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1

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

2

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

3

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review August 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels

4

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 3 Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade

5

Diagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation. f Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the pointDiagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2007 221 Coal 20.99 Nuclear Electric Power 8.41 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 42

Bensel, Terrence G.

6

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Production: Trade: Stock Change and Other 8: Consumption: Fossil Fuels 2

7

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949–2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949–2012

8

Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Imports

9

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

10

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

11

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

12

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma, 1960 - 2011 1960 33.9 902.0 1,118.9 0.0 NA 17.8 17.8 2,072.6 1961 26.1 976.9 1,119.9 0.0 NA 20.2 20 ...

13

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 589.7 1,771.0 (s) NA 270.2 270.2 2,630.9 1961 0.0 633.8 1,737.7 0.1 NA 248.2 ...

14

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.0 5.0 5.0 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.1 5.1 5.1

15

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas, 1960 - 2011 1960 26.4 6,610.7 5,379.4 0.0 NA 50.2 50.2 12,066.6 1961 26.5 6,690.2 5,447.3 0.0 NA 52.0 ...

16

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana, 1960 - 2011 1960 346.3 0.3 69.9 0.0 NA 24.6 24.6 441.1 1961 336.7 0.4 66.7 0.0 NA 24.2 24.2 428.0

17

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 190.5 190.5 190.5 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 188.9 188.9 188.9

18

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.1 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 36.2 36.2 36.7 1961 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 35.1 35.1 35.5

19

Table US12. Total Consumption by Energy End Uses, 2005 Quadrillion ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Other Appliances and Lighting Space Heating (Major Fuels) 4 Air-Conditioning 5 Water Heating 6 ...

20

Figure 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.1. 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuelsa Nuclear Electric Power Renew-able Energyb Total Imports Exports Net Importsc ... fuel ethanol stock change; and biodiesel stock change and balancing item.

22

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

23

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Minnesota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

24

Analysis of the market and product costs for coal-derived high Btu gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE analyzed the market potential and economics of coal-derived high-Btu gas using supply and demand projections that reflect the effects of natural gas deregulation, recent large oil-price rises, and new or pending legislation designed to reduce oil imports. The results indicate that an increasingly large market for supplemental gas should open up by 1990 and that SNG from advanced technology will probably be as cheap as gas imports over a wide range of assumptions. Although several studies suggest that a considerable market for intermediate-Btu gas will also exist, the potential supplemental gas demand is large enough to support both intermediate - and high-Btu gas from coal. Advanced SNG-production technology will be particularly important for processing the US's abundant, moderately to highly caking Eastern coals, which current technology cannot handle economically.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 - 2011 1960 796.6 36.9 31.3 0.0 NA 37.0 37.0 901.9 1961 756.0 37.3 32.7 0.0 NA 36.4 36.4 862.4

26

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

27

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 78. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 79. U.S. coal production in four cases, 2007, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 80. Average minemouth coal prices by regionCoal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Total Coal Production Increases at a Slower Rate Than in the Past In the AEO2009 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at both new and existing plants and the startup of several CTL

28

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather than air) is used for gasification, the resulting medium Btu gas could be economically transported by pipeline from the gasification sites to the Gulf coast. Technical, environmental, and economic aspects of implementing this technology are discussed.

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

COMPCOAL{trademark}: A profitable process for production of a stable high-Btu fuel from Powder River Basin coal  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a process to produce a stable, clean-burning, premium fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and other low-rank coals. This process is designed to overcome the problems of spontaneous combustion, dust formation, and readsorption of moisture that are experienced with PRB coal and with processed PRB coal. This process, called COMPCOAL{trademark}, results in high-Btu product that is intended for burning in boilers designed for midwestern coals or for blending with other coals. In the COMPCOAL process, sized coal is dried to zero moisture content and additional oxygen is removed from the coal by partial decarboxylation as the coal is contacted by a stream of hot fluidizing gas in the dryer. The hot, dried coal particles flow into the pyrolyzer where they are contacted by a very small flow of air. The oxygen in the air reacts with active sites on the surface of the coal particles causing the temperature of the coal to be raised to about 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) and oxidizing the most reactive sites on the particles. This ``instant aging`` contributes to the stability of the product while only reducing the heating value of the product by about 50 Btu/lb. Less than 1 scf of air per pound of dried coal is used to avoid removing any of the condensible liquid or vapors from the coal particles. The pyrolyzed coal particles are mixed with fines from the dryer cyclone and dust filter and the resulting mixture at about 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) is fed into a briquettor. Briquettes are cooled to about 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C) by contact with a mist of water in a gas-tight mixing conveyor. The cooled briquettes are transferred to a storage bin where they are accumulated for shipment.

Smith, V.E.; Merriam, N.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Table 8. U.S. Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating oil. (b) Wood and wood-derived fuels. (c) Municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste, agricultural byproducts, ...

31

The Btu tax is dead, long live the Btu tax  

SciTech Connect

The energy industry is powerful. That is the only explanation for its ability to jettison a cornerstone of the Clinton Administration's proposed deficit reduction package, the Btu tax plan, expected to raise about $71.5 billion over a five-year period. Clinton had proposed a broad-based energy tax of 25.7 cents per million Btus, and a surcharge of 34.2 cents on petroleum products, to be phased in over three years starting July 1, 1994. House Democrats went along, agreeing to impose a tax of 26.8 cents per million Btus, along with the 34.2-cent petroleum surcharge, both effective July 1, 1994. But something happened on the way to the Senate. Their version of the deficit reduction package contains no broad-based energy tax. It does, however, include a 4.3 cents/gallon fuel tax. Clinton had backed down, and House Democrats were left feeling abandoned and angry. What happened has as much to do with politics-particularly the fourth branch of government, lobbyists-as with a President who wants to try to please everyone. It turns out that almost every lawmaker or lobbyist who sought an exemption from the Btu tax, in areas as diverse as farming or ship and jet fuel used in international commercial transportation, managed to get it without giving up much in return. In the end, the Btu tax was so riddled with exemptions that its effectiveness as a revenue-raiser was in doubt. Meanwhile, it turns out that the Btu tax is not dead. According to Budget Director Leon Panetta, the Administration has not given up on the Btu tax and will fight for it when the reconciliation bill goes to a joint House-Senate conference.

Burkhart, L.A.

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)- Energy Production and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production and Imports Production and Imports Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Production and Imports Figure 5. Total energy production and consumption, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 6. Energy production by fuel, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Net imports of energy are expected to continue to meet a major share of total U.S. energy demand (Figure 5). In the AEO2008 reference case, the net import share of total U.S. energy consumption in 2030 is 29 percent, slightly less than the 30-percent share in 2006. Rising fuel prices over the projection period are expected to spur increases in domestic energy

33

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

34

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

case Other projections (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) EVA a IHSGI INFORUM IEA b Exxon- Mobil c BP b (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) 2015 Production 1,084 993 20.24...

35

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

36

BTU convergence spawning gas market opportunities in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The so-called BTU convergence of US electric power and natural gas sectors is spawning a boom in market opportunities in the US Northeast that ensures the region will be North America`s fastest growing gas market. That`s the view of Catherine Good Abbott, CEO of Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., who told a Ziff Energy conference in Calgary that US Northeast gas demand is expected to increase to almost 10 bcfd in 2000 and more than 12 bcfd in 2010 from about 8 bcfd in 1995 and only 3 bcfd in 1985. The fastest growth will be in the US Northeast`s electrical sector, where demand for gas is expected to double to 4 bcfd in 2010 from about 2 bcfd in 1995. In other presentations at the Ziff Energy conference, speakers voiced concerns about the complexity and speed of the BTU convergence phenomenon and offered assurances about the adequacy of gas supplies in North American to meet demand growth propelled by the BTU convergence boom. The paper discusses the gas demand being driven by power utilities, the BTU convergence outlook, electric power demand, Canadian production and supply, and the US overview.

NONE

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Consumption, Production, and Imports, 1973-2012 Consumption, Production, and Imports, Monthly Overview, April 2013 Net Imports,...

38

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

39

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

40

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

42

Analysis of industrial markets for low and medium Btu coal gasification. [Forecasting  

SciTech Connect

Low- and medium-Btu gases (LBG and MBG) can be produced from coal with a variety of 13 existing and 25 emerging processes. Historical experience and previous studies indicate a large potential market for LBG and MBG coal gasification in the manufacturing industries for fuel and feedstocks. However, present use in the US is limited, and industry has not been making substantial moves to invest in the technology. Near-term (1979-1985) market activity for LBG and MBG is highly uncertain and is complicated by a myriad of pressures on industry for energy-related investments. To assist in planning its program to accelerate the commercialization of LBG and MBG, the Department of Energy (DOE) contracted with Booz, Allen and Hamilton to characterize and forecast the 1985 industrial market for LBG and MBG coal gasification. The study draws five major conclusions: (1) There is a large technically feasible market potential in industry for commercially available equipment - exceeding 3 quadrillion Btu per year. (2) Early adopters will be principally steel, chemical, and brick companies in described areas. (3) With no additional Federal initiatives, industry commitments to LBG and MBG will increase only moderately. (4) The major barriers to further market penetration are lack of economic advantage, absence of significant operating experience in the US, uncertainty on government environmental policy, and limited credible engineering data for retrofitting industrial plants. (5) Within the context of generally accepted energy supply and price forecasts, selected government action can be a principal factor in accelerating market penetration. Each major conclusion is discussed briefly and key implications for DOE planning are identified.

1979-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates the high costs of oxygen and methanation required to produce gas that can be transmitted over long distance. Standard low Btu fixed bed gasifiers have historically been plagued by three constraints; namely, the production of messy tars and oils, the inability to utilize caking coals, and the inability to accept coal fines. Mansfield Carbon Products, Inc., a subsidiary of A.T. Massey Coal Company, has developed an atmospheric pressure, two-stage process that eliminates these three problems.

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Energy Overview Overview, 1949-2011 Production and Consumption, 2011 Overview, 2011 Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual...

45

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Figure 6. Energy...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6. Energy production by fuel, 1970-2025 (quadrillion Btu). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information...

46

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Figure 5. Total...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Total energy production and consumption, 1970-2025 (quadrillion Btu). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy...

47

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade Stock Change and Other d Consumption Fossil Fuels a Nuclear Electric Power Renew- able Energy b Total Imports Exports Net...

48

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade Stock Change and Other d Consumption Fossil Fuels a Nuclear Electric Power Renew- able Energy b Total Imports Exports Net...

49

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 23 Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu) End-Use Sectors Electric

50

Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 29 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumptiona

51

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL ... World Total ww (Quadrillion (10 15) Btu) F.4 World Dry Natural Gas Production (Btu ...

52

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR ... World Total ww - - NA (Quadrillion (10 15) Btu) F.5 World Coal Production (Btu ...

53

Process designs and cost estimates for a medium Btu gasification plant using a wood feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification plant to effect the conversion of wood to medium-Btu gas has been designed. The Purox gasifier and associated equipment were selected as a prototype, since this system is nearer to commercialization than others considered. The object was to determine the cost of those processing steps common to all gasification schemes and to identify specific research areas. A detailed flowsheet and mass-balance are presented. Capital investment statements for three plant sizes (400, 800, 1,600 oven-dry tons per day) are included along with manufacturing costs for each of these plants at three feedstock prices: $10, $20, $30 per green ton (or $20, $40, $60 per dry ton). The design incorporates a front-end handling system, package cryogenic oxygen plant, the Purox gasifier, a gas-cleaning train consisting of a spray scrubber, ionizing wet scrubber, and condenser, and a wastewater treatment facility including a cooling tower and a package activated sludge unit. Cost figures for package units were obtained from suppliers and used for the oxygen and wastewater treatment plants. The gasifier is fed with wood chips at 20% moisture (wet basis). For each pound of wood, 0.32 lb of oxygen are required, and 1.11 lb of gas are produced. The heating value of the gas product is 300 Btu/scf. For each Btu of energy input (feed + process energy) to the plant, 0.91 Btu exists with the product gas. Total capital investments required for the plants considered are $9, $15, and $24 million (1978) respectively. In each case, the oxygen plant represents about 50% of the total investment. For feedstock prices from $10 to $30 per green ton ($1.11 to $3.33 per MM Btu), break-even costs of fuel gas range from $3 to $7 per MM Btu. At $30/ton, the feedstock cost represents approximately 72% of the total product cost for the largest plant size; at $10/ton, it represents only 47% of product cost.

Desrosiers, R. E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

55

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

56

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1 ...

57

An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price gap between oil and natural gas and coal continues to widen, Monsanto has carefully searched out and examined opportunities to convert fuel use to coal. Preliminary studies indicate that the low-btu gas produced by fixed-bed, air blown gasifiers could potentially replace the natural gas now used in process heaters. The technology is well established and requires less capital than the higher-btu process heaters. Low-btu gas has sufficient heating value and flame temperature to be acceptable fuel for most process heaters. Economics for gas production appear promising, but somewhat uncertain. Rough evaluations indicate rates of return of as much as 30-40%. However, the economics are very dependent on a number of site- specific considerations including: coal vs. natural gas prices, economic life of the gas-consuming facility, quantity of gas required, need for desulfurization, location of gasifiers in relation to gas users, existence of coal unloading and storage facilities, etc. Two of these factors, the difference between coal and natural gas prices and the project life are difficult to predict. The resulting uncertainty has caused Monsanto to pursue coal gasification for process heaters with cautious optimism, on a site by site basis.

Nebeker, C. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Transportation and Handling of Medium Btu Gas in Pipelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-derived medium btu gas can be safely transported by pipeline over moderate distances, according to this survey of current industrial pipeline practices. Although pipeline design criteria will be more stringent than for natural gas pipelines, the necessary technology is readily available.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high price of natural gas and fuel oil for steam/power generation has alerted industry's decision makers to potentially more economical ways to provide the needed energy. Low-Btu fuel gas produced from coal appears to be an attractive alternate that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification facility needs to address those items that are not only unique to the gasification process itself, but also items generic to conventional firing of coal. This paper will discuss the environmental data necessary for permitting a low-Btu gasification facility located in the State of Louisiana. An actual case study for a 500,000 lb/hr natural gas-fired process steam plant being converted to low Btu gas will be presented. Typical air, water and solid waste effluents that must be considered will also be described.

Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1963 54.3 228.1 837.6 0.0 na 10.6 10.6 1,130.6 ... 1976 562.9 339.4 778.1 0.0 na 12.5 12.5 1,692.9 ... 2010 7,658.3 2,521.3 r 308.8 r 0.0 0.9 43.5 r ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Monthly energy review: September 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy production during June 1996 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.5% decrease from the level of production during June 1995. Energy consumption during June 1996 totaled 7.1 quadrillion Btu, 2.7% above the level of consumption during June 1995. Net imports of energy during June 1996 totaled 1.6 quadrillion Btu, 4.5% above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Statistics are presented on the following topics: energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. 37 figs., 59 tabs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

64

Materials exposure test facilities for varying low-Btu coal-derived gas  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Readiness Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in the Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. The objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating in a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two METC facilities have been designed, fabricated and will be operated simultaneously exposing ceramic materials dynamically and statically to products of combustion of a coal-derived gas. The current studies will identify the degradation of ceramics due to their exposure to a coal-derived gas combustion environment.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Energy Production (Quadrillion Btu) Total, 1973-2012 Total, Monthly By Source, 1973-2012 By Source, Monthly Total, January-April By Source, April 2013 a Natural gas plant...

66

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Loading ...

67

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail sales, and electrical system energy losses.

68

Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

70

High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: BTU QuickConverter | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program...

72

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if ``logical`` refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO{sub x}; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

76

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

77

Analysis of medium-BTU gasification condensates, June 1985-June 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides the final results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from biomass gasification systems which are part of the US Department of Energy Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The work described in detail in this report involves extensive analysis of condensates from four medium-BTU gasifiers. The analyses include elemental analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and Ames Assay. This work was an extension of a broader study earlier completed of the condensates of all the gasifers and pyrolyzers in the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recoverd in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures as a result of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high concentrations. Future studies of the time/temperature relationship to tar composition and the effect of processing atmosphere should be undertaken. Further processing of the condensates either as wastewater treatment or upgrading of the organics to useful products is also recommended. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 2000's: 12.91: 15.20 ...

79

Parametric Analysis of a 6500-Btu/kWh Heat Rate Dispersed Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost and performance assessments of two alternative system designs for a 2-MW molten carbonate fuel cell power plant yielded encouraging results: a 6500-Btu/kWh heat rate and a total plant investment of $1200-$1300/kW. Differences between the two designs establish a permissible range of operating conditions for the fuel cell that will help guide its development.

1985-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

80

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands, Fiscal Years 2003-2011 Fiscal Year 7 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 1 Natural Gas 2 Coal 3 Total Fossil Fuels 4 Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Trillion Cubic Feet Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Short Tons Quadrillion Btu Percent Quadrillion Btu Percent 2003 R 689 R 4.00 R 33.3 R 94 R 0.35 R 14.9 R 7.08 R 7.81 R 35.5 R 466 R 9.58 R 43.3 R 21.74 R 37.2 2004 R 680 R 3.94 R 33.8 R 105 R .39 R 16.0 R 6.68 R 7.38 R 34.0 R 484 R 9.89 R 43.9 R 21.60 R 37.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

82

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

83

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

84

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

85

Development and testing of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept represents a highly efficient and environmentally compatible advanced coal fueled power generation technology. When IGCC is coupled with high temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), the efficiency and cost advantage of IGCC is further improved with respect to systems based on conventional low temperature gas cleanup. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) characterization of particulates and other contaminants in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle; and (3) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, trace element, and particulate emissions.

Bevan, S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Samuels, M.S.; Tolpadi, A.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quadrillion Btu Natural Gas Electrical Losses Electrical Losses Electrical Losses Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Coal Renewable Energy Coal Petroleum Electricity...

87

Monthly energy review, May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy production during February 1994 totaled 5.3 quadrillion Btu, a 2.2% increase over February 1993. Coal production increased 9%, natural gas rose 2.5%, and petroleum decreased 3.6%; all other forms of energy production combined were down 3%. Energy consumption during the same period totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 4.1% above February 1993. Natural gas consumption increased 5.8%, petroleum 5.2%, and coal 2.3%; consumption of all other energy forms combined decreased 0.7%. Net imports of energy totaled 1.4 quadrillion Btu, 16.9% above February 1993; petroleum net imports increased 10.1%, natural gas net imports were down 4.9%, and coal net exports fell 43.7%. This document is divided into: energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, international energy, appendices (conversion factors, etc.), and glossary.

Not Available

1994-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

89

Monthly energy review, July 1990  

SciTech Connect

US total energy consumption in July 1990 was 6.7 quadrillion Btu Petroleum products accounted for 42 percent of the energy consumed in July 1990, while coal accounted for 26 percent and natural gas accounted for 19 percent. Residential and commercial sector consumption was 2.3 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector accounted for 35 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Industrial sector consumption was 2.4 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The industrial sector accounted for 36 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Transportation sector consumption of energy was 1.9 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 1 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector consumed 29 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Electric utility consumption of energy totaled 2.8 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. Coal contributed 53 percent of the energy consumed by electric utilities in July 1990, while nuclear electric power contributed 21 percent; natural gas, 12 percent; hydroelectric power, 9 percent; petroleum, 5 percent; and wood, waste, geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy, about 1 percent.

Not Available

1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Energy Flow, 2011 0 Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 3 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail

92

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is intended to give the reader knowledge into utility marketing strategies, rates, and services. Although water is a utility service, this paper will concern itself with the energy utilities, gas and electric. Commonality and diversity exist in the strategies and rates of the gas and electric utilities. Both provide services at no charge which make energy operation for their customers easier, safer and more economical. It is important to become familiar with utility strategies, rates, and services because energy knowledge helps your business operate at the lowest energy cost ($/BTU).

Phillips, J. N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source, 1949-2011 (Billion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (Dry) Crude Oil 3: NGPL 4: Total: Hydro-electric Power 6: Geothermal 7: Solar/PV 8: Wind 9: Biomass 10: Total: 1949. ... refuse recovery. See Table 7.1.

95

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Cofiring of coal and dairy biomass in a 100,000 btu/hr furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dairy biomass (DB) is evaluated as a possible co-firing fuel with coal. Cofiring of DB offers a technique of utilizing dairy manure for power/steam generation, reducing greenhouse gas concerns, and increasing financial returns to dairy operators. The effects of cofiring coal and DB have been studied in a 30 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) burner boiler facility. Experiments were performed with Texas Lignite coal (TXL) as a base line fuel. The combustion efficiency from co-firing is also addressed in the present work. Two forms of partially composted DB fuels were investigated: low ash separated solids and high ash soil surface. Two types of coal were investigated: TXL and Wyoming Powder River Basin coal (WYO). Proximate and ultimate analyses were performed on coal and DB. DB fuels have much higher nitrogen (kg/GJ) and ash content (kg/GJ) than coal. The HHV of TXL and WYO coal as received were 14,000 and 18,000 kJ/kg, while the HHV of the LA-PC-DBSepS and the HA-PC-DB-SoilS were 13,000 and 4,000 kJ/kg. The HHV based on stoichiometric air were 3,000 kJ/kg for both coals and LA-PC-DB-SepS and 2,900 kJ/kg for HA-PC-DB-SoilS. The nitrogen and sulfur loading for TXL and WYO ranged from 0.15 to 0.48 kg/GJ and from 0.33 to 2.67 for the DB fuels. TXL began pyrolysis at 640 K and the WYO at 660 K. The HA-PC-DB-SoilSs began pyrolysis at 530 K and the LA-PC-DB-SepS at 510 K. The maximum rate of volatile release occurred at 700 K for both coals and HA-PC-DB-SoilS and 750K for LA-PC-DB-SepS. The NOx emissions for equivalence ratio (?) varying from 0.9 to 1.2 ranged from 0.34 to 0.90 kg/GJ (0.79 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for pure TXL. They ranged from 0.35 to 0.7 kg/GJ (0.82 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for a 90:10 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend and from 0.32 to 0.5 kg/GJ (0.74 to 0.12 lb/mmBTU) for a 80:20 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend over the same range of ?. In a rich environment, DB:coal cofiring produced less NOx and CO than pure coal. This result is probably due to the fuel bound nitrogen in DB is mostly in the form of urea which reduces NOx to non-polluting gases such as nitrogen (N2).

Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

2010 Renewable Energy Data Book (Book), Energy Efficiency & Renewable...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

(2010) 11.3% Nuclear 3.3% Hydropower 7.6% Non-Hydro Renewables 29.2% Coal 33.1% Natural Gas 15.6% Crude Oil U.S. Energy Production (2010): 74.9 Quadrillion Btu U.S. Non-Hydro...

100

Automated on-line determination of PPB levels of sodium and potassium in low-Btu coal gas and fluidized bed combustor exhaust by atomic emission spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), US Department of Energy, is involved in the development of processes and equipment for production of low-Btu gas from coal and for fluidized bed combustion of coal. The ultimate objective is large scale production of electricity using high temperature gas turbines. Such turbines, however, are susceptible to accelerated corrosion and self-destruction when relatively low concentrations of sodium and potassium are present in the driving gas streams. Knowledge and control of the concentrations of those elements, at part per billion levels, are critical to the success of both the gas cleanup procedures that are being investigated and the overall energy conversion processes. This presentation describes instrumentation and procedures developed at the Ames Laboratory for application to the problems outlined above and results that have been obtained so far at METC. The first Ames instruments, which feature an automated, dual channel flame atomic emission spectrometer, perform the sodium and potassium determinations simultaneously, repetitively, and automatically every two to three minutes by atomizing and exciting a fraction of the subject gas sample stream in either an oxyhydrogen flame or a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The analytical results are printed and can be transmitted simultaneously to a process control center.

Haas, W.J. Jr.; Eckels, D.E.; Kniseley, R.N.; Fassel, V.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption grows by 12% in the AEO2014 Reference case, from 95 quadrillion Btu in 2012 to 106 quadrillion Btu in 2040-1.3 quadrillion Btu less than in AEO2013 (Figure 8). The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 82% in 2012 to 80% in 2040, as consumption of petroleum-based liquid fuels declines, largely as a result of slower growth in VMT and increased vehicle efficiency. figure dataTotal U.S. consumption of petroleum and other liquids, which was 35.9 quadrillion Btu (18.5 MMbbl/d) in 2012, increases to 36.9 quadrillion Btu (19.5 MMbbl/d) in 2018, then declines to 35.4 quadrillion Btu (18.7 MMbbl/d) in 2034 and remains at that level through 2040. Total consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases slightly through 2022 and then

102

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption grows by 7 percent in the AEO2013 Reference case, from 98 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 104 quadrillion Btu in 2035-2.5 quadrillion Btu less than in AEO2012-and continues to grow at a rate of 0.6 percent per year, reaching about 108 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 7). The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 82 percent in 2011 to 78 percent in 2040, as consumption of petroleum-based liquid fuels falls, largely as a result of the incorporation of new fuel efficiency standards for LDVs. figure dataWhile total liquid fuels consumption falls, consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases significantly, from 1.3 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 2.1 quadrillion Btu in 2040, and its share of

103

Monthly energy review, July 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy production during April 1995 totaled 5.5 quadrillion Btu, a 1.0-percent decrease from the level of production during April 1994. Coal production decreased 7.7 percent, natural gas increased 1.3 percent, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids increased 0.3 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were up 8.6 percent from the level of production during April 1994.

NONE

1995-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

104

production | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

production production Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

105

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2. World Energy Consumption, 1970-2020 (Quadrillion Btu). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. horizonal line image...

106

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. World Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2020 (Quadrillion Btu). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. horizonal line...

107

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 (Quadrillion Btu). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. horizonal...

108

U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections 35 Table 22. Energy intensity, projected vs. actual Projected (quadrillion Btu Billion 2005 Chained...

109

"Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,...

110

How much of the world's energy does the United States use? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of the world's energy does the United States use? In 2010, world total primary energy consumption was 511 quadrillion Btu. The United States' primary energy ...

111

How is electricity used in U.S. homes? - FAQ - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimated U.S. residential electricity consumption by end-use, 2011. End-use Quadrillion Btu Billion kilowatthours Share of total; ... tariff, and demand charge data?

112

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... quadrillion Btu Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Unconventional light-duty vehicles constitute 45 percent of sales in 2030 Hybrids Flex Fuel Turbo Direct Injection ...

113

Rest of US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Primary energy use by fuel, 1980-2035 …in absolute terms, all fuels grow except petroleum liquids U.S. energy consumption quadrillion Btu

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Eagle Ford (tx

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Table US1. Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Other Appliances and Lighting Space Heating (Major Fuels) 4 Air-Conditioning 5 Water Heating 6 ...

115

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wind Offshore Wind Electricity Generation (billion kilowatthours) Biogenic Municipal Waste 5/ Energy Consumption 6/ (quadrillion Btu) End-Use Generators 7/

116

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power

117

U.S. expected to be largest producer of petroleum and natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Maps by energy source and topic, includes ... Press Releases ... for 2011 and 2012 were roughly equivalent—within 1 quadrillion Btu of one another. In 2013, ...

118

Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Fossil Fuels

119

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

120

Table US1. Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Part 1: Housing Unit Characteristics and Energy Usage Indicators Energy Consumption 2 Energy Expenditures 2 Total U.S. (quadrillion Btu) Per Household (Dollars) Per

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy...

122

Figure 70. Delivered energy consumption for transportation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 70. Delivered energy consumption for transportation by mode, 2011 and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Total Rail Pipeline Marine ...

123

Figure 64. Industrial energy consumption by fuel, 2011, 2025, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 64. Industrial energy consumption by fuel, 2011, 2025, and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Natural Gas Petroleum and other liquids

124

Figure 63. Industrial delivered energy consumption by application ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 63. Industrial delivered energy consumption by application, 2011-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Manufacturing heat and power Nonmanufacturing heat ...

125

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region...

126

Annual Renewable Electricity Net Generation by Country (1980...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Generation by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity net generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu)....

127

Table AP1. Total Households Using Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005 Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Electricity

128

Bulk chemicals industry uses 5% of U.S. energy - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The industrial sector is responsible for nearly a third of total energy use in the United States, consuming an estimated 31 quadrillion Btu in 2012.

129

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Table A1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Grow th...

130

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

"MSN","YYYYMM","Value","Column_Order","Description","Unit" "OGTCBUS",197313,57.349835,1,"Petroleum and Natural Gas Consumption","Quadrillion Btu" ...

131

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Figure 2. Energy...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Energy Consumption by Fuel, 1970-2025 (quadrillion Btu). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. History: Energy...

132

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fig26 Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2013 U.S. Renewable Energy Supply (Quadrillion Btu) Energy Source Hydropower Wood biomass Liquid biofuels

133

IEA and EIA: Similarities and Differences in Projections and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China and India account for about half of the world increase in energy use . 15 . world energy consumption . quadrillion Btu . Source: EIA, International Energy ...

134

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA...

135

EIA Data: Total International Primary Energy Consumption

This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Data: Total International Primary Energy Consumption

This table lists total primary energy consumption by country and region in Quadrillion Btu.  Figures in this table...

136

Renewable Energy Consumption for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Consumption for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu)...

137

Natural Gas Consumption by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas Consumption by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual dry natural gas consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information...

138

OpenEI - Industrial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by...

139

table E1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL ... Table E.1 World Primary Energy Consumption (Btu), 1980-2006 (Quadrillion (10 15 ) Btu) Page

140

Facts and Stats | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

combined7 Global energy and climate The approximate energy released in the burning of a wood match: 1 Btu8 Total energy used in the U.S. each year: 99.89 quadrillion Btu9 Portion...

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141

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has the objectives to: A. Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition. B. Determine emissions characteristics including NO, NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents, and C. Operate with at least two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions. As a result of this program: 1. GE Engineering is now confident that the syngas fuels produced by all currently--viable coal gasifiers can be accommodated by the GE advanced (``F`` Technology) combustion system, and 2. For proposed syngas fuels with varying amounts of steam, nitrogen or CO{sub 2} diluent, the combustion and emissions characteristics can be reasonably estimated without undertaking expensive new screening tests for each different fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Belisle, F.H.; Maxwell, G.P.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 4. Coefficients of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coefficients of Linear Equations for Natural Gas- and Coefficients of Linear Equations for Natural Gas- and Oil-Related Methane Emissions Emissions Sources Intercept Variable Name and Units Coefficient Variable Name and Units Coefficient Natural Gas -38.77 Time trend (calendar year) .02003 Dry gas production (thousand cubic feet .02186 Natural Gas Processing -0.9454 Natural gas liquids production (million barrels per day) .9350 Not applicable Natural Gas Transmission and Storage 2.503 Pipeline fuel use (thousand cubic feet) 1.249 Dry gas production (thousand cubic feet) -0.06614 Natural Gas Distribution -58.16 Time trend (calendar year) .0297 Natural gas consumption (quadrillion Btu) .0196 Oil production, Refining, and Transport 0.03190 Oil consumption (quadrillion Btu) .002764 Not applicable Source: Derived from data used in Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1999, DOE/EIA-0573(99), (Washington, DC, October 2000).

143

~A four carbon alcohol. It has double the amount of carbon of ethanol, which equates to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's). ~Butanol is safer to handle with a Reid Value of 0.33 psi is easily recovered, increasing the energy yield of a bushel of corn by an additional 18 percent over the energy yield of ethanol produced from the same quantity of corn. ~Current butanol prices as a chemical

Toohey, Darin W.

144

Monthly energy review, May 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an overview of the May energy statistics by the Energy Information Administration. The contents of the report include an energy overview, US energy production, trade stocks and prices for petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. Energy production during February 1997 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu, a 1.9% decrease from the level of production during February 1996. Coal production increased 1.2%, natural gas production decreased 2.9%, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 2.1%. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.3% from the level of production during February 1996. Energy consumption during February 1997 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 4.0% below the level of consumption during February 1996. Consumption of petroleum products decreased 4.4%, consumption of natural gas was down 3.5%, and consumption of coal fell 2.2%. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 6.7% from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during February 1997 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 14.1% above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 12.7% and net imports of natural gas were up 7.4%. Net exports of coal fell 12.1% from the level in February 1996. 37 figs., 75 tabs.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Monthly Energy Review, February 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Energy production during November 1997 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.3-percent decrease from the level of production during November 1996. Natural gas production increased 2.8 percent, production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.7 percent, and coal production decreased 1.6 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 1.1 percent from the level of production during November 1996. Energy consumption during November 1997 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 0.1 percent above the level of consumption during November 1996. Consumption of natural gas increased 1.5 percent, consumption of coal fell 0.3 percent, while consumption of petroleum products decreased 0.2 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.8 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during November 1997 totaled 1.7 quadrillion Btu, 8.6 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 6.3 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 1.2 percent. Net exports of coal fell 17.8 percent from the level in November 1996.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Monthly energy review, July 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy production during April 1994 totaled 5.5 quadrillion Btu, a 2.2-percent increase from the level of production during April 1993. Coal production increased 11.8 percent, petroleum production fell 4.0 percent, and natural gas production decreased 0.3 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 2.9 percent from the level of production during April 1993. Energy consumption during April 1994 totaled 6.7 quadrillion Btu, 1.4 percent above the level of consumption during April 1993. Petroleum consumption increased 3.9 percent, coal consumption rose 1.1 percent, and natural gas consumption decreased 1.5 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.4 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during April 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 8.7 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 4.5 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 18.5 percent. Net exports of coal fell 9.2 percent from the level in April 1993.

Not Available

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

148

Monthly energy review, August 1994  

SciTech Connect

Energy production during May 1994 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 2.4-percent increase from the level of production during May 1993. Coal production increased 13.3 percent, natural gas production rose 1.7 percent, and petroleum production decreased 2.5 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 8.3 percent from the level of production during May 1993. Energy consumption during May 1994 totaled 6.6 quadrillion Btu, 3.6 percent above the level of consumption during May 1993. Natural gas consumption increased 8.7 percent, coal consumption rose 4.6 percent, and petroleum consumption was up 3.6 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 5.8 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during May 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 14.3 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 8.4 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 23.2 percent. Net exports of coal fell 16.8 percent from the level in May 1993.

Not Available

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Monthly energy review, June 1994  

SciTech Connect

Energy production during March 1994 totaled 5.9 quadrillion Btu, a 3.7-percent increase from the level of production during March 1993. Coal production increased 15.7 percent, petroleum production fell 4.1 percent, and natural gas production decreased 1.1 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were up 0.5 percent from the level of production during March 1993. Energy consumption during March 1994 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 1.3 percent below the level of consumption during March 1993. Natural gas consumption decreased 3.6 percent, petroleum consumption fell 1.6 percent, and coal consumption remained the same. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined increased 3.7 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during March 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 6.7 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 3.2 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 15.7 percent. Net exports of coal rose 2.1 percent from the level in March 1993.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center EML 4930/EML 5930 Energy Conversion Systems II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. District heating - distributing heat from waste heat from power generating plants. Water heating: passive Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Heating Quadrillion Btu 1 Btu = 1,055.0559 joule 1 Quadrillion = 1015 Domestic active solar heating: Space heating - Cost effective to invest in home insulation

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

152

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e.g. , petroleum refineries, electricity-generating plants,will be about 0.65 g per 10^ Btu-refinery product. This is ain a modern Swedish refinery (Cooper and Emanuelsson, 1992).

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Impact of Codes, Regulations, and Standards on Split-Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and Under  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes a framework for understanding the technology and regulation of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps 65,000 Btu/hr and under. The reporting framework is structured so that it can be added to in the future. This study is broken into six chapters:The basic components, refrigeration cycle, operation, and efficiency ratings of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps are covered for background information.Equipment efficiency ...

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

Scheffer, K.D.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

155

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

Monthly energy review, May 1995  

SciTech Connect

Energy production during Feb 95 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu (Q), 3.1% over Feb 94. Energy consumption totaled 7.4 Q, 0.7% below Feb 94. Net imports of energy totaled 1.3 Q, 5.6% below Feb 94. This publication is divided into energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

NONE

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

157

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation figure data Delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector grows from 27.6 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 28.8 quadrillion Btu in 2035 in the AEO2012 Reference case (Figure 7). Energy consumption by light-duty vehicles (LDVs) (including commercial light trucks) initially declines in the Reference case, from 16.5 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 15.7 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to projected increases in the fuel economy of highway vehicles. Projected energy consumption for LDVs increases after 2025, to 16.3 quadrillion Btu in 2035. The AEO2012 Reference case projections do not include proposed increases in LDV fuel economy standards-as outlined in the December 2011 EPA and NHTSA Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for 2017 and

158

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels 5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels Total, 1980-2011 As Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1980-2011 By Fuel, 2011 By Petroleum Product, 2011 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases and pentanes plus are aggregated to avoid disclosure of proprie- tary information. 2 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, waxes, and miscellaneous products. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Note: See Note 2, "Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels" at end of section. Source: Table 1.15. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 Quadrillion Btu Natural Gas 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 3 6 9 Percent Total Petroleum Products Coal 2.0 1.0 0.9 0.3 0.1 (s) 0.3 LPG¹ Petro- Asphalt Lubri- Petro- Special Other² 0.0 0.6 1.2 1.8 2.4 Quadrillion Btu

159

Analysis of the economic potential of solar thermal energy to provide industrial process heat. Final report, Volume I. [In-depth analysis of 78 industries  

SciTech Connect

The process heat data base assembled as the result of this survey includes specific process applications from 78 four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. These applications account for the consumption of 9.81 quadrillion Btu in 1974, about 59 percent of the 16.6 quadrillion Btu estimated to have been used for all process heat in 1974. About 7/sup 1///sub 2/ percent of industrial process heat is used below 212/sup 0/F (100/sup 0/C), and 28 percent below 550/sup 0/F (288/sup 0/C). In this study, the quantitative assessment of the potential of solar thermal energy systems to provide industrial process heat indicates that solar energy has a maximum potential to provide 0.6 quadrillion Btu per year in 1985, and 7.3 quadrillion Btu per year in 2000, in economic competition with the projected costs of conventional fossil fuels for applications having a maximum required temperature of 550/sup 0/ (288/sup 0/C). A wide variety of collector types were compared for performance and cost characteristics. Performance calculations were carried out for a baseline solar system providing hot water in representative cities in six geographical regions within the U.S. Specific industries that should have significant potential for solar process heat for a variety of reasons include food, textiles, chemicals, and primary metals. Lumber and wood products, and paper and allied products also appear to have significant potential. However, good potential applications for solar process heat can be found across the board throughout industry. Finally, an assessment of nontechnical issues that may influence the use of solar process heat in industry showed that the most important issues are the establishment of solar rights, standardization and certification for solar components and systems, and resolution of certain labor-related issues. (Volume 1 of 3 volumes.)

1977-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

Comparison of coal-based systems: marketability of medium-Btu gas and SNG (substitute natural gas) for industrial applications. Final report, July 1979-March 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In assessing the marketability of synthetic fuel gases from coal, this report emphasizes the determination of the relative attractiveness of substitute natural gas (SNG) and medium-Btu gas (MBG) for serving market needs in eight industrial market areas. The crucial issue in predicting the marketability of coal-based synthetic gas is the future price level of competing conventional alternatives, particularly oil. Under a low oil-price scenario, the market outlook for synthetic gases is not promising, but higher oil prices would encourage coal gasification.

Olsen, D.L.; Trexel, C.A.; Teater, N.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 14. Comparisons of coal projections, 2011-2040 (million short tons, except where noted) Projection 2011 AEO2013 Reference case Other projections (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) EVA a ICF b IHSGI INFORUM IEA Exxon- Mobil c (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) 2025 Production 1,096 1,113 22.54 958 1,104 1,107 1,061 -- -- East of the Mississippi 456 447 -- 402 445 -- -- -- -- West of the Mississippi 639 666 -- 556 659 -- -- -- -- Consumption Electric power 929 929 17.66 786 939 864 -- -- 13 Coke plants 21 22 0.58 22 15 19 -- -- -- Coal-to-liquids -- 6 -- -- 36 -- -- -- -- Other industrial/buildings 49 53 1.69 d 29 72 44 1.96 d -- -- Total consumption (quadrillion Btu) 19.66 -- 19.35 -- -- 18.34 -- -- 13 Total consumption (million short tons) 999 1,010 -- 836 1,061 927 1,015 e -- -- Net coal exports (million short tons) 96 124 -- 118 43 181 46 -- --

162

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product, 1949-2012 Primary Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product, 1949-2012 (Thousand Btu per Chained (2009) Dollar) Note: See "Real Dollars" in Glossary. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.7. 16 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 1.7 Primary Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP Petroleum and Natural Gas Other Energy a Total Petroleum and Natural Gas Other Energy a Total Quadrillion Btu Billion Chained (2009) Dollars Thousand Btu per Chained (2009) Dollar 1950 ............................ 19.284 15.332 34.616 2,181.9 8.84 7.03 15.86 1955

163

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

164

2009 -Asia rld Reneuvable ffxx*rgy Smxlgr&$$ XSSS * Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production Btu in Fuel Total Btu Spent for One Btu Available at Fuel Pumps "In summary, bioethanol may play

165

Annual Energy Review 1994. highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quadrillion Quadrillion Btu Highlights: Annual Energy Review 1994 At the halfway mark of this century, coal was the leading source of energy produced in the United States. Now, as we approach the end of the 20th century, coal is still the leading source of energy produced in this country (Figure 1). Between those points of time, however, dramatic changes occurred in the composition of our Nation's energy production. For example, crude oil and natural gas plant liquids production overtook coal production in the early 1950s. That source was matched by natural gas for a few years in the mid-1970s, and then, in the early 1980s, coal regained its prominence. After 1985, crude oil production suffered a nearly steady annual decline. While the fossil fuels moved up and down in their indi-

166

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions Indicators Estimates, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Energy Consumption Energy Consumption per Capita Energy Expenditures 1 Energy Expenditures 1 per Capita Gross Output 3 Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of Gross Output 3 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of GDP Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2 per Real Dollar of GDP Quadrillion Btu Million Btu Million Nominal Dollars 4 Nominal Dollars 4 Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Real (2005) Dollars 5 Thousand Btu per Real (2005) Dollar 5 Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide per Million Real (2005) Dollars 5 1949 31.982 214 NA NA NA NA 267.2 NA R 1,843.1 R 17.35 R 1,197 1950 34.616 227 NA NA NA NA

167

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions For additional terms, refer to: the Glossary of Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 for additional greenhouse gas related terms, the Glossary of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for additional manufacturing terms, and Appendix F of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for descriptions of the major industry groups. British Thermal Unit: The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. One quadrillion Btu is 1015 Btu, or 1.055 exajoules. Btu: See British Thermal Unit. Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless, non-poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it traps heat radiated into the atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global warming.

