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1

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

2

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

3

BTU Accounting for Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

convert utility bills to BTUs? All fuels can be measured in terms of BTU content. Natural gas has a million BTUs per thousand cubic feet; propane - 92,000 BTUs per gallon; fuel oil - 140,000 BTUs per gallon; electricity - 3,413 BTUs per KW hour... BTU ACCOUNTING FOR INDUSTRY Robert O. Redd-CPA Seidman & Seidman Grand Rapids, Michigan Today, as never before, American industry needs to identify and control their most criti cal resources. One of these is energy. In 1973 and again in 1976...

Redd, R. O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption grows by 7 percent in the AEO2013 Reference case, from 98 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 104 quadrillion Btu in 2035-2.5 quadrillion Btu less than in AEO2012-and continues to grow at a rate of 0.6 percent per year, reaching about 108 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 7). The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 82 percent in 2011 to 78 percent in 2040, as consumption of petroleum-based liquid fuels falls, largely as a result of the incorporation of new fuel efficiency standards for LDVs. figure dataWhile total liquid fuels consumption falls, consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases significantly, from 1.3 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 2.1 quadrillion Btu in 2040, and its share of

5

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption grows by 12% in the AEO2014 Reference case, from 95 quadrillion Btu in 2012 to 106 quadrillion Btu in 2040-1.3 quadrillion Btu less than in AEO2013 (Figure 8). The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 82% in 2012 to 80% in 2040, as consumption of petroleum-based liquid fuels declines, largely as a result of slower growth in VMT and increased vehicle efficiency. figure dataTotal U.S. consumption of petroleum and other liquids, which was 35.9 quadrillion Btu (18.5 MMbbl/d) in 2012, increases to 36.9 quadrillion Btu (19.5 MMbbl/d) in 2018, then declines to 35.4 quadrillion Btu (18.7 MMbbl/d) in 2034 and remains at that level through 2040. Total consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases slightly through 2022 and then

6

Low-Btu coal gasification in the United States: company topical. [Brick producers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazelton and other brick producers have proved the reliability of the commercial size Wellman-Galusha gasifier. For this energy intensive business, gas cost is the major portion of the product cost. Costs required Webster/Hazelton to go back to the old, reliable alternative energy of low Btu gasification when the natural gas supply started to be curtailed and prices escalated. Although anthracite coal prices have skyrocketed from $34/ton (1979) to over $71.50/ton (1981) because of high demand (local as well as export) and rising labor costs, the delivered natural gas cost, which reached $3.90 to 4.20/million Btu in the Hazelton area during 1981, has allowed the producer gas from the gasifier at Webster Brick to remain competitive. The low Btu gas cost (at the escalated coal price) is estimated to be $4/million Btu. In addition to producing gas that is cost competitive with natural gas at the Webster Brick Hazelton plant, Webster has the security of knowing that its gas supply will be constant. Improvements in brick business and projected deregulation of the natural gas price may yield additional, attractive cost benefits to Webster Brick through the use of low Btu gas from these gasifiers. Also, use of hot raw gas (that requires no tar or sulfur removal) keeps the overall process efficiency high. 25 references, 47 figures, 14 tables.

Boesch, L.P.; Hylton, B.G.; Bhatt, C.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation figure data Delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector grows from 27.6 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 28.8 quadrillion Btu in 2035 in the AEO2012 Reference case (Figure 7). Energy consumption by light-duty vehicles (LDVs) (including commercial light trucks) initially declines in the Reference case, from 16.5 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 15.7 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to projected increases in the fuel economy of highway vehicles. Projected energy consumption for LDVs increases after 2025, to 16.3 quadrillion Btu in 2035. The AEO2012 Reference case projections do not include proposed increases in LDV fuel economy standards-as outlined in the December 2011 EPA and NHTSA Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for 2017 and

8

Figure legends supplemental figures Supplemental figure 1.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Kruskal-Wallis-test). Supplemental figure 3. (a) Survival of GFAPcre+/VHL+f/+f /VEGF+f/+f mice (n=19

Kleinfeld, David

9

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

10

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Steam is the most transferring heat from But most steam systems LOWEST PRESSURE STEAM SAVES MORE BTU'S THAN YOU THINK Stafford J. Vallery Armstrong Machine Works Three Rivers, Michigan steam to do the process heating rather than...

Vallery, S. J.

11

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

12

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

13

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

14

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

15

EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

16

Figure S.1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2- Figures and Table 2.1 2- Figures and Table 2.1 Figure S.1 Figure 1.1 Figure 1.2 Figure 1.3 Figure 2.1 Figure 2.2 Figure 2.3 Figure 3.1 Figure 3.2 Figure 3.3 Figure 3.4 Figure 3.5 Figure 3.6 Figure 3.7 Figure 3.8 Figure 3.9 Figure 3.10 Figure 3.11 Figure 3.12 Figure 3.13 Figure 3.14 Figure 3.15 Figure 3.16 Figure 3.17 Figure 3.18 Figure 3.19 Figure 4.1 Figure 4.2 Figure 4.3 Figure 4.4 Figure 4.5 Figure 4.6 Figure 4.7 Figure 4.8 Figure 4.9 Figure 4.10 Figure 4.11 Figure 4.12 Figure 4.13 Figure 4.14 Figure 4.15 Figure 4.16 Figure 4.17 Figure 4.18 Figure 4.19 J.1 Lewiston Stage Contents Relationship (NOT AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT) J.2 Keswick Stage Contents Relationship (NOT AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT) J.3 Natoma Stage Contents Relationship (NOT AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC

17

U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

18

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights print version PDF Logo World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case, which does not include prospective legislation or policies, world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Chart data

19

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation figure data Delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector remains relatively constant at about 27 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 6). Energy consumption by LDVs (including commercial light trucks) declines in the Reference case, from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to incorporation of the model year 2017 to 2025 GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs. Despite the projected increase in LDV miles traveled, energy consumption for LDVs further decreases after 2025, to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2035, as a result of fuel economy improvements achieved through stock turnover as older, less efficient vehicles are replaced by newer, more fuel-efficient vehicles. Beyond 2035, LDV energy demand begins to level off

20

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Consumption Total primary energy consumption in the AEO2008 reference case increases at an average rate of 0.9 percent per year, from 100.0 quadrillion Btu in 2006 to 123.8 quadrillion Btu in 2030—7.4 quadrillion Btu less than in the AEO2007 reference case. In 2030, the levels of consumption projected for liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal are all lower in the AEO2008 reference case than in the AEO2007 reference case. Among the most important factors resulting in lower total energy demand in the AEO2008 reference case are lower economic growth, higher energy prices, greater use of more efficient appliances, and slower growth in energy-intensive industries. Figure 2. Delivered energy consumption by sector, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

22

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 78. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 79. U.S. coal production in four cases, 2007, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 80. Average minemouth coal prices by regionCoal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Total Coal Production Increases at a Slower Rate Than in the Past In the AEO2009 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at both new and existing plants and the startup of several CTL

23

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

24

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 1 - World Energy and Economic Outlook In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use; OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the NON-OECD Economies by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

25

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

26

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates...

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Method for producing low and medium BTU gas from coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for producing low and medium BTU gas from carbonizable material is described which comprises: partly devolatizing the material and forming hot incandescent coke therefrom by passing a bed of the same part way through a hot furnace chamber on a first horizontally moving grate while supplying a sub-stoichiometric quantity of air to the same and driving the reactions: C + O/sub 2/ = CO/sub 2/; 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO discharging the hot incandescent coke from the end of the first grate run onto a second horizontally moving grate run below the first grate run in the same furnace chamber so as to form a bed thereon, the bed formed on the second grate run being considerably thicker than the bed formed on the first grate run, passing the hot incandescent coke bed on the second grate run further through the furnace chamber in a substantially horizontal direction while feeding air and stream thereto so as to fully burn the coke and in ratio of steam to air driving the following reactions: 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO; C + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO; C + 2H/sub 2/O = 2H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/; CO + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ taking off the ash residue of the burned coke and taking off the gaseous products of the reactions.

Mansfield, V.; Francoeur, C.M.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

THERMAL BUILDING PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION USING SPATIAL ARCHETYPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is spent for heating and cooling systems, see Figure 1.2. Figure 1.1 Primary energy consumption by sector, 1970-2020 in quadrillion Btu (EIA, 2001) Figure 1.2 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by end use encouragement, love and support #12;1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1. Energy Consumption Energy conscious building

Papalambros, Panos

29

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

30

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1: World Energy and Economic Outlook 1: World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year’s outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. Figure 7. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Country Grouping, 2003-2030 (Quadrillion Btu) Printer friendly version Region 2003 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Average Annual Percent Change, 2003-2030

31

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

32

Biaxial Interference Figures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biaxial interference figures are similar to uniaxial figures but show more variety in the shape and movement of isogyres. Biaxial figures often contain only a single isogyre, which is not always parallel to a ...

Richard E. Stoiber; Stearns A. Morse

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Overview Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2035. figure data In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD nations),2 where demand is driven by strong long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD nations increases by 85 percent in the Reference case, as compared with an increase of 18 percent for the OECD economies.

34

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Overview Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2035. figure data In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD nations),2 where demand is driven by strong long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD nations increases by 85 percent in the Reference case, as compared with an increase of 18 percent for the OECD economies.

35

Toxicological characterization of the process stream from an experimental low Btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Samples were obtained from selected positions in the process stream of an experimental low Btu gasifier using a five-stage multicyclone train and...Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay) and forin vit...

J. M. Benson; J. O. Hill; C. E. Mitchell

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mutagenicity of potential effluents from an experimental low btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential waste effluents produced by an experimental low Btu coal gasifier were assessed for mutagenic activity inSalmonella...strain TA98. Cyclone dust, tar and water effluents were mutagenic, but only followin...

J. M. Benson; C. E. Mitchell; R. E. Royer

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

38

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

39

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

40

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World energy demand and economic outlook World energy demand and economic outlook Overview In the IEO2013 Reference case, world energy consumption increases from 524 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040, a 30-year increase of 56 percent (Figure 12 and Table 1). More than 85 percent of the increase in global energy demand from 2010 to 2040 occurs among the developing nations outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD), driven by strong economic growth and expanding populations. In contrast, OECD member countries are, for the most part, already more mature energy consumers, with slower anticipated economic growth and little or no anticipated population growth.7 Figure 12. World total energy consumption, 1990-2040.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation sector energy demand Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy in 2040, the same as the level of energy demand in 2011 (Figure 70). The projection of no growth in transportation energy demand differs markedly from the historical trend, which saw 1.1-percent average annual growth from 1975 to 2011 [126]. No growth in transportation energy demand is the result of declining energy use for LDVs, which offsets increased energy use for heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), aircraft, marine, rail, and pipelines. Energy demand for LDVs declines from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2040, in contrast to 0.9-percent average annual growth

42

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential from Market Trends Residential from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

43

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

44

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

45

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Overview In the IEO2013 Reference case, which does not include prospective greenhouse gas reduction policies, coal remains the second largest energy source worldwide. World coal consumption rises at an average rate of 1.3 percent per year, from 147 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 180 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 220 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 70). The near-term increase reflects significant increases in coal consumption by China, India, and other non-OECD countries. In the longer term, growth of coal consumption decelerates as policies and regulations encourage the use of cleaner energy sources, natural gas becomes more economically competitive as a result of shale gas development, and growth of industrial use of coal slows largely as a result of China's industrial activities. Consumption is dominated by

46

DOE-EIA-0484(2010)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case-which reflects a scenario assuming that current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). The global economic recession that began in 2007 and continued into 2009 has had a profound impact on world energy demand in the near term. Total world marketed energy consumption contracted by 1.2 percent in 2008 and by an estimated 2.2 percent in 2009, as manufactur- ing and consumer

47

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. The IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand from 2004 to 2030. Total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase from 447 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 quadrillion Btu in 2030-a 57-percent increase over the projection period (Table 1 and Figure 8). The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Generally, countries outside the OECD 3 have higher projected economic growth rates and more rapid population growth

48

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: September 19, 2011 | Next Scheduled Release Date: June 10, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2011) No International Energy Outlook will be released in 2012. The next edition of the report is scheduled for release in Spring 2013 Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for

49

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

50

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),2 known as non-OECD, where demand is driven by strong, long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD countries increases by 90 percent; in OECD countries, the increase

51

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

52

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

53

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

54

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

55

An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the production of low-BTU gas from a coal gasification reactor for combustion before introduction to the topping cycle gas turbine (Minchener, 1990). Most low-BTU gases are heavily loaded with sulfur-containing compounds which appear to be a major problem... with direct combustion of coal and low-BTU gases (Caraway, 1995). Environmental standards require the removal of these compounds which can be expensive and hazardous when removed from coal in post-combustion processes. However, gasification of coal results...

Carney, Christopher Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

57

MECS Fuel Oil Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel : Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel Figure 1. Percent of Total Purchased Fuel Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS): Consumption of Energy; U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM): Statistics for Industry Groups and Industries: Statistical Abstract of the United States. Note: The years below the line on the "X" Axis are interpolated data--not directly from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey or the Annual Survey of Manufactures. Figure 2: Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Figure 2. Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of

58

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2007 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. Average Annual Growth in Delivered Energy Consumption by Region and End-use Sector, 2004-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. Industrial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

59

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)- Energy Production and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production and Imports Production and Imports Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Production and Imports Figure 5. Total energy production and consumption, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 6. Energy production by fuel, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Net imports of energy are expected to continue to meet a major share of total U.S. energy demand (Figure 5). In the AEO2008 reference case, the net import share of total U.S. energy consumption in 2030 is 29 percent, slightly less than the 30-percent share in 2006. Rising fuel prices over the projection period are expected to spur increases in domestic energy

60

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2008 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 65 percent and international coal trade increases by 53 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2005 to 29 percent in 2030. Figure 46. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 47. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 48. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2009 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 49 percent from 2006 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2006 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 42. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 43. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 44. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

62

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2009 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 73 percent, compared with an increase of 15 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. World Oil Prices in the IEO2009 and IEO2008 Reference Cases, 1980-2030 (2007 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

63

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Industrial Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Industrial Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 6 - Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by an average of 1.4 percent per year from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. Much of the growth is expected to occur in the developing non-OECD nations. Figure 63. OECD and Non-OECD Industrial Sector Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 64. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2006 and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 65. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Major Energy-Intensive Industry Shares, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

64

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2008 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030.Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 85 percent,compared with an increase of 19 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2005-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. World Oil Prices in Two Cases, 1980-2030 (nominal dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

65

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 5 - Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 54. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 55. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to

66

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Overview Figure 65. World coal consumption by region, 1980-2035 figure dataIn the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not include prospective greenhouse gas reduction policies, world coal consumption increases by 50 percent, from 139 quadrillion Btu in 2008 to 209 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 65). Although world coal consumption increases at an average rate of 1.5 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, the growth rates by region are uneven, with total coal consumption for OECD countries remaining near 2008 levels and coal consumption in non-OECD countries increasing at a pace of 2.1 percent per year. As a result, increased use of coal in non-OECD countries accounts for nearly all the growth in world coal consumption over the period. In 2008, coal accounted for 28 percent of world energy consumption (Figure

67

The effect of CO? on the flammability limits of low-BTU gas of the type obtained from Texas lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. N. Heffington An experimental study was conducted to determine if relatively large amounts of CO in a low-BTU gas of the type 2 derived from underground gasification of Texas lignite would cause significant... ? Flammability limit data for three actual samples of low-BTU gas obtained from an in-situ coal gasification experiment (Heffington, 1981). The HHC are higher LIST OF TABLES (Cont'd) PAGE hydrocarbons orimarily C H and C H . ----- 34 I 2 6 3 8' TABLE 5...

Gaines, William Russell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption is projected to grow by 57 percent over the 2004 to 2030 period. Total world energy use rises from 447 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 qua- drillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). Global energy demand grows despite the relatively high world oil and natural gas prices that are projected to persist into the mid-term outlook. The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2004 to 2030 is projected for nations outside

69

Efficient Energy Utilization in the Industrial Sector - Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

require. Recent figures for the distribution of energy indi cate that the industrial sector consumes about 44% of the total with about 2/3 of that for combustion and the remainder for raw materials. This repre sents about 24 quadrillion BTU's per year... 16 years to a possible 70 quqd rillion BTU's. The total energy consumption wi~l continue to grow over the next 16 years as shown in Figure 2. Again, under moderate economic growth, energy gnowth will average about 3 percent per year. For exa...

Davis, S. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

Horner, M.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

72

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

73

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2002 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use in the IEO2005 reference case forecast is expected in the countries with emerging economies. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumptiion by Region, 1970-2025. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) reference case, world marketed energy consumption is projected to increase on average by 2.0 percent per year over the 23-year forecast horizon from 2002 to 2025—slightly lower than the 2.2-percent average annual growth rate from 1970 to 2002. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 412 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2002 to 553 quadrillion Btu in

74

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Efficiency from Executive Summary Efficiency from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

75

Facility Automation Products--Systems--Applications--Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prices depend on energy costs. This variable is further complicated by foreign competition subjected to a different set of regulations. ENERGY CONSUMPTION QUADRILLIONS OF BTU'S Figure 1 INTRODUCTION The task of managing energy within...), it is noted that the industrial portion is dropping at a faster rate than the total, which shows an admirable attention to the crisis. 76 ESL-IE-86-06-15 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 17...

Bynum, H. D.

76

The synthesis of sound figures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss a novel technique to control the spatial distribution of sound level within a synthesized sound field. The problem is formulated by separating the sound field into regions with high acoustic level, so-called bright regions, and ... Keywords: Multichannel sound reproduction, Quiet zones, Sound field synthesis, Sound figures

Karim Helwani; Sascha Spors; Herbert Buchner

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification-assessment program for potential users in New Jersey. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burns and Roe Industrial Services Corporation and Public Service Electric and Gas in association with Scientific Design Company have completed a technical and economic evaluation of coal gasification. The evaluation also addressed the regulatory, institutional, and environmental issues of coal gasification. Two uses of coal-derived medium Btu (MBU) gas were explored: (1) substitute boiler fuel for electric generation and (2) substitute fuel for industrial customers using natural gas. The summary and conclusions of his evaluation are: The Sewaren Generating Station was selected as potentially the most suitable site for the coal gasification plant. The Texaco process was selected because it offered the best combination of efficiency and pilot plant experience; in addition, it is a pressurized process which is advantageous if gas is to be supplied to industrial customers via a pipeline. Several large industrial gas customers within the vicinities of Sewaren and Hudson Generating Stations indicated that MBG would be considered as an alternate fuel provided that its use was economically justified. The capital cost estimates for a 2000 tons/day and a 1000 tons/day gasification plant installed at Sewaren Generating Station are $115.6 million and $73.8 million, in 1980 dollars, respectively. The cost of supplying MBG to industrial customers is competitive with existing pipeline natural gas on a Btu heating value basis for gasifier capacity factors of 35% or higher.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

EIS-0268-Figures-1997.pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOFJ'EIS-0268 DOFJ'EIS-0268 - PKw.2F Figure 4-L L-Lake and environs. 4-3 -- =----- 90 --m--- -m- EAST o (C.nti""ed O"figure 4.4b) AA 320 1 300 1 Fourmile Indian Grave Upland Pen Branch Brench Formation Branch 280 ~ 280 240 : E -220 ~ L 200 180 I 160 140 1 I I 1 2 3 4 5 Miles Legend: _ _ Inferredcontact Note:TO converito kilometersmultiply by 1.609 to convetito metersmultiply by0.304e Figure 4-4a. Generalized geologic cross section from Fourmile Branch to L DO~IS-0268 I t" 1 I I t 4-8 DOE/EIS-0268 I 4-60 I t t i I I DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,. 4-61 DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,,.':, .. ,.. , 4-62 I 1 I I I DOE/EIS-0268 4-63 DOEI'EIS-0268 ., . . 4-64 I I 1 B I I I m 1 I I I I 1 I I I m I DOE~IS-0268 4-65 DO~IS-0268 Radon in homes: 200 millirem per year Notes me major contributor to the annual average individual dose in the United StaIeS, [ncluti"g residents of the Central Savannah River Area, is naturally occuning radiation

79

Annual Energy Review, 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

that was generated from nonrenewable energy sources and -0.03 quadrillion Btu for hydroelectric pumped storage. Notes: Data are preliminary. Totals may not equal sum of...

