Heat Exchanger Cross Section Design to remove ~12 kW Lithium tank #12;Oil cycle Flexible tubes Oil pump Heat exchanger Oil chamber Inside the lab Outside the lab #12;Elect

  15. What does the 2°C Target Imply for a Global Climate Agreement in 2020? The LIMITS Study on Durban Action Platform Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Tavoni, Massimo; Aboumahboub, Tino; Luderer, Gunnar; Calvin, Katherine V.; DeMaere, Gauthier; Krey, Volker; Riahi, Keywan; Rosler, Hilke; Schaeffer, Michiel; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides a novel and comprehensive model?based assessment of possible outcomes of the Durban Platform negotiations with a focus on emissions reduction requirements, the consistency with the 2°C target and global economic impacts. The Durban Action scenarios investigated in the LIMITS study—all assuming the implementation of comprehensive global emission reductions after 2020, but assuming different 2020 emission reduction levels and different long?term stabilization targets—show that the probability of exceeding the 2°C limit increases with stabilization target from below one third for 450?470 ppm to 40?60% for 490?510 ppm in 2100. Global time?averaged economic costs of the Durban Action scenarios are limited across models, and are largely unaffected by the stringency of 2020 pledges. By contrast, the economic impact of delaying action beyond 2030 is much stronger on transitional costs. The main significance of short term action in the period 2010?2030 lies in preparing the ground for steep emissions reductions thereafter by inducing global emissions to peak and decline. The institutional challenges of all scenarios with fragmented near?term climate policy can be expected to be high as reflected in a steep rise of carbon prices and decarbonization rates until 2040. We conclude that an agreement on comprehensive emissions reductions to be implemented from 2020 onwards has particular significance for meeting long term climate policy objectives.

  16. Estimation of landfill emission lifespan using process oriented modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ustohalova, Veronika . E-mail: veronika.ustohalova@uni-essen.de; Ricken, Tim; Widmann, Renatus

    2006-07-01

    Depending on the particular pollutants emitted, landfills may require service activities lasting from hundreds to thousands of years. Flexible tools allowing long-term predictions of emissions are of key importance to determine the nature and expected duration of maintenance and post-closure activities. A highly capable option represents predictions based on models and verified by experiments that are fast, flexible and allow for the comparison of various possible operation scenarios in order to find the most appropriate one. The intention of the presented work was to develop a experimentally verified multi-dimensional predictive model capable of quantifying and estimating processes taking place in landfill sites where coupled process description allows precise time and space resolution. This constitutive 2-dimensional model is based on the macromechanical theory of porous media (TPM) for a saturated thermo-elastic porous body. The model was used to simulate simultaneously occurring processes: organic phase transition, gas emissions, heat transport, and settlement behavior on a long time scale for municipal solid waste deposited in a landfill. The relationships between the properties (composition, pore structure) of a landfill and the conversion and multi-phase transport phenomena inside it were experimentally determined. In this paper, we present both the theoretical background of the model and the results of the simulations at one single point as well as in a vertical landfill cross section.

  17. H\\alpha\\ Emission Variability in Active M Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Keaton J; Davenport, James R A; Hawley, Suzanne L; West, Andrew A; Rogel, Allen B

    2011-01-01

    We use ~12,000 spectra of ~3,500 magnetically active M0-M9 dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey taken at 10-15 minute intervals, together with ~300 spectra of ~60 M0-M8 stars obtained hourly with the Hydra multi-object spectrometer, to probe H\\alpha\\ variability on timescales of minutes to weeks. With multiple observations for every star examined, we are able to characterize fluctuations in H\\alpha emission as a function of activity strength and spectral type. Stars with greater magnetic activity (as quantified by L_H\\alpha/L_bol) are found to be less variable at all spectral types. We attribute this result to the stronger level of persistent emission in the high activity stars, requiring a larger heating event in order to produce measurable variability. We also construct H\\alpha\\ structure functions to constrain the timescale of variability. The more active objects with lower variability exhibit a characteristic timescale longer than an hour, likely due to larger, longer lasting heating events, while the...

  18. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  19. Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.P.

    1997-12-31

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  20. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Holmes

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.