168

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Consumption Total primary energy consumption in the AEO2008 reference case increases at an average rate of 0.9 percent per year, from 100.0 quadrillion Btu in 2006 to 123.8 quadrillion Btu in 2030—7.4 quadrillion Btu less than in the AEO2007 reference case. In 2030, the levels of consumption projected for liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal are all lower in the AEO2008 reference case than in the AEO2007 reference case. Among the most important factors resulting in lower total energy demand in the AEO2008 reference case are lower economic growth, higher energy prices, greater use of more efficient appliances, and slower growth in energy-intensive industries. Figure 2. Delivered energy consumption by sector, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

169

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights print version PDF Logo World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case, which does not include prospective legislation or policies, world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Chart data

170

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption, which was 101.4 quadrillion Btu in 2007, grows by 10 percent in the AEO2012 Reference case, from 98.2 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 108.0 quadrillion Btu in 2035-6 quadrillion Btu less than the AEO2011 projection for 2035. The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 83 percent of total U.S. energy demand in 2010 to 77 percent in 2035. Biofuel consumption has been growing and is expected to continue to grow over the projection period. However, the projected increase would present challenges, particularly for volumes of ethanol beyond the saturation level of the E10 gasoline pool. Those additional volumes are likely to be slower in reaching the market, as infrastructure and consumer demand adjust. In

171

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation figure data Delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector remains relatively constant at about 27 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 6). Energy consumption by LDVs (including commercial light trucks) declines in the Reference case, from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to incorporation of the model year 2017 to 2025 GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs. Despite the projected increase in LDV miles traveled, energy consumption for LDVs further decreases after 2025, to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2035, as a result of fuel economy improvements achieved through stock turnover as older, less efficient vehicles are replaced by newer, more fuel-efficient vehicles. Beyond 2035, LDV energy demand begins to level off

172

Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Motor Gasoline, no E85 Pipeline Other E85 Jet Fuel

173

Supplement Tables to the Annual Energy Outlook 2005  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) New England 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014...

174

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 5.1 - U.S. Total and Delivered Energy (Overview) (Quadrillion Btu per year) 1980 1990 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 7 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Total Consumption by Source 1...

175

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SIC Code Industry Group Total Net Electricity Natural Gas Petro-leum Coal Other (MMTC/ Quadrillion Btu) Total: 371.7: 131.1: 93.5: 87.3: 56.8: 3.1: ...

176

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, June 2013 22 Energy...

177

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 5.2 - Electricity Flow Diagram (Quadrillion Btu) Source: EIA, Annual Energy Review 2004, DOEEIA-0384(2004) (Washington, D.C., August 2005), Diagram 5. Notes: a Blast...

178

DOE/EIA-0304 Survey of Large Combustors:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

consumption in the United States has been approximated at 25 to 26 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu).- Manufacturin g is by far the largest components totaling 12.9...

179

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption.
2011-07-25T20:15:39Z...

180

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Total f Coal Natural Gas b Petro- leum c Total d Hydro-...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

AEO2012 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2012 Early Release Overview Total U.S. consumption of liquid fuels, including both fossil fuels and biofuels, grows from 37.2 quadrillion Btu (19.2 million barrels per day)...

182

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Appendix F Table F10. Total Non-OECD delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sectorfuel Projections Average annual percent change,...

183

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Appendix F Table F16. Delivered energy consumption in the Middle East by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sectorfuel Projections Average annual percent...

184

t2t3.PDF  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (1 of 3) (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) New England 1999- 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008...

185

sup_t2t3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (1 of 3) (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) New England 2000- 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009...

186

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

187

--No Title--  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

188

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2011 Energy Imports Energy Exports 10 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Quadrillion Btu Petroleum...

189

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Table A17. Renewable Energy, Consumption by Sector and Source 1 (Quadrillion Btu per Year) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020...

190

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy 1 Electricity Net Imports 3 Total Coal Coal Coke Net Imports 3 Natural Gas 4...

191

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Years, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Imports Exports Net Imports 1 Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Petroleum Bio- fuels 4 Elec- tricity Total Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas...

192

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biomass (lignin) and biogas for process heat. Theylignin/BTU- fuel) and emission factors for biogas (g/BTU-gas) by biogas-use factors (BTU-gas/BTU-fuel). The emission

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

194

Co-production of electricity and alternate fuels from coal. Final report, August 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calderon process and its process development unit, PDU, were originally conceived to produce two useful products from a bituminous coal: a desulfurized medium BTU gas containing primarily CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O; and a desulfurized low BTU gas containing these same constituents plus N{sub 2} from the air used to provide heat for the process through the combustion of a portion of the fuel. The process was viewed as a means for providing both a synthesis gas for liquid fuel production (perhaps CH{sub 3}OH, alternatively CH{sub 4} or NH{sub 3}) and a pressurized, low BTU fuel gas, for gas turbine based power generation. The Calderon coal process comprises three principle sections which perform the following functions: coal pyrolysis in a continuous, steady flow unit based on coke oven technology; air blown, slagging, coke gasification in a moving bed unit based on a blast furnace technology; and a novel, lime pebble based, product gas processing in which a variety of functions are accomplished including the cracking of hydrocarbons and the removal of sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and of particulates from both the medium and low BTU gases. The product gas processing unit, based on multiple moving beds, has also been conceived to regenerate the lime pebbles and recover sulfur as elemental S.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Monthly energy review, January 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication contains statistical information and data analysis of energy production and consumption within the major energy industries of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy and oil and gas resource development. Energy production during October 1993 totaled 5.5-quadrillion Btu, a 3.0 percent decrease from the level of production during October 1992. Coal production decreased 5.6 percent, petroleum production decreased 3.4 percent, and natural gas production increased 1.9 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.0 percent from the level of production during October 1992. Energy consumption during October 1993 totaled 6.7 quadrillion Btu, 0.9 percent above the level of consumption during October 1992. Natural gas consumption increased 6.5 percent, coal consumption rose 2.9 percent, and petroleum consumption was down 1.3 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 5.5 percent from the level of 1 year earlier.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 xvii Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 0 30 60 90 120 Quadrillion Btu Figure 1. Energy Overview The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. The Nation imported more energy to fill the gap. In 2002, net imported energy accounted for 26 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 per Chained (1996) Dollar Thousand Btu Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product Over the second half of the 20th century, the rate at which energy was consumed per dollar of the economy's output of goods and services fell dramatically. By the end of the century, the rate was half of the mid-century

198

Energy Perspectives - AER 2004, August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 25 50 75 100 125 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2004, net imported energy accounted for 29 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 per Chained (2000) Dollar Thousand Btu Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

199

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2007, net imported energy accounted for 29 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Primary Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2000) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

200

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Review 2009 Annual Energy Review 2009 xix 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to meet its needs. In 2009, net imported energy accounted for 24 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Primary Energy Overview Energy Perspectives Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2006, net imported energy accounted for 30 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2000) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

202

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Expenditures Indicators Estimates Energy Consumption and Expenditures Indicators Estimates Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 Energy Expenditures, 1970-2010 Energy Consumption per Real Dollar² of Gross Domestic Product, 1949-2011 Energy Consumption per Capita, Energy Expenditures per Capita, Energy Expenditures as Share of Gross 1949-2011 1970-2010 Domestic Product and Gross Output,³ 1987-2010 12 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 Billion Nominal Dollars¹ 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Thousand Btu per Real (2005) Dollar² ¹ See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. ² In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price deflators

203

Comparison of elementary geothermal-brine power-production processes  

SciTech Connect

From applied technology geothermal committee meeting; Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA (7 Aug 1973). A comparison of three simple geothermal power- production systems shows that the flashed steam and the compound systems are favored for use with high-temperature brines. The binary system becomes economically competitive only when used on low-temperature brines (enthalpies less than 350 Btu/lb). Geothermal power appears to be economically attractive even when low-temperature brines are used. (auth)

Green, M.A.; Laird, A.D.K.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Total, 1949-2012 Petroleum Products Supplied as Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1949-2012 By Product, October 2013 50 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Quadrillion Btu 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Percent d 0.074 0.002 0.708 0.244 0.001 0.258 0.022 1.462 0.061 0.033 0.302 Asphalt Aviation Distillate Jet Kerosene Liquefied Lubricants Motor Petroleum Residual Other 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Quadrillion Btu a Includes renewable diesel fuel (including biodiesel) blended into distil- late fuel oil. b Includes kerosene-type jet fuel only. c Includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

205

Synthesis gas production  

SciTech Connect

Raw synthesis gas produced by the gasification of coal, heavy oil or similar carbonaceous material is contacted with a reforming catalyst at a temperature in the range between about 1000/sup 0/ and about 1800/sup 0/F and at a pressure between about 100 and about 2000 psig prior to adjustment of the carbon monoxide-to-hydrogen ratio and treatment of the gas to increase its Btu content. This catalytic reforming step eliminates C/sub 2/+ compounds in the gas which tend to form tarry downstream waste products requiring further treatment, obviates polymerization problems which may otherwise interfere with upgrading of the gas by means of the water gas shift and methanation reactions, and improves overall process thermal efficiency by making possible efficient low level heat recovery.

Kalina, T.; Moore, R.E.

1977-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

206

Computer Optimization of Steam Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As fuel costs continued to rise sharply during the 1970' s, the staff at Exxon's Benicia Refinery realized there was a growing economic incentive to optimize the production of high pressure steam. A significant percentage of the Refinery's total energy is consumed in generating high pressure steam. Recently, a computer program was implemented to optimize high pressure steam production. The first challenge in developing the program was to provide reliable analog and digital instrumentation allowing simultaneous analog header control along with effective digital steam flow control. Once appropriate instrumentation became available, the effort focused on identifying the best approach for developing the computer control program. After screening several alternatives, it became apparent that we were dealing with an allocation problem which could be effectively handled with a linear program. The control program has performed well since it was commissioned. It has experienced a service factor of greater than 95% while reducing energy consumption of the boilers by over 500 million Btu's per day.

Todd, C. H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Monthly energy review, March 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Energy production during December 1997 totaled 5.9 quadrillion Btu, a 2.8 percent increase from the level of production during December 1996. Coal production increased 9.5 percent, natural gas production increased 3.9 percent, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.1 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.9 percent from the level of production during December 1996.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

< Introduction Table 1. Comparison of projections in the AEO2014 and AEO2013 Reference case, 2011-2040 2025 2040 Energy and economic factors 2011 2012 AEO2014 AEO2013 AEO2014 AEO2013 Primary energy production (quadrillion Btu) Crude oil and natural gas plant liquids 15.31 17.08 23.03 18.70 19.99 17.01 Dry natural gas 23.04 24.59 32.57 29.22 38.37 33.87 Coal 22.22 20.60 22.36 22.54 22.61 23.54 Nuclear/Uranium 8.26 8.05 8.15 9.54 8.49 9.44 Hydropower 3.11 2.67 2.84 2.86 2.90 2.92 Biomass 3.90 3.78 5.08 5.27 5.61 6.96 Other renewable energy 1.70 1.97 3.09 2.32 3.89 3.84 Other 0.80 0.41 0.24 0.85 0.24 0.89 Total 78.35 79.15 97.36 91.29 102.09 98.46 Net imports (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum and other liquid fuelsa 18.78 16.55 11.41 15.89 13.65 15.99

209

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal On This Page Early declines in coal... Long-term outlook for coal... Growth in average... Substantial changes in coal... Concerns about GHG... Early declines in coal production are more than offset by growth after 2014 U.S. coal production declined by 2.3 quadrillion Btu in 2009. In the AEO2011 Reference case, production does not return to its 2008 level until after 2025. Between 2008 and 2014 a potential recovery in coal production is kept in check by continued low natural gas prices and increased generation from renewables and nuclear capacity. After 2014, coal production grows at an average annual rate of 1.1 percent through 2035, with increases in coal use for electricity generation and for the production of synthetic liquids. figure data Western coal production increases through 2035 (Figure 101) but at a much

210

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 85. Cellulose ethanol production, 2005-2030 (billion gallons per year). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 86. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Lower Costs, Greater Demand Could Spur Cellulose Ethanol Production For AEO2007, two alternative ethanol cases examine the potential impact on ethanol demand of lower costs for cellulosic ethanol production, in combination with policies that increase sales of FFVs [170]. The reference case projects that 10.5 percent of new light-duty vehicles will be capable

211

Biomass Energy Production Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Energy Production Incentive Biomass Energy Production Incentive Biomass Energy Production Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 100,000 per fiscal year per taxpayer; 2.1 million per fiscal year for all taxpayers Program Info Start Date 5/29/2008 State South Carolina Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount 0.01 per kWh / 0.30 per therm Provider South Carolina Energy Office In 2007 South Carolina enacted the ''Energy Freedom and Rural Development Act'', which provides production incentives for certain biomass-energy facilities. Eligible systems earn $0.01 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for electricity generated or $0.30 per therm (100,000 Btu) for energy produced

212

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. Includes 0.1 quadrillion Btu of electricity net

213

DOE/EIA-0304 Survey of Large Combustors:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

304 304 Survey of Large Combustors: Report on Alternative- Fuel Burning Capabilities of Large Boilers in 1979 U.S. Department of Energy Energy information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use Energy End Use Division Introduction During recent years, total annual industrial energy consumption in the United States has been approximated at 25 to 26 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu).^- Manufacturin g is by far the largest components totaling 12.9 quadrillion Btu of purchased fuels and electricity for heat and power during 1979.2 QJ this amount, 10.5 quadrillion Btu was accounted for by purchased fuels alone (e.g., fuel oil, coal, natural gas, etc.). Other than fuel consumption by type and industrial classificati on, very little information existed on specific fuel consumption characterist

214

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption, which was 101.7 quadrillion Btu in 2007, grows by 21 percent in the AEO2011 Reference case, from 94.8 quadrillion Btu in 2009 to 114.3 quadrillion Btu in 2035, to about the same level as in the AEO2010 projection in 2035. The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 84 percent of total U.S. energy demand in 2009 to 78 percent in 2035, reflecting the impacts of CAFE standards and provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (EIEA2008), Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA2007), and State legislation. Although the situation is uncertain, EIA's present view of the projected rates of technology development and market penetration of cellulosic

215

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

216

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Overview Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2035. figure data In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD nations),2 where demand is driven by strong long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD nations increases by 85 percent in the Reference case, as compared with an increase of 18 percent for the OECD economies.

217

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

218

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1: World Energy and Economic Outlook 1: World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last yearÂ’s outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. Figure 7. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Country Grouping, 2003-2030 (Quadrillion Btu) Printer friendly version Region 2003 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Average Annual Percent Change, 2003-2030

219

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Overview Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2035. figure data In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD nations),2 where demand is driven by strong long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD nations increases by 85 percent in the Reference case, as compared with an increase of 18 percent for the OECD economies.

220

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Overview In the IEO2013 Reference case, which does not include prospective greenhouse gas reduction policies, coal remains the second largest energy source worldwide. World coal consumption rises at an average rate of 1.3 percent per year, from 147 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 180 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 220 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 70). The near-term increase reflects significant increases in coal consumption by China, India, and other non-OECD countries. In the longer term, growth of coal consumption decelerates as policies and regulations encourage the use of cleaner energy sources, natural gas becomes more economically competitive as a result of shale gas development, and growth of industrial use of coal slows largely as a result of China's industrial activities. Consumption is dominated by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

222

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

223

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector diagram image Footnotes: 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public.

224

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 1 - World Energy and Economic Outlook In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use; OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the NON-OECD Economies by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

225

DOE-EIA-0484(2010)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case-which reflects a scenario assuming that current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). The global economic recession that began in 2007 and continued into 2009 has had a profound impact on world energy demand in the near term. Total world marketed energy consumption contracted by 1.2 percent in 2008 and by an estimated 2.2 percent in 2009, as manufactur- ing and consumer

226

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World energy demand and economic outlook World energy demand and economic outlook Overview In the IEO2013 Reference case, world energy consumption increases from 524 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040, a 30-year increase of 56 percent (Figure 12 and Table 1). More than 85 percent of the increase in global energy demand from 2010 to 2040 occurs among the developing nations outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD), driven by strong economic growth and expanding populations. In contrast, OECD member countries are, for the most part, already more mature energy consumers, with slower anticipated economic growth and little or no anticipated population growth.7 Figure 12. World total energy consumption, 1990-2040.

227

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

228

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation sector energy demand Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy in 2040, the same as the level of energy demand in 2011 (Figure 70). The projection of no growth in transportation energy demand differs markedly from the historical trend, which saw 1.1-percent average annual growth from 1975 to 2011 [126]. No growth in transportation energy demand is the result of declining energy use for LDVs, which offsets increased energy use for heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), aircraft, marine, rail, and pipelines. Energy demand for LDVs declines from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2040, in contrast to 0.9-percent average annual growth

229

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential from Market Trends Residential from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

230

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. The IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand from 2004 to 2030. Total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase from 447 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 quadrillion Btu in 2030-a 57-percent increase over the projection period (Table 1 and Figure 8). The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Generally, countries outside the OECD 3 have higher projected economic growth rates and more rapid population growth

231

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: September 19, 2011 | Next Scheduled Release Date: June 10, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2011) No International Energy Outlook will be released in 2012. The next edition of the report is scheduled for release in Spring 2013 Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for

232

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

233

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),2 known as non-OECD, where demand is driven by strong, long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD countries increases by 90 percent; in OECD countries, the increase

234

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Future of U.S. Domestic Oil and Gas Production For International Energy Forum January 21, 2013 | Riyadh, KSA By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski January 21, 2013 Growth in energy production outstrips growth in consumption leading to reduction in net imports 3 U.S. energy production and consumption quadrillion Btu

235

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Monetary Fund International Monetary Fund January 14, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski January 14, 2013 Growth in energy production outstrips growth in consumption leading to reduction in net imports 3 U.S. energy production and consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release

236

INTEGRATED RESULTS APPENDIX D-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.94 Natural Gas 2.70 2.62 2.90 3.01 3.02 3.04 Steam Coal 1.27 1.20 1.12 1.06 0.99 0.93 Energy Consumption Coal 1.27 1.20 1.77 1.70 1.62 1.57 Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Petroleum Subtotal 36.5 38.9 41 Coal 1.27 1.20 2.42 2.36 2.27 2.21 Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Petroleum Subtotal 36.5 38.9 40

237

Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8  

SciTech Connect

This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

U.S. Energy Flow - 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared similar flow charts of U.S. energy consumption since 1972. The chart follows the flow of individual fuels and compares these on the basis of a common energy unit of quadrillion British thermal units (Btu). A quadrillion, or ''quad,'' is 10{sup 15}. One Btu is the quantity of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 F at or near 39.2 F. The width of each colored line across this chart is in proportion to the amount of quads conveyed. (Exception: lines showing extremely small amounts have been made wide enough to be clearly visible.) In most cases, the numbers used in this chart have been rounded to the nearest tenth of a quad, although the original data was published in hundredths or thousandths of a quad. As a consequence of independent rounding, some of the summary numbers may not appear to be a precise total of their various components. The first chart in this document uses quadrillion Btu's to conform with data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA). However, the second chart is expressed in exajoules. A joule is the metric unit for heat. One Btu equals 1,055.06 joules; and one quadrillion Btu's equals 1.055 exajoules (an exajoule is 10{sup 18} joules).

Kaiper, G V

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference March 01, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Adam Sieminski , Platts, March 01, 2013 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu

242

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IFRI IFRI March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 History Projections 2011 36% 20%

243

ECUT energy data reference series: ammonia synthesis energy-use and capital stock information  

SciTech Connect

Energy requirements for ammonia synthesis totaled 0.55 quadrillion Btu of natural gas in 1980 and 28,500 MMBtu (8.3 x 10/sup 6/ kWh) of electricity. Efficiencies ranged from 0.72 to 0.8 for natural gas and 0.65 for electricity. Ammonia production in 1980 is estimated at 21 million tones. In the year 2000, U.S. ammonia production is estimated to be between 27 to 34 million tones with 19 to 31 million tons being produced using natural gas. A most likely value of 25 million tons of ammonia from natural gas feedstock is projected. As much as 20% of the energy from natural gas fuel could be saved if a more active catalyst could be developed that would reduce the operating pressure of ammonia synthesis to 1 atm.

Young, J.K.; Johnson, D.R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

SciTech Connect

For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

SciTech Connect

For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Programs and Their Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has been working with industry since 1976 to encourage the development and adoption of new, energy-efficient technologies. ITP has helped industry not only use energy and materials more efficiently but also improve environmental performance, product quality, and productivity. To help ITP determine the impacts of its programs, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) periodically reviews and analyzes ITP program benefits. PNNL contacts vendors and users of ITP-sponsored technologies that have been commercialized, estimates the number of units that have penetrated the market, conducts engineering analyses to estimate energy savings from the new technologies, and estimates air pollution and carbon emission reductions. This paper discusses the results of PNNL's most recent review (conducted in 2009). From 1976-2008, the commercialized technologies from ITP's research and development programs and other activities have cumulatively saved 9.27 quadrillion Btu, with a net cost savings of $63.91 billion.

Weakley, S. A.; Roop, J. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass feedstock price Units: million Btu Supporting Information: LHV Description: Electricity price Units: kWh Description: Hydrogen fill pressure Units: psi Description:...