80

Chinese Rural Vehicles: An Explanatory Analysis of Technology, Economics, Industrial Organization, Energy Use, Emissions, and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diesel fuel consumption in 2000 was 69.5 million metric tons (MMT) 79 (see Table 9-1) or 2.96 quadrillion BTU.

Sperling, Dan; Lin, Zhenhong; Hamilton, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Word Pro - S8  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Flow, 2013 (Quadrillion Btu) 1 Blast furnace gas and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased...

82

Word Pro - S1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade Stock Change and Other d Consumption Fossil Fuels a Nuclear Electric Power Renew- able Energy b Total Imports Exports Net Imports c Fossil...

83

Kosovo: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Kosovo Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code XK 3-letter ISO code...

84

Falkland Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Falkland Islands Population 2,932 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FK 3-letter ISO code...

85

L:\\main\\pkc\\aeotabs\\aeo2009\\stim_all.wpd  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case 16 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply,...

86

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal's share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 199.0 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 54). Coal consumption increases by 2.6 per- cent per year on average from 2004 to 2015, then slows to an average increase of 1.8 percent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and primary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD

87

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources The renewable energy share of total world energy consumption is expected to remain unchanged at 8 percent through 2025, despite a projected 56-percent increase in consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable resources. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, moderate growth in the world’s consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy resources is projected over the next 24 years. Renewable energy sources are not expected to compete economically with fossil fuels in the mid-term forecast. In the absence of significant government policies aimed at reducing the impacts of carbon-emitting energy sources on the environment, it will be difficult to extend the use of renewables on a large scale. IEO2003 projects that consumption of renewable energy worldwide will grow by 56 percent, from 32 quadrillion Btu in 2001 to 50 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 69).

88

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage HIGHLIGHTS World energy consumption is projected to increase by 60 percent from 1997 to 2020. Recent price developments in world oil markets and economic recovery in Southeast Asia have altered projections relative to last year’s report. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000), world energy consumption increases by 60 percent over a 23-year forecast period, from 1997 to 2020. Energy use worldwide increases from 380 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1997 to 608 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 1999 are reflected in this year’s outlook. Shifting short-term world oil markets, the beginnings

89

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Highlights picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent from 1999 to 2020. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2001 reference case forecast. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001), world energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent over a 21-year forecast horizon, from 1999 to 2020. Worldwide energy use grows from 382 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1999 to 607 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 2000 influenced this year’s outlook, including persistently high world oil prices, stronger than anticipated economic recovery in southeast Asia, and

90

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

highlights.gif (3388 bytes) highlights.gif (3388 bytes) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 65 percent from 1996 to 2020. The current economic problems in Asia and Russia have lowered projections relative to last year’s report. In the reference case projections for this International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), world energy consumption reaches 612 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) by 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1)—an increase of 65 percent over the 24-year projection period. The IEO99 projection for the world’s energy demand in 2020 is about 4 percent (almost 30 quadrillion Btu) lower than last year’s projection. The downward revision is based on events in two parts of the world: Asia and Russia. In Asia, the economic crisis that began in early 1997 persisted throughout 1998, as economic

91

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 2.0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to

92

Microsoft Word - figure_20.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 2005 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (2005 = 1.0) as published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. dollars per thousand cubic feet base year Figure 21. Average price of natural gas delivered to residential consumers, 1980-2011 nominal dollars

93

Microsoft Word - figure_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

38 38 0 2 4 6 8 10 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Trillion Cubic Feet 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report." Figure 15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2002-2006 Cautionary Note: Number of Residential and Commercial Consumers The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that there may be some double counting in the number of residential and commercial customers reported for 2002 through 2006. EIA collects information on the number of residential and commercial consumers through a survey of companies that deliver gas

94

Microsoft Word - figure_18.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2001-2005 Note: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for

95

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2007 (Million Cubic Feet) Nigeria Algeria 37,483 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports.

96

Microsoft Word - figure_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Trillion Cubic Feet 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-920, "Combined Heat and Power Plant Report"; and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Figure 15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2003-2007 Cautionary Note: Number of Residential and Commercial Consumers The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that there may be some double counting in the number of residential and commercial customers reported for 2003 through 2007.

97

PHOBOS Experiment: Figures and Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

PHOBOS consists of many silicon detectors surrounding the interaction region. With these detectors physicists can count the total number of produced particles and study the angular distributions of all the products. Physicists know from other branches of physics that a characteristic of phase transitions are fluctuations in physical observables. With the PHOBOS array they look for unusual events or fluctuations in the number of particles and angular distribution. The articles that have appeared in refereed science journals are listed here with separate links to the supporting data plots, figures, and tables of numeric data. See also supporting data for articles in technical journals at http://www.phobos.bnl.gov/Publications/Technical/phobos_technical_publications.htm and from conference proceedings at http://www.phobos.bnl.gov/Publications/Proceedings/phobos_proceedings_publications.htm

The PHOBOS Collaboration

98

Microsoft Word - figure_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

38 38 0 2 4 6 8 10 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Trillion Cubic Feet 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Figure 15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2001-2005 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA -176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report." Cautionary Note: Number of Residential and Commercial Consumers The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that there may be some double counting in the number of residential and commercial customers reported for 2001 through 2005. EIA collects information on the number of residential and commercial consumers through a survey of companies that deliver gas

99

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,833 ,833 35 Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2009 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 111,144 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates

100

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2010 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 26.8 0.8 0.2 3.4 3.280 0.190 0.042 0.333 0.739 0.033 21.3 1.1 3.3 3.3 2.0 3.1 6.5 0.03 7.4 0.073 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2009 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 26.0 0.7 0.2 3.5 3.271 0.236 0.013 0.338 0.701 0.031 20.6 1.0 3.4 3.0 1.9 3.1 6.2 0.03 6.9 0.160 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to

102

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Algeria Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2007 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 24.6 0.6 0.2 3.8 3.783 0.448 0.077 0.095 0.292 0.482 0.047 19.1 0.9 3.2 3.4 1.8 3.0 6.6 0.03 6.8 0.115 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895A, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to

103

Microsoft Word - figure_14.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 14. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2010 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway India Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Yemen Japan Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 53,122 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Gulf of Mexico Canada Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates based on historical data. Energy Information

104

Microsoft Word - figure_17.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 C ommercial All O ther States W isconsin Minnesota Pennsylvania Michigan O hio N ew Jersey Texas California N ew York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion C ubic Feet Residential Indiana G eorgia N ew Jersey Pennsylvania Texas O hio Michigan Illinois California All O ther States N ew York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion C ubic Feet Figure 17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2010 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet E lectric P ower 7,387,184 34% Industrial 6,517,477 30% C om m ercial 3,101,675 14% R esidential 4,787,320 22% Industrial All O ther States Minnesota Iowa Pennsylvania O klahoma Illinois O hio Indiana Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 E lectric Power All O ther States Arizona Mississippi Louisiana Alabama

105

Microsoft Word - figure_16.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Commercial All Other States Wisconsin Minnesota Pennsylvania Texas Ohio New Jersey Michigan California New York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Wisconsin Indiana Texas New Jersey Pennsylvania Ohio Michigan Illinois California All Other States New York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Figure 16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2008 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Pow er 6,668,379 31% Industrial 6,650,276 31% Commercial 3,135,852 15% Residential 4,872,107 23% Industrial All Other States Georgia Iow a Oklahom a Pennsylvania Illinois Indiana Ohio Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Electric Power All Other States Mississippi New Jersey Louisiana

106

Microsoft Word - figure_17.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Commercial All Other States Wisconsin M innesota Pennsylvania Ohio M ichigan Texas New Jersey California New York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion C ubic Feet Residential Colorado Indiana Texas New Jersey Pennsylvania Ohio M ichigan Illinois California All Other States New York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion C ubic Feet Figure 18. Natural gas delivered to consumers in the United States, 2011 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Residential 4,713,695 21% Commercial 3,153,605 14% Industrial 6,904,843 31% Electric Power 7,573,863 34% Industrial All Other States M innesota Iowa Oklahoma Pennsylvania Ohio Illinois Indiana Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Electric Power

107

Microsoft Word - figure_16.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Commercial All Other States Wisconsin Minnesota Pennsylvania Ohio Texas Michigan New Jersey California New York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Wisconsin Indiana Texas New Jersey Pennsylvania Ohio Michigan Illinois California All Other States New York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Figure 16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2007 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Pow er 6,841,408 33% Industrial 6,624,846 31% Commercial 3,017,105 14% Residential 4,717,311 22% Industrial All Other States Georgia Oklahom a Michigan Pennsylvania Illinois Indiana Ohio Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Power All Other States Alabam a

108

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 20088 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 25.8 0.7 0.2 3.6 3.589 0.267 0.012 0.365 0.590 0.050 20.3 1.0 3.4 3.4 1.9 3.1 6.7 0.03 6.7 0.055 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to

109

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Egypt Algeria Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2006 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 23.5 0.7 0.1 3.3 3.590 0.389 0.017 0.057 0.322 0.341 0.061 18.5 0.9 3.0 2.5 1.7 4.4 2.8 6.5 0.02 6.2 0.120 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895A, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids

110

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2008 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 45,772 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates.

111

Microsoft Word - figure_16.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Commercial All Other States Wisconsin Minnesota Pennsylvania Ohio Michigan Texas New Jersey California New York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Minnesota Indiana Texas New Jersey Pennsylvania Ohio Michigan Illinois California All Other States New York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Figure 16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2009 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Pow er 6,872,049 33% Industrial 6,167,193 29% Commercial 3,118,833 15% Residential 4,778,478 23% Industrial All Other States Georgia Iow a Pennsylvania Oklahom a Ohio Illinois Indiana Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Electric Power All Other States Nevada Pennsylvania Alabam a Arizona

112

Microsoft Word - Figure_15_2014.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual Figure 15....

113

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

Toto the Robot Figure 1. Toto, front view. Figure 2. Toto, rear view.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toto the Robot Figure 1. Toto, front view. Figure 2. Toto, rear view. Toto the Robot was created so in the back to allow the tape- recorder to be held inside, and the figure was spray-painted. With his metallic a robot, helps account for his lack of verbal charm. Second, some younger children may recognize in Toto

Indiana University

115

Microsoft Word - Figure_03_04.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Citygate dollars per thousand cubic feet Figure 3 and 4 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 NGPL Composite Spot Price NG Spot Price at Henry Hub dollars per thousand c ubic feet Note: Prices are in nominal dollars. Source: Table 3. Figure 3. Average citygate and consumer prices of natural gas in the United States, 2010-2013 Figure 4. Spot prices of natural gas and natural gas plant liquids in the United States, 2010-2013

116

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 xvii Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 0 30 60 90 120 Quadrillion Btu Figure 1. Energy Overview The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. The Nation imported more energy to fill the gap. In 2002, net imported energy accounted for 26 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 per Chained (1996) Dollar Thousand Btu Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product Over the second half of the 20th century, the rate at which energy was consumed per dollar of the economy's output of goods and services fell dramatically. By the end of the century, the rate was half of the mid-century

117

RELEVANT SPECTROSCOPIC DATA Figure A.1: 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 25°C, 499.85 MHz) of 1iPr Figure A.12: 1 H NMR Spectrum (C6D6, 70°C, 499.85 MHz) of 1iPr Figure A.13: 13 C{1 H} NMR Spectrum (C6D6, 25°C, 125.70 MHz) of 1iPr #12;228 Figure A.14: 31 P{1 H} NMR Spectrum (C6D6, 25°C, 121.48 MHz) of 1iPr #12;229 Figure A.15: 1 H-13 C HSQC NMR Spectrum (C6D6, 25°C, 499

Winfree, Erik

118

EIS-0023-FEIS-Figures-1979.pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NORTM NORTM CAROLINA 2 -- r /'- 3Charlo,te Gree,v:; I, o s. \ '~ ( % SOUTH CAROLINA ".4 o " .Alkenoco'"mb'a A1l.a,to \ August. ( SRP O Macon \ GEORGIA ? Charleston 50 MI ".* / 100 Ml 150 Mi 1 \ ATLANTIC OCEAN Sov.nn.h / FIGURE III-1. Location of SRP Relative to Surrounding Population Centers III-2 --- - FIGURE III-2. The Savannah River Plant III-3 FIGURE 'III-3. Profile of Geologic Formation Beneath the Savannah River Plant . III-5 ,-, -,.. . . . . . 5 .-- -612 CRYSTALLINE ROCK . II rfoce FIGURE III-4. Hydrostatic Head in Ground Water Near H Area III-8 ~'z 'Kw ) -.- ________ Alu EN F PLATEAU ";<--'-----% \ ~//i.s,t,,7 --- I '220--- Heed in Tuscaloosa ft H20 obove me.. $,0 level - 5 0 5 10 ,5 MILES FIGURE III-5. Flow in Tuscaloosa Aquifer (Ongoing hydrographic measurements indicate that this flow pattern has remained the same under the SRP site since the early 1950' s.) 111-10 . FIGURE

119

Annual Energy Review 1994. highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quadrillion Quadrillion Btu Highlights: Annual Energy Review 1994 At the halfway mark of this century, coal was the leading source of energy produced in the United States. Now, as we approach the end of the 20th century, coal is still the leading source of energy produced in this country (Figure 1). Between those points of time, however, dramatic changes occurred in the composition of our Nation's energy production. For example, crude oil and natural gas plant liquids production overtook coal production in the early 1950s. That source was matched by natural gas for a few years in the mid-1970s, and then, in the early 1980s, coal regained its prominence. After 1985, crude oil production suffered a nearly steady annual decline. While the fossil fuels moved up and down in their indi-

120

Energy Perspectives - AER 2004, August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 25 50 75 100 125 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2004, net imported energy accounted for 29 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 per Chained (2000) Dollar Thousand Btu Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2007, net imported energy accounted for 29 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Primary Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2000) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

122

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Review 2009 Annual Energy Review 2009 xix 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to meet its needs. In 2009, net imported energy accounted for 24 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Primary Energy Overview Energy Perspectives Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

123

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2006, net imported energy accounted for 30 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2000) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

124

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

125

Figure legends Figure 1: Normalized radiance spectra of the different experimental color  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment groups. The fluorescent (red) line represents the narrow rearing treatment. The 5500K (green) and 10000K (blue) lines represent the two bulb types used. #12;Figure S4: Behavioral predictive model performance for the broad-spectrum

Carleton, Karen L.

126

Microsoft Word - Figure_14_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

44 0 2 4 6 8 10 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Constant Dollars Nominal Dollars Figure 14. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-2002 Figure 15. Average City Gate Price of Natural Gas in the United States, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 2002 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1996 = 1.0) as published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis.

127

Monthly energy review: September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy production during June 1996 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.5% decrease from the level of production during June 1995. Energy consumption during June 1996 totaled 7.1 quadrillion Btu, 2.7% above the level of consumption during June 1995. Net imports of energy during June 1996 totaled 1.6 quadrillion Btu, 4.5% above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Statistics are presented on the following topics: energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. 37 figs., 59 tabs.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis" Independent Statistics & Analysis" ,"U.S. Energy Information Administration" ,"Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures, December 2013" ,"U.S. Prices" ,,"West Texas Intermediate (WTI) Crude Oil Price" ,,"U.S. Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"U.S. Diesel Fuel and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Price" ,,"U.S. Natural Gas Prices" ,"World Liquid Fuels" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Production and Consumption Balance" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Outages Among OPEC Producers" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Disruptions Among non-OPEC Producers" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption Growth"

129

Microsoft Word - Figure_18_19.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK MD 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Power Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: States where the electric power price has been withheld (see Table 23) are included in the $0.00-$2.49 price category.

130

Microsoft Word - Figure_14_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK DE 0 2 4 6 8 10 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Constant Dollars Nominal Dollars Figure 14. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-2004 Figure 15. Average City Gate Price of Natural Gas in the United States, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 2004 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product

131

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market Trends-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 33. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 34. Primary energy use by fuel, 2005-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Increases Through 2030 The future path of U.S. energy demand will depend on trends in population, economic growth, energy prices, and technology adoption. AEO2007 cases developed to illustrate the uncertainties associated with those factors include low and high economic growth cases, low and high price cases, and

132

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 85. Cellulose ethanol production, 2005-2030 (billion gallons per year). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 86. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Lower Costs, Greater Demand Could Spur Cellulose Ethanol Production For AEO2007, two alternative ethanol cases examine the potential impact on ethanol demand of lower costs for cellulosic ethanol production, in combination with policies that increase sales of FFVs [170]. The reference case projects that 10.5 percent of new light-duty vehicles will be capable

133

Microsoft Word - Figure_3_4.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001-and over WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK GOM 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 T e x a s G u l f o f M e x i c o N e w M e x i c o O k l a h o m a W y o m i n g L o u i s i a n a C o l o r a d o A l a s k a K a n s a s A l a b a m a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 Billion Cubic Meters 2002 2003 2002 Figure 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2002-2003 Figure 3. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2003 (Million Cubic Feet) GOM = Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly and Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Mineral Management

134

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

135

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption, which was 101.4 quadrillion Btu in 2007, grows by 10 percent in the AEO2012 Reference case, from 98.2 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 108.0 quadrillion Btu in 2035-6 quadrillion Btu less than the AEO2011 projection for 2035. The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 83 percent of total U.S. energy demand in 2010 to 77 percent in 2035. Biofuel consumption has been growing and is expected to continue to grow over the projection period. However, the projected increase would present challenges, particularly for volumes of ethanol beyond the saturation level of the E10 gasoline pool. Those additional volumes are likely to be slower in reaching the market, as infrastructure and consumer demand adjust. In

136

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail sales, and electrical system energy losses.

137

Addressing the problem with natural ventilation : producing a guide for designers to integrate natural ventilation into the early stages of building design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, the United States alone is responsible for approximately twenty percent of the world's total energy consumption. This consumption is equivalent to roughly 100 quadrillion Btu of energy, or in plainer terms, over ...

Fennessy, Kristian (Kristian M.)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

139

--No Title--  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

140

Word Pro - S2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2013 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, September 2014 22 U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

USA Energy Demand and World Markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the AEO95 model reference case scenario, the United States is projected to consume 104 quadrillion Btu of primary energy resources in 2010, 19 percent more than in 1993. Primary energy consumption includes ...

Charles E. Brown Ph.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Annual Energy Review 1997  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in quadrillion Btu, 0.16 net imported electricity from nonrenewable sources; -0.04 hydroelectric pumped storage; and -0.10 ethanol blended into motor gasoline, which is accounted...

143

Annual Energy Review 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in quadrillion Btu, 0.11 net imported electricity from nonrenewable sources; -0.06 hydroelectric pumped storage; and -0.11 ethanol blended into motor gasoline, which is accounted...

144

Energy Information Administration/Annual Energy Review  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0.05 electricity net imports from fossil fuels. Includes, in quadrillion Btu, -0.09 hydroelectric pumped storage and -0.15 ethanol blended into motor gasoline, which is accounted...

145

Annual Energy Review 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Includes, in quadrillion Btu, 0.10 electricity net imports from fossil fuels; -0.06 hydroelectric pumped storage; and -0.14 ethanol blended into motor gasoline, which is accounted...

146

Fact #792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source, 1982 and 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In the last 30 years, overall energy consumption has grown by about 22 quadrillion Btu. The share of energy consumption by the transportation sector has seen modest growth in that time from about...

147

Faroe Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Faroe Islands Population 48,351 GDP 2,450,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FO 3-letter...