248

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

249

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

250

Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Boiler Commercial Boiler Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler October 7, 2013 - 10:27am Addthis What's Covered All Federal purchases of hot water or steam boilers (using either oil or gas) with a rated capacity (Btu/h) of 300,000-10,000,000 must meet or exceed FEMP-designated thermal efficiencies. FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Boilers Table 1 displays the FEMP-designated minimum efficiency requirements for

251

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal exec summary Executive Summary Assuming no additional constraints on CO2 emissions, coal remains the largest source of electricity generation in the AEO2011 Reference case because of continued reliance on existing coal-fired plants. EIA projects few new central-station coal-fired power plants, however, beyond those already under construction or supported by clean coal incentives. Generation from coal increases by 25 percent from 2009 to 2035, largely as a result of increased use of existing capacity; however, its share of the total generation mix falls from 45 percent to 43 percent as a result of more rapid increases in generation from natural gas and renewables over the same period. See more Mkt trends Market Trends U.S. coal production declined by 2.3 quadrillion Btu in 2009. In the

252

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

253

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

254

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 11.59 12.16 15.95 14.50 13.47 13.40 13.12 0.3% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 2.78 2.88 4.14 4.20 3.85 3.87 3.89 1.0% Dry natural gas ...................................................... 21.82 23.51 27.19 29.22 30.44 32.04 33.87 1.3% Coal 1 ...................................................................... 22.04 22.21 21.74 22.54 23.25 23.60 23.54 0.2%

255

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market Trends-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 33. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 34. Primary energy use by fuel, 2005-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Increases Through 2030 The future path of U.S. energy demand will depend on trends in population, economic growth, energy prices, and technology adoption. AEO2007 cases developed to illustrate the uncertainties associated with those factors include low and high economic growth cases, low and high price cases, and

256

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

257

C:\WEBSHARE\WWWROOT\eppats\errataeppats.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Advanced Technology Scenarios 10/12/2001 The Gross Domestic Product rows in Tables C2 on pages 110 -111, and D2 on pages 164 -165 are corrected as follows: Table C2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Continued) (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source 1999 Projections 2005 2010 Reference Reference with Emissions Limits Advanced Technology Advanced Technology with Emissions Limits Reference Reference with Emissions Limits Advanced Technology Advanced Technology with Emissions Limits Total Energy Consumption Distillate Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.53 8.77 8.67 8.58 8.49 9.51 9.39 9.02 8.91 Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.15 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13

258

AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu and the U.S. Dollar. The data is broken down into production, imports, exports, consumption and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption disposition energy exports imports Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary- Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

259

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 1.4b Primary Energy Exports by Source and Total Net Imports (Quadrillion Btu) Exports Net Imports a Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Petroleum Biofuels d Electricity Total Total Crude Oil b Petroleum Products c Total 1950 Total ...................... 0.786 0.010 0.027 0.202 0.440 0.642 NA 0.001 1.465 0.448 1955 Total ...................... 1.465 .013 .032 .067 .707 .774 NA .002 2.286 .504 1960 Total ...................... 1.023 .009 .012 .018 .413 .431 NA .003 1.477 2.710 1965 Total ...................... 1.376 .021 .027 .006 .386 .392 NA .013 1.829 4.063 1970 Total ...................... 1.936 .061 .072 .029 .520 .549 NA

260

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock  

SciTech Connect

We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(quadrillion Btu)" " ","Non-OECD","OECD" 1990,154.362,200.481 2000,171.4905222,234.4840388 2010,281.673,242.25 2020,375.271,254.561 2030,460.011,269.176 2040,535.067,284.578...

262

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 75. Non-OECD coal consumption by region, 1980, 2010, 2020, and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Total Non?OECD 1980.00 12.69 15.93 2.65 31.28 2010.00 8.92 88.42 5.30 ...

263

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Table 1. Summary of results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Summary of results Table 1. Summary of results Energy/Economic Factors 2000 2001 2025 Reference Low Economic Growth High Economic Growth Low World Oil Price High World Oil Price Primary Production (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 15.14 14.94 15.05 14.38 15.45 14.12 15.92 Natural Gas 19.50 19.97 27.47 25.24 28.72 26.99 27.99 Coal 22.58 23.97 29.29 27.81 31.08 29.18 29.74 Nuclear Power 7.87 8.03 8.43 8.43 8.43 8.43 8.43 Renewable Energy 5.96 5.33 8.78 8.26 9.38 8.82 8.76 Other 1.09 0.57 0.80 0.80 0.83 0.81 0.82 Total Primary Production 72.15 72.81 89.83 84.93 93.90 88.36 91.66 Net Imports (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum (including SPR) 22.28 23.29 41.23 37.63 45.82 44.06 37.97 Natural Gas 3.62 3.73 7.93 6.93 9.29 7.63 8.01 Coal/Other (- indicates export) -0.84 -0.54 0.27 0.22 0.38 0.26 0.27 Total Net Imports 25.06 26.48 49.43 44.78 55.49 51.96 46.25 Discrepancy -2.18 1.99 0.19

264

Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 - Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Welcome to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Welcome to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 Table 1. Summary of results for five cases Sensitivity Factors 1999 2000 2020 Reference Low Economic Growth High Economic Growth Low World Oil Price High World Oil Price Primary Production (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 15.06 15.04 15.95 15.52 16.39 14.40 17.73 Natural Gas 19.20 19.59 29.25 27.98 29.72 28.54 30.03 Coal 23.15 22.58 28.11 26.88 30.08 27.58 29.04 Nuclear Power 7.74 8.03 7.49 7.38 7.49 7.31 7.58 Renewable Energy 6.69 6.46 8.93 8.59 9.37 8.90 8.97 Other 1.66 1.10 0.93 0.91 0.73 0.40 1.06 Total Primary Production 73.50 72.80 90.66 87.26 93.79 87.13 94.40 Net Imports (quadrillion Btu)

265

U.S. Pellet Industry Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a survey of the U.S. Pellet Industry, its current capacity, economic drivers, and projected demand for biomass pellets to meet future energy consumption needs. Energy consumption in the US is projected to require an ever increasing portion of renewable energy sources including biofuels, among which are wood, and agrictulrual biomass. Goals set by federal agencies will drive an ever increasing demand for biomass. The EIA projections estimate that renewable energy produced by 2035 will be roughly 10% of all US energy consumption. Further analysis of the biofuels consumption in the US shows that of the renewable energy sources excluding biofuels, nearly 30% are wood or biomass waste. This equates to roughly 2% of the total energy consumption in the US coming from biomass in 2009, and the projections for 2035 show a strong increase in this amount. As of 2009, biomass energy production equates to roughly 2-2.5 quadrillion Btu. The EIA projections also show coal as providing 21% of energy consumed. If biomass is blended at 20% to co-fire coal plants, this will result in an additional 4 quadrillion Btu of biomass consumption. The EISA goals aim to produce 16 billion gal/year of cellulosic biofuels, and the US military has set goals for biofuels production. The Air Force has proposed to replace 50% of its domestic fuel requirements with alternative fuels from renewable sources by 2016. The Navy has likewise set a goal to provide 50% of its energy requirements from alternative sources. The Department of Energy has set similarly ambitious goals. The DOE goal is to replace 40% of 2004 gasoline use with biofuels. This equates to roughly 60 billion gal/year, of which, 45 billion gal/year would be produced from lignocellulosic resources. This would require 530 million dry tons of herbaceous and woody lignocellulosic biomass per year.

Corrie I. Nichol; Jacob J. Jacobsen; Richard D. Boardman

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

267

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

268

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source, Fiscal Years 1975-2011 2 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source, Fiscal Years 1975-2011 Total U.S. Government Energy Consumption By Major Energy Source By Selected Petroleum Product 26 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Jet Fuel 1 Distillate fuel oil and residual fuel oil. 2 Includes ethanol blended into motor gasoline. Note: U.S. Government's fiscal year was October 1 through September 30, except in 1975 and 1976 when it was July 1 through June 30. Source: Table 1.12. 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 Quadrillion Btu 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Quadrillion Btu 1.57 1.38 1.40 1.36 1.38 1.37 1.42 1.45 1.43 1.48 1.45 1.41 1.47 1.36 1.46 1.44 1.46 1.29 1.25 1.18 1.13 1.11 1.09 1.04 1.01 0.99 1.00 1.04 1.14 1.19 1.16 1.07 1.09 1.12 1.09

269

Analysis of the results of Federal incentives used to stimulate energy production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research program analyzed the Federal incentives used to stimulate nuclear, hydro, coal, gas, oil, and electricity production in order to supply what was learned to the selection of an incentives strategy to induce new energy production from renewable resources. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter 2 examines the problem of estimating effects from a theoretical perspective. Methods of quantifying and identifying the many interactive effects of government actions are discussed. Chapter 3 presents a generic analysis of the result of Federal incentives. Chapters 4 through 9 deal with incentives to energy forms - nuclear, hydro, coal, oil, gas, and electricity. Chapter 10 summarizes the estimated results of the incentives, which are presented in terms of their quantity and price impacts. The incentive costs per million Btu of induced energy production is also discussed. Chapter 11 discusses the parity issue, that is an equivalence between Federal incentives to renewable resources and to traditional energy resources. Any analysis of incentives for solar needs will profit from an analysis of the costs of solar incentives per million Btu compared with those for traditional energy forms. Chapter 12 concludes the analysis, discussing the history of traditional energy incentives as a guide to solar-energy incentives. 216 references, 38 figures, 91 tables.

Cone, B.W.; Emery, J.C.; Fassbender, A.G.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

271

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption is projected to grow by 57 percent over the 2004 to 2030 period. Total world energy use rises from 447 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 qua- drillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). Global energy demand grows despite the relatively high world oil and natural gas prices that are projected to persist into the mid-term outlook. The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2004 to 2030 is projected for nations outside

272

Drilling often results in both oil and natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar › Energy in Brief ... Btu = British thermal units. ... A future Today in Energy article will focus on how drilling efficiency relates to ...

273

Natural Gas Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production Processing: The Crucial Link Between Natural Gas Production and Its Transportation to Market Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, January 2006 1 The natural gas product fed into the mainline gas transportation system in the United States must meet specific quality measures in order for the pipeline grid to operate properly. Consequently, natural gas produced at the wellhead, which in most cases contains contaminants 1 and natural gas liquids, 2 must be processed, i.e., cleaned, before it can be safely delivered to the high-pressure, long-distance pipelines that transport the product to the consuming public. Natural gas that is not within certain specific gravities, pressures, Btu content range, or water content levels will

274

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix A. Feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to SNG. Plant production is 21.6 MM scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $95,115,000 - September, 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. For utility financing, the gas production costs are respectively $5.09, $5.56, $6.50, and $8.34 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton delivered to the plant at a moisture content of 49.50 wt %. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $6.62, $7.11, $8.10, and $10.06 per MM Btu. The cost calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for by-product char is 58.3%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Solar production of industrial process steam at Ore-Ida frozen-fried-potato plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TRW is designing a system for the demonstration of the Solar Production of Industrial Process Steam. Included, besides the Conceptual Design, is an Environmental Impact Assessment and a System Safety Analysis report. The system as proposed and conceptualized consists of an array of 9520 square feet of parabolic trough concentrating solar energy collectors which generate pressurized hot water. The pressurized water is allowed to flash to steam at 300 psi (417/sup 0/F) and fed directly into the high pressure steam lines of the Ore-Ida Foods, Inc., processing plant in Ontario, Oregon. Steam is normally generated in the factory by fossil-fired boilers and is used by means of a steam-to-oil heat exchanger for the process of frying potatoes in their frozen food processing line. The high pressure steam is also cascaded down to 125 psi for use in other food processing operations. This solar system will generate 2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr during peak periods of insolation. Steam requirements in the plant for frying potatoes are: 43 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr at 300 psi and 52 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr at the lower temperatures and pressures. The Ontario plant operates on a 24 hr/day schedule six days a week during the potato processing campaigns and five days a week for the remainder of the year. The seventh day and sixth day, respectively, use steam for cleanup operations. An analysis of the steam generated, based on available annual insolation data and energy utilized in the plant, is included.

Cherne, J.M.; Gelb, G.H.; Pinkerton, J.D.; Paige, S.F.

1978-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Methane production from hog manure in small-scale units  

SciTech Connect

Fuel gas production from manure on small-sized (100 to 500 hogs) family-operated farms can become an economically sound proposition within a decade if current price rise trends for fossil fuels continue. Minimum plant cost resulting from an optimistic assumption of the state of digestion technology leads to a fuel gas cost about equal to LPG cost on a Btu basis. Hog farms with over 3000 animals would permit digester gas costs, which would match LPG cost. It may be better to build a plant before LPG costs rise to meet gas costs in order to take advantage of lower plant costs, which will generate future cost savings. The credit for gas produced makes digestion competitive with aerobic methods for manure disposal whose capital costs are much lower.

Silveston, P.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Vehicle Technologies Office: DOE Brochure Highlights Ethanol...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ethanol production beginning with fertilizer manufacture, GREET determined that producing ethanol from corn requires 0.74 million Btu fossil energy input per million Btu of ethanol...

278

Fuel.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

F14: Other Petroleum Products Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2011 State Consumption Prices Expenditures Thousand Barrels Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu...

279

Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The existing trace element washability data on Illinois coals are based on float-sink methods, and these data are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on samples from modern preparation plants, as well as other product (as-shipped) coals. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability data on as-shipped coals that were collected during 1992--1993 from Illinois mines. During the second quarter, froth flotation/release analysis (FF/RA) tests on 34 project samples were completed at {minus}100, {minus}200, and {minus}400 mesh particle sizes. Products from the FF/RA tests were analyzed for ash, moisture, and some for total S and heating value (BTU), and the resulting data are being used to construct a series of washability curves. For example, these curves can show variation in BTU or combustible recovery as a function of the amount of ash or S rejected. Composite samples, each having 80% of the total BTU (or combustibles), were prepared for the {minus}100 and {minus}200 mesh FF/RA tests and submitted for trace element analysis. The composite samples for the {minus}400 mesh FF/RA tests will be submitted soon, and the analytical results are expected to be available in 3--4 months. The trace element data on the composite samples will indicate the potential for the removal of each element from the coals at the chosen flotation conditions and particle sizes.

Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D.; Khan, S. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass: feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 200 tons of wood per day  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a result of an additional study made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The report has as its basis the original 2000 tons of wood per day study generated from process development unit testing performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of this additional work was to determine the feasibility of a smaller scale plant one-tenth the size of the original or 200 tons of dry wood feed per day. Plant production based on this wood feed is 2.16 MM Scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per Scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $26,680,000 - September 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood prices represent the cost of unchipped wood delivered to the plant site. For utility financing, the gas production costs are, respectively, $14.34, $14.83, $15.86, and $17.84 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $18.76, $19.26, $20.28, and $22.31 per MM Btu for the corresponding wood costs. The costs calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for char is 57.4%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

282

Energy Utilization in Fermentation Ethanol Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fuel ethanol industry has put into practice several techniques for minimizing energy requirements for ethanol manufacture. Thermal energy usage in fermentation grain ethanol plants has been reduced from the prior practice of 80,900 Btu per gallon ethanol to current demonstrated practice of 49,700 Btu per gallon. Future, state-of-the-art improvements are expected to reduce usage further to 37,000 Btu per gallon or less. The total energy input is projected at 52,000 Btu per gallon after adding in the electrical power. Energy savings have been achieved primarily by flash vapor reuse, pressure cascading of distillation units, and use of more efficient byproduct drying methods. These energy saving techniques should also be useful in other commercial processing applications.

Easley, C. E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

284

An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

285

Use of tamarisk as a potential feedstock for biofuel production.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses the energy and water use of saltcedar (or tamarisk) as biomass for biofuel production in a hypothetical sub-region in New Mexico. The baseline scenario consists of a rural stretch of the Middle Rio Grande River with 25% coverage of mature saltcedar that is removed and converted to biofuels. A manufacturing system life cycle consisting of harvesting, transportation, pyrolysis, and purification is constructed for calculating energy and water balances. On a dry short ton woody biomass basis, the total energy input is approximately 8.21 mmBTU/st. There is potential for 18.82 mmBTU/st of energy output from the baseline system. Of the extractable energy, approximately 61.1% consists of bio-oil, 20.3% bio-char, and 18.6% biogas. Water consumptive use by removal of tamarisk will not impact the existing rate of evapotranspiration. However, approximately 195 gal of water is needed per short ton of woody biomass for the conversion of biomass to biocrude, three-quarters of which is cooling water that can be recovered and recycled. The impact of salt presence is briefly assessed. Not accounted for in the baseline are high concentrations of Calcium, Sodium, and Sulfur ions in saltcedar woody biomass that can potentially shift the relative quantities of bio-char and bio-oil. This can be alleviated by a pre-wash step prior to the conversion step. More study is needed to account for the impact of salt presence on the overall energy and water balance.

Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Norman, Kirsten

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products technical evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the AMAX Research and Development Center are cooperating in the development of a Mild Gasification process that will rapidly devolatilize coals of all ranks at relatively low temperatures between 930{degree} and 1470{degree}F (500{degree}and 800{degree}C) and near atmospheric pressure to produce primary products that include a reactive char, a hydrocarbon condensate, and a low-Btu gas. These will be upgraded in a ``coal refinery`` system having the flexibility to optimize products based on market demand. Task 2 of the four-task development sequence primarily covered bench-scale testing on a 10-gram thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a 1 to 4-lb/hr continuous fluidized-bed reactor (CFBR). Tests were performed to determine product yields and qualities for the two major test coals-one a high-sulfur bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin (Indiana No. 3) and the other a low-sulfur subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin (Wyodak). Results from Task 3, on product upgrading tests performed by AMAX Research and Development (R&D), are also reported. Task 4 included the construction, operation of a Process Research Unit (PRU), and the upgrading of the products. An economic evaluation of a commercial facility was made, based on the data produced in the PRU, CFBR, and the physical cleaning steps.

Ness, R.O. Jr.; Runge, B.; Sharp, L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products technical evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the AMAX Research and Development Center are cooperating in the development of a Mild Gasification process that will rapidly devolatilize coals of all ranks at relatively low temperatures between 930[degree] and 1470[degree]F (500[degree]and 800[degree]C) and near atmospheric pressure to produce primary products that include a reactive char, a hydrocarbon condensate, and a low-Btu gas. These will be upgraded in a coal refinery'' system having the flexibility to optimize products based on market demand. Task 2 of the four-task development sequence primarily covered bench-scale testing on a 10-gram thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a 1 to 4-lb/hr continuous fluidized-bed reactor (CFBR). Tests were performed to determine product yields and qualities for the two major test coals-one a high-sulfur bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin (Indiana No. 3) and the other a low-sulfur subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin (Wyodak). Results from Task 3, on product upgrading tests performed by AMAX Research and Development (R D), are also reported. Task 4 included the construction, operation of a Process Research Unit (PRU), and the upgrading of the products. An economic evaluation of a commercial facility was made, based on the data produced in the PRU, CFBR, and the physical cleaning steps.

Ness, R.O. Jr.; Runge, B.; Sharp, L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table G1. Heat contents Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production .................................................. million Btu per short ton 20.136 Consumption .............................................. million Btu per short ton 19.810 Coke plants ............................................. million Btu per short ton 26.304 Industrial .................................................. million Btu per short ton 23.651 Residential and commercial .................... million Btu per short ton 20.698 Electric power sector ............................... million Btu per short ton 19.370

289

Glass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Production Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hall (2005), “Prices, Production, and Inventories over theProduction Targets ? Guillermo Caruana CEMFI caruana@cem?.esthe theory using monthly production targets of the Big Three

Caruana, Guillermo; Einav, Liran

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Pottery Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul T. Nicholson. ) Pottery Production, Nicholson, UEE 2009Short Citation: Nicholson 2009, Pottery Production. UEE.Paul T. , 2009, Pottery Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Nicholson, Paul T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Cordage Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

294: fig. 15-3). Cordage Production, Veldmeijer, UEE 2009Short Citation: Veldmeijer, 2009, Cordage Production. UEE.André J. , 2009, Cordage Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Veldmeijer, André J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

294

Documentation of the Industrial Minor Fuels and Raw Materials model (MFUEL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the industrial demand for energy is projected by components of the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS), mainly the PURchased Heat and Power System (PURHAPS) and the oil refineries model (REFPRIDE). Other components of IFFS project a few fuel uses that are sometimes considered industrial. MFUEL projects those portions of industrial demand not covered by other components of IFFS: industrial use of motor gasoline, industrial consumption of lubricants and waxes, petrochemical feedstocks, metallurgical coal, special naphthas, natural gas used as a chemical feedstock, asphalt and road oil, petroleum coke, industrial kerosene, industrial hydropower, net imports of coal coke, other petroleum, and LPG used as a feedstock or by gas utilities. Each fuel is projected by a single equation at the national level, based on historical relationships, and then shared out to Federal Regions. MFUEL accounts for 5.01 quadrillion Btu out of the industrial energy total of 19.66 quadrillion in 1983, including 3.52 quadrillion Btu out of the 7.83 quadrillion of industrial petroleum use.

Werbos, P.J.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Renewable Energy Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity net generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Renewable Energy Generation world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 37.3 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 43 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

296

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Efficiency from Executive Summary Efficiency from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

297

Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4%

298

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Overview Figure 65. World coal consumption by region, 1980-2035 figure dataIn the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not include prospective greenhouse gas reduction policies, world coal consumption increases by 50 percent, from 139 quadrillion Btu in 2008 to 209 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 65). Although world coal consumption increases at an average rate of 1.5 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, the growth rates by region are uneven, with total coal consumption for OECD countries remaining near 2008 levels and coal consumption in non-OECD countries increasing at a pace of 2.1 percent per year. As a result, increased use of coal in non-OECD countries accounts for nearly all the growth in world coal consumption over the period. In 2008, coal accounted for 28 percent of world energy consumption (Figure

299

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Highlights picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent from 1999 to 2020. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2001 reference case forecast. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001), world energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent over a 21-year forecast horizon, from 1999 to 2020. Worldwide energy use grows from 382 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1999 to 607 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 2000 influenced this yearÂ’s outlook, including persistently high world oil prices, stronger than anticipated economic recovery in southeast Asia, and

300

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2008 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030.Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 85 percent,compared with an increase of 19 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2005-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. World Oil Prices in Two Cases, 1980-2030 (nominal dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

highlights.gif (3388 bytes) highlights.gif (3388 bytes) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 65 percent from 1996 to 2020. The current economic problems in Asia and Russia have lowered projections relative to last year’s report. In the reference case projections for this International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), world energy consumption reaches 612 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) by 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1)—an increase of 65 percent over the 24-year projection period. The IEO99 projection for the world’s energy demand in 2020 is about 4 percent (almost 30 quadrillion Btu) lower than last year’s projection. The downward revision is based on events in two parts of the world: Asia and Russia. In Asia, the economic crisis that began in early 1997 persisted throughout 1998, as economic

302

Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends From 2009 to 2035, transportation sector energy consumption grows at an average annual rate of 0.6 percent (from 27.2 quadrillion Btu to 31.8 quadrillion Btu), slower than the 1.2 percent average rate from 1975 to 2009. The slower growth is a result of changing demographics, increased LDV fuel economy, and saturation of personal travel demand.[1] References [1] ↑ 1.0 1.1 AEO2011 Transportation Sector Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Transportation&oldid=378906" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

303

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2007 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. Average Annual Growth in Delivered Energy Consumption by Region and End-use Sector, 2004-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. Industrial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

304

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal's share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 199.0 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 54). Coal consumption increases by 2.6 per- cent per year on average from 2004 to 2015, then slows to an average increase of 1.8 percent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and primary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD

305

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of generation and delivery to the customer) are estimated

306

Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Heating and cooling your home uses more energy and costs more money than any other system in your home -- typically making up about 54% of your

307

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources The renewable energy share of total world energy consumption is expected to remain unchanged at 8 percent through 2025, despite a projected 56-percent increase in consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable resources. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, moderate growth in the worldÂ’s consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy resources is projected over the next 24 years. Renewable energy sources are not expected to compete economically with fossil fuels in the mid-term forecast. In the absence of significant government policies aimed at reducing the impacts of carbon-emitting energy sources on the environment, it will be difficult to extend the use of renewables on a large scale. IEO2003 projects that consumption of renewable energy worldwide will grow by 56 percent, from 32 quadrillion Btu in 2001 to 50 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 69).

308

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2008 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 65 percent and international coal trade increases by 53 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coalÂ’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2005 to 29 percent in 2030. Figure 46. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 47. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 48. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

309

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.jpg (1776 bytes) coal.jpg (1776 bytes) CoalÂ’s share of world energy consumption falls slightly in the IEO99 forecast. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia, but it is projected to lose market share to natural gas in some other areas of the world. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1996. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 30

310

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 5 - Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coalÂ’s share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 54. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 55. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to

311

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2009 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 49 percent from 2006 to 2030, and coalÂ’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2006 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 42. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 43. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 44. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

312

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage HIGHLIGHTS World energy consumption is projected to increase by 60 percent from 1997 to 2020. Recent price developments in world oil markets and economic recovery in Southeast Asia have altered projections relative to last yearÂ’s report. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000), world energy consumption increases by 60 percent over a 23-year forecast period, from 1997 to 2020. Energy use worldwide increases from 380 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1997 to 608 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 1999 are reflected in this yearÂ’s outlook. Shifting short-term world oil markets, the beginnings

313

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

314

Renewable Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

315

renewable electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electricity electricity Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

316

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 -0.0% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.8% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.58 0.59 0.51 0.45 0.40 0.36 0.32 -2.1%

317

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1997. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU). In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 33 percent between 1985 and 1997, displaced in considerable measure by

318

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

319

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2009 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 73 percent, compared with an increase of 15 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. World Oil Prices in the IEO2009 and IEO2008 Reference Cases, 1980-2030 (2007 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

320

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Industrial Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Industrial Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 6 - Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by an average of 1.4 percent per year from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. Much of the growth is expected to occur in the developing non-OECD nations. Figure 63. OECD and Non-OECD Industrial Sector Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 64. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2006 and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 65. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Major Energy-Intensive Industry Shares, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2002 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use in the IEO2005 reference case forecast is expected in the countries with emerging economies. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumptiion by Region, 1970-2025. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) reference case, world marketed energy consumption is projected to increase on average by 2.0 percent per year over the 23-year forecast horizon from 2002 to 2025—slightly lower than the 2.2-percent average annual growth rate from 1970 to 2002. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 412 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2002 to 553 quadrillion Btu in

322

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Forum Renewable Energy Forum Beijing, China May 27, 2010 David Sandalow Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs U.S. Department of Energy 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Quadrillion Btu China China and the United States together consume around 40% of the world's energy... 37% Rest of the world United States 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption (million MtCO 2 ) ...and together account for more than 40% of global GHG emissions. 42% China Rest of the world United States 2003 projection 2006 projection 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Quadrillion Btu 2010 projection Actual energy consumption China's energy demand

323

Annual Energy Review, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document presents statistics on energy useage for 1995. A reviving domestic economy, generally low energy prices, a heat wave in July and August, and unusually cold weather in November and December all contributed to the fourth consecutive year of growth in U.S. total energy consumption, which rose to an all-time high of almost 91 quadrillion Btu in 1995 (1.3). The increase came as a result of increases in the consumption of natural gas, coal, nuclear electric power, and renewable energy. Petroleum was the primary exception, and its use declined by only 0.3 percent. (Integrating the amount of renewable energy consumed outside the electric utility sector into U.S. total energy consumption boosted the total by about 3.4 quadrillion Btu, but even without that integration, U.S. total energy consumption would have reached a record level in 1995.)

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

World's Demand for World's Demand for Liquid Fuels A Roundtable Discussion A New Climate For Energy EIA 2009 Energy Conference April 7, 2009 Washington, DC 2 World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type 0 50 100 150 200 250 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Quadrillion Btu Liquids Natural Gas Coal Renewables Nuclear History Projections Source: EIA, IEO2008 36% 23% 6% 8% 29% 33% 24% 8% 6% 27% 3 World Liquids Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 0 50 100 150 200 250 2005 2015 2030 Quadrillion Btu Building Industrial Transportation Electric Power Source: EIA, IEO2008 4 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Light Sweet Crude Oil (2007 $/B) Reference Case High World Oil Price Low World Oil Price World Oil Prices in Three Price Cases, AEO2009 - Real Prices History Projections Source: EIA, AEO2009, NYMEX

325

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 347 Primary Energy Consumption by Source 1 Delivered Total Energy by Sector 8 1 Includes electricity net imports, not shown separately. 2 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 3 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 4 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 5 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 6 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. 7 Calculated as the primary energy consumed by the electric power sector minus the

326

Coal consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal Coal consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_coal_consumption_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 38.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

327

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 2.0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to

328

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World energy demand and economic outlook World energy demand and economic outlook Overview In the IEO2011 Reference case, world energy consumption increases by 53 percent, from 505 quadrillion Btu in 2008 to 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Table 1). In the near term, the effects of the global recession of 2008-2009 curtailed world energy consumption.8 As nations recover from the downturn, however, world energy demand rebounds in the Reference case and increases strongly as a result of robust economic growth and expanding populations in the world's developing countries. OECD member countries are, for the most part, more advanced energy consumers.9 Energy demand in the OECD economies grows slowly over the projection period, at an average annual rate of 0.6 percent, whereas energy consumption in the non-OECD

329

Fuel-cycle assessment of selected bioethanol production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large amount of corn stover is available in the U.S. corn belt for the potential production of cellulosic bioethanol when the production technology becomes commercially ready. In fact, because corn stover is already available, it could serve as a starting point for producing cellulosic ethanol as a transportation fuel to help reduce the nation's demand for petroleum oil. Using the data available on the collection and transportation of corn stover and on the production of cellulosic ethanol, we have added the corn stover-to-ethanol pathway in the GREET model, a fuel-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory. We then analyzed the life-cycle energy use and emission impacts of corn stover-derived fuel ethanol for use as E85 in flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). The analysis included fertilizer manufacturing, corn farming, farming machinery manufacturing, stover collection and transportation, ethanol production, ethanol transportation, and ethanol use in light-duty vehicles (LDVs). Energy consumption of petroleum oil and fossil energy, emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}], nitrous oxide [N{sub 2}O], and methane [CH{sub 4}]), and emissions of criteria pollutants (carbon monoxide [CO], volatile organic compounds [VOCs], nitrogen oxide [NO{sub x}], sulfur oxide [SO{sub x}], and particulate matter with diameters smaller than 10 micrometers [PM{sub 10}]) during the fuel cycle were estimated. Scenarios of ethanol from corn grain, corn stover, and other cellulosic feedstocks were then compared with petroleum reformulated gasoline (RFG). Results showed that FFVs fueled with corn stover ethanol blends offer substantial energy savings (94-95%) relative to those fueled with RFG. For each Btu of corn stover ethanol produced and used, 0.09 Btu of fossil fuel is required. The cellulosic ethanol pathway avoids 86-89% of greenhouse gas emissions. Unlike the life cycle of corn grain-based ethanol, in which the ethanol plant consumes most of the fossil fuel, farming consumes most of the fossil fuel in the life cycle of corn stover-based ethanol.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Hong, H.; Energy Systems

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836 3.046 2.649 2.429 2000 2.392 2.596 2.852 3.045 3.604 4.279 3.974 4.467 5.246 5.179 5.754 8.267 2001 7.374 5.556 5.245 5.239 4.315 3.867 3.223 2.982 2.558 2.898 2.981 2.748

331

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

c Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ... and electrical system energy losses. ... • Geographic coverage is the 50 states and the Distr ...

332

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1997-Jan : 01/10 : 3.79 : ...

333

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 01/10 3.79 01/17 4.19 01/24 2.98 01/31 2.91 1997-Feb 02/07 2.53 02/14 2.30 02/21 1.91 02/28 1.82 1997-Mar 03/07 1.86 03/14 1.96 03/21 1.91 03/28 1.84 1997-Apr 04/04 1.88 04/11 1.98 04/18 2.04 04/25 2.14 1997-May 05/02 2.15 05/09 2.29 05/16 2.22 05/23 2.22 05/30 2.28 1997-Jun 06/06 2.17 06/13 2.16 06/20 2.22 06/27 2.27 1997-Jul 07/04 2.15 07/11 2.15 07/18 2.24 07/25 2.20 1997-Aug 08/01 2.22 08/08 2.37 08/15 2.53 08/22 2.54 08/29 2.58

334

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050 2.104 2.163 2.124 2.103 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.055 2.107 2.077 1.981 2.072 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.066 2.062 2.058 2.075 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.144 2.069 2.097 2.085 2.066 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.068 2.089 2.131 2.163 2.187

335

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494 1.557 1.674 1.790 1.961 2.459 1996 2.483 2.458 2.353 2.309 2.283 2.544 2.521 2.049 1.933 2.481 3.023 3.645 1997 3.067 2.065 1.899 2.005 2.253 2.161 2.134 2.462 2.873 3.243 3.092 2.406 1998 2.101 2.263 2.253 2.465 2.160 2.168 2.147 1.855 2.040 2.201 2.321 1.927 1999 1.831 1.761 1.801 2.153 2.272 2.346 2.307 2.802 2.636 2.883 2.549 2.423 2000 2.385 2.614 2.828 3.028 3.596 4.303 3.972 4.460 5.130 5.079 5.740 8.618 2001 7.825 5.675 5.189 5.189 4.244 3.782 3.167 2.935 2.213 2.618 2.786 2.686

336

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.112 2.131 2.117 2.068 2.087 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.086 2.082 2.083 2.092 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.124 2.100 2.116 2.100 2.086 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.095 2.099 2.123 2.155 2.183 1994 Apr-18 to Apr-22 2.187 2.167 2.174 2.181 2.169

337

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

338

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

339

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 1.72 1999 1.85 1.77 1.79 2.15 2.26 2.30 2.31 2.80 2.55 2.73 2.37 2.36 2000 2.42 2.66 2.79 3.04 3.59 4.29 3.99 4.43 5.06 5.02 5.52 8.90 2001 8.17 5.61 5.23 5.19 4.19 3.72 3.11 2.97 2.19 2.46 2.34 2.30 2002 2.32 2.32 3.03 3.43 3.50 3.26 2.99 3.09 3.55 4.13 4.04 4.74 2003 5.43 7.71 5.93 5.26 5.81 5.82 5.03 4.99 4.62 4.63 4.47 6.13 2004 6.14 5.37 5.39 5.71 6.33 6.27 5.93 5.41 5.15 6.35 6.17 6.58 2005 6.15 6.14 6.96 7.16 6.47 7.18 7.63 9.53 11.75 13.42 10.30 13.05

340

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187 06/24 2.176 1994-Jul 07/01 2.256 07/08 2.221 07/15 2.172 07/22 2.137 07/29 2.207

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977 3.055 2.586 2.403 2000 2.396 2.591 2.868 3.058 3.612 4.258 3.981 4.526 5.335 5.151 5.455 7.337 2001 6.027 5.441 5.287 5.294 4.384 3.918 3.309 3.219 2.891 3.065 3.022 2.750

342

Table E4. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

343

Table E4A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters ...

344

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam is the most common and economical way of transferring heat from one location to another. But most steam systems use the header pressure steam to do the job. The savings are substantially more than just the latent heat differences between the high and low steam pressures. The discussion below shows how the savings in using low pressure steam can be above 25%! The key to the savings is not in the heat exchanger equipment or the steam trap, but is back at the powerhouse - the sensible heat requirement of the boiler feed water. Chart III shows potential steam energy savings and will be useful in estimating the steam energy savings of high pressure processes.

Vallery, S. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

British Thermal Units (Btu) - Energy Explained, Your Guide To ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landfill Gas and Biogas; Biomass & the Environment See also: Biofuels. Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel. Ethanol; Use of Ethanol; Ethanol & the Environment; Biodiesel;

346

POTENTIAL MARKETS FOR HIGH-BTU GAS FROM COAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has become increasilngly clear that the energy-related ilemna facing this nation is both a long-term and deepening problem. A widespread recognition of the critical nature of our energy balance, or imbalance, evolved from the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973. The seeds of this crisis were sown in the prior decade, however, as our consumption of known energy reserves outpaced our developing of new reserves. The resultant increasing dependence on foreign energy supplies hs triggered serious fuel shortages, dramatic price increases, and a pervsive sense of unertainty and confusion throughout the country.

Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, Inc.,

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.160 2.130 2.138 2.171 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.140 2.128 2.112 2.103 2.111 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.116 2.133 2.130 2.130 2.120 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.114 2.137 2.170 2.146 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.117 2.134 2.120 2.086 2.112

348

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.109 2.142 2.192 2.164 2.136 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.107 2.129 2.115 2.050 2.077 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.076 2.072 2.070 2.087 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.134 2.090 2.109 2.093 2.081 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.090 2.099 2.128 2.175 2.196

349

Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

e Conventional hydroelectric power. f Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utilities and, beginning in 1996, other energy service ...

350

Table 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook › Annual ... excluding freight or shipping and insurance costs. ... 4 Derived by multiplying the price per Btu of each fossil fuel by the ...

351

1982 Annual Energy Review. [1960 to 1982; in some cases for a longer period  

SciTech Connect

Total energy consumption in the United States equaled 70.9 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1982, a decline of 4.1% compared to 1981. Depressed economic activity was a major factor in reducing total energy demand. However, conservation also played a role as energy consumption per dollar of GNP continued to fall. Most of the decline in energy use involved petroleum and natural gas. Reduced petroleum demand translated into a 21.7% reduction in net petroleum imports. Natural gas demand and production fell, prompted by reduced economic activity and a substantial increase in prices. Crude oil prices fell for the first time in more than a decade. Weakened market conditions adversely affected the rate of domestic oil and gas exploration and development activities. Nonetheless, domestic crude oil production rose 1.2%. International activities were highlighted by a decline in crude oil production, especially by members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), a decrease in crude oil prices, and a substantial increase in electricity production by nuclear-powered utility plants in non-Communist countries. Energy production in the United States in 1982 remained essentially unchanged from that of 1981, as small gains in hydroelectric power and nuclear power production were offset by losses in natural gas production. For the third straight year, energy consumption in the United States declined. Whereas declines in 1980 and 1981 resulted primarily from consumer response to higher prices and conservation, the 1982 decline reflected primarily an economic slowdown, especially in industry. Annual per capita consumption fell to 306 million Btu, the lowest level since 1967. Changes in energy prices in 1982 were mixed. Whereas most petroleum prices declined, prices of natural gas, coal, and electricity rose.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Wood pellet production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Energy Limited's wood pellet refinery, Bristol, Florida, produces wood pellets for fuel from scrap wood from a nearby sawmill and other hog fuel delivered to the plant from nearby forest lands. The refinery will provide 50,000 tons of pellets per year to the Florida State Hospital at Chattahoochee to fire recently converted boilers in the central power plant. The pellets are densified wood, having a moisture content of about 10% and a heating value of 8000 Btu/lb. They are 0.5 inches in diameter and 2 to 3 inches in length.

Moore, J.W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Total Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Manufacturing Industries, 1994 Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) Carbon Intensity SIC Code Industry Group Total Net Electricity Natural Gas Petro- leum Coal Other (MMTC/ Quadrillion Btu) Total 371.7 131.1 93.5 87.3 56.8 3.1 17.16 20 Food and Kindred Products 24.4 9.8 9.1 W W 0.1 20.44 21 Tobacco Products W 0.1 W W W W W 22 Textile Mill Products 8.7 5.5 1.7 0.6 1.0 * 28.21 23 Apparel and Other Textile Products W 1.3 0.4 W W W W 24 Lumber and Wood Products 4.9 3.4 0.7 W W 0.2 9.98 25 Furniture and Fixtures 1.6 1.1 0.3 * 0.1 0.1 23.19 26 Paper and Allied Products 31.6 11.0 8.3 4.3 7.8 0.3 11.88

354

Geothermal source potential and utilization for alcohol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of using a potential geothermal source to drive a fuel grade alcohol plant. Test data from the well at the site indicated that the water temperature at approximately 8500 feet should approach 275/sup 0/F. However, no flow data was available, and so the volume of hot water that can be expected from a well at this site is unknown. Using the available data, numerous fuel alcohol production processes and various heat utilization schemes were investigated to determine the most cost effective system for using the geothermal resource. The study found the direct application of hot water for alcohol production based on atmospheric processes using low pressure steam to be most cost effective. The geothermal flow rates were determined for various sizes of alcohol production facility using 275/sup 0/F water, 235/sup 0/F maximum processing temperature, 31,000 and 53,000 Btu per gallon energy requirements, and appropriate process approach temperatures. It was determined that a 3 million gpy alcohol plant is the largest facility that can practically be powered by the flow from one large geothermal well. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared, operating costs were calculated, the economic feasibility of the propsed project was examined, and a sensitivity analysis was performed.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Production of Biogas from Wastewaters of Food Processing Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Process used in converting biodegradable, soluble, organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters to a directly-burnable biogas composed mainly of methane has been developed, tested, and commercially applied in Holland. Operations on wastewater from the processing of sugar beets have shown hydraulic retention times of less than 10 hours with reactor loadings of at least 10 Kg COD per m3 digester volume per day and purification efficiencies exceeding 90%. Biogas production is at a rate of about 1 therm (100000 BTU) per 10 Kg COD treated. A moderately sized (1000 m3) wastewater treatment plant processing the order of 10000 Kg COD per day will, therefore, produce the order of 1000 therms of energy per day while, at the same time, reducing the COD level in the effluent by an order of magnitude. The set of conditions required for efficient operation of this anaerobic process will be discussed. The process is unique in its mixed sludge bed approach allowing for tolerance of swings in Ph (6-8) at relatively low temperatures (32 C - 38 C) which can be readily achieved from most wastewater streams with little expenditure of additional energy. Sludge production is remarkably low, only about 5% of the COD loading, greatly alleviating disposal problems. These characteristics are conducive for the use of the anaerobic process to recover energy from a variety of wastewaters rich in carbohydrate-type substances as produced routinely as a by product of many types of food processing activities.

Sax, R. I.; Holtz, M.; Pette, K. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

357

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

358

Zero Energy Windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Windows in the U.S. consume 30 percent of building heating and cooling energy, representing an annual impact of 4.1 quadrillion BTU (quads) of primary energy. Windows have an even larger impact on peak energy demand and on occupant comfort. An additional 1 quad of lighting energy could be saved if buildings employed effective daylighting strategies. The ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program has made standard windows significantly more efficient. However, even if all windows in the stock were replaced with today's efficient products, window energy consumption would still be approximately 2 quads. However, windows can be ''net energy gainers'' or ''zero-energy'' products. Highly insulating products in heating applications can admit more useful solar gain than the conductive energy lost through them. Dynamic glazings can modulate solar gains to minimize cooling energy needs and, in commercial buildings, allow daylighting to offset lighting requirements. The needed solutions vary with building type and climate. Developing this next generation of zero-energy windows will provide products for both existing buildings undergoing window replacements and products which are expected to be contributors to zero-energy buildings. This paper defines the requirements for zero-energy windows. The technical potentials in terms of national energy savings and the research and development (R&D) status of the following technologies are presented: (1) Highly insulating systems with U-factors of 0.1 Btu/hr-ft{sup 2}-F; (2) Dynamic windows: glazings that modulate transmittance (i.e., change from clear to tinted and/or reflective) in response to climate conditions; and (3) Integrated facades for commercial buildings to control/ redirect daylight. Market transformation policies to promote these technologies as they emerge into the marketplace are then described.