148

Monaco: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

up":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Monaco Population 35,352 GDP 5,424,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MC 3-letter ISO...

149

American Samoa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name American Samoa Population 55,519 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AS 3-letter ISO...

150

Microsoft Word - Figure_3_4.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 T e x a s G u l f o f M e x i c o O k l a h o m a N e w M e x i c o W y o m i n g L o u i s i a n a C o l o r a d o A l a s k a K a n s a s C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 Billion Cubic Meters 2003 2004 2003 Figure 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2003-2004 GOM = Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA -895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Mineral Management Service. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA -895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Mineral Management Service. None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001-and over

151

Figure 3-11 South Table Mountain Utilities Map  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

FTLB AMMO LEGEND Gas Existing Buildings Electrical Figure 3-11 South Table Mountain Utilities Map Sewer Communication Water Surface Drainage Storm Water WATER TANK FACILITIES...

152

Supplemental Figures: Figure S1. Analysis of endo-siRNA targets in different microarray datasets. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplemental Figures: Figure S1. Analysis of endo-siRNA targets in different microarray datasets. The percentage of each array dataset that were predicted endo-siRNA targets according to the Ambros dataset (Lee et al. 2006) was plotted [(number of endo-siRNA targets in microarray dataset / total genes

Bass, Brenda L.

153

Stuttering as Reflected in Adults Self-Figure Drawings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This pilot study aimed to detect indicators within self-figure drawings that reflect stuttering in adults. A sample of 20 adults who stutter from childhood were given a blank sheet...n...= 20). Indicators include...

Rachel Lev-Wiesel; Ayala Shabat; Ayala Tsur

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ES2 Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Consumer Price Index (CPI-U), and Real Average Retail Gasoline Price, 1978-2004, 1985100...

155

Ion beam figuring of small optical components Thomas W. Drueding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion beam figuring of small optical components Thomas W. Drueding Boston University College of Engineering Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department Boston, Massachusetts 02215 Steven C. Fawcett Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107 Thomas G. Bifano Boston University College of Engineering Aerospace

156

Correctness of depiction in planar diagrams of spatial figures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that it is possible to decide whether a given planar diagram correctly depicts the spatial figure consisting of a planar quadrangle together with its shadow in another plane.

P. L. Robinson

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

History of mirror casting, figuring, segmentation and active optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accurate general figures for the mirrors with which one could achieve the optimum ... the beginning of the twentieth century by Karl Schwarzschild. A first design for a reflecting telescope ... dispersing len...

Lothar Noethe

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Supplementary Figure 1 SHAPE-MaP data analysis pipeline.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Figure 1 SHAPE-MaP data analysis pipeline. Outline of software pipeline that fully.1 GHz Intel Core i7 and 16 GB RAM). This strategy is implemented in the SHAPE-MaP Folding Pipeline

Cai, Long

159

Figure 7.1. Control of an alarm system. Figure 7.2. A simple memory element.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-digit BCD counter. Enable Q0 Q1 Q2 D0 D1 D2 Load Clock 1 0 0 0 Clock Q30 D3 Enable Q0 Q1 Q2 D0 D1 D2 Load Clock 0 0 0 Q30 D3 BCD0 BCD1 Clear Figure 7.30. Johnson counter. D Q Q Clock D Q Q D Q Q Q0 Q1 Qn 1 by CAD tools. Data Clock Latch #12;Figure 7.34. Timing simulation of storage elements. Figure 7.35. Code

Kalla, Priyank

160

A simple figure of merit for high temperature superconducting switches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of the new high temperature superconductors has revived interest in many special applications, including superconducting switches. For comparison of switch types, a simple figure of merit based in switch performance is proposed, derived for superconducting switches, and then calculated for thyristors and vacuum switches. The figure of merit is then used to show what critical current density would be needed for superconducting switches to compete with more conventional switches. 46 refs., 1 fig.

Honig, E.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Muon Figures: 2001/04/19 Chris Waltham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muon Figures: 2001/04/19 Chris Waltham Hanging Wall 65 Looking o o ~25 S of W Fault Line r=2730 r) and replaced with back#12;ll. The grid is 1000' (#25;300m) square. p Muon Track Light from Muon Xf PSUP Impact Parameter at time Tf Muon leaves PSUP V h Cherenkov Cone Figure 3: Fitting Diagram 2 #12; ) (degrees) fit v

Learned, John

162

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2006 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) reference case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a

163

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 7 - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption In the IEO2009 reference case, transportation energy use in the non-OECD countries increases by an average of 2.7 percent per year from 2006 to 2030, as compared with an average of 0.3 percent per year for the OECD countries. Figure 69. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Liquids Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure data Over the next 25 years, world demand for liquids fuels is projected to increase more rapidly in the transportation sector than in any other end-use sector. In the IEO2009 reference case, the transportation share of

164

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal On This Page Early declines in coal... Long-term outlook for coal... Growth in average... Substantial changes in coal... Concerns about GHG... Early declines in coal production are more than offset by growth after 2014 U.S. coal production declined by 2.3 quadrillion Btu in 2009. In the AEO2011 Reference case, production does not return to its 2008 level until after 2025. Between 2008 and 2014 a potential recovery in coal production is kept in check by continued low natural gas prices and increased generation from renewables and nuclear capacity. After 2014, coal production grows at an average annual rate of 1.1 percent through 2035, with increases in coal use for electricity generation and for the production of synthetic liquids. figure data Western coal production increases through 2035 (Figure 101) but at a much

165

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" (Presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" A finite set of results reported in consistent units * To track progress of individual projects on a consistent basis * To enable comparing projects in a transparent manner Potential BILIWG Figures of Merit Key BILI Distributed Reforming Targets * Cost ($/kg of H2): H2A analysis - Distributed reforming station,1000 kg/day ave./daily dispensed, 5000/6250 psi (and 10,000/12,000 psi) dispensing, 500 units/yr. * nth unit vs. 500 units/yr ? * production unit only (with 300 psi outlet pressure) ? * Production unit efficiency: LHV H2 out/(LHV of feedstocks and all other energy in) GTG - WTG efficiency? - Feedstock conversion energy efficiency? * Production unit capital cost: Distributed reforming station,1000 kg/day ave./daily dispensed, 300 psi outlet pressure

166

Figure 7.8 shows the cross-sections so recovered for the connection of the SHGC of Figure 6.8.b and the termination of the SHGC of Figure 6.8.d.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

30 Figure 7.8 shows the cross-sections so recovered for the connection of the SHGC of Figure 6.8.b and the termination of the SHGC of Figure 6.8.d. For discontinuous connections where there are no limb patches description (see top right SHGC in Figure 7.12.b and c for which discontinuity is caused by self occlusion

Southern California, University of

167

Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the first time, the lift, drag, and guidance forces acting on a permanent magnet are measured as the magnet passes over different arrays of figure-eight (null-flux) coils. The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of dynamic circuit theory, which is used to explain more optimal coil arrays.

Mulcahy, T.H.; He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rossing, T.D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the first time, the lift, drag, and guidance forces acting on a permanent magnet are measured as the magnet passes over different arrays of figure-eight (null-flux) coils. The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of dynamic circuit theory, which is used to explain more optimal coil arrays.

Mulcahy, T.H.; He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rossing, T.D. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Microsoft Word - figure_07-2014-update.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Figure 7. U.S. natural gas trade summary, 2009-2013 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 2009...

170

Figures of the World Healthcare Organisation show that stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figures of the World Healthcare Organisation show that stroke is currently the leading cause disabilities following a stroke, the economic burden and shortage of rehabilitation therapists are also developed a robotic exoskeleton system that meets the requirements of effective post-stroke upper

171

THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS35116 FIGURE 3-46  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lIb THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS3·5116 FIGURE 3-46 Energy cannot be created or destroyed; it can. The first law of thermodynamics, also known as the conservation of energy principle, provides a sound basis observa- tions, the first law of thermodynamics states that energy can be neither created nor destroyed

Kammen, Daniel M.

172

[FIGURE] FIG 0.0 ELEPHANTS AND ETHICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[FIGURE] FIG 0.0 ELEPHANTS AND ETHICS 1.Wemmer,Elephants and Ethics 2/1/08 2:22 PM Page i #12;1.Wemmer,Elephants and Ethics 2/1/08 2:22 PM Page ii #12;Edited by CHRISTEN WEMMER AND CATHERINE A. CHRISTEN ELEPHANTS AND ETHICS TOWARD A MORALITY OF COEXISTENCE Foreword by John Seidensticker THE JOHNS

Hardin, Rebecca D.

173

Monthly energy review, July 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US total energy consumption in July 1990 was 6.7 quadrillion Btu Petroleum products accounted for 42 percent of the energy consumed in July 1990, while coal accounted for 26 percent and natural gas accounted for 19 percent. Residential and commercial sector consumption was 2.3 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector accounted for 35 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Industrial sector consumption was 2.4 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The industrial sector accounted for 36 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Transportation sector consumption of energy was 1.9 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 1 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector consumed 29 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Electric utility consumption of energy totaled 2.8 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. Coal contributed 53 percent of the energy consumed by electric utilities in July 1990, while nuclear electric power contributed 21 percent; natural gas, 12 percent; hydroelectric power, 9 percent; petroleum, 5 percent; and wood, waste, geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy, about 1 percent.

Not Available

1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands, Fiscal Years 2003-2011 Fiscal Year 7 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 1 Natural Gas 2 Coal 3 Total Fossil Fuels 4 Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Barrels Quadrillion Btu Percent Trillion Cubic Feet Quadrillion Btu Percent Million Short Tons Quadrillion Btu Percent Quadrillion Btu Percent 2003 R 689 R 4.00 R 33.3 R 94 R 0.35 R 14.9 R 7.08 R 7.81 R 35.5 R 466 R 9.58 R 43.3 R 21.74 R 37.2 2004 R 680 R 3.94 R 33.8 R 105 R .39 R 16.0 R 6.68 R 7.38 R 34.0 R 484 R 9.89 R 43.9 R 21.60 R 37.0

175

7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed is to be determined.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to be determined. Assumptions 1 The computers are operated by 4 adult men. 2 The computers consume 40 percent to the amount of electrical energy they consume. Therefore, AC Outside Computer room 4000 Btu/h ( ( ) ( Q Q Q Q. Analysis The unit that will cost less during its lifetime is a better buy. The total cost of a system

Bahrami, Majid

176

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

177

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 8.0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

178

Residential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

179

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal Residential coal Residential market trends icon Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy consumption. The residential sector accounted for 57 percent of that energy

180

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Index (click to jump links) Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Energy Demand in Alternative Technology Cases Annual Growth in Energy Use Is Projected To Continue Net energy delivered to consumers represents only a part of total primary energy consumption. Primary consumption includes energy losses associated with the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity, which are allocated to the end-use sectors (residential, commercial, and industrial) in proportion to each sector’s share of electricity use [103]. Figure 45. Primary and delivered energy consumption, excluding transportation use, 1970-2025 (quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Commercial Mkt trends Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

182

Figure 1: IPA symbols [wikipedia]. Unvoiced Consonants Voiced Consonants Vowels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1: IPA symbols [wikipedia]. Unvoiced Consonants Voiced Consonants Vowels Example Dbet IPA/at H û Example Dbet IPA /th/is D D /b/ee b b /d/og d d /g/ab g g /j/udge J ? /l/ook l l /m/an m m /n/ap n n /r/eal r r plea/s/ure Z Z si/ng/ G N /v/ow v v /w/in w w /y/ou y j /z/oo z z Example Dbet IPA L

Allen, Jont

183

Fermilab E866 (NuSea) Figures and Data Plots  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The NuSea Experiment at Fermilab studied the internal structure of protons, in particular the difference between up quarks and down quarks. This experiment also addressed at least two other physics questions: nuclear effects on the production of charmonia states (bound states of charm and anti-charm quarks) and energy loss of quarks in nuclei from Drell-Yan measurements on nuclei. While much of the NuSea data are available only to the collaboration, figures, data plots, and tables are presented as stand-alone items for viewing or download. They are listed in conjunction with the published papers, theses, or presentations in which they first appeared. The date range is 1998 to 2008. To see these figures and plots, click on E866 publications or go directly to http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/papers.html. Theses are at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866theses/e866theses.html and the presentations are found at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866talks/e866talks.html. Many of the items are postscript files.

E866 NuSea Collaboration

184

Figure 1. Rapidly wilting black walnut in the final stage of thousand cankers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Chihuahua, Mexico (Figure 3). This range appears to coincide largely with the distribution of Arizona walnut

185

The effect of a multivalley energy band structure on the thermoelectric figure of merit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

value of the thermoelectric figure of merit Z than a similar material which has only a single valleyL-49 The effect of a multivalley energy band structure on the thermoelectric figure of merit D. M A comparison is drawn between the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit of a multivalleyed semiconductor

Boyer, Edmond

186

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

187

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector diagram image Footnotes: 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public.

188

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. Includes 0.1 quadrillion Btu of electricity net

189

DOE/EIA-0304 Survey of Large Combustors:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

304 304 Survey of Large Combustors: Report on Alternative- Fuel Burning Capabilities of Large Boilers in 1979 U.S. Department of Energy Energy information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use Energy End Use Division Introduction During recent years, total annual industrial energy consumption in the United States has been approximated at 25 to 26 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu).^- Manufacturin g is by far the largest components totaling 12.9 quadrillion Btu of purchased fuels and electricity for heat and power during 1979.2 QJ this amount, 10.5 quadrillion Btu was accounted for by purchased fuels alone (e.g., fuel oil, coal, natural gas, etc.). Other than fuel consumption by type and industrial classificati on, very little information existed on specific fuel consumption characterist

190

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption, which was 101.7 quadrillion Btu in 2007, grows by 21 percent in the AEO2011 Reference case, from 94.8 quadrillion Btu in 2009 to 114.3 quadrillion Btu in 2035, to about the same level as in the AEO2010 projection in 2035. The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 84 percent of total U.S. energy demand in 2009 to 78 percent in 2035, reflecting the impacts of CAFE standards and provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (EIEA2008), Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA2007), and State legislation. Although the situation is uncertain, EIA's present view of the projected rates of technology development and market penetration of cellulosic

191

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Energy Flow, 2011 0 Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 3 1 Includes lease condensate. 2 Natural gas plant liquids. 3 Conventional hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, and wind. 4 Crude oil and petroleum products. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. 5 Natural gas, coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. 6 Adjustments, losses, and unaccounted for. 7 Natural gas only; excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 8 Petroleum products, including natural gas plant liquids, and crude oil burned as fuel. 9 Includes 0.01 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 10 Includes 0.13 quadrillion Btu of electricity net imports. 11 Total energy consumption, which is the sum of primary energy consumption, electricity retail

192

A1. Form EIA-176 Figure Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Form EIA-176 Form EIA-176 Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 214 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 PART IV: SUPPLY OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS RECEIVED WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED INTO REPORT STATE RESPONDENT COPY Page 2 PART III: TYPE OF COMPANY AND GAS ACTIVITIES OPERATED IN THE REPORT STATE 1.0 Type of Company (check one) 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date: a b c d e Investor owned distributor Municipally owned distributor Interstate pipeline Intrastate pipeline Storage operator f g h i j SNG plant operator Integrated oil and gas Producer Gatherer Processor k Other (specify) 2.0 Gas Activities Operated On-system Within the Report State (check all that apply) a b c d e Produced Natural Gas

193

BRAHMS (Broad Range Hadron Magnetic Spectrometer) Figures and Data Archive  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The BRAHMS experiment was designed to measure charged hadrons over a wide range of rapidity and transverse momentum to study the reaction mechanisms of the relativistic heavy ion reactions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the properties of the highly excited nuclear matter formed in these reactions. The experiment took its first data during the RHIC 2000 year run and completed data taking in June 2006. The BRAHMS archive makes publications available and also makes data and figures from those publications available as separate items. See also the complete list of publications, multimedia presentations, and related papers at http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/brahms/WWW/publications.html

194

STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) Figures and Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The primary physics task of STAR is to study the formation and characteristics of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a state of matter believed to exist at sufficiently high energy densities. STAR consists of several types of detectors, each specializing in detecting certain types of particles or characterizing their motion. These detectors work together in an advanced data acquisition and subsequent physics analysis that allows final statements to be made about the collision. The STAR Publications page provides access to all published papers by the STAR Collaboration, and many of them have separate links to the figures and data found in or supporting the paper. See also the data-rich summaries of the research at http://www.star.bnl.gov/central/physics/results/. [See also DDE00230

The STAR Collaboration

195

Production of low BTU gas from biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transported with little difficulty. It was decided to use a fluidized bed reactor for the gasification. Fluidized bed reactors offer many advantages when utilized as a medium for gasifi- cation of solid fuels. Some of them are excellent mixing... carbon and graphite. The results showed the equilibrium constant to be a function of temperature alone, independent of carbon source, particle size and other physical properties of the carbon. Brink (1976) studied the pyrolysis and gasifi- cation...

Lee, Yung N.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

figures for inverse problem paper in 3d - Department of Mathematics ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIGURES FOR INVERSE PROBLEM PAPER IN 3D. JUAN E. SANTOS. Departamento de Geof sica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Astron omicas y Geof sicas,.

santos

1910-20-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 1 4 3 48 23 30 10 Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards Numbers represent active grants as at 1 October 2013 Figure 2. Technology Transfer award Transfer funding division. In the 2012/13 financial year Technology Transfer approved awards worth a total

Rambaut, Andrew

199

23 Figure 3.1: Color transition from purple/maroon argillites into bright red  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;23 Figure 3.1: Color transition from purple/maroon argillites into bright red argillites. This transition weathering, possibly sideritic layer in the lower part of the picture. The fine grained overlying red Island Section, lower maroon and purple part in red unit (level: 9 meter; Figure 3.3); south shore Gull

Kidd, William S. F.

200

Figure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 1E Roberts, Energy in US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluctuations and Global Events 14E Roberts, Energy in US DOE: 2011 Vehicle Technology Market Report #12;Figure 15: Effect of Oil Prices on US Economy 15E Roberts, Energy in US DOE: 2011 Vehicle Technology MarketFigure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 2008 1E Roberts, Energy in US Source: www.eia.gov #12

Sutton, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and economic factors 2010 2011 AEO2013 AEO2012 AEO2013 AEO2012 AEO2013 Primary energy production (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 14.37 15.05 18.70 17.69 17.27 16.82 17.01 Dry...

202

DuPont Energy Innovations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21 1 6 2 9 9 U. S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2007 (Quadrillion BTU) Source energy flat with 1990 levels. Progress: · Consumption down 7 percent overall as compared to 1990. · SinceDuPont Energy Innovations University of Delaware Energy Institute Inauguration September 19, 2008

Firestone, Jeremy

203

Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The estimated energy ultimate recoverable reserves (URR) from the logistic model is 2750 quadrillion BTU (2900, coal reserves, coal production forecast, peak coal, USA energy, non- linear fitting #12;3 1 reported coal reserves of any nation, containing approximately 28% of the world

Khare, Sanjay V.

204

Plasmonic Figures of Merit in a Doped Graphene Sheet | MIT-Harvard...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasmonic Figures of Merit in a Doped Graphene Sheet May 15, 2014 at 2pm36-428 Marco Polini NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa MarcoPolini...

205

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

206

Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency September 28, 2010 - 10:20am Addthis Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Recovery Act funded energy efficiency lighting upgrades in Huntington, New York. Street lighting accounts for 40% of town's electric costs. Huntington estimates $151,000 in annual savings through lighting changes. Return-on-investment -- that is the phrase town officials in Huntington, New York, carefully considered before commissioning several projects to improve municipal energy efficiency. "Saving town residents money on energy bills is one way to help stimulate the local economy. So we looked for projects that would save our residents as much money as possible," said Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone.

207

Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency September 28, 2010 - 10:20am Addthis Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Recovery Act funded energy efficiency lighting upgrades in Huntington, New York. Street lighting accounts for 40% of town's electric costs. Huntington estimates $151,000 in annual savings through lighting changes. Return-on-investment -- that is the phrase town officials in Huntington, New York, carefully considered before commissioning several projects to improve municipal energy efficiency. "Saving town residents money on energy bills is one way to help stimulate the local economy. So we looked for projects that would save our residents as much money as possible," said Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone.

208

ON THE EQUILIBRIUM FIGURE OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS AND SATELLITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many exoplanets have been observed close to their parent stars with orbital periods of a few days. As for the major satellites of the Jovian planets, the figure of these planets is expected to be strongly shaped by tidal forces. However, contrary to solar system satellites, exoplanets may present high values for the obliquity and eccentricity due to planetary perturbations, and may also be captured in spin-orbit resonances different from the synchronous one. Here we give a general formulation of the equilibrium figure of those bodies that makes no particular assumption on the spin and/or orbital configurations. The gravity field coefficients computed here are well suited for describing the figure evolution of a body whose spin and orbit undergo substantial variations in time.

Correia, Alexandre C. M. [Departamento de Fisica, I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rodriguez, Adrian [Insituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, IAG-USP, Rua do Matao 1226, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

Graffiti (Figural)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004 Middle Egyptian Quarries Project: 2004 field season.flat space available. In quarries and in way-stops onwith further study is the quarry of Abdel Qurna just north

Cruz-Uribe, Eugene

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Supplemental Figures Supplemental Figure1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) induced a gradual change in firing patterns, eventually leading to self-sustained tonic discharges (the

Fujisawa, Shigeyoshi

211

Figure 1. Schematic of initial air pump design Design of Air Pump System Using Bond Graph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is presented in Figure 1. It is a vibratory pump in which an electromagnetic circuit drives a small permanent magnet attached to a pivoted lever that, in turn, drives a rubber bellows pump. The bellows pump has of the cascaded arrangement of three coupled subsystems: the electromagnetic actuator, the lever, and the air

Fernandez, Thomas

212

Figure 1: ATA 42 antenna array at Hat Creek ********ADAPTIVE REAL TIME IMAGING FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY*******  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1: ATA 42 antenna array at Hat Creek ********ADAPTIVE REAL TIME IMAGING FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY --------------------------­ · Astronomers primarily interested in astronomy. ­ Data reduction preoccupies radio astronomy specialists,f,p Bandpass( )f PolCal( )f,p Gains( )s,f,p S Beam Imager Astronomy Solver I2 ( ) )^(^, 2sVpfV - å ¹kj X Solver

Militzer, Burkhard

213

Figure 1: Multiplex logarithmic microfluidic perfusion array for probing shear stress effects on stem cells. (A)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1: Multiplex logarithmic microfluidic perfusion array for probing shear stress effects on stem cells. (A) Microfluidic perfusion systems exhibit more defined shear stress profiles and consume. (B) A 1x6 multiplex logarithmic microfluidic array for simultaneous application of shear stress

Voldman, Joel

214

Magnetic Levitation System The following figure shows the cross section of a magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) train.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Levitation System The following figure shows the cross section of a magnetic levitation in matched pairs. The magnetic attraction of the vertically paired magnets balances the force of gravity and levitates the vehicle above the guideway. d h z Train Track Magnets Fixed Reference Line Magnets

Hagan, Martin

215

High figure-of-merit nematic mixtures based on totally unsaturated isothiocyanate liquid crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1. Introduction The continuous demand for faster electro-optic response times is the driving force of figure-of-merit were observed at room temperature for the formulated nematic mixtures. Potential phased arrays (OPAs) for laser communications, require faster response times. In order to achieve a fast

Wu, Shin-Tson

216

* All figures are in color on the Coastal Sediments Proceedings DVD. NONUNIFORM SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODELING AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1783 * All figures are in color on the Coastal Sediments Proceedings DVD. NONUNIFORM SEDIMENT@ncche.olemiss.edu. Abstract: A depth-averaged two-dimensionalnonuniform sediment transport model is applied to the beaches. The sediment transport, bed change and sorting equations are solved simultaneously and implicitly at the same

US Army Corps of Engineers

217

3-19 Urban Design Figure 3-9 Aerial View E Looking West  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

View F Looking North West #12;3-21 Urban Design Figure 3-11 Skyline and Massachusetts Avenue Gateway to careful site planning and transportation demand management. As the area has become more densely developed employed by TranSComm whose primary responsibilities include identifying and responding to transportation

Mohanty, Raj

218

Figure 1: Swimmer in swimming User Experiences with a Virtual Swimming Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accomplished the artistic endeavour by swimming in the pool of the ocean liner, Queen Elizabeth II, travelingFigure 1: Swimmer in swimming apparatus. User Experiences with a Virtual Swimming Interface Exhibit@ece.ubc.ca Abstract. We created an exhibit based on a new locomotion interface for swimming in a virtual reality ocean

British Columbia, University of

219

Enhancement of thermoelectric figure-of-merit by resonant states of aluminium doping in lead selenide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By adding aluminium (Al) into lead selenide (PbSe), we successfully prepared n-type PbSe thermoelectric materials with a figure-of-merit (ZT) of 1.3 at 850 K. Such a high ZT is achieved by a combination of high Seebeck ...

Zhang, Qinyong

220

Figure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Classification of sea ice in MIZ is important for navigation in these regions and for accurate evaluation of heatFigure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice classification in the Marginal Ice Zone using ERS SAR images Andrey V. Bogdanov1a , Marc Toussaint1b , Stein

Toussaint, Marc

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SPACESHUTTLEPROGRAMPETITIONFOR HCFC 141b Exemption Allowance Figure 3.2 Cornpleteil ET in Sliruy Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF HCFC 141b BLOWN FOAM Orbiter uses HCFC 141b blown foam to thermally insulate the Main Propulsion System location, necessitating the use of HCFC I-llb blown foam insulation Figures 3 4 and 3.5, respectively. illustrate the umbilical without and with foam insulation 17 #12;SPACESHUTTLEPROGRAMPETITION FOR HCFC 141b

Christian, Eric

222

IN PRINT (Feb. 2012): Am J Psych Word length: 3,983 Tables: 2, Figures: 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in individuals with autism as early as two years of age. Studies using head circumference suggest that brainIN PRINT (Feb. 2012): Am J Psych Word length: 3,983 Tables: 2, Figures: 4 Brain Volume Findings Neurological Institute, McGill University *IBIS Network: The IBIS (Infant Brain Imaging Study) Network

Utah, University of

223

Figure 1. Bipartite network showing how candidate SNPs co-occur across Colombian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. Bipartite network showing how candidate SNPs co-occur across Colombian patients with one Study of Chronic Metabolic Diseases in Colombians Maria A. Caro MSc1,2 , Bryant Dang BS1 , Gabriel, are associated with key demographic and clinical variables in Colombians with metabolic disease. The results

Bhavnani, Suresh K.

224

NANOTECHNOLOGY 4 NOVEMBER 2004 Figure 1. A `quasi-optical' electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NANOTECHNOLOGY 4 NOVEMBER 2004 Figure 1. A `quasi-optical' electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. EPR: Progress towards spin-based quantum computing Electron- and/or nuclear-spin-based quantum-dependent recombination (SDR)1-4 is an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique that is potentially useful in spin

Demirel, Melik C.

225

Figure 1. Nicaragua at night. The circled area is the Bluefields region.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Instead, they advocate a focus on rural electrification for this region3 . blueEnergy blueEnergy%3 . The electrification rate in rural areas of Nicaragua, where 45% of the population lives, is a meager 25% 2 (Figure 1 are connected to an electric grid, rural areas outside of these cities are not. Due to geographic barriers

Kammen, Daniel M.

226

Figure 2: The mercury jet target geometry. The proton beam and mercury jet cross at z=-37.5 cm.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2: The mercury jet target geometry. The proton beam and mercury jet cross at z=-37.5 cm. Figure 3: The layout of multiple proton beam entry directions relative to mercury jet at z=-75 cm. A PION of a free liquid mercury jet with an intense proton beam. We study the variation of meson production

McDonald, Kirk

227

A novel optimization-based pole-figure inversion method: comparison with WIMV and maximum entropy methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An optimization-based pole-figure inversion method is presented that utilizes the orientation distribution function gradient for conditional control of the solution. The novel pole-figure inversion method, coined the hybrid -seminorm minimization, is empirically shown to be versatile, general and robust in the presence of simulated experimental errors.

Bernier, J.V.

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Facts & figures 2010 The University of Gothenburg is, with its 37,000 students, one of the lar-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost 59 % Premises 13 % Other operating costs 24 % Capital costs 4 % Expenditure in percentages #12 funding and other sources Expenditure SEK 4,785 million of which: > SEK 2,817 million is spent > SEK 190 million is spent on capital costs Finances facts & figures 2010 facts & figures 2010 Personnel

Johannesson, Henrik

229

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared Amorphous and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--The noise figures (NF) of near-infrared (near-IR) amorphous silicon (a Amorphous and Mid-Infrared Crystalline Silicon Optical Parametric Amplifiers Jichi Ma and Sasan Fathpour

Fathpour, Sasan

230

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

231

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

232

About the Work of Art In the 1940s, Christian Petersen sculpted a plaster figure of George Washington Carver. He  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About the Work of Art In the 1940s, Christian Petersen sculpted a plaster figure of George this sculpture in bronze as he originally intended, so he painted the work of art to resemble bronze. The plaster

Mayfield, John

233

Adjoint-Based Implicit Uncertainty Analysis for Figures of Merit in a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A primary purpose of computational models is to inform design decisions and, in order to make those decisions reliably, the confidence in the results of such models must be estimated. Monte Carlo neutron transport models are common tools for reactor designers. These types of models contain several sources of uncertainty that propagate onto the model predictions. Two uncertainties worthy of note are (1) experimental and evaluation uncertainties of nuclear data that inform all neutron transport models and (2) statistical counting precision, which all results of a Monte Carlo codes contain. Adjoint-based implicit uncertainty analyses allow for the consideration of any number of uncertain input quantities and their effects upon the confidence of figures of merit with only a handful of forward and adjoint transport calculations. When considering a rich set of uncertain inputs, adjoint-based methods remain hundreds of times more computationally efficient than Direct Monte-Carlo methods. The LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) engine is a concept being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Various options exist for the LIFE blanket, depending on the mission of the design. The depleted uranium hybrid LIFE blanket design strives to close the fission fuel cycle without enrichment or reprocessing, while simultaneously achieving high discharge burnups with reduced proliferation concerns. Neutron transport results that are central to the operation of the design are tritium production for fusion fuel, fission of fissile isotopes for energy multiplication, and production of fissile isotopes for sustained power. In previous work, explicit cross-sectional uncertainty analyses were performed for reaction rates related to the figures of merit for the depleted uranium hybrid LIFE blanket. Counting precision was also quantified for both the figures of merit themselves and the cross-sectional uncertainty estimates to gauge the validity of the analysis. All cross-sectional uncertainties were small (0.1-0.8%), bounded counting uncertainties, and were precise with regard to counting precision. Adjoint/importance distributions were generated for the same reaction rates. The current work leverages those adjoint distributions to transition from explicit sensitivities, in which the neutron flux is constrained, to implicit sensitivities, in which the neutron flux responds to input perturbations. This treatment vastly expands the set of data that contribute to uncertainties to produce larger, more physically accurate uncertainty estimates.

Seifried, J E; Fratoni, M; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Peterson, P F; Powers, J J; Taylor, J M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 01/10 3.79 01/17 4.19 01/24 2.98 01/31 2.91 1997-Feb 02/07 2.53 02/14 2.30 02/21 1.91 02/28 1.82 1997-Mar 03/07 1.86 03/14 1.96 03/21 1.91 03/28 1.84 1997-Apr 04/04 1.88 04/11 1.98 04/18 2.04 04/25 2.14 1997-May 05/02 2.15 05/09 2.29 05/16 2.22 05/23 2.22 05/30 2.28 1997-Jun 06/06 2.17 06/13 2.16 06/20 2.22 06/27 2.27 1997-Jul 07/04 2.15 07/11 2.15 07/18 2.24 07/25 2.20 1997-Aug 08/01 2.22 08/08 2.37 08/15 2.53 08/22 2.54 08/29 2.58

235

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050 2.104 2.163 2.124 2.103 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.055 2.107 2.077 1.981 2.072 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.066 2.062 2.058 2.075 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.144 2.069 2.097 2.085 2.066 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.068 2.089 2.131 2.163 2.187

236

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494 1.557 1.674 1.790 1.961 2.459 1996 2.483 2.458 2.353 2.309 2.283 2.544 2.521 2.049 1.933 2.481 3.023 3.645 1997 3.067 2.065 1.899 2.005 2.253 2.161 2.134 2.462 2.873 3.243 3.092 2.406 1998 2.101 2.263 2.253 2.465 2.160 2.168 2.147 1.855 2.040 2.201 2.321 1.927 1999 1.831 1.761 1.801 2.153 2.272 2.346 2.307 2.802 2.636 2.883 2.549 2.423 2000 2.385 2.614 2.828 3.028 3.596 4.303 3.972 4.460 5.130 5.079 5.740 8.618 2001 7.825 5.675 5.189 5.189 4.244 3.782 3.167 2.935 2.213 2.618 2.786 2.686

237

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.112 2.131 2.117 2.068 2.087 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.086 2.082 2.083 2.092 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.124 2.100 2.116 2.100 2.086 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.095 2.099 2.123 2.155 2.183 1994 Apr-18 to Apr-22 2.187 2.167 2.174 2.181 2.169

238

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

239

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

240

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 1.72 1999 1.85 1.77 1.79 2.15 2.26 2.30 2.31 2.80 2.55 2.73 2.37 2.36 2000 2.42 2.66 2.79 3.04 3.59 4.29 3.99 4.43 5.06 5.02 5.52 8.90 2001 8.17 5.61 5.23 5.19 4.19 3.72 3.11 2.97 2.19 2.46 2.34 2.30 2002 2.32 2.32 3.03 3.43 3.50 3.26 2.99 3.09 3.55 4.13 4.04 4.74 2003 5.43 7.71 5.93 5.26 5.81 5.82 5.03 4.99 4.62 4.63 4.47 6.13 2004 6.14 5.37 5.39 5.71 6.33 6.27 5.93 5.41 5.15 6.35 6.17 6.58 2005 6.15 6.14 6.96 7.16 6.47 7.18 7.63 9.53 11.75 13.42 10.30 13.05

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187 06/24 2.176 1994-Jul 07/01 2.256 07/08 2.221 07/15 2.172 07/22 2.137 07/29 2.207

242

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977 3.055 2.586 2.403 2000 2.396 2.591 2.868 3.058 3.612 4.258 3.981 4.526 5.335 5.151 5.455 7.337 2001 6.027 5.441 5.287 5.294 4.384 3.918 3.309 3.219 2.891 3.065 3.022 2.750

243

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836 3.046 2.649 2.429 2000 2.392 2.596 2.852 3.045 3.604 4.279 3.974 4.467 5.246 5.179 5.754 8.267 2001 7.374 5.556 5.245 5.239 4.315 3.867 3.223 2.982 2.558 2.898 2.981 2.748

244

Fumigation of a diesel engine with low Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 0.5 liter single-cylinder, indirect-injection diesel engine has been fumigated with producer gas. Measurements of power, efficiency, cylinder pressure, and emissions were made. At each operating condition, engine load was held constant, and the gas-to-diesel fuel ratio was increased until abnormal combustion was encountered. This determined the maximum fraction of the input energy supplied by the gas, E/sub MAX/, which was found to be dependent upon injection timing and load. At light loads, E/sub MAX/ was limited by severe efficiency loss and missfire, while at heavy loads it was limited by knock or preignition. Fumigation generally increased ignition delay and heat release rates, but peak pressures were not strongly influenced. Efficiency was slightly decreased by fumigation as were NO/sub X/ and particle emissions while CO emissions were increased.

Ahmadi, M.; Kittelson, D.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Electrical Generation Using Non-Salable Low BTU Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High operating costs are a significant problem for independent operators throughout the U.S. Often, decisions to temporarily idle or abandon a well or lease are dictated by these cost considerations, which are often seen as unavoidable. Options for continuing operations on a marginal basis are limited, but must include non-conventional approaches to problem solving, such as the use of alternative sources of lease power, and scrupulous reduction of non-productive operating techniques and costs. The loss of access to marginal oil and gas productive reservoirs is of major concern to the DOE. The twin difficulties of high operating costs and low or marginal hydrocarbon production often force independent operators to temporarily or permanently abandon existing lease facilities, including producing wells. Producing well preservation, through continued economical operation of marginal wells, must be maintained. Reduced well and lease operating costs are expected to improve oil recovery of the Schaben field, in Ness County, Kansas, by several hundred thousands of barrels of oil. Appropriate technology demonstrated by American Warrior, allows the extension of producing well life and has application for many operators throughout the area.

Scott Corsair

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,025 1,025 1,023 2010's 1,028 1,025 1,026 1,024...

247

Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,033 1,023 1,024 2010's 1,015 1,021 1,022 1,016...

248

Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,010 1,010 1,007 2010's 1,006 1,009 1,014 1,029...

249

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,024 1,023 1,022 2010's 1,021 1,017 1,015 1,022...

250

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,024 1,024 1,025 1,027 1,026 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,025 2014 1,027 1,022 1,028 1,026 1,029 1,032 1,033...

251

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,050 1,050 1,049 1,047 1,048 1,048 1,046 1,041 1,044 1,043 1,045 1,044 2014 1,044 1,044 1,045 1,044 1,038 1,036 1,038...

252

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,015 1,031 1,021 1,010 997 988 994 1,001 1,026 1,034 1,054 2014 1,048 1,036 1,030 1,022 1,006 993 984 996 1,005...

253

Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,028 1,032 1,033 1,032 2014 1,034 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,040 1,039 1,043...

254

Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,018 1,018 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,017 1,016 1,017 2014 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025...

255

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,037 1,040 1,041 2010's 1,034 1,031 1,032 1,037...

256

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,034 1,033 1,033 1,035 1,035 1,038 1,037 1,044 1,045 1,044 1,043 1,044 2014 1,044 1,042 1,041 1,050 1,047 1,048 1,053...

257

Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,064 1,062 1,046 2010's 1,044 1,047 1,032 1,028...

258

Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,032 1,039 1,031 2010's 1,033 1,024 1,029 1,034...

259

Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001 1,002 1,003 1,003 1,002 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,000 2014 1,002 1,004 1,001 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001...

260

Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,032 1,028 1,031 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,029 2014 1,029 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,033 1,030 1,031...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,018 1,034 1,019 2010's 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,018...

262

Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,006 1,006 1,005 2010's 1,005 1,013 1,012...

263

Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,039 1,037 1,034 1,031 1,032 1,031 1,033 1,039 1,032 1,029 1,034 2014 1,033 1,033 1,032 1,034 1,032 1,033 1,033...

264

Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,011 1,010 1,012 1,011 1,017 1,020 1,020 1,023 1,021 1,014 1,013 1,013 2014 1,013 1,012 1,010 1,034 1,041 1,044 1,029...

265

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,052 1,059 1,044 2010's 1,045 1,038 1,043 1,046...

266

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.160 2.130 2.138 2.171 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.140 2.128 2.112 2.103 2.111 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.116 2.133 2.130 2.130 2.120 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.114 2.137 2.170 2.146 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.117 2.134 2.120 2.086 2.112

267

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.109 2.142 2.192 2.164 2.136 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.107 2.129 2.115 2.050 2.077 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.076 2.072 2.070 2.087 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.134 2.090 2.109 2.093 2.081 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.090 2.099 2.128 2.175 2.196

268

Development of Gas Turbine Combustors for Low BTU Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-capacity combined cycles with high-temperature gas turbines burning petroleum fuel or LNG have already ... the other hand, as the power generation technology utilizing coal burning the coal gasification com...