Arasteh, Dariush; Selkowitz, Steve; Apte, Josh; LaFrance, Marc

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

359

Coal gasification via the Lurgi process: Topical report: Volume 1, Production of SNG (substitute material gas)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lurgi baseline study was requested by the DOE/GRI Operating Committee of the Joint Coal Gasification Program for the purpose of updating the economics of earlier Lurgi coal gasification plant studies for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) based on commercially advanced technologies. The current study incorporates the recent experience with large size Lurgi plants in an effort to improve capital and operating costs of earlier plant designs. The present coal gasification study is based on a mine mouth plant producing 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG using the Lurgi dry bottom coal gasification technology. A Western subbituminous coal was designated as the plant food, obtained from the Rosebud seam at Colstrip, Montana. This study presents the detailed description of an integrated facility which utilizes coal, air, and water to produce 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG. The plant consists of coal handling and preparation, twenty-six Lurgi dry bottom gasifiers, shift conversion, acid gas removal, methanation, compression and drying of product gas, sulfur recovery, phenol and ammonia recovery, as well as necessary support facilities. The plant is a grass roots, mine mouth facility located in a Western location similar to the town of Colstrip in Rosebud County, Montana. The Lurgi Corporation assisted in this study, under subcontract to Foster Wheeler, by supplying the heat and material balances, flow sheets, utilities, catalysts and chemical requirements, and cost data for Lurgi designed process sections. Details of material supplied by Lurgi Corporation are presented in Appendix A. 52 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

Zahnstecher, L.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas. Detailed economic feasibility study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An economic evaluation of the application of the multi-solid fluid reactor design to wood gasification was completed. The processing options examined include plant capacity, production of a high-Btu (1006 Btu/SCF HHV) gas versus an intermediate-Btu gas (379 Btu/SCF HHV), and operating pressure. 9 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Direct SNG production by the CS/R hydrogasification process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CS/R Hydrogasification Process utilizes a short residence-time entrained-flow reactor, derived from aerospace rocket reactor technology, for quickly reacting pulverized coal with hot hydrogen to directly produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Development testing has indicated the feasibility of two primary process options: the production of SNG as the sole major product or the coproduction of SNG and chemical-grade benzene. Recent emphasis has focused on process design, optimization, and economics. Preliminary design studies of commercial-scale (250 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/day) grassroots SNG plants have been completed for two widely different types of feedstock: Kentucky No. 9 hvAb coal and Minnesota peat. This paper summarizes the pertinent experimental data and analytical modeling studies of flash hydropyrolysis used as a basic input to the process design effort. The commercial process flowsheets for each feedstock are described, and the resultant capital and operating costs are discussed. Sensitivity analyses are presented relating the cost of gas to the major process operating variables and economic parameters.

Kahn, D.R.; Combs, L.P.; Garey, M.P.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

RMOTC - Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production RMOTC Pumpjack in action During the process of the sale of NPR-3, RMOTC will focus on maximizing the value of the NPR-3 site and will continue with its Production Optimization Projects. NPR-3 includes 9,481 acres with more than 400 oil-producing wells. Current oil production is at approximately 240 barrels of oil per day. In July 2013, RMOTC began working on a number of Production Optimization Projects within the NPR-3 field, with the goal to optimize and improve flow and efficiency. Production Optimization Projects include repairing and replacing existing infrastructure with new infrastructure in order to optimize current wells and bring additional wells online. These Production Optimization Projects will continue throughout 2013 and are focused on improving current production and creating revenue for the America tax payer.

363

Antihydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

Antihydrogen production in ATHENA is analyzed more carefully. The most important peculiarities of the different experimental situations are discussed. The protonium production via the first matter-antimatter chemical reaction is commented too.

Rizzini, Evandro Lodi; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola [Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l'Ingegneria e per i Materiali, Universita di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

364

Tin Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...descending order, Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Bolivia, and Australia. These countries supply more than 85% of total world production....

365

Available Technologies: Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate ...  

Iron and steel production; Food and ... The implementation of OFC in these industries has the potential of an annual recovery of up to 1,703 quadrillion BTUs from ...

366

Nanocoatings for High-Efficiency Industrial Hydraulic and Tooling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial manufacturing in the U.S. accounts for roughly one third of the 98 quadrillion Btu total energy consumption. Motor system losses amount to 1.3 quadrillion Btu, which represents the largest proportional loss of any end-use category, while pumps alone represent over 574 trillion BTU (TBTU) of energy loss each year. The efficiency of machines with moving components is a function of the amount of energy lost to heat because of friction between contacting surfaces. The friction between these interfaces also contributes to downtime and the loss of productivity through component wear and subsequent repair. The production of new replacement parts requires additional energy. Among efforts to reduce energy losses, wear-resistant, low-friction coatings on rotating and sliding components offer a promising approach that is fully compatible with existing equipment and processes. In addition to lubrication, one of the most desirable solutions is to apply a protective coating or surface treatment to rotating or sliding components to reduce their friction coefficients, thereby leading to reduced wear. Historically, a number of materials such as diamond-like carbon (DLC), titanium nitride (TiN), titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN), and tungsten carbide (WC) have been examined as tribological coatings. The primary objective of this project was the development of a variety of thin film nanocoatings, derived from the AlMgB14 system, with a focus on reducing wear and friction in both industrial hydraulics and cutting tool applications. Proof-of-concept studies leading up to this project had shown that the constituent phases, AlMgB14 and TiB2, were capable of producing low-friction coatings by pulsed laser deposition. These coatings combine high hardness with a low friction coefficient, and were shown to substantially reduce wear in laboratory tribology tests. Selection of the two applications was based largely on the concept of improved mechanical interface efficiencies for energy conservation. In mobile hydraulic systems, efficiency gains through low friction would translate into improved fuel economy and fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Stationary hydraulic systems, accordingly, would consume less electrical power. Reduced tooling wear in machining operations would translate to greater operating yields, while lowering the energy consumed during processing. The AlMgB14 nanocoatings technology progressed beyond baseline laboratory tests into measurable energy savings and enhancements to product durability. Three key hydraulic markets were identified over the course of the project that will benefit from implementation: industrial vane pumps, orbiting valve-in-star hydraulic motors, and variable displacement piston pumps. In the vane pump application, the overall product efficiency was improved by as much as 11%. Similar results were observed with the hydraulic motors tested, where efficiency gains of over 10% were noted. For variable displacement piston pumps, overall efficiency was improved by 5%. For cutting tools, the most significant gains in productivity (and, accordingly, the efficiency of the machining process as a whole) were associated with the roughing and finishing of titanium components for aerospace systems. Use of the AlMgB14 nanocoating in customer field tests has shown that the coated tools were able to withstand machining rates as high as 500sfm (limited only by the substrate material), with relatively low flank wear when compared to other industrial offerings. AlMgB14 coated tools exhibited a 60% improvement over similarly applied TiAlN thin films. Furthermore, AlMgB14-based coatings in these particular tests lasted twice as long than their TiAlN counterparts at the 500sfm feed rates. Full implementation of the technology into the industrial hydraulic and cutting tool markets equates to a worldwide energy savings of 46 trillion BTU/year by 2030. U.S.-based GHG emissions associated with the markets identified would fall accordingly, dropping by as much as 50,000 tonnes annually.

Clifton B. Higdon III

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b b Primary Energy Net Imports (Quadrillion Btu) Total, 1949-2012 By Major Source, 1949-2012 Total, Monthly By Major Source, Monthly U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 9 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Natural Gas Crude Oil a Petroleum Products b Coal Crude Oil a 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 -5 Petroleum Products b Coal Natural Gas J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2011 2012 2013 2011 2012 2013 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 -0.5 a Crude oil and lease condensate. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, which began in 1977. b Petroleum products, unfinished oils, pentanes plus, and gasoline blending components. Does not include biofuels.

368

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 (Quadrillion Btu) Residential and Commercial a Sectors, Selected Products Industrial a Sector, Selected Products Transportation Sector, Selected Products 56 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Kerosene Residual Fuel Oil LPG b 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Distillate Fuel Oil Asphalt and Road Oil 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Distillate Fuel Oil d Jet Fuel e Motor Gasoline c a Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. b Liquefied petroleum gases. c Beginning in 1993, includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

369

Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal fines. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. For this effort, we will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach. Previously it has been decided that corn starch would be used as binder and a roller-and-die mill would be used for pellet manufacture. A quality starch binder has been identified and tested. To potentially lower binder costs, a starch that costs about 50% of the high quality starch was tested. Results indicate that the lower cost starch will not lower binder cost because more is required to produce a comparable quality pellet. Also, a petroleum in water emulsion was evaluated as a potential binder. The compound seemed to have adhesive properties but was found to be a poor binder. Arrangements have been made to collect a waste slurry from the mine previously described.

Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Annual Energy Outlook 2011: With Projections to 2035  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Table G1. Heat Rates Fuel Units Approximate Heat Content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.933 Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.800 Coke Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 26.327 Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.911 Residential and Commercial . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.284 Electric Power Sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.536 Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton

371

Topic: Productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... General Information: 301-975-5020 mfg@nist ... competitive in the global market, companies need to ... become more efficient in energy, production and ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

372

Silicon Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... An Investigation into the Electrochemical Production of Si by the FFC Cambridge Process: Emre Ergül1; ?shak Karakaya2; Metehan Erdo?an2; ...

373

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

374

Hydrogen Production  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Increase your H2IQ More information Making...

375

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2010 Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients for Buildings (MMT CO2 per Quadrillion Btu) (1) All Residential Commercial Buildings Buildings Buildings Coal Average (2) 95.35 95.35 95.35 Natural Gas Average (2) 53.06 53.06 53.06 Petroleum Products Distillate Fuel Oil/Diesel 73.15 - - Kerosene 72.31 - - Motor Gasoline 70.88 - - Liquefied Petroleum Gas 62.97 - - Residual Fuel Oil 78.80 - - Average (2) 69.62 68.45 71.62 Electricity Consumption (3) Average - Primary (4) 57.43 57.43 57.43 Average - Site (5) 178.3 179.1 177.9 New Generation Gas Combined Cycle - Site (6) 112.5 112.5 112.5 Gas Combustion Turbine - Site (6) 171.4 171.4 171.4 Stock Gas Generator - Site (7) 133.9 133.9 133.9 All Fuels (3) Average - Primary 56.23 55.79 56.77 Average - Site 111.4 105.6 118.7 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. The

376

U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technology Program and Its Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has been working with industry since 1976 to encourage the development and adoption of new, energy-efficient technologies. ITP has helped industry not only use energy and materials more efficiently but also improve environmental performance, product quality, and productivity. To help ITP determine the impacts of its programs, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) periodically reviews and analyzes ITP program benefits. PNNL contacts vendors and users of ITP-sponsored technologies that have been commercialized, estimates the number of units that have penetrated the market, conducts engineering analyses to estimate energy savings from the new technologies, and estimates air pollution and carbon emission reductions. This paper discusses the results of PNNL’s most recent review (conducted in 2008). From 1976-2007, the commercialized technologies from ITP’s research and development programs and other activities have cumulatively saved 6.17 quadrillion Btu, with a net cost savings of $63.0 billion.

Weakley, S. A.; Roop, J. M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office and Its Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), formerly the Industrial Technologies Program, has been working with industry since 1976 to encourage the development and adoption of new, energy-efficient technologies. AMO has helped industry not only use energy and materials more efficiently but also improve environ-mental performance, product quality, and productivity. To help AMO determine the impacts of its pro-grams, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) periodically reviews and analyzes AMO pro-gram benefits. PNNL contacts vendors and users of AMO-sponsored technologies that have been commercialized, estimates the number of units that have penetrated the market, conducts engineering analyses to estimate energy savings from the new technologies, and estimates air pollution and carbon emission reductions. This paper discusses the results of PNNL's most recent review (conducted in 2011). From 1976-2010, the commercialized technologies from AMO's research and development programs and other activities have cumulatively saved 10.7 quadrillion Btu, with a net cost savings of $56.5 billion.

Weakley, S. A.; Steel, L. M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program and Its Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has been working with industry since 1976 to encourage the development and adoption of new, energy-efficient technologies. ITP has helped industry not only use energy and materials more efficiently but also improve environ-mental performance, product quality, and productivity. To help ITP determine the impacts of its pro-grams, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) periodically reviews and analyzes ITP pro-gram benefits. PNNL contacts vendors and users of ITP-sponsored technologies that have been commer-cialized, estimates the number of units that have penetrated the market, conducts engineering analyses to estimate energy savings from the new technolo-gies, and estimates air pollution and carbon emission reductions. This paper discusses the results of PNNL's most recent review (conducted in 2010). From 1976-2009, the commercialized technologies from ITP's research and development programs and other activities have cumulatively saved 10.0 quadrillion Btu, with a net cost savings of $61.82 billion.

Weakley, S. A.; Brown, S. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day high-Btu SNG from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report describes results on feedstock characterization. 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

382

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Energy Information Administration Natural Gas Annual 1999 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed ... 1,106...

383

Table A3. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table A3. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption and Biofuels Production, 1949-2011 (Million Btu per Barrel)

384

L:\main\pkc\aeotabs\aeo2012\appa.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2010-2035 (percent) 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Production Crude oil and lease condensate . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.35 11.59 13.46 14.46 13.80 13.69 13.15 0.5% Natural gas plant liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.57 2.78 3.30 3.63 3.68 3.71 3.65 1.1% Dry natural gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.09 22.10 24.23 25.81 26.63 27.43 28.51 1.0% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.63 22.08 20.50 21.18 22.51 22.78 23.51 0.3% Nuclear / uranium 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.36 8.44 8.68 9.28 9.60 9.55 9.35 0.4% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.67 2.51 2.90 2.94 2.97 3.01 3.06 0.8% Biomass 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.72 4.05

385

Annual Energy Outlook 2008: With Projections to 2030-Appendixes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 115 Appendix A Reference Case Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Growth 2006-2030 (percent) 2005 2006 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.99 10.80 12.76 13.25 13.40 12.99 12.04 0.5% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.33 2.36 2.27 2.29 2.31 2.17 2.11 -0.5% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.60 19.04 19.85 20.08 20.24 20.17 20.00 0.2% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.19 23.79 23.97 24.48 25.20 26.85 28.63 0.8% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.16 8.21 8.31 8.41 9.05 9.50 9.57 0.6% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.70 2.89 2.92 2.99 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.2% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

386

Annual Energy Outlook 2009: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 109 Appendix A Reference Case Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Growth 2007-2030 (percent) 2006 2007 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.80 10.73 12.19 12.40 14.06 15.63 15.96 1.7% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.36 2.41 2.58 2.55 2.57 2.62 2.61 0.3% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.99 19.84 20.95 20.88 22.08 23.87 24.26 0.9% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.79 23.50 24.21 24.49 24.43 25.11 26.93 0.6% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.21 8.41 8.45 8.68 8.99 9.04 9.47 0.5% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.87 2.46 2.67 2.94 2.95 2.96 2.97 0.8% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

387

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Total Coal b Natural Gas (Dry) Crude Oil c NGPL d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................. 14.060 6.233 11.447 0.823 32.563 0.000 1.415 NA NA NA 1.562 2.978 35.540 1955 Total .................. 12.370 9.345 14.410 1.240 37.364 .000 1.360 NA NA NA 1.424 2.784 40.148 1960 Total .................. 10.817 12.656 14.935 1.461 39.869 .006 1.608 (s) NA NA 1.320 2.928 42.803 1965 Total .................. 13.055 15.775 16.521 1.883 47.235 .043 2.059 .002 NA NA 1.335 3.396 50.674 1970 Total .................. 14.607 21.666 20.401 2.512 59.186 .239 2.634 .006 NA NA 1.431 4.070 63.495 1975 Total ..................

388

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 1 Table C1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices 2009 Projections 2015 2025 2035 Low Oil Price Reference High Oil Price Low Oil Price Reference High Oil Price Low Oil Price Reference High Oil Price Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . 11.34 12.35 12.51 12.76 11.19 12.64 15.18 9.32 12.80 15.31 Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.57 2.88 2.86 2.90 3.50 3.55 3.62 3.85 3.92 3.86 Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.50 23.05 23.01 23.23 24.24 24.60 25.20 26.91 27.00 27.63 Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.58 20.63 20.94 20.83 23.30 23.64 24.98 23.82 26.01 30.33 Nuclear Power . . . . . . . .

389

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Title Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-60146 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Apte, Joshua S., and Dariush K. Arasteh Call Number LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

390

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 11.59 12.16 15.95 14.50 13.47 13.40 13.12 0.3% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 2.78 2.88 4.14 4.20 3.85 3.87 3.89 1.0% Dry natural gas ...................................................... 21.82 23.51 27.19 29.22 30.44 32.04 33.87 1.3% Coal 1 ...................................................................... 22.04 22.21 21.74 22.54 23.25 23.60 23.54 0.2%

391

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 1 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Grow th 2007-2030 (percent) 2006 2007 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude O il and Lease Conden sate . . . . . . . . . . . 10.80 10.73 12.18 12.40 14.02 15.64 15.98 1.7% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.36 2.41 2.52 2.50 2.52 2.56 2.55 0.3% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.99 19.84 20.87 20.83 22.02 23.81 24.28 0.9% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.79 23.50 24.21 24.56 24.41 25.05 26.79 0.6% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.21 8.41 8.45 8.68 9.00 9.05 9.44 0.5% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.87 2.46 2.67 2.94 2.95 2.96 2.97 0.8% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.97 3.23 4.20 5.16 6.49 7.86

392

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Energy Review December 2013 Monthly Energy Review December 2013 Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Imports Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Petroleum Biofuels c Electricity Total Crude Oil a Petroleum Products b Total 1950 Total ...................... 0.009 0.011 0.000 1.056 0.830 1.886 NA 0.007 1.913 1955 Total ...................... .008 .003 .011 1.691 1.061 2.752 NA .016 2.790 1960 Total ...................... .007 .003 .161 2.196 1.802 3.999 NA .018 4.188 1965 Total ...................... .005 .002 .471 2.654 2.748 5.402 NA .012 5.892 1970 Total ...................... .001 .004 .846 2.814 4.656 7.470 NA .021 8.342 1975 Total ...................... .024 .045 .978 8.721 4.227 12.948 NA .038 14.032 1980 Total ...................... .030 .016 1.006 11.195 3.463 14.658 NA .085 15.796 1985 Total

393

L:\main\pkc\aeotabs\aeo2008\appa.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 1 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices Reference Case Annual Growth 2006-2030 (percent) 2005 2006 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.99 10.80 12.71 13.05 13.76 12.89 12.12 0.5% Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.33 2.36 2.21 2.22 2.27 2.24 2.18 -0.3% Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.60 19.04 19.61 19.91 20.28 20.24 20.41 0.3% Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.19 23.79 23.31 24.33 25.61 28.43 31.16 1.1% Nuclear Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.16 8.21 8.31 8.41 9.15 9.68 9.89 0.8% Hydropower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.70 2.89 2.92 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.2% Biomass 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.83 2.97 4.11 4.44

394

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 1 Table C1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices 2011 Projections 2020 2030 2040 Low oil price Reference High oil price Low oil price Reference High oil price Low oil price Reference High oil price Production Crude oil and lease condensate .................... 12.16 15.22 15.95 16.61 11.89 13.47 15.07 9.99 13.12 14.63 Natural gas plant liquids ................................ 2.88 3.98 4.14 4.24 3.79 3.85 3.99 3.69 3.89 4.08 Dry natural gas .............................................. 23.51 26.44 27.19 27.61 28.09 30.44 31.87 30.91 33.87 36.61 Coal 1 ............................................................. 22.21

395

Annual Energy Outlook 2011: With Projections to 2035  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 1 Table B1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply, Disposition, and Prices 2009 Projections 2015 2025 2035 Low Economic Growth Reference High Economic Growth Low Economic Growth Reference High Economic Growth Low Economic Growth Reference High Economic Growth Production Crude Oil and Lease Condensate . . . . . . . . . . 11.34 12.53 12.51 12.55 12.44 12.64 12.62 12.13 12.80 12.87 Natural Gas Plant Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.57 2.79 2.86 2.89 3.39 3.55 3.70 3.59 3.92 4.11 Dry Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.50 22.50 23.01 23.30 23.58 24.60 25.54 24.92 27.00 30.16 Coal 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

396

Energy use and intensity in the industrial sector, 1972 - 1991  

SciTech Connect

Energy use in the United States is substantially lower now than it would have been had energy intensities not fallen after the oil price shocks of the 1970s. The United States would have consumed over 30 quadrillion Btu (QBtu) more energy in 1991 if the energy-GDP ratio (energy divided by gross domestic product) had remained at its 1972 value. Much of this improvement has stemmed from developments within the industrial sector. This paper examines industrial energy use from two perspectives. First, the contribution of the industrial sector to the decline in the overall energy-GDP ratio is estimated. Second, the components of change in conservation trends within the industrial sector are examined. This part of the analysis identifies the change in overall industrial intensity (total energy consumption/total industrial output) that is due to improvements in energy intensity at the individual industry level in comparison to various aspects of the composition of industrial output. This paper is based upon recent work conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Alternative Fuels Policy, U.S. Department of Energy. Discussion of other end-use sectors and some additional analysis of industrial sector energy trends is found in Energy Conservation Trends - Understanding the Factors Affecting Conservation Gains and their Implications for Policy Development.

Belzer, D.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary . Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 12.20 13.87 20.36 19.19 17.71 16.81 16.00 0.5% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 3.11 3.21 3.54 3.84 3.98 4.08 3.99 0.8% Dry natural gas ...................................................... 23.04 24.59 29.73 32.57 35.19 36.89 38.37 1.6% Coal 1 ...................................................................... 22.22 20.60 21.70 22.36 22.61 22.68 22.61 0.3% Nuclear / uranium 2 ................................................. 8.26 8.05 8.15 8.15 8.18 8.23 8.49 0.2%

398

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 1 Table B1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices 2011 Projections 2020 2030 2040 Low economic growth Reference High economic growth Low economic growth Reference High economic growth Low economic growth Reference High economic growth Production Crude oil and lease condensate .................... 12.16 15.95 15.95 15.99 12.93 13.47 13.79 12.69 13.12 13.37 Natural gas plant liquids ................................ 2.88 4.10 4.14 4.20 3.80 3.85 3.92 3.86 3.89 3.95 Dry natural gas .............................................. 23.51 26.58 27.19 27.80 29.33 30.44 31.92 32.46 33.87 35.32 Coal 1 ............................................................. 22.21

399

Hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen by reacting an ash containing material with water and at least one halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine and iodine to form reaction products including carbon dioxide and a corresponding hydrogen halide is claimed. The hydrogen halide is decomposed to separately release the hydrogen and the halogen. The halogen is recovered for reaction with additional carbonaceous materials and water, and the hydrogen is recovered as a salable product. In a preferred embodiment the carbonaceous material, water and halogen are reacted at an elevated temperature. In accordance with another embodiment, a continuous method for the production of hydrogen is provided wherein the carbonaceous material, water and at least one selected halogen are reacted in one zone, and the hydrogen halide produced from the reaction is decomposed in a second zone, preferably by electrolytic decomposition, to release the hydrogen for recovery and the halogen for recycle to the first zone. There also is provided a method for recovering any halogen which reacts with or is retained in the ash constituents of the carbonaceous material.