I. Fukue; S. Mandai; M. Inada

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Energy Consumption 2. Energy Consumption by Sector Figure 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, August 2013 22 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Transportation Residential 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Industrial Transportation Residential Commercial J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 1 2 3 4 Industrial Commercial 2011 2012 2013 1.664 1.511 2.610 2.385 3.644 0.231 0.188 1.728 2.379 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation 0 1 2 3 4 Primary Consumption Total Consumption Electric Power Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#consumption. Source: Table 2.1. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013

270

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Renewable . Renewable Energy Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0

271

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012 (trillion cubic feet) Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 29.5 0.8 0.2 3.3 2.963 0.112 0.620 0.971 0.014 24.1 1.3 2.9 2.8 2.5 2.9 7.2 0.03 9.1 0.003 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and

272

Thermoelectric figure of merit of Ag{sub 2}Se with Ag and Se excess  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the temperature range of 100-300 K, the electric ({sigma}) and thermoelectric ({alpha}{sub 0}) properties of Ag{sub 2}Se with an excess of Ag as high as {approx}0.1 at. % and Se as high as {approx}1.0 at. %, respectively, are investigated. From the data on {sigma}, {alpha}{sub 0}, and {chi}{sub tot} (thermal conductivities), the thermoelectric power {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}{sigma} and the figure of merit Z are calculated. It is found that {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}{sigma} and Z attain the peak values at room temperature and the electron concentration n {approx} 6.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}.

Aliev, F. F., E-mail: farzali@physics.ab.az; Jafarov, M. B.; Eminova, V. I. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

High figure-of-merit ultrathin metal transparent electrodes incorporating a conductive grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is known that ultrathin (<10 nm) metal films (UTMFs) can achieve high level of optical transparency at the expense of the electrical sheet resistance. In this letter, we propose a design, the incorporation of an ad hoc conductive grid, which can significantly reduce the sheet resistance of UTMF based transparent electrodes, leaving practically unchanged their transparency. The calculated highest figure-of-merit corresponds to a filling factor and a grid spacing-to-linewidth ratio of 0.025 and 39, respectively. To demonstrate the capability of the proposed method the sheet resistance of a continuous 2 nm Ni film (>950 OMEGA/square) is reduced to approx6.5 OMEGA/square when a 100 nm thick Cu grid is deposited on it. The transparency is instead maintained at values exceeding 75%. These results, which can be further improved by making thicker grids, already demonstrate the potential in applications, such as photovoltaic cells, optical detectors and displays.

Ghosh, D. S.; Chen, T. L. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Castelldefels, Barcelona, 08860 Catalunya (Spain); Pruneri, V. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Castelldefels, Barcelona, 08860 Catalunya (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

Thermoelectric figure of merit of silicide two-dimensional quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculation was made to estimate thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, of quantum well structured films made of Transition Metal (TM) silicide, alloys of silicon and germanium, etc. 1-dimensional quantum confinement of charge carrier with quantum well structure were assumed in the calculation model. Transport properties parallel to the layer were estimated as a function of well width. Full account was made of Fermi statistics, and thermal conduction in the barrier layer was taken into account. Results of the calculation indicate that moderate increase in ZT is possible in modulated doping superlattice structure of TM silicides. But ZT decreases with decreasing well width in combinations of silicon and TM silicides. This is due to the larger thermal conductivity of silicon used as a barrier material.

Yamamoto, Z.; Ohta, T. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment): Data Tables and Figures from Published Papers  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. More than 60 published papers and preprints are listed here with links to the full text and separate links to the supporting PHENIX data in plain text tables and to EPS and GIF figures from the papers.

276

Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends From 2009 to 2035, transportation sector energy consumption grows at an average annual rate of 0.6 percent (from 27.2 quadrillion Btu to 31.8 quadrillion Btu), slower than the 1.2 percent average rate from 1975 to 2009. The slower growth is a result of changing demographics, increased LDV fuel economy, and saturation of personal travel demand.[1] References [1] ↑ 1.0 1.1 AEO2011 Transportation Sector Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Transportation&oldid=378906" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

277

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow, (Quadrillion Btu) Electricity Flow diagram image Footnotes: 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of generation and delivery to the customer) are estimated

278

Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Heating and cooling your home uses more energy and costs more money than any other system in your home -- typically making up about 54% of your

279

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.jpg (1776 bytes) coal.jpg (1776 bytes) Coal’s share of world energy consumption falls slightly in the IEO99 forecast. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia, but it is projected to lose market share to natural gas in some other areas of the world. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1996. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 30

280

Renewable Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

renewable electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electricity electricity Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

282

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 4. Coefficients of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coefficients of Linear Equations for Natural Gas- and Coefficients of Linear Equations for Natural Gas- and Oil-Related Methane Emissions Emissions Sources Intercept Variable Name and Units Coefficient Variable Name and Units Coefficient Natural Gas -38.77 Time trend (calendar year) .02003 Dry gas production (thousand cubic feet .02186 Natural Gas Processing -0.9454 Natural gas liquids production (million barrels per day) .9350 Not applicable Natural Gas Transmission and Storage 2.503 Pipeline fuel use (thousand cubic feet) 1.249 Dry gas production (thousand cubic feet) -0.06614 Natural Gas Distribution -58.16 Time trend (calendar year) .0297 Natural gas consumption (quadrillion Btu) .0196 Oil production, Refining, and Transport 0.03190 Oil consumption (quadrillion Btu) .002764 Not applicable Source: Derived from data used in Energy Information Administration, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1999, DOE/EIA-0573(99), (Washington, DC, October 2000).

283

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 -0.0% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.8% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.58 0.59 0.51 0.45 0.40 0.36 0.32 -2.1%

284

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1997. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU). In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 33 percent between 1985 and 1997, displaced in considerable measure by

285

Slide 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Forum Renewable Energy Forum Beijing, China May 27, 2010 David Sandalow Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs U.S. Department of Energy 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Quadrillion Btu China China and the United States together consume around 40% of the world's energy... 37% Rest of the world United States 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption (million MtCO 2 ) ...and together account for more than 40% of global GHG emissions. 42% China Rest of the world United States 2003 projection 2006 projection 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Quadrillion Btu 2010 projection Actual energy consumption China's energy demand

286

Renewable Energy Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity net generation by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Renewable Energy Generation world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 37.3 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_generation_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 43 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

287

Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4%

288

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

World's Demand for World's Demand for Liquid Fuels A Roundtable Discussion A New Climate For Energy EIA 2009 Energy Conference April 7, 2009 Washington, DC 2 World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type 0 50 100 150 200 250 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Quadrillion Btu Liquids Natural Gas Coal Renewables Nuclear History Projections Source: EIA, IEO2008 36% 23% 6% 8% 29% 33% 24% 8% 6% 27% 3 World Liquids Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 0 50 100 150 200 250 2005 2015 2030 Quadrillion Btu Building Industrial Transportation Electric Power Source: EIA, IEO2008 4 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Light Sweet Crude Oil (2007 $/B) Reference Case High World Oil Price Low World Oil Price World Oil Prices in Three Price Cases, AEO2009 - Real Prices History Projections Source: EIA, AEO2009, NYMEX

289

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 347 Primary Energy Consumption by Source 1 Delivered Total Energy by Sector 8 1 Includes electricity net imports, not shown separately. 2 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 3 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 4 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 5 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 6 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. 7 Calculated as the primary energy consumed by the electric power sector minus the

290

Coal consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal Coal consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_coal_consumption_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 38.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

291

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World energy demand and economic outlook World energy demand and economic outlook Overview In the IEO2011 Reference case, world energy consumption increases by 53 percent, from 505 quadrillion Btu in 2008 to 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Table 1). In the near term, the effects of the global recession of 2008-2009 curtailed world energy consumption.8 As nations recover from the downturn, however, world energy demand rebounds in the Reference case and increases strongly as a result of robust economic growth and expanding populations in the world's developing countries. OECD member countries are, for the most part, more advanced energy consumers.9 Energy demand in the OECD economies grows slowly over the projection period, at an average annual rate of 0.6 percent, whereas energy consumption in the non-OECD

292

Monthly energy review, May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy production during Feb 95 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu (Q), 3.1% over Feb 94. Energy consumption totaled 7.4 Q, 0.7% below Feb 94. Net imports of energy totaled 1.3 Q, 5.6% below Feb 94. This publication is divided into energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

NONE

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

293

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

294

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

295

MARINE KELP: ENERGY RESOURCE IN THE COASTAL ZONE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feed Supplements Algin Liquid Sludge Effluents Gas ScrubberIntermediate BTU Gas (Methane) Sludge Processing IC0 2 Sludge Fertilizer Feedstock Figure l. Complete Marine

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 14. Comparisons of coal projections, 2011-2040 (million short tons, except where noted) Projection 2011 AEO2013 Reference case Other projections (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) EVA a ICF b IHSGI INFORUM IEA Exxon- Mobil c (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) 2025 Production 1,096 1,113 22.54 958 1,104 1,107 1,061 -- -- East of the Mississippi 456 447 -- 402 445 -- -- -- -- West of the Mississippi 639 666 -- 556 659 -- -- -- -- Consumption Electric power 929 929 17.66 786 939 864 -- -- 13 Coke plants 21 22 0.58 22 15 19 -- -- -- Coal-to-liquids -- 6 -- -- 36 -- -- -- -- Other industrial/buildings 49 53 1.69 d 29 72 44 1.96 d -- -- Total consumption (quadrillion Btu) 19.66 -- 19.35 -- -- 18.34 -- -- 13 Total consumption (million short tons) 999 1,010 -- 836 1,061 927 1,015 e -- -- Net coal exports (million short tons) 96 124 -- 118 43 181 46 -- --

297

Monthly energy review, July 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy production during April 1994 totaled 5.5 quadrillion Btu, a 2.2-percent increase from the level of production during April 1993. Coal production increased 11.8 percent, petroleum production fell 4.0 percent, and natural gas production decreased 0.3 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 2.9 percent from the level of production during April 1993. Energy consumption during April 1994 totaled 6.7 quadrillion Btu, 1.4 percent above the level of consumption during April 1993. Petroleum consumption increased 3.9 percent, coal consumption rose 1.1 percent, and natural gas consumption decreased 1.5 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.4 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during April 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 8.7 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 4.5 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 18.5 percent. Net exports of coal fell 9.2 percent from the level in April 1993.

Not Available

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels 5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels Total, 1980-2011 As Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1980-2011 By Fuel, 2011 By Petroleum Product, 2011 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases and pentanes plus are aggregated to avoid disclosure of proprie- tary information. 2 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, waxes, and miscellaneous products. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Note: See Note 2, "Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels" at end of section. Source: Table 1.15. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 Quadrillion Btu Natural Gas 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 3 6 9 Percent Total Petroleum Products Coal 2.0 1.0 0.9 0.3 0.1 (s) 0.3 LPG¹ Petro- Asphalt Lubri- Petro- Special Other² 0.0 0.6 1.2 1.8 2.4 Quadrillion Btu

299

Multiple-Filled Skutterudites: High Thermoelectric Figure of Merit through Separately Optimizing Electrical and Thermal Transports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Skutterudites CoSb{sub 3} with multiple cofillers Ba, La, and Yb were synthesized and very high thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = 1.7 at 850 K was realized. X-ray diffraction of the densified multiple-filled bulk samples reveals all samples are phase pure. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirm that multiple guest fillers occupy the nanoscale-cages in the skutterudites. The fillers are further shown to be uniformly distributed and the Co-Sb skutterudite framework is virtually unperturbed from atomic scale to a few micrometers. Our results firmly show that high power factors can be realized by adjusting the total filling fraction of fillers with different charge states to reach the optimum carrier density, at the same time, lattice thermal conductivity can also be significantly reduced, to values near the glass limit of these materials, through combining filler species of different rattling frequencies to achieve broad-frequency phonon scattering. Therefore, partially filled skutterudites with multiple fillers of different chemical nature render unique structural characteristics for optimizing electrical and thermal transports in a relatively independent way, leading to continually enhanced ZT values from single- to double-, and finally to multiple-filled skutterudites. The idea of combining multiple fillers with different charge states and rattling frequencies for performance optimization is also expected to be valid for other caged TE compounds.

Zhang, Weiqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yang, Jiong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yang, Jihui [General Motors Corporation; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Shi, Xun [General Motors Corporation-R& D; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Cho, Jung Y [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Bai, Shengqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Phase transition enhanced thermoelectric figure-of-merit in copper chalcogenides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While thermoelectric materials can be used for solid state cooling, waste heat recovery, and solar electricity generation, low values of the thermoelectric figure of merit, zT, have led to an efficiency too low for widespread use. Thermoelectric effects are characterized by the Seebeck coefficient or thermopower, which is related to the entropy associated with charge transport. For example, coupling spin entropy with the presence of charge carriers has enabled the enhancement of zT in cobalt oxides. We demonstrate that the coupling of a continuous phase transition to carrier transport in Cu{sub 2}Se over a broad (360410 K) temperature range results in a dramatic peak in thermopower, an increase in phonon and electron scattering, and a corresponding doubling of zT (to 0.7 at 406 K), and a similar but larger increase over a wider temperature range in the zT of Cu{sub 1.97}Ag{sub .03}Se (almost 1.0 at 400 K). The use of structural entropy for enhanced thermopower could lead to new engineering approaches for thermoelectric materials with high zT and new green applications for thermoelectrics.

Brown, David R.; Day, Tristan; Snyder, G. Jeffrey, E-mail: jsnyder@caltech.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Borup, Kasper A.; Christensen, Sebastian; Iversen, Bo B. [Department of Chemistry and iNano, Aarhus University, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Figure 1. Schematic drawing showing the components of a Li-ion battery cell and the information that can be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposals In Situ Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Advanced Li-ion BatteriesFigure 1. Schematic drawing showing the components of a Li-ion battery cell and the information (8300 28th Ct NE, Unit 200, Lacey, Washington 98516) Electrochemical energy storage devices (EES

302

Enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit in edge-disordered zigzag graphene nanoribbons H. Sevinli* and G. Cuniberti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

qualify zigzag graphene nanoribbons as a very promising material for thermoelectric applications. DOI: 10Enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit in edge-disordered zigzag graphene nanoribbons H. Sevinçli* and G. Cuniberti Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden

Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

303

Figure 1. Photolithography techniques are used to create microfluidic flow cells where biofouling can be studied for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. Photolithography techniques are used to create microfluidic flow cells where biofouling and construct microfluidic flow cells for real-time observation of bacterial attachment and biofouling. He microfluidic devices, and computer multiphysics simulation with COMSOL. The student will also learn to work

Shor, Leslie McCabe

304

Correct figures for Gertz, Stewart, and Khosla, ``An Iconic Programming Language for SensorBased Robots,'' SOAR 1992. interface X  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12; #12; #12; #12; #12; #12; #12; #12; Correct figures for Gertz, Stewart, and Khosla, ``An Iconic S job T actuator interface Z to actuator Z from sensor Y raw data in typed data in from sensor X iconic programming language iconic programs (jobs) graphical interfaces real­time tasks subroutine calls graphical

305

Figure 2. Urban lawns have ~ 2x the microbial biomass of native and/or cultivated areas. Viable microbial biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2. Urban lawns have ~ 2x the microbial biomass of native and/or cultivated areas. Viable and fertilized Corn: flood irrigated and fertilized Wheat-Fallow: a dryland winter wheat cropping system C and N mineralization rates (data not shown) than other ecosystems, suggesting that energy

Hall, Sharon J.

306

Development of Figure of Merits (FOMs) for Intermediate Coolant Characterization and Selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on characterization of several coolant performances in the IHTL. There are lots of choices available for the IHTL coolants; gases, liquid metals, molten salts, and etc. Traditionally, the selection of coolants is highly dependent on engineer's experience and decisions. In this decision, the following parameters are generally considered: melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. The followings are general thermal-hydraulic requirements for the coolant in the IHTL: (1) High heat transfer performance - The IHTL coolant should exhibit high heat transfer performance to achieve high efficiency and economics; (2) Low pumping power - The IHTL coolant requires low pumping power to improve economics through less stringent pump requirements; (3) Low amount of coolant volume - The IHTL coolant requires less coolant volume for better economics; (4) Low amount of structural materials - The IHTL coolant requires less structural material volume for better economics; (5) Low heat loss - The IHTL requires less heat loss for high efficiency; and (6) Low temperature drop - The IHTL should allow less temperature drop for high efficiency. Typically, heat transfer coolants are selected based on various fluid properties such as melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. However, the selection process & results are highly dependent on the engineer's personal experience and skills. In the coolant selection, if a certain coolant shows superior properties with respect to the others, the decision will be very straightforward. However, generally, each coolant material exhibits good characteristics for some properties but poor for the others. Therefore, it will be very useful to have some figures of merits (FOMs), which can represent and quantify various coolant thermal performances in the system of interest. The study summarized in this paper focuses on developing general FOMs for the IHTL coolant selection and shows some estimation results.

Eung Soo Kim; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Figure 2 Known and speculative Eocene-Oligocene paleovalleys of northern California and western Nevada. Lower portions of channels from Lindgren (1911) and Lawler (1995). Some central Nevada calderas shown.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dayton Kings Beach Reno Sparks Sun Valley Yerington Dutch Hill Mine Bean Hill Spanish Peak TaylorsLake FIGURE 8 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 6 Taylorsville N 0 10 20 0 10 20 miles 30 kilometers CALIFORNIA NEVADA LassenCounty SierraCounty Plumas County Figure 4 Map of known and speculative Eocene-Oligocene paleovalleys

Tingley, Joseph V.

308

11.5 MATLAB Laboratory Experiment on Circuits Consider the electrical circuit presented in Figure 11.18. Assume that all resistors in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11.5 MATLAB Laboratory Experiment on Circuits Consider the electrical circuit presented in Figure analysis, form the matrices j and k and the vector of initial conditions. Use MATLAB to find the currents via MATLAB, using the electrical circuit given in Figure 11.19 and the corresponding formulas

Gajic, Zoran

309

Colored figures Franke & Gaser (2012): Longitudinal changes in individual BrainAGE in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colored figures Franke & Gaser (2012): Longitudinal changes in individual BrainAGE in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease Figure 1: Depiction of the BrainAGE concept. A: The model of healthy brain aging is trained with the chronological age and preprocessed structural MRI data

Gaser, Christian

310

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset representation used in later figures. In these boxes the "dataset-wise" scheme, the examples are relabeled prior to conducting the cross- validation, while

311

Figure of merit for dark energy constraints from current observational data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to make useful comparisons of different dark energy experiments, it is important to choose the appropriate figure of merit (FoM) for dark energy constraints. Here we show that for a set of dark energy parameters (f{sub i}), it is most intuitive to define FoM=1/{radical}(detCov(f{sub 1},f{sub 2},f{sub 3},...)), where Cov(f{sub 1},f{sub 2},f{sub 3},...) is the covariance matrix of (f{sub i}). In order for this FoM to represent the dark energy constraints in an optimal manner, the dark energy parameters (f{sub i}) should have clear physical meaning and be minimally correlated. We demonstrate two useful choices of (f{sub i}) using 182 SNe Ia (from the HST/GOODS program, the first year Supernova Legacy Survey, and nearby SN Ia surveys), [R(z{sub *}),l{sub a}(z{sub *}),{omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}] from the five year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurement of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, assuming the Hubble Space Telescope prior of H{sub 0}=72{+-}8 (km/s) Mpc{sup -1}, and without assuming spatial flatness. We find that for a dark energy equation of state linear in the cosmic scale factor a, the correlation of (w{sub 0},w{sub 0.5}) [w{sub 0}=w{sub X}(z=0), w{sub 0.5}=w{sub X}(z=0.5), with w{sub X}(a)=3w{sub 0.5}-2w{sub 0}+3(w{sub 0}-w{sub 0.5})a] is significantly smaller than that of (w{sub 0},w{sub a}) [with w{sub X}(a)=w{sub 0}+(1-a)w{sub a}]. In order to obtain model-independent constraints on dark energy, we parametrize the dark energy density function X(z)={rho}{sub X}(z)/{rho}{sub X}(0) as a free function with X{sub 0.5}, X{sub 1.0}, and X{sub 1.5} [values of X(z) at z=0.5, 1.0, and 1.5] as free parameters estimated from data. If one assumes a linear dark energy equation of state, current observational data are consistent with a cosmological constant at 68% C.L. If one assumes X(z) to be a free function parametrized by (X{sub 0.5},X{sub 1.0},X{sub 1.5}), current data deviate from a cosmological constant at z=1 at 68% C.L., but are consistent with a cosmological constant at 95% C.L. Future dark energy experiments will allow us to dramatically increase the FoM of constraints on (w{sub 0},w{sub 0.5}), and of (X{sub 0.5},X{sub 1.0},X{sub 1.5}). This will significantly shrink the dark energy parameter space to either enable the discovery of dark energy evolution, or the conclusive evidence for a cosmological constant.

Wang Yun [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Figure of merit for dark energy constraints from current observational data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to make useful comparisons of different dark energy experiments, it is important to choose the appropriate figure of merit (FoM) for dark energy constraints. Here we show that for a set of dark energy parameters {fi}, it is most intuitive to define FoM=1/det?Cov(f1,f2,f3,), where Cov(f1,f2,f3,) is the covariance matrix of {fi}. In order for this FoM to represent the dark energy constraints in an optimal manner, the dark energy parameters {fi} should have clear physical meaning and be minimally correlated. We demonstrate two useful choices of {fi} using 182 SNeIa (from the HST/GOODS program, the first year Supernova Legacy Survey, and nearby SNIa surveys), [R(z*),la(z*),?bh2] from the five year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurement of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, assuming the Hubble Space Telescope prior of H0=728??(km/s)?Mpc-1, and without assuming spatial flatness. We find that for a dark energy equation of state linear in the cosmic scale factor a, the correlation of (w0,w0.5) [w0=wX(z=0), w0.5=wX(z=0.5), with wX(a)=3w0.5-2w0+3(w0-w0.5)a] is significantly smaller than that of (w0,wa) [with wX(a)=w0+(1-a)wa]. In order to obtain model-independent constraints on dark energy, we parametrize the dark energy density function X(z)=?X(z)/?X(0) as a free function with X0.5, X1.0, and X1.5 [values of X(z) at z=0.5, 1.0, and 1.5] as free parameters estimated from data. If one assumes a linear dark energy equation of state, current observational data are consistent with a cosmological constant at 68% C.L. If one assumes X(z) to be a free function parametrized by (X0.5,X1.0,X1.5), current data deviate from a cosmological constant at z=1 at 68% C.L., but are consistent with a cosmological constant at 95% C.L. Future dark energy experiments will allow us to dramatically increase the FoM of constraints on (w0,w0.5), and of (X0.5,X1.0,X1.5). This will significantly shrink the dark energy parameter space to either enable the discovery of dark energy evolution, or the conclusive evidence for a cosmological constant.

Yun Wang

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

313

Figures of merit for focusing mega-electron-volt ion beams in biomedical imaging and proton beam writing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A figure of merit (FOM) has been developed for focusing quadrupole multiplet lenses for ion micro- and nanobeam systems. The method which is based on measurement of the central peak of the two-dimensional autocorrelation function of an image provides separate FOM for the horizontal and vertical directions. The approach has been tested by comparison with the edge widths obtained by nonlinear fitting the edge widths of a Ni grid and found to be reliable. The FOM has the important advantage for ion beam imaging of biomedical samples that the fluence needed is considerably lower than for edge fitting.

Ren Minqin; Whitlow, Harry J.; Ananda Sagari, A. R.; Kan, Jeroen A. van; Osipowicz, Thomas; Watt, Frank [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 (Finland); Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions For additional terms, refer to: the Glossary of Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 for additional greenhouse gas related terms, the Glossary of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for additional manufacturing terms, and Appendix F of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for descriptions of the major industry groups. British Thermal Unit: The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. One quadrillion Btu is 1015 Btu, or 1.055 exajoules. Btu: See British Thermal Unit. Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless, non-poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it traps heat radiated into the atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global warming.

315

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions Indicators Estimates, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Energy Consumption Energy Consumption per Capita Energy Expenditures 1 Energy Expenditures 1 per Capita Gross Output 3 Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of Gross Output 3 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Expenditures 1 as Share of GDP Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2 per Real Dollar of GDP Quadrillion Btu Million Btu Million Nominal Dollars 4 Nominal Dollars 4 Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Nominal Dollars 4 Percent Billion Real (2005) Dollars 5 Thousand Btu per Real (2005) Dollar 5 Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide per Million Real (2005) Dollars 5 1949 31.982 214 NA NA NA NA 267.2 NA R 1,843.1 R 17.35 R 1,197 1950 34.616 227 NA NA NA NA

316

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product, 1949-2012 Primary Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product, 1949-2012 (Thousand Btu per Chained (2009) Dollar) Note: See "Real Dollars" in Glossary. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.7. 16 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Table 1.7 Primary Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of Gross Domestic Product Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP Petroleum and Natural Gas Other Energy a Total Petroleum and Natural Gas Other Energy a Total Quadrillion Btu Billion Chained (2009) Dollars Thousand Btu per Chained (2009) Dollar 1950 ............................ 19.284 15.332 34.616 2,181.9 8.84 7.03 15.86 1955

317

Supplemental Figures and Tables for Groundfish EFH Review Phase 1 Report "Federal and State Marine Protected Areas Type of Fishing Restriction"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Federal and State Marine Protected Areas ­ Type of Fishing Restriction" Author and state MPAs depicted in map figures, categorized by level of fishing restriction Fishing Restriction BEFORE AFTER Commercial and Recreational Fishing Prohibited

Goldfinger, Chris

318

Figures xiii Preface xix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? 2 What Software Testing Is--and Isn't 3 What Is Different about Testing Object-Oriented Software? 5 Overview of Our Testing Approach 6 Test Early 7 Test Often 7 Test Enough 8 The Testing Perspective 8 #12;vi Contents Chapter 2 The Testing Perspective 15 Testing Perspective 15 Object-Oriented Concepts

McGregor, John D.

319

Figure 1. Top: Theoretical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

only electrodes and catalysts, but also interfaces for chemical separations, water desalination, materials synthesis and characterization, geologic and biological processes. Thus...

320

Cancer Facts & Figures - 2010  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

heal, a lump or thickening, ear pain, a neck mass, coughing up blood, or a red or white patch that persists. Difficulties in chewing, swallowing, or moving the tongue or jaws are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.2 (s) Process Heating Machine Drive Facility HVAC² Process Cooling and Refrigeration Electrochemical Processes Facility Lighting Conventional Electricity Generation 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Quadrillion Btu 5.5 2.9 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 Natural Gas Net Electricity Coal³ Residual Fuel Oil Distillate

322

1-6 Figure 1.3. View of the field area, looking south-southwest. Left side of the picture shows the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mountain massif. The Vermont Valley and the Tinmouth Valley are separated by a ridge along a fault (Pine of the Taconic Allochthon, with Dorset Mountains truncating the Valley. The base of Dorset Mountain contains. It is a gray weathering, medium bedded dolomite. (looking west) #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;2-27 Figure 2

Kidd, William S. F.

323

Supplementary Figure 1: Bayesian 50% majority-rule consensus trees for the combined dataset of mitochondrial genes (left) and nuclear genes (right). Color coding distinguishes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Supplementary Figure 1: Bayesian 50% majority-rule consensus trees for the combined dataset of mitochondrial genes (left) and nuclear genes (right). Color coding distinguishes groups supported by PP 99 for individual nuclear genes: Rag-1, Rag-2 and C-mos. Color coding distinguishes groups supported by PP 99

324

Figure 1. Ankle behavior can be approximated by a linear torsional spring in the progression stage of the stance phase of normal gait.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. Ankle behavior can be approximated by a linear torsional spring in the progression stage of the stance phase of normal gait. Abstract--In this paper we explore the mechanical behavior of the ankle in the progression stage of stance during normal walking. We show that the torque/angle behavior of the ankle during

Dollar, Aaron M.

325

Physics 305 Problem set 1 Due: Fri, Jan. 27, 2012 1) (a) Consider a thin slab of resistive material, as in the first figure, with resistivity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics 305 Problem set 1 Due: Fri, Jan. 27, 2012 1) (a) Consider a thin slab of resistive material, as in the first figure, with resistivity and thickness d. Find the resistance of a square piece, with edge length covers each of the two faces. Show that it is independent of L. (This is the two-dimensional "resistivity

Ross, Joseph

326

Figure 2 illustrates the proposed arrangement of the system value model for a given UAV design. The properties of the UAV system are split into five categories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2 illustrates the proposed arrangement of the system value model for a given UAV design. The properties of the UAV system are split into five categories: performance, acquisition cost, supportability of mission success minus the life-cycle-cost of the UAV system. This simplified value model accounts

Sóbester, András

327

Development of A Cryogenic Drift Cell Spectrometer and Methods for Improving the Analytical Figures of Merit for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cryogenic (325-80 K) ion mobility-mass spectrometer was designed and constructed in order to improve the analytical figures-of-merit for the chemical analysis of small mass analytes using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. The instrument incorporates...

May, Jody C.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

Assignment Carbon Footprints Name__Lachniet__ 1) See Figure 1.1a at the back of the assignment (from IPCC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) How does the United States rank in terms of 'carbon intensity', the amount of emissions per capita, relative to other countries? The United States (and Canada) rank #1 in the highest 'carbon intensity' perAssignment Carbon Footprints Name__Lachniet__ 1) See Figure 1.1a at the back

Lachniet, Matthew S.

329

Supplementary Figure 1| Neutron diffraction data at 86 % relative humidity. a) Schematic representation of neutron diffraction geometry for -2 scans. Diffraction data are obtained  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distributions of lipid and protein under varying levels of hydration. Predicted neutron scattering profiles as number density profiles weighted by the neutron scattering lengths of individual atoms, then symmetrizedSupplementary Figure 1| Neutron diffraction data at 86 % relative humidity. a) Schematic

White, Stephen

330

Design and Simulation for Architectural Geometry Figure 1: Daytime and nighttime scenes of designed roof by using the developed computational tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roof by using the developed computational tools 031.PDF Keywords: Architectural Geometry, Procedural an innovative computational design tool used to edit architectural geometry interactively and demonstratesDesign and Simulation for Architectural Geometry Figure 1: Daytime and nighttime scenes of designed

331

ProClim-Flash | No 57, June 201318 Figure 1: Swiss CH4 fluxes from (a) anthropogenic (agriculture, energy, waste) and (b) natural contributors (wetlands, lakes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

April 2013 under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and under the Kyoto Protocol layers representing CH4 emissions from wastewater treatment and natural sources and sinks (Figure 1b by the CCES projects ENHANCE, www.cces.ethz.ch/ projects/sulu/ENHANCE, and BioChange, www.cces.ethz.ch/projects/clench/BioChange

332

FIGURE 2. -Immunodiffusion comparison of Vibrio anguil-larum 775 and Vibrio sp. 1669. Wells I, 3, and 5 contain V. an-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 FIGURE 2. -Immunodiffusion comparison of Vibrio anguil- larum 775 and Vibrio sp. 1669. Wells I, 3, and 5 contain V. an- guillarum 775 sonicate and wells 2, 4, and 6 contain Vibrio sp. 1669 sonicate disease in young salmon. J. Compo Patho!' 77;419-423. RUCKER, R. R. 1959. Vibrio infections among marine

333

Small (5 million Btu/h) and large (300 million Btu/h) thermal test rigs for coal and coal slurry burner development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NEI International Combustion Ltd. of Derby, England, now operates two thermal test rigs for the development of burners capable of handling coal-water slurries (CWS). A general description of the large rig and its capacity was given. Also, the necessary conversions of the equipment to handle CWS were described. Information on the properties of the CWS was included. This consisted of chemical analysis of the parent coal and the slurry, sieve analysis of a dry sample, and viscosity versus temperature data of the CWS. The process of design development of the burner was outlined. Ten illustrations were presented, including schematic diagrams of equipment and graphs of data.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.; Hufton, P.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

OpenEI - Nonelectric  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/54 This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu) for nonelectric use in the United States by energy use sector and energy source between 2004 and 2008. The data was compiled and published by EIA; the spreadsheet provides more details about specific sources for data used in the analysis.

License
Type of License: 

335

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

41 41 Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Electricity Net Imports Total Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Total Wood 1 1635 NA - - - - NA - - (s) (s) - - (s) 1645 NA - - - - NA - - 0.001 0.001 - - 0.001 1655 NA - - - - NA - - .002 .002 - - .002 1665 NA - - - - NA - - .005 .005 - - .005 1675 NA - - - - NA - - .007 .007 - - .007 1685 NA - - - - NA - - .009 .009 - - .009 1695 NA - - - - NA - - .014 .014 - - .014 1705 NA - - - - NA - - .022 .022 - - .022 1715 NA - - - - NA - - .037 .037 - - .037

336

Transformational Manufacturing | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transformational Manufacturing Transformational Manufacturing Argonne's new Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program focuses on scalable process R&D to produce advanced battery materials in sufficient quantity for industrial testing. The U.S. manufacturing industry consumes more than 30 quadrillion Btu of energy per year, directly employs about 12 million people and generates another 7 million jobs in related businesses. Argonne is working with industry to develop innovative and transformational technology to improve the efficiency and competitiveness of domestic manufacturing while reducing its carbon footprint. The lab's efforts concentrate on sustainable manufacturing, applied nanotechnology and distributed energy, with an emphasis on transitioning science discoveries to the market.

337

Figures and Data Plots from the Published Papers of the BELLE Experiment at the KEK - B Factory  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This resource provides more than 300 citations to preprints and papers with the figures from each one pulled out separately for easy access and downloading. These are physics publications. Be sure to also see the page of Technical Journal publications at http://belle.kek.jp/belle/bellenim/index.htm and the lists of conference presentations from 2000 through 2009. Belle is a high-energy physics (HEP) experiment that began in 1999 at the KEK B-factory in Japan under the direction of the international Belle Collaboration. The original Letter of Intent from the Collaboration stated their scientific goal as follows:

The laws of nature have a high degree of symmetry between matter and antimatter; violations of this symmetry, the so-called CP violations, are only seen as a small effect in the decays of neutral K mesons. Although experimental evidence for CP violation was first observed 30 years ago, we still do not understand how they occur. In 1973, Kobayashi and Maskawa (KM) noted that CP violation could be accommodated in the Standard Model only if there were at least six quark flavors, twice the number of quark flavors known at that time. The KM model for CP violation is now considered to be an essential part of the Standard Model. In 1980, Sanda and Carter pointed out that the KM model contained the possibility of rather sizable CP violating asymmetries in certain decay modes of the B meson. The subsequent observation of a long b quark lifetime and a large amount of mixing in the neutral B meson system indicated that it would be feasible to carry out decisive tests of the KM model by studying B meson decays. Our collaboration has been formed around the common interest of clarifying the long standing physics puzzle of CP violation. Our goal is to make a definitive test of the Standard Models predictions for CP violations in the decays of B mesons. [Copied, with editing, from Letter of Intent (KEK-Report94-2, April 1994); see http://belle.kek.jp/bdocs/old_publication.html and open the Letter of Intent file]

That original Belle experiment verified the KM theory, leading to a Nobel prize in 2008 for Kobayashi and Maskawa. Belle II Collaboration is now working on additional discoveries.

None

338

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

Schierup, Mikkel Heide

339

Review Problems 2-72 The deflection of the spring of the two-piston cylinder with a spring shown in the figure is to be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2-31 Review Problems 2-72 The deflection of the spring of the two-piston cylinder with a spring shown in the figure is to be determined. Analysis Summing the forces acting on the pistonN/m, the pressures in kPa (i.e., kN/m2 ) and the diameters in m units. 2-73 The pressure in chamber 1 of the two-piston

Bahrami, Majid

340

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 79.3 80.2 87.0 91.9 96.2 100.7 106.4 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.8 1.5 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.1 81.7 89.1 93.9 98.1 103.0 108.8 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.6 105.2 100.4 98.1 97.2 95.8 93.8 -0.4%

342

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Key Definitions Quad: Quadrillion Btu (10^15 or 1,000,000,000,000,000 Btu) Generic Quad for the Buildings Sector: One quad of primary energy consumed in the buildings sector (includes the residential and commercial sectors), apportioned between the various primary fuels used in the sector according to their relative consumption in a given year. To obtain this value, electricity is converted into its primary energy forms according to relative fuel contributions (or shares) used to produce electricity in the given year. Electric Quad (Generic Quad for the Electric Utility Sector): One quad of primary energy consumed at electric utility power plants to supply electricity to end-users, shared among various fuels according to their relative contribution in

343

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 80.2 80.8 87.1 91.9 96.2 100.8 106.5 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.5 1.6 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.7 82.4 89.1 93.9 98.2 103.1 108.9 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.2 100.7 98.5 96.7 95.6 94.6 93.9 -0.3%

344

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Expenditures Indicators Estimates Energy Consumption and Expenditures Indicators Estimates Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 Energy Expenditures, 1970-2010 Energy Consumption per Real Dollar² of Gross Domestic Product, 1949-2011 Energy Consumption per Capita, Energy Expenditures per Capita, Energy Expenditures as Share of Gross 1949-2011 1970-2010 Domestic Product and Gross Output,³ 1987-2010 12 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 Billion Nominal Dollars¹ 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Thousand Btu per Real (2005) Dollar² ¹ See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. ² In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price deflators

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuator ball bearings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Figure 4, a BTU involves a large load-bearing ball supported by many small... with paint, while nonreflecting balls made out of nylon ... Source: Cooperstock, Jeremy R. -...

346

Motor cortex activation by H-coil and figure-8 coil at different depths. Combined motor threshold and electric field distribution study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective To compare the ability of an H-coil and figure-8 coil to stimulate different motor cortex regions. Methods The resting (rMT) and active (aMT) motor thresholds were measured for the right hand APB and leg AHB muscles in 10 subjects, using an H-coil and a figure-8 coil. The electric field distribution induced by the coils was measured in a head model. The combination of the hand and leg \\{MTs\\} with the field measurements was used to determine the depth of hand and leg motor areas via the intersection points. Results The rMT and aMT of both APB and AHB were significantly lower for the H-coil. The ratio and difference between the leg and hand rMT and aMT were significantly lower for the H-Coil. Electric field measurements revealed significantly more favorable depth profile and larger volume of stimulation for the H-coil. The averaged intersection for the APB was at a distance from coil of 1.830.54cm and at an intensity of 97.821.4V/m, while for the AHB it was at a distance of 2.730.44cm and at an intensity of 118.621.3V/m. Conclusion The results suggest a more efficient activation of deeper motor cortical regions using the H-coil. Significance The combined evaluation of \\{MTs\\} by H- and figure-8 coils allows measurement of the individual depth of different motor cortex regions. This could be helpful for optimizing stimulation parameters for TMS treatment.

Yiftach Roth; Gaby S. Pell; Andrei V. Chistyakov; Alon Sinai; Abraham Zangen; Menashe Zaaroor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Sulfidation-oxidation of advanced metallic materials in simulated low-Btu coal-gasifier environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of structural alloys in complex multicomponent gas environments is of considerable interest for their effective utilization in coal conversion schemes. Little understanding...

T. C. Tiearney Jr.; K. Natesan

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Energy Policy: Independence by 1985 My Be Unreachable Without Btu Tax  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...domestic oil production and the diffi-culties...Countries (OPEC). The decontrol...the Earth Day move-ment...indeed-high enough per-haps to...about by OPEC in late 1973 and early...of oil a day less than...18 miles per gallon by...of oil a day (mbd...consumption in 1973. The added...domestic production of energy...