Darnell, A.J.; Parkins, W.E.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Product Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1 Wrought alloy products and tempers...or cold-finished Rivets Forgings and forging stock Foil Fin stock Drawn Extruded Rod Bar Wire 1050 . . . . . . . . . H112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1060 O, H12, H14, H16, H18 O, H12, H14, H112 O, H12, H14, H18, H113 O, H112 . . . .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Production Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Figure 1 shows the sequence of shapes in the production of a hollow handle for a table knife formed and coined in a 410 kg (900 lb) pneumatic drop hammer. The work metal was 0.81 mm (0.032 in.) thick copper alloy C75700 (nickel silver, 65â??12) annealed to a hardness of 35 to 45 HRB; blank size was 25 by...

402

Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2011 Hiroshi Sakuragi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Large amounts of fossil fuels are consumed every day in spite of increasing environmental problems. To preserve the environment and construct a sustainable society, the use of biofuels derived from different kinds of biomass is being practiced worldwide. Although bioethanol has been largely produced, it commonly requires food crops such as corn and sugar cane as substrates. To develop a sustainable energy supply, cellulosic biomass should be used for bioethanol production instead of grain biomass. For this purpose, cell surface engineering technology is a very promising method. In biobutanol and biodiesel production, engineered host fermentation has attracted much attention; however, this method has many limitations such as low productivity and low solvent tolerance of microorganisms. Despite these problems, biofuels such as bioethanol, biobutanol, and biodiesel are potential energy sources that can help establish a sustainable society. 1.

Hiroshi Sakuragi; Kouichi Kuroda; Mitsuyoshi Ueda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Solar production of industrial process steam for the Lone Star Brewery. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report outlines the detailed design and system analysis of a solar industrial process steam system for the Lone Star Brewery. The industrial plant has an average natural gas usage of 12.7 MMcf per month. The majority of this energy goes to producing process steam of 125 psi and 353/sup 0/F at about 50,000 lb/h, with this load dropping to about 6000 lb/h on the weekends. The maximum steam production of the solar energy system is about 1700 lb/h. The climatic conditions at the industrial site give 50% of the possible amount of sunshine during the winter months and more than 70% during the summer months. The long-term yearly average daily total radiation on a horizontal surface is 1574 Btu/day-ft/sup 2/, the long-term yearly average daytime ambient temperature is 72/sup 0/F, and the percentage of clear day insolation received on the average day of the year is 62%. The solar steam system will consist of 9450 ft/sup 2/ of Solar Kinetics T-700 collectors arranged in fifteen 90-ft long rows through which 67.5 gpm of Therminol T-55 is pumped. This hot Therminol then transfers the heat collected to a Patterson-Kelley Series 380 unfired steam boiler. The solar-produced steam is then metered to the industrial process via a standard check valve. The thermal performance of this system is projected to produce about 3 million lbs of steam during an average weather year, which is approximately 3 billion Btu's. As with any prototype system, this steam system cannot be justified for purely economic reasons. It is estimated, however, that if the cost of the collectors can be reduced to a mass production level of $3 per lb then this type of system would be cost effective in about six years with the current government incentives and a fuel escalation rate of 10%. This period can be shortened by a combination of an increased investment tax credit and an accelerated depreciation.

Deffenbaugh, D.M.; Watkins, P.V.; Hugg, S.B.; Kulesz, J.J.; Decker, H.E.; Powell, R.C.

1979-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief primer on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat, and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. References for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper.

Singh, S.P.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. Because the subject is vast and the space is limited, references for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper. 24 references.

Singh, S.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Sugar Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar Production Sugar Production Name: Lauren Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: This is the experiment I did: our class took 6 sugars, placed them in test tubes and put three drops of yeast in each test tube. we then placed them in the incubator for one day and the next day looked at our results. the purpose was to find out with sugar would produce the most carbon dioxide. two of the sugars that we tested were LACTOSE and STARCH. my question is, why are lactose and starch the only sugars who didn't produce any, or very very little, carbon dioxide? and how is this process related to glycolysis? Replies: Bacteria and yeast are very efficient with their enzyme systems. They don't make enzymes they can't use. Yeast don't have the enzymes necessary to metabolize lactose. Starch is a complex sugar and yeast needs certain enzymes to break starch down into sugar. Every chemical reaction needs its own enzyme.

409

Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Commonwealth of Kentucky is one of the leading states in the production of both coal and timber. As a result of mining and processing coal, an estimated 3 million tons of fine coal are disposed annually to waste-slurry impoundments with an additional 500 million tons stored at a number of disposal sites around the state due to past practices. Likewise, the Kentucky timber industry discards nearly 35,000 tons of sawdust on the production site due to unfavorable economics of transporting the material to industrial boilers for use as a fuel. With an average heating value of 6,700 Btu/lb, the monetary value of the energy disposed in the form of sawdust is approximately $490,000 annually. Since the two industries are typically in close proximity, one promising avenue is to selectively recover and dewater the fine-coal particles and then briquette them with sawdust to produce a high-value fuel. The benefits are i) a premium fuel product that is low in moisture and can be handled, transported, and utilized in existing infrastructure, thereby avoiding significant additional capital investment and ii) a reduction in the amount of fine-waste material produced by the two industries that must now be disposed at a significant financial and environmental price. As such, the goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of producing a premium fuel with a heating value greater than 10,000 Btu/lb from waste materials generated by the coal and timber industries. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the briquetting process indicated that the goal was successfully achieved. Low-ash briquettes containing 5% to 10% sawdust were produced with energy values that were well in excess of 12,000 Btu/lb. A major economic hurdle associated with commercially briquetting coal is binder cost. Approximately fifty binder formulations, both with and without lime, were subjected to an extensive laboratory evaluation to assess their relative technical and economical effectiveness as binding agents for the briquetting of 90% coal and 10% sawdust blends. Guar gum, wheat starch, and a multi-component formulation were identified as most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the pulverized-coal market with costs being around $8 per ton of the coal-sawdust blend. REAX/lime and a second multi-component formulation were identified as the most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the stoker-coal market. Various sources of sawdust generated from different wood types were also investigated to determine their chemical properties and to evaluate their relative performance when briquetted with clean coal to form a premium fuel. The highest heating values, approaching 7,000 Btu/lb, were obtained from oak. Sawdusts from higher-density, red oak, white oak, hickory, and beech trees provided higher quality briquettes relative to their lower-density counterparts. In addition to sawdust type, a number of other parameters were evaluated to characterize their impact on briquette properties. The parameters that exhibited the greatest impact on briquette performance were binder concentration; sawdust concentration and particle size; cure temperature; and ash content. Parameters that had the least impact on briquette properties, at least over the ranges studied, were moisture content, briquetting force, and briquetting dwell time. The continuous production of briquettes from a blend of coal and sawdust was evaluated using a 200 lbs/hr Komarek Model B-100 briquetter. The heating values of briquettes produced by the unit exceeded the goal of the project by a large margin. A significant observation was the role of feed moisture on the stability of the mass flow rate through the briquetter and on briquette strength. Excessive feed moisture levels caused inconsistent or stoppage of material flow through the feed hopper and resulted in the production of variable-quality briquettes. Obviously, the limit on feed moisture content has a significant impact on the economics of coal-sawdust briquetting since it will ultimately dictate dew

Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.; Tao, D.

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.2 (s) Process Heating Machine Drive Facility HVAC² Process Cooling and Refrigeration Electrochemical Processes Facility Lighting Conventional Electricity Generation 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Quadrillion Btu 5.5 2.9 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 Natural Gas Net Electricity Coal³ Residual Fuel Oil Distillate

411

Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome The Production Services site contains links to each of the division's groups with descriptions of their services. Our goal is to update this website frequently to reflect ongoing service upgrades which, by planning and design, are added so that we can continue to meet your needs in a constantly changing work environment. Note: The Graphic Design Studio has been relocated to the second floor in the north wing of the Research Support Building 400. The telephone number remains the same, X7288. If you have any questions, please call supervisor, Rick Backofen, X6183. Photography Photography services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of photography services available. Video Video services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of video services available.

412

Biological Air Emissions Control for an Energy Efficient Forest Products Industry of the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. wood products industry is a leader in the production of innovative wood materials. New products are taking shape within a growth industry for fiberboard, plywood, particle board, and other natural material-based energy efficient building materials. However, at the same time, standards for clean air are becoming ever stricter. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) during production of wood products (including methanol, formaldehyde, acetylaldehyde, and mercaptans) must be tightly controlled. Conventional VOC and HAP emission control techniques such as regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) and regenerative catalytic oxidation (RCO) require significant amounts of energy and generate secondary pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and spent carbon. Biological treatment of air emissions offers a cost-effective and sustainable control technology for industrial facilities facing increasingly stringent air emission standards. A novel biological treatment system that integrates two types of biofilter systems, promises significant energy and cost savings. This novel system uses microorganisms to degrade air toxins without the use of natural gas as fuel or the creation of secondary pollutants. The replacement of conventional thermal oxidizers with biofilters will yield natural gas savings alone in the range of $82,500 to $231,000 per year per unit. Widespread use of biofilters across the entire forest products industry could yield fuel savings up to 5.6 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year and electricity savings of 2.1 trillion Btu per year. Biological treatment systems can also eliminate the production of NOx, SO2, and CO, and greatly reduce CO2 emissions, when compared to conventional thermal oxidizers. Use of biofilters for VOC and HAP emission control will provide not only the wood products industry but also the pulp and paper industry with a means to cost-effectively control air emissions. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a novel sequential treatment technology that integrates two types of biofilter systems – biotrickling filtration and biofiltration – for controlling forest product facility air emissions with a water-recycling feature for water conservation. This coupling design maximizes the conditions for microbial degradation of odor causing compounds at specific locations. Water entering the biotrickling filter is collected in a sump, treated, and recycled back to the biotrickling filter. The biofilter serves as a polishing step to remove more complex organic compounds (i.e., terpenes). The gaseous emissions from the hardboard mill presses at lumber plants such as that of the Stimson Lumber Company contain both volatile and condensable organic compounds (VOC and COC, respectively), as well as fine wood and other very small particulate material. In applying bio-oxidation technology to these emissions Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TAMUK) and Bio•Reaction (BRI) evaluated the potential of this equipment to resolve two (2) control issues which are critical to the industry: • First, the hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions (primarily methanol and formaldehyde) and • Second, the fine particulate and COC from the press exhaust which contribute to visual emissions (opacity) from the stack. In a field test in 2006, the biological treatment technology met the HAP and COC control project objectives and demonstrated significantly lower energy use (than regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) or regenerative catalytic oxidizers (RCOs), lower water use (than conventional scrubbers) all the while being less costly than either for maintenance. The project was successfully continued into 2007-2008 to assist the commercial partner in reducing unit size and footprint and cost, through added optimization of water recycle and improved biofilm activity, and demonstration of opacity removal capabilities.

Jones, K; Boswell, J.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement tracer tests. Topical report, December 20, 1995--December 20, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ERC is developing the detailed design of the commercial entry MW-class power plant. The product requirements and specifications have been derived. The planned baseline power plant is rated at 2.85 MW on natural gas and has a heat rate of 6.22 {times} 10{sup 6} J/kWh (5900 Btu/kWh; 58% LHV). Additional optional features will be available to include non-standard site conditions and other fuels. In parallel, the baseline product design has progressed to the final design phase. The preliminary product design, which also included parametric optimization, major component vendor interaction, and cost estimation, has been completed during the past year. The power plant approach consists of several factory-constructed truck-transportable modules. A computer-generated power plant layout is shown in a figure. The proposed power plant is expected to have a gross output of 3.03 MW, providing net 2.85 MW AC. The parasitic power loss is approximately 6%, of which, inverter, step-up transformer, BOP motors, and miscellaneous loads consume 2%, 1%, 2%, and 1%, respectively.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the author. ) Stone Tool Production, Hikade, UEE 2010Short Citation: Hikade 2010, Stone Tool Production. UEE.Thomas, 2010, Stone Tool Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production:...

416

CO-PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY USING PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foster Wheeler has completed work under a U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement to develop a gasification equipment module that can serve as a building block for a variety of advanced, coal-fueled plants. When linked with other equipment blocks also under development, studies have shown that Foster Wheeler's gasification module can enable an electric generating plant to operate with an efficiency exceeding 60 percent (coal higher heating value basis) while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The heart of the equipment module is a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) that is used to gasify the coal; it can operate with either air or oxygen and produces a coal-derived syngas without the formation of corrosive slag or sticky ash that can reduce plant availabilities. Rather than fuel a gas turbine for combined cycle power generation, the syngas can alternatively be processed to produce clean fuels and or chemicals. As a result, the study described herein was conducted to determine the performance and economics of using the syngas to produce hydrogen for sale to a nearby refinery in a hydrogen-electricity co-production plant setting. The plant is fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, produces 99.95 percent pure hydrogen at a rate of 260 tons per day and generates 255 MWe of power for sale. Based on an electricity sell price of $45/MWhr, the hydrogen has a 10-year levelized production cost of $6.75 per million Btu; this price is competitive with hydrogen produced by steam methane reforming at a natural gas price of $4/MMBtu. Hence, coal-fueled, PCFB gasifier-based plants appear to be a viable means for either high efficiency power generation or co-production of hydrogen and electricity. This report describes the PCFB gasifier-based plant, presents its performance and economics, and compares it to other coal-based and natural gas based hydrogen production technologies.

Zhen Fan

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Democracy from Above: Regime Transition in the Kingdom of Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

85% 87.5% n/a 79% 75% Agricultural contribution to GDP 56% 45% 38% 27% 22% Manufacturing contribution to GDP 4% 6% 9% 6% n/a Primary energy consumption14 (quadrillion Btu) 0 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.02 Sources: Planning Commission of Bhutan, World... 14 Primary energy includes petroleum, dry natural gas and coal, and net hydroelectric, solar, geothermal, wind, and wood and waste electricity. Also includes net electricity imports. 15 Acemoglu, D & Robinson, J. A. (2005). Economic Origins of 28...

Sinpeng, Aim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

OpenEI - Nonelectric  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/54 This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu) for nonelectric use in the United States by energy use sector and energy source between 2004 and 2008. The data was compiled and published by EIA; the spreadsheet provides more details about specific sources for data used in the analysis.

License
Type of License: 

419

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

41 41 Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Electricity Net Imports Total Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Total Wood 1 1635 NA - - - - NA - - (s) (s) - - (s) 1645 NA - - - - NA - - 0.001 0.001 - - 0.001 1655 NA - - - - NA - - .002 .002 - - .002 1665 NA - - - - NA - - .005 .005 - - .005 1675 NA - - - - NA - - .007 .007 - - .007 1685 NA - - - - NA - - .009 .009 - - .009 1695 NA - - - - NA - - .014 .014 - - .014 1705 NA - - - - NA - - .022 .022 - - .022 1715 NA - - - - NA - - .037 .037 - - .037

420

Transformational Manufacturing | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transformational Manufacturing Transformational Manufacturing Argonne's new Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program focuses on scalable process R&D to produce advanced battery materials in sufficient quantity for industrial testing. The U.S. manufacturing industry consumes more than 30 quadrillion Btu of energy per year, directly employs about 12 million people and generates another 7 million jobs in related businesses. Argonne is working with industry to develop innovative and transformational technology to improve the efficiency and competitiveness of domestic manufacturing while reducing its carbon footprint. The lab's efforts concentrate on sustainable manufacturing, applied nanotechnology and distributed energy, with an emphasis on transitioning science discoveries to the market.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Microchannel Reactor System Design & Demonstration For On-Site H2O2 Production by Controlled H2/O2 Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We successfully demonstrated an innovative hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production concept which involved the development of flame- and explosion-resistant microchannel reactor system for energy efficient, cost-saving, on-site H2O2 production. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for controlled direct combination of H2 and O2 in all proportions including explosive regime, at a low pressure and a low temperature to produce about 1.5 wt% H2O2 as proposed. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we demonstrated our H2O2 production approach by ‘numbering up’ the channels in a multi-channel microreactor-based pilot plant to produce 1 kg/h of H2O2 at 1.5 wt% as demanded by end-users of the developed technology. To our knowledge, we are the first group to accomplish this significant milestone. We identified the reaction pathways that comprise the process, and implemented rigorous mechanistic kinetic studies to obtain the kinetics of the three main dominant reactions. We are not aware of any such comprehensive kinetic studies for the direct combination process, either in a microreactor or any other reactor system. We showed that the mass transfer parameter in our microreactor system is several orders of magnitude higher than what obtains in the macroreactor, attesting to the superior performance of microreactor. A one-dimensional reactor model incorporating the kinetics information enabled us to clarify certain important aspects of the chemistry of the direct combination process as detailed in section 5 of this report. Also, through mathematical modeling and simulation using sophisticated and robust commercial software packages, we were able to elucidate the hydrodynamics of the complex multiphase flows that take place in the microchannel. In conjunction with the kinetics information, we were able to validate the experimental data. If fully implemented across the whole industry as a result of our technology demonstration, our production concept is expected to save >5 trillion Btu/year of steam usage and >3 trillion Btu/year in electric power consumption. Our analysis also indicates >50 % reduction in waste disposal cost and ~10% reduction in feedstock energy. These savings translate to ~30% reduction in overall production and transportation costs for the $1B annual H2O2 market.

Adeniyi Lawal

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

422

Petroleum - Exploration & Production - EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity. ... Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf.

423

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix B: feasibility study of methanol production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day  

SciTech Connect

A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing fuel grade methanol from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle. PNL obtained this information from laboratory and process development unit testing. The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to methanol. Plant production is 997 tons per day of methanol with a HHV of 9784 Btu per pound. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to methanol are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $120,830,000 - September 1980 basis. Methanol production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood costs include delivery to the plant. For utility financing, the methanol production costs are respectively $.45, $.48, $.55, and $.69 per gallon for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $.59, $.62, $.69, and $.83 per gallon for the corresponding wood costs. Both calculation methods include a return on equity capital in the costs. The thermal efficiency of the plant is 52.9%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BTU input, for "wood and bark combustion in boilers." ) DataCH4 emission from the combustion of wood chips is almost 100combustion Feedstock natural gas natural gas natural gas natural gas natural gas natural gas wood

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: potential UCG products and markets. Final report, Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) The US will continue to require new sources of energy fuels and substitutes for petrochemical feedstocks into the foreseeable future. Most of this requirement will be met using coal. However, the cost of mining, transporting, cleaning, and preparing coal, disposing of ash or slag and scrubbing stack gases continues to rise; particularly, in the Eastern US where the need is greatest. UCG avoids these pitfalls and, as such, should be considered a viable alternative to the mining of deeper coals. (2) Of the two possible product gases LBG and MBG, MBG is the most versatile. (3) The most logical use for UCG product in the Eastern US is to generate power on-site using a combined-cycle or co-generation system. Either low or medium Btu gas (LBG or MBG) can be used. (4) UCG should be an option whenever surface gasification is considered; particularly, in areas where deeper, higher sulfur coal is located. (5) There are environmental and social benefits to use of UCG over surface gasification in the Eastern US. (6) A site could be chosen almost anywhere in the Illinois and Ohio area where amenable UCG coal has been determined due to the existence of existing transportation or transmission systems. (7) The technology needs to be demonstrated and the potential economic viability determined at a site in the East-North-Central US which has commercial quantities of amenable bituminous coal before utilities will show significant interest.

None

1982-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Chemicals from biomass: an assessment of the potential for production of chemical feedstocks from renewable resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This assessment of the potential for production of commodity chemicals from renewable biomass resources is based on (1) a Delphi study with 50 recognized authorities to identify key technical issues relevant to production of chemicals from biomass, and (2) a systems model based on linear programming for a commodity chemicals industry using renewable resources and coal as well as gas and petroleum-derived resources. Results from both parts of the assessment indicate that, in the absence of gas and petroleum, coal undoubtedly would be a major source of chemicals first, followed by biomass. The most attractive biomass resources are wood, agricultural residues, and sugar and starch crops. A reasonable approximation to the current product slate for the petrochemical industry could be manufactured using only renewable resources for feedstocks. Approximately 2.5 quads (10/sup 15/ Btu (1.055 x 10/sup 18/ joules)) per year of oil and gas would be released. Further use of biomass fuels in the industry could release up to an additional 1.5 quads. however, such an industry would be unprofitable under current economic conditions with existing or near-commercial technology. As fossil resources become more expensive and biotechnology becomes more efficient, the economics will be more favorable. Use of the chemicals industry model to evaluate process technologies is demonstrated. Processes are identified which have potential for significant added value to the system if process improvements can be made to improve the economics. Guidelines and recommendations for research and development programs to improve the attractiveness of chemicals from biomass are discussed.

Donaldson, T.L.; Culberson, O.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

429

WABASH RIVER IMPPCCT, INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the Gasification Engineering Corporation and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, financial, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility Study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility and for fence-line commercial plants operated at The Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations (i.e. the Commercial Embodiment Plant or CEP) (2) Research, development, and testing to address any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Ltd., plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. During the reporting period work was furthered to support the development of capital and operating cost estimates associated with the installation of liquid or gas phase methanol synthesis technology in a Commercial Embodiment Plant (CEP) utilizing the six cases previously defined. In addition, continued development of the plant economic model was accomplished by providing combined cycle performance data. Performance and emission estimates for gas turbine combined cycles was based on revised methanol purge gas information. The economic model was used to evaluate project returns with various market conditions and plant configurations and was refined to correct earlier flaws. Updated power price projections were obtained and incorporated in the model. Sensitivity studies show that break-even methanol prices which provide a 12% return are 47-54 cents/gallon for plant scenarios using $1.25/MM Btu coal, and about 40 cents/gallon for most of the scenarios with $0.50/MM Btu petroleum coke as the fuel source. One exception is a high power price and production case which could be economically attractive at 30 cents/gallon methanol. This case was explored in more detail, but includes power costs predicated on natural gas prices at the 95th percentile of expected price distributions. In this case, the breakeven methanol price is highly sensitive to the required project return rate, payback period, and plant on-line time. These sensitivities result mainly from the high capital investment required for the CEP facility ({approx}$500MM for a single train IGCC-methanol synthesis plant). Finally, during the reporting period the Defense Contractor Audit Agency successfully executed an accounting audit of Global Energy Inc. for data accumulated over the first year of the IMPPCCT project under the Cooperative Agreement.