LUTHER J. CARTER

1976-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...

Phillips, J. N.

352

2001 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com or (978) 750-8400. Geology; July 2001; v. 29; no. 7; p. 623626; 3 figures; Data Repository item 2001069. 623  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these episodes is highly depleted in 18O compared to modern speleothems. The 18O values for calcite deposited, uranium-series method. Figure 1. Map showing location of Hoti Cave (star) and generalized modern, summer

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

353

KvAP1ORQ MthK3LDC Kv12R9R Supplementary Figure S1: Detailed view of TPenA docked into the 3 bestfit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of K2P channel block shown in Figure 1. Piechotta et al. Supplementary Information C2 TEA C4 TButA C5 TPenA C6 THexA C7 THepA C8 TOctA #12;Piechotta et al. Supplementary Information Supplementary Figure been published previously; a Milacet al(2011) b Treptow& Klein (2010). KvAP1ORQKv12R9RMthK3LDCKcsA3FB6

Tucker, Stephen J.

354

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen CROSS EFFECTS, TOTAL SYSTEM LAY-OUT 13.6.2001 10-1 Figure 10.1 Typical pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up system: dry scrubber +  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up system: dry scrubber + baghouse filter for SO2 and particulate For a conventional pulverised coal-fired power plant a set-up is shown in Figure 10.1, with a gas clean-up system scrubber (pH ~ 6) 60 - 70 7 Re-heater 350 - 400 8 SCR DeNOx 300 - 400 9 Active coke bed 100 - 150 Figure 10

Zevenhoven, Ron

355

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Total, 1949-2012 Petroleum Products Supplied as Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1949-2012 By Product, October 2013 50 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Quadrillion Btu 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Percent d 0.074 0.002 0.708 0.244 0.001 0.258 0.022 1.462 0.061 0.033 0.302 Asphalt Aviation Distillate Jet Kerosene Liquefied Lubricants Motor Petroleum Residual Other 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Quadrillion Btu a Includes renewable diesel fuel (including biodiesel) blended into distil- late fuel oil. b Includes kerosene-type jet fuel only. c Includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

356

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

< Introduction Table 1. Comparison of projections in the AEO2014 and AEO2013 Reference case, 2011-2040 2025 2040 Energy and economic factors 2011 2012 AEO2014 AEO2013 AEO2014 AEO2013 Primary energy production (quadrillion Btu) Crude oil and natural gas plant liquids 15.31 17.08 23.03 18.70 19.99 17.01 Dry natural gas 23.04 24.59 32.57 29.22 38.37 33.87 Coal 22.22 20.60 22.36 22.54 22.61 23.54 Nuclear/Uranium 8.26 8.05 8.15 9.54 8.49 9.44 Hydropower 3.11 2.67 2.84 2.86 2.90 2.92 Biomass 3.90 3.78 5.08 5.27 5.61 6.96 Other renewable energy 1.70 1.97 3.09 2.32 3.89 3.84 Other 0.80 0.41 0.24 0.85 0.24 0.89 Total 78.35 79.15 97.36 91.29 102.09 98.46 Net imports (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum and other liquid fuelsa 18.78 16.55 11.41 15.89 13.65 15.99

357

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Comparison of projections in the AEO2012 and AEO2011 Reference case, 2009-2035 2025 2035 Energy and economic factors 2009 2010 AEO2012 AEO2011 AE2012 AEO2011 Primary energy (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 13.93 14.37 17.48 16.19 16.81 16.72 Dry natural gas 21.09 22.10 26.63 24.60 28.51 27.00 Coal 21.63 22.08 22.51 23.64 23.51 26.01 Nuclear power 8.36 8.44 9.60 9.17 9.35 9.14 Hydropower 2.67 2.51 2.97 3.04 3.06 3.09 Biomass 3.72 4.05 6.73 7.20 9.68 8.63 Other renewable energy 1.11 1.34 2.13 2.58 2.80 3.22 Other 0.47 0.64 0.76 0.88 0.88 0.78 Total 72.97 75.52 88.79 87.29 94.59 94.59 Net imports (quadrillion Btu) Liquid fuels 20.90 20.35 16.33 19.91 16.22 19.85

358

Monthly energy review, January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains statistical information and data analysis of energy production and consumption within the major energy industries of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy and oil and gas resource development. Energy production during October 1993 totaled 5.5-quadrillion Btu, a 3.0 percent decrease from the level of production during October 1992. Coal production decreased 5.6 percent, petroleum production decreased 3.4 percent, and natural gas production increased 1.9 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.0 percent from the level of production during October 1992. Energy consumption during October 1993 totaled 6.7 quadrillion Btu, 0.9 percent above the level of consumption during October 1992. Natural gas consumption increased 6.5 percent, coal consumption rose 2.9 percent, and petroleum consumption was down 1.3 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 5.5 percent from the level of 1 year earlier.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Influence of samarium on the thermoelectric figure of merit of Sm{sub x}Pb{sub 1-x}Te alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperature and concentration dependences of the electrical (conductivity {sigma}, the Hall coefficient R), thermoelectric (thermovoltage {alpha}), and thermal (thermal conductivity K{sub tot}) characteristics of Sm{sub x}Pb{sub 1-x}Te alloys (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08) are studied in the temperature range 100-500 K. Using the data for {sigma}, {alpha}, and K{sub tot}, the thermoelectric power {alpha}{sup 2}{sigma}, figure of merit Z, and efficiency {delta} are calculated. It is established that at room-temperature {alpha}{sup 2}{sigma} and Z peak at the hole concentration p Almost-Equal-To 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}.

Aliev, F. F., E-mail: farzali@physics.ab.az; Hasanov, H. A., E-mail: hummat.hasanov@gmail.com [Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Figure 12 Vehicle tracking Figure 11 Pedestrian tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-finders, infra-red obstacle detectors, GPS, Forward Looking Infra-Red (FLIR), microwave, etc. provide other

Brandt, Scott A.

362

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 42,411 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 253,214 690,780 634,185 658,523 134,764 63,063 526,726 121,049 34,531 492,655 101,101 23,154 40,113 1,496,283 68,601

363

Microsoft Word - figure_18.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel 0 2 4 6 8 1 0 1 2 1 4 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 Notes: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. Prices are in nominal dollars. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; Form EIA-423, "Monthly Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas

364

Microsoft Word - figure_19.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power V ehicle Fuel 0 2 4 6 8 1 0 1 2 1 4 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 Notes: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. Prices are in nominal dollars. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; Form EIA-423, "Monthly Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas

365

Microsoft Word - figure_18.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel 0 2 4 6 8 1 0 1 2 1 4 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 Note: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey."

366

Microsoft Word - Figure_11.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

36 Electric Power 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 Billion Cubic Meters Industrial 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a L o u i s i a n a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 Billion Cubic Meters Commercial 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 Billion Cubic Meters Residential 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 Billion Cubic Meters Note: Vehicle fuel volume for 2004 was 20,514 million cubic feet. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-886, "Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Service Vehicle Suppliers and Users";

367

Figure2b.eps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coulomb-hole Coulomb-hole summations and energies for GW calculations with limited number of empty orbitals: a modified static remainder approach Jack Deslippe, 1 Georgy Samsonidze, 1 Manish Jain, 1 Marvin L. Cohen, 1 and Steven G. Louie 1 1 Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, California 94720 and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (Dated: December 4, 2011) Abstract Ab initio GW calculations are a standard method for computing the spectroscopic properties of many materials. The most computationally expensive part in conventional implementations of the method is the generation and summation over the large number of empty orbitals required to converge the electron self energy. We propose a scheme to reduce the summation over empty states by the use of a modified static-remainder approximation, which

368

Microsoft Word - figure_19.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

63 63 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel Notes: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. Prices are in nominal dollars. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; Form EIA-423, "Monthly Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer

369

Microsoft Word - figure_18.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel 0 2 4 6 8 1 0 1 2 1 4 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 Note: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; Form EIA-423, "Monthly Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas

370

Supplementary Figure 1 Analysis Modalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the dataset being analyzed is depicted by the dark color. Global Analysis. The entire dataset is analyzed wide user base. First, users can access the web application from our own web servers, which are running.IOBIO uses the MIT License. Implementation Details BAM.IOBIO is a Javascript and HTML web application using

Cai, Long

371

Figure 4. World Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. World Oil Prices" " (2007 dollars per barrel)" ,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022,2023,2024,2025,2026,2027,2028,2029,2030...

372

Microsoft Word - figure_99.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL MS LA MO AR TX NM OK CO KS UT AZ WY NE IL IA MN WI ND SD ID MT WA OR NV CA HI AK MI Gulf...

373

114 Figure 2-16  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

triangular ripples in unconsolidated pteropod shells. These form parallel to the direction of the current31.7'W. Field of view 5 x 7 meters. Shoestring rills forming in unconsolidated sediments at the head

Kidd, William S. F.

374

Microsoft Word - Figure_01.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gas in the United States, 2009-2013 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 E xports Im ports C itygate dollars per thousand cubic feet Note: Prices are in nominal dollars....

375

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 (Million Cubic Feet) 24,891 2,895 Nigeria WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico Algeria C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada N i g e r i a O m a n Qatar Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Malaysia 2,986 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 335,380 634,982 664,318 612,297 125,202 33,223 531,868 103,624

376

Do you know where your money goes each month? The following will help to figure your monthly spending. 1. List all the money you owe credit cards, loans, money you borrowed from family and friends, collection ac-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do you know where your money goes each month? The following will help to figure your monthly spending. 1. List all the money you owe ­ credit cards, loans, money you borrowed from family and friends be less than or equal to income (Lesson 6). The first chart is for money you owe. The second is for income

Liskiewicz, Maciej

377

Figure 2: We observed several directions along the length of the Bridge in H, [S II], and [N II] for over 8 minutes. Many of these sightlines align with previous studies to compare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2: We observed several directions along the length of the Bridge in H, [S II], and [N II the Magellanic Bridge, using the Wisconsin H Mapper observatory, to investigate the warm ionized gas in extensive of the ionized component. Ongoing work will include extensively mapping the Bridge in H, [S II], and [N II

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

378

4-114 The volume of chamber 1 of the two-piston cylinder shown in the figure is to be determined. Assumptions At specified conditions, helium behaves as an ideal gas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4-63 4-114 The volume of chamber 1 of the two-piston cylinder shown in the figure the forces acting on the piston in the vertical direction gives kPa8.248 10 4 kPa)1555( 22 1 2 2 1 2 21

Bahrami, Majid

379

Downloaded 07 Feb 2012 to 128.180.65.141. Redistribution subject to AIP license or copyright; see http://jap.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions Characterizations of Seebeck coefficients and thermoelectric figures of merit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/(mK)] due to the increased alloy scattering, however, the optimized thermoelectric material was obtained for materials based on AlGaN34,35 and InGaN36,37 alloys. The thermoelectric properties for RF-sputtered Al and thermoelectric figures of merit for AlInN alloys with various In-contents Jing Zhang,a) Hua Tong, Guangyu Liu

Gilchrist, James F.

380

Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

John Maples John Maples 2011 EIA Energy Conference April 26, 2011 Transportation and the Environment Light-duty vehicle combined Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards (CAFE) in three cases, 2005-2035 2 0 20 40 60 80 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 miles per gallon Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 CAFE6 CAFE3 Reference John Maples, April 26, 2011 Light-duty vehicle delivered energy consumption and total transportation carbon dioxide emissions, 2005-2035 3 0 5 10 15 20 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Reference CAFE3 CAFE6 quadrillion Btu 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 John Maples, April 26, 2011 Distribution of new light-duty vehicle sales by price, 2010 and 2025 (2009$) 4 Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microsoft PowerPoint - Sweetnam NG Disc Slides - April 7 2010 final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas: Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context 2010 Energy Conference U.S. Energy Information Administration Johns Hopkins University - SAIS p y April 7, 2010 - Washington, DC Natural Gas: U.S. Markets is a Global Context, April 7, 2010 Richard Newell, March 2, 2010 1 Richard Newell, SAIS, December 14, 2009 1 April 7, 2010 Washington, DC Discussion Outline * Setting the context * Demand/supply outlook for 3 regions - United States United States - OECD Europe - China * Evolution of the global gas market - Expected trade flows - Pricing and contract issues - Key uncertainties Natural Gas: U.S. Markets is a Global Context, April 7, 2010 2 Natural gas is expected to provide about 23% of the world's energy needs 250 History Projections world energy consumption quadrillion Btu 200 Liquids (including biofuels)

382

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy in the Energy in the Transportation and Power Sectors April 7 th , 2009 Energy Information Administration 2009 Energy Conference: A New Climate for Energy Energy Information Administration 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Nuclear Natural Gas Liquid Fuels Coal Renewables (excl liquid biofuels) Renewable energy to contribute a growing share of supply History Projections Liquid Biofuels quadrillion Btu Source: EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Renewable Energy in The Transportation and Power Sectors * David Humbird National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Bob Dineen Renewable Fuels Association * Denise Bode American Wind Energy Association * Bryan Hannegan Electric Power Research Institute Transportation Power 0 5 10 15 20 25 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Industrial Transportation

383

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 101, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

384

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

385

Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

386

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 109, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Delta EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Delta- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

387

source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

388

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

389

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Mountain Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 8, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption mountain region Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

390

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Regional Entity Texas Regional Entity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 98, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Texas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

391

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

th U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum th U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum Welcoming Remarks David Danielson Assistant Secretary Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Dr. David Danielson, Assistant Secretary The 4th U.S. - China Energy Efficiency Forum 3 - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1971 1974 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 U.S. and China : World's Largest Energy Consumers and Emitters Total CO2 from Energy Consumption (Gt) Source: World Bank Indicators. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion (2012 Edition), IEA, Paris. U.S. 5.4 China 7.3 Global Energy Consumption - 100 200 300 400 500 600 Quadrillion Btu Rest of the World 38% 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 50 100 150 200

392

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A1. Total energy supply, disposition, and price summary (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Supply, disposition, and prices Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Production Crude oil and lease condensate ............................ 11.59 12.16 15.95 14.50 13.47 13.40 13.12 0.3% Natural gas plant liquids ........................................ 2.78 2.88 4.14 4.20 3.85 3.87 3.89 1.0% Dry natural gas ...................................................... 21.82 23.51 27.19 29.22 30.44 32.04 33.87 1.3% Coal 1 ...................................................................... 22.04 22.21 21.74 22.54 23.25 23.60 23.54 0.2%

393

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Monetary Fund International Monetary Fund January 14, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski January 14, 2013 Growth in energy production outstrips growth in consumption leading to reduction in net imports 3 U.S. energy production and consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release

394

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

395

East South Central | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East South Central East South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 6, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Commercial East South Central EIA Electric Power Energy Consumption Industrial Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

396

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 102, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Northeast Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

397

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

398

Delta | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 109, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Delta EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Delta- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

399

West | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 108, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation West Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

400

undefined | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

undefined undefined Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 112, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords undefined Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Central- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Source, a 1949-2012 By Source, a Monthly Total, January-August By Source, a August 2013 a Small quantities of net imports of coal coke and electricity are not shown. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.3. 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 15 30 45 Petroleum Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M

402

Appendix A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 78.99 79.28 85.71 89.73 93.56 96.99 100.37 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 28.13 28.24 30.55 32.18 33.98 35.82 37.61 1.0% Mobile homes ..................................................... 6.58 6.41 5.70 5.46 5.29 5.14 5.03 -0.9% Total ................................................................. 113.70 113.93 121.96 127.38

403

Southeastern | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 111, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Southeastern Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

404

Westchester | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Westchester Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

405

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia-Carolina Virginia-Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

406

Solar Thermal/PV | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal/PV Thermal/PV Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

407

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 111, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Southeastern Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

408

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 106, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 25th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO East EIA Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / East- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

409

Slide 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workshop on Biofuels Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook Workshop on Biofuels Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook March 20, 2013 | Washington, DC By Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Topics addressed * Current role of biofuels * Biofuels outlook 2 Howard Gruenspecht, Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook March 20, 2013 Liquid biofuels currently provide about 1 percent of total U.S. energy 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History 2011 36% 20% 26% 8% 8% 1% Shares of total U.S. energy Nuclear Oil and other liquids Liquid biofuels Natural gas

410

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New England New England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England- Reference Case (xls, 297.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

411

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 7, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

412

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A17. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Marketed renewable energy 1 Residential (wood) ............................................... 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.44 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.1% Commercial (biomass) ........................................ 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.0% Industrial 2 ............................................................. 2.32 2.18 2.53 2.67 2.82 3.08 3.65 1.8% Conventional hydroelectric ................................. 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.0%

413

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.53 0.53 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 -0.0% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01 -1.8% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.58 0.59 0.51 0.45 0.40 0.36 0.32 -2.1% Liquid fuels and other petroleum subtotal ......... 1.14 1.14 1.05 0.98 0.93 0.89 0.86 -1.0%

414

Energy Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview for CNA Panel Discussion May 8, 2013 | Crystal City, VA by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Non-OECD nations drive the increase in energy demand 2 world energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2011 0 100 200 300 400 500 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Non-OECD OECD 244 260 482 288 History Projections 2008 Howard Gruenspecht , CNA Panel May 8, 2013 Growth in income and population drive rising energy use; energy intensity improvements moderate increases in energy demand 3 average annual change (2008-2035) percent per year Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2011 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 U.S. OECD Europe Japan South Korea China India Brazil Middle East Africa Russia

415

C:\WEBSHARE\WWWROOT\eppats\errataeppats.wpd  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Advanced Technology Scenarios 10/12/2001 The Gross Domestic Product rows in Tables C2 on pages 110 -111, and D2 on pages 164 -165 are corrected as follows: Table C2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Continued) (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source 1999 Projections 2005 2010 Reference Reference with Emissions Limits Advanced Technology Advanced Technology with Emissions Limits Reference Reference with Emissions Limits Advanced Technology Advanced Technology with Emissions Limits Total Energy Consumption Distillate Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.53 8.77 8.67 8.58 8.49 9.51 9.39 9.02 8.91 Kerosene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.15 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13

416

AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu and the U.S. Dollar. The data is broken down into production, imports, exports, consumption and price. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption disposition energy exports imports Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary- Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

417

Commercial Building Research and Development | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research and Research and Development Commercial Building Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows,

418

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected years of data from 1949 through 1972 have been added to this table. For all years of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 1.4b Primary Energy Exports by Source and Total Net Imports (Quadrillion Btu) Exports Net Imports a Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Petroleum Biofuels d Electricity Total Total Crude Oil b Petroleum Products c Total 1950 Total ...................... 0.786 0.010 0.027 0.202 0.440 0.642 NA 0.001 1.465 0.448 1955 Total ...................... 1.465 .013 .032 .067 .707 .774 NA .002 2.286 .504 1960 Total ...................... 1.023 .009 .012 .018 .413 .431 NA .003 1.477 2.710 1965 Total ...................... 1.376 .021 .027 .006 .386 .392 NA .013 1.829 4.063 1970 Total ...................... 1.936 .061 .072 .029 .520 .549 NA

419

Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy use is projected to grow rapidly over the next 25 years in the energy use is projected to grow rapidly over the next 25 years in the Reference case projection from EIA's latest International Energy Outlook 1 Howard Gruenspecht, Meeting China's Energy Demand, EIA Annual Conference Washington DC, April 27, 2011 energy consumption in China quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 1% 6% 70% 3% 20% Coal Nuclear Renewables Natural gas Petroleum and other liquids Projections History 2007 10% 3% 62% 6% 19% EIA projections over the past decade have tended to underestimate the

420

Renewable Energy Consumption for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu) for nonelectric use in the United States by energy use sector and energy source between 2004 and 2008. The data was compiled and published by EIA; the spreadsheet provides more details about specific sources for data used in the analysis. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Nonelectric Renewable Energy Consumption Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Non-Elec.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 27.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 2, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The energy consumption data is broken down by sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power) as well as source, and also provides total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA middle atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