Doug Strickland

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

430

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Mg Production(Australia).pdf 49.21 KB MgProduction_Australia.mht 81.47 KB Mg Production(Brazil Israel Congo Malaysia).pdf 50.48 KB

431

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Key Definitions Quad: Quadrillion Btu (10^15 or 1,000,000,000,000,000 Btu) Generic Quad for the Buildings Sector: One quad of primary energy consumed in the buildings sector (includes the residential and commercial sectors), apportioned between the various primary fuels used in the sector according to their relative consumption in a given year. To obtain this value, electricity is converted into its primary energy forms according to relative fuel contributions (or shares) used to produce electricity in the given year. Electric Quad (Generic Quad for the Electric Utility Sector): One quad of primary energy consumed at electric utility power plants to supply electricity to end-users, shared among various fuels according to their relative contribution in

432

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

433

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 79.3 80.2 87.0 91.9 96.2 100.7 106.4 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.8 1.5 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.1 81.7 89.1 93.9 98.1 103.0 108.8 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.6 105.2 100.4 98.1 97.2 95.8 93.8 -0.4%

434

Windows technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

This assessment estimates that energy loss through windows is approximately 15 percent of all the energy used for space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings in New York State. The rule of thumb for the nation as a whole is about 25 percent. The difference may reflect a traditional assumption of single-pane windows while this assessment analyzed installed window types in the region. Based on the often-quoted assumption, in the United States some 3.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy, costing some $20 billion, is annually consumed as a result of energy lost through windows. According to this assessment, in New York State, the energy lost due to heat loss through windows is approximately 80 trillion Btu at an annual cost of approximately $1 billion.

Baron, J.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 80.2 80.8 87.1 91.9 96.2 100.8 106.5 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.5 1.6 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.7 82.4 89.1 93.9 98.2 103.1 108.9 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.2 100.7 98.5 96.7 95.6 94.6 93.9 -0.3%

436

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC MODIS Land Product Subsets MODIS Collection 5 Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Create subset for user selected site, area, product, and time period. Data for...

437

Production Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Project Accounts Production Project Accounts Overview Most NERSC login accounts are associated with specific individuals and must not be shared. Sometimes it is...

438

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

439

Century Model Product Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Century Model Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of a new model product. The model product "CENTURY: Modeling Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change, Version 4...

440

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report Data for: 2005 Release Date: May 15, 2006 Next Release: May 15, 2007

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Comparison of Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Comparison of Productive Capacity Comparisons of base case productive capacities for this and all previous studies were made (Figure B1).

442

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

443

Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Inc has shown that BUTANOL REPLACES GASOLINE - 100 pct and has no pollution problems, and further proved it is possible to produce 2.5 gallons of butanol per bushel corn at a production cost of less than $1.00 per gallon. There are 25 pct more Btu-s available and an additional 17 pct more from hydrogen given off, from the same corn when making butanol instead of ethanol that is 42 pct more Btu-s more energy out than it takes to make - that is the plow to tire equation is positive for butanol. Butanol is far safer to handle than gasoline or ethanol. Butanol when substituted for gasoline gives better gas mileage and does not pollute as attested to in 10 states. Butanol should now receive the same recognition as a fuel alcohol in U.S. legislation as ethanol. There are many benefits to this technology in that Butanol replaces gasoline gallon for gallon as demonstrated in a 10,000 miles trip across the United States July-August 2005. No modifications at all were made to a 1992 Buick Park Avenue; essentially your family car can go down the road on Butanol today with no modifications, Butanol replaces gasoline. It is that simple. Since Butanol replaces gasoline more Butanol needs to be made. There are many small farms across America which can grow energy crops and they can easily apply this technology. There is also an abundance of plant biomass present as low-value agricultural commodities or processing wastes requiring proper disposal to avoid pollution problems. One example is in the corn refinery industry with 10 million metric tons of corn byproducts that pose significant environmental problems. Whey lactose presents another waste management problem, 123,000 metric tons US, which can now be turned into automobile fuel. The fibrous bed bioreactor - FBB - with cells immobilized in the fibrous matrix packed in the reactor has been successfully used for several organic acid fermentations, including butyric and propionic acids with greatly increased reactor productivity, final product concentration, and product yield. Other advantages of the FBB include efficient and continuous operation without requiring repeated inoculation, elimination of cell lag phase, good long-term stability, self cleaning and easier downstream processing. The excellent reactor performance of the FBB can be attributed to the high viable cell density maintained in the bioreactor as a result of the unique cell immobilization mechanism within the porous fibrous matrix Since Butanol replaces gasoline in any car today - right now, its manufacturing from biomass is the focus of EEI and in the long term production of our transportation fuel from biomass will stabilize the cost of our fuel - the underpinning of all commerce. As a Strategic Chemical Butanol has a ready market as an industrial solvent used primarily as paint thinner which sells for twice the price of gasoline and is one entry point for the Company into an established market. However, butanol has demonstrated it is an excellent replacement for gasoline-gallon for gallon. The EEI process has made the economics of producing butanol from biomass for both uses very compelling. With the current costs for gasoline at $3.00 per gallon various size farmstead turn-key Butanol BioRefineries are proposed for 50-1,000 acre farms, to produce butanol as a fuel locally and sold locally. All butanol supplies worldwide are currently being produced from petroleum for $1.50 per gallon and selling for $3.80 wholesale. With the increasing price of gasoline it becomes feasible to manufacture and sell Butanol as a clean-safe replacement for gasoline. Grown locally - sold locally at gas prices. A 500 acre farm at 120 bushels corn per acre would make $150,000 at $2.50 per bushel for its corn, when turned into 150,000 gallons Butanol per year at 2.5 gallons per bushel the gross income would be $430,000. Butanol-s advantage is the fact that no other agricultural product made can be put directly into your gas tank without modifying your car. The farmer making and selling locally has no overhead for shippi

David E. Ramey; Shang-Tian Yang

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

Assessing economic impacts of clean diesel engines. Phase 1 report: U.S.- or foreign-produced clean diesel engines for selected light trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light trucks' share of the US light vehicle market rose from 20% in 1980 to 41% in 1996. By 1996, annual energy consumption for light trucks was 6.0 x 10{sup 15} Btu (quadrillion Btu, or quad), compared with 7.9 quad for cars. Gasoline engines, used in almost 99% of light trucks, do not meet the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. These engines have poor fuel economy, many getting only 10--12 miles per gallon. Diesel engines, despite their much better fuel economy, had not been preferred by US light truck manufacturers because of problems with high NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. The US Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, has funded research projects at several leading engine makers to develop a new low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine, first for large trucks, then for light trucks. Recent advances in diesel engine technology may overcome the NO{sub x} and particulate problems. Two plausible alternative clean diesel (CD) engine market penetration trajectories were developed, representing an optimistic case (High Case) and an industry response to meet the CAFE standards (CAFE Case). However, leadership in the technology to produce a successful small, advanced diesel engine for light trucks is an open issue between U.S. and foreign companies and could have major industry and national implications. Direct and indirect economic effects of the following CD scenarios were estimated by using the Standard and Poor's Data Resources, Inc., US economy model: High Case with US Dominance, High Case with Foreign Dominance, CAFE Case with US Dominance, and CAFE Case with Foreign Dominance. The model results demonstrate that the economic activity under each of the four CD scenarios is higher than in the Base Case (business as usual). The economic activity is highest for the High Case with US dominance, resulting in maximum gains in such key indicators as gross domestic product, total civilian employment, and federal government surplus. Specifically, the cumulative real gross domestic product surplus over the Base Case during the 2000--2022 period is about $56 x 10{sup 9} (constant 1992 dollars) under this high US dominance case. In contrast, the real gross domestic product gains under the high foreign dominance case would be only about half of the above gains with US dominance.

Teotia, A.P.; Vyas, A.D.; Cuenca, R.M.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

Manufacturing fuel-switching capability, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Historically, about one-third of all energy consumed in the United States has been used by manufacturers. About one-quarter of manufacturing energy is used as feedstocks and raw material inputs that are converted into nonenergy products; the remainder is used for its energy content. During 1988, the most recent year for which data are available, manufacturers consumed 15.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy to produce heat and power and to generate electricity. The manufacturing sector also has widespread capabilities to switch from one fuel to another for either economic or emergency reasons. There are numerous ways to define fuel switching. For the purposes of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), fuel switching is defined as the capability to substitute one energy source for another within 30 days with no significant modifications to the fuel-consuming equipment, while keeping production constant. Fuel-switching capability allows manufacturers substantial flexibility in choosing their mix of energy sources. The consumption of a given energy source can be maximized if all possible switching into that energy source takes place. The estimates in this report are based on data collected on the 1988 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), Forms 846 (A through C). The EIA conducts this national sample survey of manufacturing energy consumption on a triennial basis. The MECS is the only comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries. The MECS was first conducted in 1986 to collect data for 1985. This report presents information on the fuel-switching capabilities of manufacturers in 1988. This report is the second of a series based on the 1988 MECS. 8 figs., 31 tabs.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Illinois coal production pushes Illinois Basin production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal production in the Illinois Basin during the first half of 2012 (64.4 million short tons) was 13% higher than the same period in 2011. This ...

447

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By-products generated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

448

Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Co-production Plant Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future high-efficiency, low-emission generation plants that produce electric power, transportation fuels, and/or chemicals from fossil fuel feed stocks require a new class of fuel-flexible combustors. In this program, a validated combustor approach was developed which enables single-digit NO{sub x} operation for a future generation plants with low-Btu off gas and allows the flexibility of process-independent backup with natural gas. This combustion technology overcomes the limitations of current syngas gas turbine combustion systems, which are designed on a site-by-site basis, and enable improved future co-generation plant designs. In this capacity, the fuel-flexible combustor enhances the efficiency and productivity of future co-production plants. In task 2, a summary of market requested fuel gas compositions was created and the syngas fuel space was characterized. Additionally, a technology matrix and chemical kinetic models were used to evaluate various combustion technologies and to select two combustor concepts. In task 4 systems analysis of a co-production plant in conjunction with chemical kinetic analysis was performed to determine the desired combustor operating conditions for the burner concepts. Task 5 discusses the experimental evaluation of three syngas capable combustor designs. The hybrid combustor, Prototype-1 utilized a diffusion flame approach for syngas fuels with a lean premixed swirl concept for natural gas fuels for both syngas and natural gas fuels at FA+e gas turbine conditions. The hybrid nozzle was sized to accommodate syngas fuels ranging from {approx}100 to 280 btu/scf and with a diffusion tip geometry optimized for Early Entry Co-generation Plant (EECP) fuel compositions. The swozzle concept utilized existing GE DLN design methodologies to eliminate flow separation and enhance fuel-air mixing. With changing business priorities, a fully premixed natural gas & syngas nozzle, Protoytpe-1N, was also developed later in the program. It did not have the diluent requirements of Prototype-1 and was demonstrated at targeted gas turbine conditions. The TVC combustor, Prototype-2, premixes the syngas with air for low emission performance. The combustor was designed for operation with syngas and no additional diluents. The combustor was successfully operated at targeted gas turbine conditions. Another goal of the program was to advance the status of development tools for syngas systems. In Task 3 a syngas flame evaluation facility was developed. Fundamental data on syngas flame speeds and flame strain were obtained at pressure for a wide range of syngas fuels with preheated air. Several promising reduced order kinetic mechanisms were compared with the results from the evaluation facility. The mechanism with the best agreement was selected for application to syngas combustor modeling studies in Task 6. Prototype-1 was modeled using an advanced LES combustion code. The tools and combustor technology development culminate in a full-scale demonstration of the most promising technology in Task 8. The combustor was operated at engine conditions and evaluated against the various engine performance requirements.

Joel Haynes; Justin Brumberg; Venkatraman Iyer; Jonathan Janssen; Ben Lacy; Matt Mosbacher; Craig Russell; Ertan Yilmaz; Williams York; Willy Ziminsky; Tim Lieuwen; Suresh Menon; Jerry Seitzman; Ashok Anand; Patrick May

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Mountain Home Geothermal Project: geothermal energy applications in an integrated livestock meat and feed production facility at Mountain Home, Idaho. [Contains glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mountain Home Geothermal Project is an engineering and economic study of a vertically integrated livestock meat and feed production facility utilizing direct geothermal energy from the KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) southeast of Mountain Home, Idaho. A system of feed production, swine raising, slaughter, potato processing and waste management was selected for study based upon market trends, regional practices, available technology, use of commercial hardware, resource characteristics, thermal cascade and mass flow considerations, and input from the Advisory Board. The complex covers 160 acres; utilizes 115 million Btu per hour (34 megawatts-thermal) of geothermal heat between 300/sup 0/F and 70/sup 0/F; has an installed capital of $35.5 million;produces 150,000 hogs per year, 28 million lbs. of processed potatoes per year, and on the order of 1000 continuous horsepower from methane. The total effluent is 200 gallons per minute (gpm) of irrigation water and 7300 tons per year of saleable high grade fertilizer. The entire facility utilizes 1000 gpm of 350/sup 0/F geothermal water. The economic analysis indicates that the complex should have a payout of owner-invested capital of just over three years. Total debt at 11% per year interest would be paid out in 12 (twelve) years.

Longyear, A.B.; Brink, W.R.; Fisher, L.A.; Matherson, R.H.; Neilson, J.A.; Sanyal, S.K.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Comparison of projections in the AEO2012 and AEO2011 Reference case, 2009-2035 2025 2035 Energy and economic factors 2009 2010 AEO2012 AEO2011 AE2012 AEO2011 Primary energy (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 13.93 14.37 17.48 16.19 16.81 16.72 Dry natural gas 21.09 22.10 26.63 24.60 28.51 27.00 Coal 21.63 22.08 22.51 23.64 23.51 26.01 Nuclear power 8.36 8.44 9.60 9.17 9.35 9.14 Hydropower 2.67 2.51 2.97 3.04 3.06 3.09 Biomass 3.72 4.05 6.73 7.20 9.68 8.63 Other renewable energy 1.11 1.34 2.13 2.58 2.80 3.22 Other 0.47 0.64 0.76 0.88 0.88 0.78 Total 72.97 75.52 88.79 87.29 94.59 94.59 Net imports (quadrillion Btu) Liquid fuels 20.90 20.35 16.33 19.91 16.22 19.85

451

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

452

Monthly energy review, November, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject report, published in October 1989 by the Energy Information Administration, is one of a series of three reports on how US households use energy. It is based on data collected in the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The survey includes single-family homes, apartments, and mobile homes, and covers the six major sources of energy consumed in the residential sector: electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases (LPG), and wood. Data are presented in the form of aggregate totals and household averages. This Highlights'' reviews some of the major findings of the report. The primary uses of energy in US households include space heating and cooling, heating water, refrigerating foods, cooking foods, and operating household appliances. In 1987, energy consumption of the major sources of residential energy (excluding wood) totaled 9.1 quadrillion Btu. (Consumption of wood was an estimated 0.85 quadrillion Btu of energy.) From 1978 to 1987, total energy consumption decreased 14 percent while the number of households increased 18 percent (Table FE1). The lower level of consumption in 1987 was due partly to a warmer winter in that year than in 1978 and partly to conservation efforts.

Not Available

1990-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

453

Table E1A. Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Warehouse and Storage ..... 456 194 14 20 6 132 Q 36 2 5 48 Other ..... 286 138 18 11 4 59 Q 10 Q 5 33 Vacant ...

454

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Billion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 33,764,330 : 0 : 2,754,099 : 36,518,430 : 2,323,614 : 2,347,876 : 910,509: 1,696,301 : 651,575 -530,622 : 33,877,300 : 0 : 2,754,099 : ...

455

What are Ccf, Mcf, Btu, and therms? How do I convert ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Why am I being charged more for propane than the price on EIA's website? ... How much shale gas is produced in the United States? What are Ccf, Mcf, ...

456

What are Ccf, Mcf, Btu, and therms? How do I convert prices in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Conversion Calculator. Last updated: March 20, 2013. Other FAQs about Conversion & Equivalents. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons?

457

Table E1. Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non-Mall ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other

458

Table E1. Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non-Mall ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HVAC Equipment Upgrade..... 1,156 470 73 81 117 206 29 45 11 32 92 Lighting Upgrade ..... 1,085 485 62 75 92 184 24 49 10 28 76 Window ...

459

Table E1. Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HVAC Maintenance ..... 792 29 106 105 13 302 6 83 17 40 91 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ..... 280 9 42 47 4 108 1 12 8 18 32 Window and ...

460

Table E3. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Due to rounding, data may not sum to totals. HVAC = Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. Source: Energy Information Administration, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Table E11A. District Heat Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and --- More than 7,000 HDD ..... 88 80 8 Q (*) 106.3 96.7 9.4 Q (*) - 5,500-7,000 HDD ...

462

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Table E3A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters ...

465

Table E7. Natural Gas Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Window Replacement ..... 242 179 37 10 16 48.5 35.8 7.4 2.0 3.2 Plumbing System Upgrade ..... 287 198 48 17 24 50.2 34.6 8.4 2.9 4.3 ...

466

Table A4. Approximate Heat Content of Natural Gas, 1949-2011 (Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook › Annual Energy Outlook ... 1984: 1,109: 1,031: 1,030: 1,035: 1,031: 1,005: 1,010: 1985: 1,112: 1,032: 1,031: 1,038: 1,032: 1,002: 1,011 ...

467

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

468

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E E Low Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 217 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9

469

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth case projections Low Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 203 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6

470

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

D D High Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 209 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0

471

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Economic Growth case projections High Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 197 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9

472

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access All of the MODIS ASCII Subsets are available from the ORNL DAAC's ftp site. The directory structure of the ftp site is based on the abbreviated names for the MODIS Products. Terra MODIS products are abbreviated "MOD", Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MYD" and combined Terra and Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MCD". The abbreviated names also include the version number (also known as collection). For specific products, please refer to the following table: Product Acronym Spatial Resolution Temporal Frequency Terra V005 SIN Aqua V005 SIN Terra/Aqua Combined V005 SIN Surface Reflectance SREF 500 m 8 day composites MOD09A1 MYD09A1 ---------- Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity TEMP 1 km 8 day composites MOD11A2 MYD11A2 ----------

473

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

474

Industrial Oil Products Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forum for professionals involved in research, development, engineering, marketing, and testing of industrial products and co-products from fats and oils, including fuels, lubricants, coatings, polymers, paints, inks, cosmetics, dielectric fluids, and ad

475

The Product Creation Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Product Creation Process is described in its context. A phased model is shown, as many organisations use such a model as blueprint. The operational organisation of the product creation process is discussed, especially the role of the operational leader.

Gerrit Muller

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Casthouse Productivity and Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... Cast Shop for Aluminum Production: Casthouse Productivity and ... performance indicator called Specific Energy Consumption [SEC] ... Improved Monolithic Materials for Lining Aluminum Holding and Melting Furnaces: Andy ...

477

Bio-Based Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from biomass. These bioproducts, or bio-based products, are not only made from renewable sources, but they also often...

478

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

479

Topic: Product Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: Product Data. Event. Model-Based Enterprise Summit. TDP Standards Development Summit. Group. Life Cycle Engineering Group. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

480

CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Soy Protein Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will provide an overview of the key benefits of soy protein products in an easily understood format. ...

482

Table 3. Product Applications  

of all hazardous metals, low -level radioactive waste, fission products and transuranics • Macroencapsulation of contaminated debris, metal and ...

483

MSID Products, Tools, & Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SID Products, Tools, & Services. XML Testbed - collection of XML-Related Tools; Express Engine - STEP (ISO 10303) development ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

484

IEEE 1588 Products & Implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Facsimile. 100 Bureau Drive, M/S 8220 Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8220. IEEE 1588 Products & Implementations. This page ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

485

Seamless Steel Tubular Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...). The tank also contained the search units.Fig. 6 Seamless and welded austenitic stainless steel tubular products were

486

Strangeness Production at COSY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper gives an overview of strangeness-production experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. Results on kaon-pair and phi meson production in pp, pd and dd collisions, hyperon-production experiments and Lambda p final-state interaction studies are presented.

Frank Hinterberger; Hartmut Machner; Regina Siudak

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

487

Coal production 1989  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

488

State energy price and expenditure report, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The average price paid for energy in the United States in 1986 was $7.19 per million Btu, down significantly from the 1985 average of $8.42 per million Btu. While total energy consumption increased slightly to 74.3 quadrillion Btu from 1985 to 1986, expenditures fell from $445 billion to $381 billion. Energy expenditures per capita in 1986 were $1578, down significantly from the 1985 rate. In 1986, consumers used only 94 percent as much energy per person as they had in 1970, but they spent 3.9 times as much money per person on energy as they had in 1970. By state, energy expenditures per capita in 1986 ranged from the lowest rate of $1277 in New York to the highest of $3108 in Alaska. Of the major energy sources, electricity registered the highest price per million Btu ($19.00), followed by petroleum ($5.63), natural gas ($3.97), coal ($1.62), and nuclear fuel ($0.70). The price of electricity is relatively high because of significant costs for converting energy from various forms (e.g., fossil fuels, nuclear fuel, hydroelectric energy, and geothermal energy) into electricity, and additional, somewhat smaller costs for transmitting and distributing electricity to end users. In addition, electricity is a premium form of energy because of its flexibility and clean nature at energy consumers' sites.

Not Available

1988-10-28T23:59:59.000Z