422

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab/3M Team Demonstrate Potential to Significantly Reduce Building Berkeley Lab/3M Team Demonstrate Potential to Significantly Reduce Building Lighting Energy Use Berkeley Lab/3M Team Demonstrate Potential to Significantly Reduce Building Lighting Energy Use Daylighting is the strategy of admitting light from the sun and sky to reduce the use of electric lighting in buildings. Since lighting energy use represents 13 percent of the total primary energy used by buildings in the United States (5.42 quadrillion Btu in 2010), these technologies can play a significant role towards meeting U.S. and state energy-efficiency and greenhouse gas emission-reduction goals. Conventional windows cannot provide useful daylight beyond about one to one-and-a-half times the head height of a window because interior shades, when lowered to control direct

423

Fuel | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

424

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 116, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest (xls, 119.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

425

Reliability First Corporation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reliability First Corporation Reliability First Corporation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 110, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Gateway Reliability First Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

426

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Speaker(s): Gregory Rosenquist Date: August 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Louis-Benoit Desroches In the last several years, there has been a significant growth in the activities of the Department of Energy's Appliance and Commercial Equipment Standards program. EETD's Energy Efficiency Standards group has been heavily involved in the analyses supporting recently published federal energy conservation standards, for a diverse set of appliances and commercial equipment. In this talk, I will review the EES group's efforts supporting these energy conservation standards. Collectively, they are estimated to save the nation between 14.15 to 15.17 quads (quadrillion Btu)

427

Hydroelectric Conventional | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroelectric Conventional Hydroelectric Conventional Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

428

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

429

MSW Biogenic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MSW Biogenic MSW Biogenic Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

430

Other Biomass | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Other Biomass Other Biomass Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

431

SERC Reliability Corporation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SERC Reliability Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

432

North | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North North Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 114, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA North Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

433

Energy Generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

434

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 6, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Commercial East South Central EIA Electric Power Energy Consumption Industrial Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

435

Western Electricity Coordinating | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Western Electricity Coordinating Western Electricity Coordinating Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

436

Slide 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workshop Workshop Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences January 24, 2013 | Washington, DC By Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Topics addressed * Current role of biofuels * Biofuels outlook - EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case * Biofuels and fuel market segmentation * Biofuels in the context of multiple policy issues 2 Howard Gruenspecht January 24, 2013 Liquid biofuels currently provide about 1 percent of total U.S. energy 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History 2011 36% 20% 26% 8% 8%

437

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IFRI IFRI March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 History Projections 2011 36% 20%

438

Appendix A  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Energy consumption Residential Propane .............................................................. 0.51 0.51 0.42 0.40 0.38 0.36 0.35 -1.3% Kerosene ............................................................ 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -2.5% Distillate fuel oil ................................................... 0.53 0.51 0.46 0.41 0.37 0.34 0.31 -1.7% Liquid fuels and other petroleum subtotal ......... 1.05 1.02 0.89 0.82 0.75 0.70 0.66 -1.5%

439

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Share of energy used by appliances and consumer electronics increases in Share of energy used by appliances and consumer electronics increases in U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 Over the past three decades, the share of residential electricity used by appliances and electronics in U.S. homes has nearly doubled from 17 percent to 31 percent, growing from 1.77 quadrillion Btu (quads) to 3.25 quads. This rise has occurred while Federal energy efficiency standards were enacted on every major appliance, overall household energy consumption actually decreased from 10.58 quads to 10.55 quads, and energy use per household fell 31 percent. Federal energy efficiency standards have greatly reduced consumption for home heating Total energy use in all U.S. homes occupied as primary residences decreased slightly from 10.58 quads in 1978 to 10.55 quads in 2005 as reported by the

440

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan Michigan Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 107, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Michigan Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / Michigan- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source Consumption by Sector and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

442

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release Reference Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Future of U.S. Domestic Oil and Gas Production For International Energy Forum January 21, 2013 | Riyadh, KSA By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski January 21, 2013 Growth in energy production outstrips growth in consumption leading to reduction in net imports 3 U.S. energy production and consumption quadrillion Btu

443

sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sector sector Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

444

mountain region | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mountain region mountain region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 8, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption mountain region Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

445

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 100, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / East- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

446

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from USA) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

447

Upstate New York | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

448

Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov Biogas with Fuel Cells Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 6/11/2012 Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies U.S. Energy Consumption U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector Renewable Electric Power Energy 8% Coal 21% Nuclear Energy 9% Industrial Residential & Commercial Petroleum 37% Natural Gas 25% Transportation Total U.S. Energy = 98 Quadrillion Btu/yr Source: Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2010, Table 1.3 Fuel Cells can apply to diverse sectors Share of Energy Consumed by Major Sectors of the Economy, 2010 Electric Power 29% Residential 16% Commercial 13%

449

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Program Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Program Overview - - Program Overview - Sunita Satyapal Program Manager 2012 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting May 14, 2012 Petroleum 37% Natural Gas 25% Coal 21% Nuclear Energy 9% Renewable Energy 8% Transportation Residential & Commercial Industrial Electric Power 2 U.S. Energy Consumption Total U.S. Energy = 98 Quadrillion Btu/yr Source: Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2010, Table 1.3 U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector Residential 16% Commercial 13% Industrial 22% Transportation 20% Electric Power 29% Share of Energy Consumed by Major Sectors of the Economy, 2010 Fuel Cells can apply to diverse sectors 3 Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean

450

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

451

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 EPA Criteria Pollutant Emissions Coefficients (Million Short Tons/Delivered Quadrillion Btu, unless otherwise noted) All Buildings | SO2 0.402 0.042 | 0.130 NOx 0.164 0.063 | 0.053 CO 0.057 0.283 | 0.018 Note(s): Source(s): Electricity Electricity (1) Site Fossil Fuel (2) (per primary quad) (1) 1) Emissions of SO2 are 28% lower for 2002 than 1994 estimates since Phase II of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments began in 2000. Buildings energy consumption related SO2 emissions dropped 65% from 1994 to 2011. 2) Includes natural gas, petroleum liquid fuels, coal, and wood. EPA, 1970-2010 National Emissions Inventory, Average Annual Emissions, All Criteria Pollutants, October 2012; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5 for energy consumption

452

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 112, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords undefined Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Central- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

453

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 6,928,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 6 2010 CIA World Factbook

454

OpenEI - MSW Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/51 Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls License

455

New England | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

England England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England- Reference Case (xls, 297.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

456

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal exec summary Executive Summary Assuming no additional constraints on CO2 emissions, coal remains the largest source of electricity generation in the AEO2011 Reference case because of continued reliance on existing coal-fired plants. EIA projects few new central-station coal-fired power plants, however, beyond those already under construction or supported by clean coal incentives. Generation from coal increases by 25 percent from 2009 to 2035, largely as a result of increased use of existing capacity; however, its share of the total generation mix falls from 45 percent to 43 percent as a result of more rapid increases in generation from natural gas and renewables over the same period. See more Mkt trends Market Trends U.S. coal production declined by 2.3 quadrillion Btu in 2009. In the

457

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4% Mobile homes ..................................................... 6.60 6.54 6.45 6.60 6.75 6.88 7.02 0.2% Total ................................................................. 115.23 116.17 127.52 134.02 140.63 146.96 153.32

458

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Atlantic South Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

459

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Long Island Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 104, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Long Island Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Long Island- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

460

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nonelectric | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nonelectric Nonelectric Dataset Summary Description This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu) for nonelectric use in the United States by energy use sector and energy source between 2004 and 2008. The data was compiled and published by EIA; the spreadsheet provides more details about specific sources for data used in the analysis. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Nonelectric Renewable Energy Consumption Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Non-Elec.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 27.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2004 - 2008

462

Slide 0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

This presentation was prepared by Navigant Consulting, Inc. exclusively for the benefit of the Energy This presentation was prepared by Navigant Consulting, Inc. exclusively for the benefit of the Energy Information Administration, Department of Energy. This presentation is incomplete without reference to, and should be viewed solely in conjunction with the oral briefing provided by Navigant Consulting. April 2008. 2 Table of Contents Energy Efficiency Challenges and Solutions New and Emerging Energy Efficient Technologies » Overview » Examples Market Acceptance of Technologies 3 Energy Efficiency Challenges and Solutions 4 Energy demand in the United States is projected to increase 21% by 2030, with the largest increase in the commercial sector. Forecast for Energy Demand Quadrillion Btu per Year Source: Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 (Revised Early Release), http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/aeo/.

463

OpenEI - Other Biomass  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/51 Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls License

464

Building Technologies Program Planning Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Technologies Program Planning Summary Building Technologies Program Planning Summary Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP) works in partnership with industry, state, municipal, and other federal organizations to achieve the goals of marketable net-zero energy buildings. Such buildings are extremely energy efficient, ideally producing as much energy as they use over the course of a year. BTP also works with stakeholders and federal partners to meet any remaining energy needs for their buildings through on-site renewable energy systems. Drivers Population growth and economic expansion, along with an accompanying increase in energy demand, are expected to drive energy consumption in buildings to more than 50 quadrillion Btu (quads)

465

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference March 01, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Adam Sieminski , Platts, March 01, 2013 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu

466

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description http://en.openei.org/w/skins/openei/images/ui-bg_gloss_wave-medium_40_d6...); background-attachment: scroll; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: rgb(214, 235, 225); line-height: 17px; width: 650px; background-position: 50% 0%; background-repeat: repeat no-repeat; ">This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 3, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago)

467

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South South Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 115, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation South Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

468

West South Central | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West South Central West South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 7, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

469

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North North Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 114, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA North Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

470

South Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlantic Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

471

Annual report to Congress on Federal Government energy management and conservation programs, Fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides sinformation on energy consumption in Federal buildings and operations and documents activities conducted by Federal agencies to meet statutory requirements of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act. It also describes energy conservation and management activities of the Federal Government under section 381 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. Implementation activities undertaken during FY94 by the Federal agencies under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and Executive Orders 12759 and 12902 are also described. During FY94, total (gross) energy consumption of the US Government, including energy consued to produce, process, and transport energy, was 1.72 quadrillion Btu. This represents {similar_to}2.0% of the total 85.34 quads used in US.

NONE

1995-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

472

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

473

Combined heat and power (CHP or cogeneration) for saving energy and carbon in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems simultaneously deliver electric, thermal and mechanical energy services and thus use fuel very efficiently. Today's small-scale CHP systems already provide heat, cooling and electricity at nearly twice the fuel efficiency of heat and power based on power remote plants and onsite hot water and space heating. In this paper, the authors have refined and extended the assessments of small-scale building CHP previously done by the authors. They estimate the energy and carbon savings for existing small-scale CHP technology such as reciprocating engines and two promising new CHP technologies--microturbines and fuel cells--for commercial buildings. In 2010 the authors estimate that small-scale CHP will emit 14--65% less carbon than separate heat and power (SHP) depending on the technologies compared. They estimate that these technologies in commercial buildings could save nearly two-thirds of a quadrillion Btu's of energy and 23 million tonnes of carbon.

Kaarsberg, T.; Fiskum, R.; Romm, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Koomey, J.; Teagan, W.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

475

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

477

"U.S. Energy Information Administration"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040" . World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040" "quadrillion Btu" ,"History",,,"Projections",,,,,,,"Average annual percent change, 2010-2040" ,2009,2010,,2015,2020,2025,2030,2035,2040 "OECD" " OECD Americas",117.032,120.167,,121.347,126.134,129.743,132.898,137.196,143.577,,0.5950602735 " United Statesa",94.939,97.944,,97.266,100.482,101.781,102.288,103.92,107.173,,0.3006124841 " Canada",13.666,13.465,,14.216,14.754,15.633,16.535,17.306,18.232,,1.015402463 " Mexico/Chile",8.427,8.759,,9.864,10.899,12.329,14.074,15.97,18.173,,2.462686049 " OECD Europe",79.984,82.475,,82.145,85.475,88.599,90.874,92.792,94.618,,0.4588914155

478

"U.S. Energy Information Administration"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. World consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy by region, Reference case, 2009-2040" A9. World consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy by region, Reference case, 2009-2040" "(Quadrillion Btu)" ,"History",,,"Projections",,,,,,,"Average annual percent change, 2010-2040" ,2009,2010,,2015,2020,2025,2030,2035,2040 "OECD" " OECD Americas",11.892,11.915,,13.707,14.992,15.871,16.838,18.288,20.771,,1.869798074 " United Statesa",6.875,7.032,,8.074,8.889,9.299,9.586,10.298,11.949,,1.782963121 " Canada",4.176,4.019,,4.469,4.786,5.107,5.512,5.939,6.407,,1.566672379 " Mexico/Chile",0.841,0.865,,1.164,1.316,1.465,1.74,2.052,2.414,,3.480226811 " OECD Europe",9.4,10.36,,12.612,14.653,16.37,17.222,17.891,18.533,,1.957583184

479

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Electricity Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 219 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Data collection frame differences and nonsampling error. Derived for the diagram by subtracting the "T & D Losses" estimate from "T & D Losses and Unaccounted for" derived from Table 8.1. 4 Electric energy used in the operation of power plants. 5 Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the point of

480

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 110, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Gateway Reliability First Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "quadrillion btu figure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 108, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation West Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

482

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from United States of America) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

483

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Reliability Florida Reliability Coordinating Council Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 99, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 20th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Florida Fuel Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability Coordinating Council- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

484

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 4, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

485

Gateway | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 110, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Gateway Reliability First Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

486

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

487

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 119, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region of WECC. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Rockies WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB)

488

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

489

middle atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

middle atlantic middle atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 2, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA middle atlantic Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

490

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 10, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 298.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

491

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures Household Energy Consumption by End Use, Selected Years, Household Energy Expenditures, Selected Years, 1978-2005¹ 1978-2005¹ Household Energy Consumption for Space Heating by Fuel 2005 Appliances, Electronics, and Lighting Expenditures, Selected Years, 1978-2005¹ 52 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 For years not shown, there are no data available. 2 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 3 Distillate fuel oil and kerosene. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. Source: Table 2.5. 55 63 76 83 87 97 98 110 124 136 160 201 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Dollars² 0 2 4 6 8 Quadrillion Btu Space Heating 1978 1980 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005

492

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 By Energy Source By North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 6 46 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases. 2 Natural gas liquids. 3 See "Breeze" in Glossary. 4 Includes all other types of energy that respondents indicated were consumed or allocated. 5 Energy sources produced onsite from the use of other energy sources but sold or trans- ferred to another entity. 6 See Table 2.2 for Manufacturing Group titles of industries that correspond to the 3-digit NAICS codes. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.2. 5.9 2.9 2.4 1.4 0.3 0.3 0.1 8.4 -0.6 Natural Gas Net LPG¹ and NGL² Coal Residual Coal Coke Distillate Other Shipments

493

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumption for Electricity Generation By Major Category, 1949-2011 By Major Fuel, 2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 232 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Conventional hydroelectric power. 2 Geothermal, other gases, electricity net imports, solar thermal and photovoltaic energy, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). 3 Combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. Sources: Tables 8.4a-8.4c. Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Quadrillion Btu 18.0 8.3 8.1 3.2 1.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.6 Coal

494

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

495

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Classes of compounds responsible for mutagenic and cytotoxic activity in tars and oils formed during low BTU gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI), in cooperation with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), has completed toxicity screening of vapors, liquids and solids formed during operation of an experimental pressurized, stirred-bed, coal gasifier at METC. Vapors collected from the cooled process stream on Tenax resins had no mutagenic activity in the Ames Salmonella assay. Dichloromethane extracts of liquids and solids collected from the effluent or process streams were fractionated by gel chromatography into fractions containing mostly aliphatic compounds; neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); polar (PAH) and heterocyclic compounds; and salts. The polar fraction was partitioned into acids, bases, water soluble compounds and phenols. Bacterial mutagenic activity was highest in the basic fraction with additional activity in the neutral PAHs. Highest cytotoxicity toward both the bacteria and canine alveolar macrophages was in the phenolic fraction. Treatment of the gasifier tars by nitrosation or by acetylation to remove primary aromatic amines (PAA) reduced the bacterial mutagenicity by 50-60%, indicating that some, but not all, of the mutagenicity was due to PAA.

Henderson, R.F.; Bechtold, W.F.; Benson, J.M.; Newton, G.J.; Hanson, R.L.; Brooks, A.L.; Dutcher, J.S.; Royer, R.E.; Hobbs, C.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Determination of performance characteristics of a one-cylinder diesel engine modified to burn low-Btu (lignite) gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

d = standard deviation INTRODUCTION The United States' vast lignite reserves' energy po- tential, while not commanding the public interest as much as the more "exotic" forms of energy conversion (solar, geothermal, wave energy, etc. ), has been... viewed with in- creasing interest by the technical community. Although a tremendous amount of energy is totalled in this country' s lignite coal reserves (Texas deposits alone are estimated at 100 billion tons [1] ), the energy is low-grade; i. e...

Blacksmith, James Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

498

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Table 1. Summary of results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 1. Summary of results Table 1. Summary of results Energy/Economic Factors 2000 2001 2025 Reference Low Economic Growth High Economic Growth Low World Oil Price High World Oil Price Primary Production (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 15.14 14.94 15.05 14.38 15.45 14.12 15.92 Natural Gas 19.50 19.97 27.47 25.24 28.72 26.99 27.99 Coal 22.58 23.97 29.29 27.81 31.08 29.18 29.74 Nuclear Power 7.87 8.03 8.43 8.43 8.43 8.43 8.43 Renewable Energy 5.96 5.33 8.78 8.26 9.38 8.82 8.76 Other 1.09 0.57 0.80 0.80 0.83 0.81 0.82 Total Primary Production 72.15 72.81 89.83 84.93 93.90 88.36 91.66 Net Imports (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum (including SPR) 22.28 23.29 41.23 37.63 45.82 44.06 37.97 Natural Gas 3.62 3.73 7.93 6.93 9.29 7.63 8.01 Coal/Other (- indicates export) -0.84 -0.54 0.27 0.22 0.38 0.26 0.27 Total Net Imports 25.06 26.48 49.43 44.78 55.49 51.96 46.25 Discrepancy -2.18 1.99 0.19

499

Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 - Table 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Welcome to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Welcome to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 Table 1. Summary of results for five cases Sensitivity Factors 1999 2000 2020 Reference Low Economic Growth High Economic Growth Low World Oil Price High World Oil Price Primary Production (quadrillion Btu) Petroleum 15.06 15.04 15.95 15.52 16.39 14.40 17.73 Natural Gas 19.20 19.59 29.25 27.98 29.72 28.54 30.03 Coal 23.15 22.58 28.11 26.88 30.08 27.58 29.04 Nuclear Power 7.74 8.03 7.49 7.38 7.49 7.31 7.58 Renewable Energy 6.69 6.46 8.93 8.59 9.37 8.90 8.97 Other 1.66 1.10 0.93 0.91 0.73 0.40 1.06 Total Primary Production 73.50 72.80 90.66 87.26 93.79 87.13 94.40 Net Imports (quadrillion Btu)

500

 

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total TOTAL (2) 2010-Year 1980 4.79 30% 1.72 11% 0.03 0% 0.85 5% 2.45 5.89 8.33 53% 15.72 100% - 1981 4.57 30% 1.52 10% 0.03 0% 0.87 6% 2.46 5.77 8.24 54% 15.23 100% - 1982 4.68 30% 1.42 9% 0.03 0% 0.97 6% 2.49 5.89 8.38 54% 15.48 100% - 1983 4.45 29% 1.33 9% 0.03 0% 0.97 6% 2.56 6.03 8.59 56% 15.38 100% - 1984 4.64 29% 1.51 10% 0.04 0% 0.98 6% 2.66 6.07 8.73 55% 15.90 100% - 1985 4.51 28% 1.55 10% 0.04 0% 1.01 6% 2.71 6.21 8.92 56% 16.02 100% - 1986 4.38 28% 1.52 10% 0.04 0% 0.92 6% 2.79 6.27 9.07 57% 15.94 100% -